illustrates these commercial areas

In document City of Garfield Heights (Page 44-50)

Development Inventory

Map 4.1 illustrates these commercial areas

In total, the amount of commercial space in the City has increased by nearly 10% from approximately 1.125 million square feet in 1989 to 1.234 million square feet as of January, 1997. Both the 1989 survey, as well as the more recent 1997 survey, indicate that the greatest amount of retail space in the City has been in the convenience goods and services category, which currently includes 34% of the total com-mercial space. Convenience goods and services include establish-ments such as supermarkets, other types of food or drug stores, as well as restaurants, dry cleaners and beauty salons. The new Super Finast at Turney Town accounts for a large increase in this type of space. Presently, the second most common commercial type is office space, comprising 23% of the overall space. There has been a signifi-cant amount of new office development along Transportation Boule-vard and East 98th Street since the 1989 survey, which has resulted in increases in overall space for this category. Office space comprised only 15% of total commercial space in 1989.

Floor space occupied by shopping goods and services is the third greatest retail category and occupies 21% of the overall space. This

Chapter 4, Commercial Development Inventory September, 1999

Cuyahoga County Planning Commission Page 4.2 City of Garfield Heights Master Plan

September, 1999 Chapter 4, Commercial Development Inventory Cuyahoga County Planning Commission

City of Garfield Heights Master Plan Page 4.3

Services

engineering, management consultant offices

Banks; finance companies, insurance, real estate, medical, health services; legal, Local Office

candy/nut stores; dairy product stores; beverage stores

Delicatessen; convenient foods; meat, poultry, fish, produce markets; bakers;

Other Food

Restaurants; cafeterias; sandwich, donut shops; taverns; liquor; catering halls Food Service

Drug, discount drug stores Drugs

card, gift shops; bookstores; stationery shops; beauty supply stores

Hardware, paint, wallpaper stores; garden, flower shop; record, video stores; key, Goods

Other Convenience

laundromats; photo studios; appliance and household repair; travel agencies Beauty, barber shops; watch, shoe repair stores; dry cleaners, laundries, Services

Convenience

Department stores Department Stores

(B)

Discount, junior department, variety stores Merchandise

Other General

Men's, ladies', children's wear stores; shoe stores; millinery, fur and bridal shops Clothing and Shoes

shops; toy stores

Yard goods, sporting goods, photo equipment, musical instruments, jewelry stores; pet Other ShoppingGods

lamp stores; computer sales and accessories

Furniture, appliance, carpeting; radio, TV, stereo stores; kitchen, bath accessories;

Furniture

delaerships

New car dealerships; used car lots directly adjacent to and part of new car New Auto Sales

(C)

Used car lots Used Auto Sales

Auto parts stores; tire, batteries and accessories Auto Parts Sales

Auto repair garages other than gasoline service stations; auto/truck rentals Auto Repair

Gasoline service stations, with or without repair facilities; car washes Gas Stations

rinks; racquet clubs; health clubs

Indoor movie theaters, auditoriums; bowling alleys; billiard parlors; roller/ice skating AmusementsEnclosed

(D)

Dance halls, private; semiprivate social halls Social Halls

AmusementsCommercial

Hotels, motels, tourist courts Hotels, etc.

Dance studios, music stores; beautician, barber schools Training schools

Photocopying, addressing stores; linen, uniform supply stores Business services

Retail establishments of an unidentifiable use Unidentified

Vacant stores and offices Existing Vacant

(F)

Retail structures under construction Incomplete Vacant

Vacant Retail (G) Office Space

Table 4.1, Classification System for Commercial Establishments

Chapter 4, Commercial Development Inventory September, 1999 Cuyahoga County Planning Commission Page 4.4 City of Garfield Heights Master Plan

100.0%

East 98 Street/Transportation Blvd.

0

Table 4.2, 1989 Garfield Heights Commercial Floor Space

SOURCE: Garfield Heights Master Plan (1990) by the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission

Con venience

Graph 4.1, 1989 Garfield Heights Commercial Floor Space

SOURCE: Garfield Heights Master Plan (1990) by the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission

September, 1999 Chapter 4, Commercial Development Inventory Cuyahoga County Planning Commission

City of Garfield Heights Master Plan Page 4.5

Commercial Districts

East 98 Street/Transportation Blvd.

0

Table 4.3, Total 1997 Commercial Floor Space, by Area, in Garfield Heights

SOURCE: Field surveys by the Cuyahoga County Planning Commission, January, 1997

Con venience

Graph 4.2, 1997 Garfield Heights Commercial Floor Space

SOURCE: Cuyahoga County Planning Commission, January, 1997

Chapter 4, Commercial Development Inventory September, 1999 Cuyahoga County Planning Commission Page 4.6 City of Garfield Heights Master Plan

CANAL /WARNE

RROADS

EAST 98TH STREET/

TRANSPORTATION BLVD.

GARFIELD BLVD

ROCKSIDE ROAD TURNEY

ROAD (SOUTH) TURNEY

ROAD (NORT

H) BROADW

AYAVE

EAST 131ST STREET

MCCRACKEN ROAD GRANGER ROAD

Map 4.1, Garfield Heights Commercial Areas

type of establishment includes discount stores, clothing stores, furni-ture, and appliance stores, for example. There was also 21% of the floor space occupied by these uses in 1989, yet they were the second most common establishment type at that time.

Automotive, amusements and other retail uses each contain less than 10% of the commercial space, both at present and in 1989. Other re-tail uses (eg, hotels, funeral homes, training schools, business ser-vices) totaled 6% of the commercial space most recently, whereas there was 7% of this type of commercial space found in 1989. Auto-motive uses such as gas stations and parts stores occupy 5% and 6%

of the commercial space in 1997 and 1989, respectively. Commercial amusements is the least common type of establishment and includes places like movie theaters, bowling alleys, and social halls. In 1989, 4% of the overall commercial space was devoted to this use; by 1997 this commercial category had fallen to 3%.

In 1997, vacant space occupied just under 9% of the overall commer-cial space in the City. This figure has grown somewhat from 6% in 1989. One contributor to this increase is the vacated Finast store lo-cated in the Turney Town Shopping Center. There is also a variety of vacant storefronts scattered throughout the City. In terms of the great-est density of vacant storefronts, the commercial district with the most notable vacant establishments would be the East 131st Street area. There is about 10,000 square feet of vacant space in this area, which when compared to other areas is not a notably large number, but when compared to the total commercial space of that district, comprises approximately 31% of the total commercial space.

A recent article in Crain’s Cleveland Business addressed the issue of increasing retail vacancy rates across the region. It listed 9% as the 1996 retail vacancy rate, up from 7% in 1995. This growth in vacan-cies is attributed to recent record growth in the amount of retail con-struction thereby contributing to the abandonment of older establish-ments. The 9% vacancy rate of Garfield Heights is therefore reflec-tive of present trends. It is an issue that the City may want to address before seeking new retail construction projects for the City.

Another issue for the City to consider in terms of the improvement of the commercial retail sector of Garfield Heights is the present physi-cal state of the various commercial districts. As mentioned previ-ously, E. 131st Street has a high percentage of vacancy, which can probably be partially attributed to the decline in appearance of many of the structures in the district. There are other commercial districts that have weakened aesthetic qualities, as well. The more

conspicu-September, 1999 Chapter 4, Commercial Development Inventory

Cuyahoga County Planning Commission

City of Garfield Heights Master Plan Page 4.7

ous areas are in other northern portions of the City such as Broadway Avenue. Possible solutions to these problems could include the initia-tion of a street and storefront beautificainitia-tion program. Standards could be established to encourage business owners to improve their fa-cades. More stringent signage regulations could be enacted as well as a street tree program. All of these actions could aid in improving the physical appearance of more established areas which could result in greater visibility, better business, and the attraction of new tenants to vacant storefronts.

Zoning regulations for commercial areas should also be reviewed.

Sign regulations, off street parking, and loading standards as well as landscaped buffer and set back standards should be analyzed to en-sure that these standards promote attractive and efficient commercial development. In addition, the types of commercial uses allowed in each commercial zoning district should be examined to ensure that the City’s current zoning code encourages orderly retail business de-velopment. Lastly, the City’s zoning map should be reviewed so that the areas designated for commercial and retail uses are adequately lo-cated.

In document City of Garfield Heights (Page 44-50)