5.2 Energy input study

5.2.7 Building direction

In the build direction study, tensile test specimens were built in both the X direction (parallel with gas flow direction) and Z direction (vertical to the powder bed surface) using the same processing parameters. Due to the build limitations of the machine, Z direction build cannot be higher than 70mm [173]. Therefore, flat tensile test specimens with a gauge length of 25mm and thickness of 3mm, designed according to ASTM E8-09 were built in the X direction, and round tensile test specimens with a gauge length of 16mm and neck diameter of 4mm, designed according to ASTM E8-09 were built on Z direction, shown in Figure 5-15.

Figure 5-15 Tensile test specimens built for build directions study

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Round tensile test specimens were not suitable for building in the X direction.

A vertical cross section was done on a round tensile test specimen built on X direction, shown in Figure 5-16. The cross section can be divided into two parts by a line going through the centre of the circle. The upper part has a regular circular shape, while the lower portion is more like an ellipse. This can be caused by not enough support force from the powder bed to support the solidified section, as the edge of the lower part is always built on the powder bed rather than a solid layer. Residual stresses which are reinforced by the high thermal gradients from melting to solidification in a short time also deform the part. Significant porosity between the boundary and internal solid scan can be observed in the lower part. This is also caused by the deformation during the process.

Figure 5-16 Cross section of round tensile test specimen built on X direction

Specimens were built using the stainless steel 316L virgin powder supplied by LPW Technology Ltd. The main processing parameters include laser power of 50W, lens position of 14.50mm, scanning speed of 200mm/s, solid hatch distance of 0.08mm, layer thickness of 0.05mm, single scan per layer

Z X

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and no pre-heating process. All the tested parts were built in one build to avoid any build condition effect. Six tensile test specimen of each direction were built. Measured UTS and elongation at break of parts built on both X and Z directions are shown in Table 5-9.

Build

direction X Z

UTS (MPa) 667.54±4.38 675.21±3.41

Elongation

(%) 34.75±1.87 33.25±0.93

Table 5-9 Tensile strength and elongation at break under different build directions

The results of Z direction did not show significant decrease compared with X direction; and even slightly higher in UTS. The short time scan delay (10-15 seconds for depositing a layer of powder) did not decrease the bond strength between layers, and also the layer thickness of 0.05mm used in the process was small enough to allow a melting pool overlap between two layers. High energy input can also create a deeper melting pool, therefore, the bond between two layers was not weaker than the bond between two exposure points.

Due to the limitation of the powder container inside the processing chamber, topping up in the middle of building process with prepared powder was needed when building high parts (>30mm). The action of the topping up requires the machine to be paused until the topping up ends. This process can generate 20-30 minutes scan delay for the next layer. To study the effect of topping up on the bond strength between layers, tensile test specimens with topping up processes were built and tested. The specimens after being pulled are shown in Figure 5-17. From left to right, sample 1 and 2 were built with topping up delay during the process when building the gauge length

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area, sample 3 to 6 were built without topping up delay during the process when building the gauge length area.

Figure 5-17 Tensile test specimens with/without topping up delay during the process have been pulled

Sample

number 1 2 3 4 5 6

UTS (MPa) 496.55 512.87 678.23 673.44 672.28 676.52

Elongation (%) 5.62 6.01 34.12 33.78 33.25 33.39

Table 5-10 Tensile strength and elongation at break with/without topping up delay, samples were built in Z direction

Specimens with the topping up delay (20-30 minutes) can fail at the beginning of the test even with high density, resulting in low tensile strength and elongation, as shown in Table 5-10. They always break near the topping

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up layer, while no topping up delay specimens would usually break close to the middle of the gauge length. This indicates that the topping up delay decreases the bond strength between layers. By providing the top layer enough time to completely cool, the top layer material has less activity with solidification procedure completes and the grains settle down. Residual stress in the top layer also affects the surface roughness to prevent uniform deposition of the powder material for the next layer. Therefore, to keep the bonding strength for the next layer, higher energy intensity should be delivered.

Topping up process can only affect the bond strength between two layers.

Tensile test specimens built on X direction always break in the middle of the gauge length no matter with topping up process or not, shown in Figure 5-18.

From top to bottom, sample 1 and 2 were built with a topping up delay during the process, sample 3 to 6 were built without topping up delay during the process. The delay did not affect the bond strength between two exposure points as they are not in the same vector direction. The UTS and elongation at break also remained similar for all six samples, as shown in Table 5-11.

Figure 5-18 Tensile test specimens with/without topping up delay during the process have been pulled

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Sample

number 1 2 3 4 5 6

UTS (MPa) 661.48 662.39 665.33 660.54 668.25 671.33

Elongation (%) 34.12 33.98 34.17 33.78 34.23 34.59

Table 5-11 Tensile strength and elongation at break with/without topping up delay, samples were built in X direction

In document Further process understanding and prediction on selective laser melting of stainless steel 316L (Page 140-145)