PSYCHOTIC INDI8IDUAL PSYCHOTIC INDI8IDUAL

In document Sociology of Crimes (Page 73-89)

III. ANIETY DISORDERS ANIETY DISORDERS

9. PSYCHOTIC INDI8IDUAL PSYCHOTIC INDI8IDUAL

9. PSYCHOTIC INDI8IDUAL

< present different and somewhat comple" problems

< irrational

$+C$!+ BAD*ID8 the hostage taker may feel a degree of pleasure if he finds himself important, being the center of attraction

< prolonging the time

. TERRORIST

. TERRORIST

< more difficult to handle

< when caught, they rationalie by claiming to be revolutionaries a situation they resolve to die for a cause.

$+C$!+ BAD*ID8 their causes may deteriorate in the passage of time.

< if they kill one of the hostages, the negotiators then must set to save the remaining hostages.

HOSTAGE TA

HOSTAGE TAERBS DERBS DEMANDSEMANDS

Degotiable

< food, cigarettes, drinks, alcohol, transportation, media coverage, freedom

Don<Degotiable

< weapons, ammunitions, drugs, release of prisoners, e"change of hostages PRINCIPLES IN HOSTAGE NEGOTIATION

PRINCIPLES IN HOSTAGE NEGOTIATION

the hostage has no value to the hostage taker

the priorities in the hostage situations are the preservation of life and the apprehension of the hostage taker, recover and protect property.

hostage situation must not go violently

there must be a need to live on the part of the hostage taker

IMMEDIATE ACTIONS OF THE NEGOTIATOR UPON ARRI8AL AT THE SCENE OF INCIDENT IMMEDIATE ACTIONS OF THE NEGOTIATOR UPON ARRI8AL AT THE SCENE OF INCIDENT

&. #ontainment

controlling situation and area by people involved.

. !stablish #ontact

communicate with the leader 5. Time engthening

give more time to the police to organie and coordinate plan of action.

6. Telephone Degotiation Techni3ue

6.&. e the caller (talk with the leader only) 6.. $lan and prepare

6.5. e ready with graceful e"it 6.6. *iscipline yourself to listen.

6.0. *o not tell that you are the commander, neither your rank

6.:. %ust tell -4y name isGI am a police negotiator and willing to help.

6.. *elay tactic 2 to wear down hostage taker, physically, psychologically and emotionally. Eill also give more time for police organie and coordinate plan course of action.

6./. In case hostage taker won?t talk, continue negotiating. *on?t loss hope

Ad5!nt!#es of Te$e3)one Con5e's!tion Ad5!nt!#es of Te$e3)one Con5e's!tion

&. easier to say DC

. easier to conclude the conversation 5. conversation is 3uicker

6. important items are more easily committed 0. caller has the advantage

0. Deed for face<to<face conversation

*on?t be over an"ious

wear body armor

have tactical back<up (snipers)

Implementation of 2et&ods to Deal -it& Hosta*e situation

Rule ::% Hosta*e Situation of t&e re+ised PNP Operational procedures Se4.1.

Se4.1. P'o4ed('eP'o4ed('es to &e fo$$o%ed in ! Host!#e Sit(s to &e fo$$o%ed in ! Host!#e Sit(!tion  t)e fo$$o%in# ste3!tion  t)e fo$$o%in# ste3s s)!$$ &e (nde't!"es s)!$$ &e (nde't!"en:n:

a. A crisis management task group shall be activated immediately b. Incident scene shall be secured and isolated

c. Fnauthoried persons shall not be allowed entry and e"it to the incident scene

d. Eitnesses? names, addresses, and other information shall be recorded. Eitnesses shall be

Me&e's of t)e !ss!($t te! s)!$$ %e!' !(t)o'i>ed !nd e!si$ 'e4o#ni>!&$e (nifo' d('in# t)e Me&e's of t)e !ss!($t te! s)!$$ %e!' !(t)o'i>ed !nd e!si$ 'e4o#ni>!&$e (nifo' d('in# t)e 4ond(4t of t)e o3e'!tion *onnets s)!$$ not &e (sed.

4ond(4t of t)e o3e'!tion *onnets s)!$$ not &e (sed.

Se4.-.

4onso$id!te effo'ts in so$5in# 4'isis.

Se4.?. S!fet of Host!#e+s/  in ne#oti!tin# fo' t)e 'e$e!se of ! )ost!#e, t)e s!fet of t)e )ost!#e Se4.?. S!fet of Host!#e+s/  in ne#oti!tin# fo' t)e 'e$e!se of ! )ost!#e, t)e s!fet of t)e )ost!#e s)!$$ !$%!s &e 3!'!o(nt.

s)!$$ !$%!s &e 3!'!o(nt.

Se4.. P'o4ed('es to &e fo$$o%ed d('in# ne#oti!tions Se4.. P'o4ed('es to &e fo$$o%ed d('in# ne#oti!tions

T)e fo$$o%in# s)!$$ &e (nde't!"en in t)e 4ond(4t of ne#oti!tions:

T)e fo$$o%in# s)!$$ &e (nde't!"en in t)e 4ond(4t of ne#oti!tions:

a. 7tabilie and contain the situation@

b. 7elect the right time to make contact with the hostage<taker@

c. Take time when negotiating@

d. Allow hostage<taker to speak@

e. *on?t offer the hostage<taker anything. Ehat he will ask for will be part of the negotiation@

f. Avoid directing fre3uent attention to the victim when talking to the hostage taker@

g. *o not call them Bostages. e as honest as possible@ avoid tricks@ be sincere@

h. Dever dismiss any re3uest from the hostage<taker as trivial or unimportant@

i. Dever say -DC”

;. 7often the demand

k. Dever set deadline@ try not to accept a deadline@

l. *o not make alternate suggestions not agreed upon in the negotiation@

m. *o not introduce outsiders (non<law enforcement officers) into the negotiation process, unless their presence is e"tremely necessary in the solution of the crisis@ provided that they shall be properly advised on the do?s and don?ts of hostage negotiations@

n. *o not allow any e"change of hostages, unless e"tremely necessary@ in particular, do not e"change a negotiator for a hostage@

Eotion!$ AEotion!$ Afte'effe4tsfte'effe4ts 2 the hostage taker is unable to emotionally rela", remains fearful of the future, and becomes apprehensive, tense, and nervous, e"periencing an an"iety like attack. The e"<

hostage may shake uncontrollably, e"periencing une"plained fear.

Co#nCo#niti5iti5e e AfteAfte'eff'effe4tse4ts 2 the hostages believed they failed themselves, co<workers, friends and family. That somehow they are less of a person for having been captive. 7elf<criticiing and second<

guessing are common. 7tatements such as -if only I had done so and so I wouldn?t have been captured”, are commonly heard.

*e)!5io'!*e)!5io'!$ $ Afte'effeAfte'effe4ts4ts 2 this include social and self<isolation, uncontrollable crying, and increase or decrease in aggression, poor concentration, intrusive thoughts, trouble with authority figures, an increase startle response and alcohol and drug abuse.

P)si4!$ Afte'effe4tsP)si4!$ Afte'effe4ts 2 this include the following8

!. S$ee3

!. S$ee3 diso'de' diso'de' 2 most common physical aftereffects. 7ome cannot sleep the entire night, some sleep too much than they did before captivity, some sleep much less, some can only cat<nap. 7ome re3uires medication to sleep. 7ome do not enter into 7tage 6 sleep and some very seldom engage in +apid !ye 4ovement (+!4) sleep.

7tage 6 7leep 2 is the deep sleep that immediately precedes +!4 sleep, it is necessary for the body to replenish itself and it is the sleep where the greatest physiological benefits are derived.

9. Et)no#'!3)i4

9. Et)no#'!3)i4 J aims to provide a holistic view of the problem. *ata are gathered through observation, interview and participation

. C!se St(d

. C!se St(d J intensive investigation of a particular individual, institution, community or any group considered as a unit which includes the development, ad;ustment, remedial, or corrective procedures that suitably follow diagnosis of the causes of malad;ustment or of favorable development.

*. (!ntit!ti5e Rese!'4) Desi#n

*. (!ntit!ti5e Rese!'4) Desi#nJ its focused is to describe problems descriptively and numerically. It utilies more statistical tests to e"plain the nature, characteristics, relationships and differences of variables.

T3es of (!ntit!ti5e Rese!'4) T3es of (!ntit!ti5e Rese!'4) 1. Des4'i3ti5e

1. Des4'i3ti5e J describes and interprets EBAT is. It is concerned with conditions or relationship that e"ist, practices that prevail, beliefs and processes that are going on, effects that are being felt or trends that are developing.

S(&<t3es of Des4'i3ti5e Rese!'4) S(&<t3es of Des4'i3ti5e Rese!'4)

!. Des4'i3ti5e<S('5e

!. Des4'i3ti5e<S('5eJ involves collection of information on people, events and other topics of interest to the researcher.

&. Des4'i3ti5e<Do4(ent!'

&. Des4'i3ti5e<Do4(ent!'J involves content analysis because the documentary techni3ue includes analysis of content. It is used when data cannot be obtained through 3uestionnaire or observation.

9. Co''e$!tion!$

9. Co''e$!tion!$ J it measures the e"tent or magnitude of association between two variables.

Jmeasures the e"isting relationship of variables Jalso known as Associational Researc&

. E;3e'ient!$

. E;3e'ient!$ J the researcher manipulates, changes or alters the inputs or independent variables to see the effects on the dependent variables.

Jmost commonly used methods to advanced scientific knowledge S!3$in# Desi#ns

S!3$in# Desi#ns A. S4ientifi4 S!3$in#

A. S4ientifi4 S!3$in# J each member of the population is given the chance of being included in the sample.

Po3($!tion

Po3($!tion J specific aggregation of the elements J also known as uni+erse

Sample ? representative portion of a whole

? subset of a population T3es of S4ientifi4 S!3$in#

T3es of S4ientifi4 S!3$in#

1. Rest'i4ted R!ndo

1. Rest'i4ted R!ndoJ applicable only when the population being investigated is homogenous.

9. Un'est'i4ted R!ndo

9. Un'est'i4ted R!ndoJ the best random sampling design because no restriction is imposed and every member of the population has an e3ual chance of inclusion in the sample

. St'!tified R!ndo

. St'!tified R!ndo J it divides first the population into two or more strata. 1or each stratum, the sample items were drawn at random

. Sste!ti4

. Sste!ti4 J a design which all individual in the population are arranged in a methodical manner, i.e.

alphabetical or chronological (age, e"perience) and the name may be selected in the construction of the sample

-. M($tist!#e

-. M($tist!#e J done in several stage, it can be two<stage, three, four or five stage, etcG, depending on the number of stages of sampling to be used.

. C$(ste' S!3$in#

. C$(ste' S!3$in# J population is group into clusters or small units, for instance, block or districts, and are selected by random sampling or systematic sampling.

Jadvantageous when individuals in the districts or blocks belong to the heterogeneous group

*. Non<S4ientifi4 S!3$in#

*. Non<S4ientifi4 S!3$in#J in this sampling there is sub;ectivity on the on the part of the researcher because not all the individual in a population are given an e3ual chance of being included in the sample T3es of Non<S4ientifi4 S!3$in#

T3es of Non<S4ientifi4 S!3$in#

1. P('3osi5e

1. P('3osi5e J based on choosing individuals as sample according to the purposes of the researcher 9. In4ident!$

9. In4ident!$ J a design applied to those samples which are take because they are most valuable J the researcher simply takes the nearest individual as sub;ects of the study until the sample reaches the desired sie

. (ot! S!3$in#

. (ot! S!3$in#J popular in the field of opinion research due to the fact that it is done by merely looking for individuals with re3uisite characteristics

Rese!'4) Inst'(ent

Rese!'4) Inst'(entJ a device designed or adopted by researcher for data gathering C$!ssifi4!tion of Rese!'4) Inst'(ent

C$!ssifi4!tion of Rese!'4) Inst'(ent 1. Rese!'4)e' Inst'(ent

1. Rese!'4)e' Inst'(entJ the researcher obtains information or data himself with little or no direct involvement of the other people

E;e4. O'de' No. 1-

E;e4. O'de' No. 1- < $lacing the local police forces as under the local e"ecutives which again placed then under the *epartment of Interior.

E;e4 O'de' ? !nd 

E;e4 O'de' ? !nd  < were promulgated at the height of the Buk rebellion in 4arch 59, &'09 by

$resident !lpidio Huirino, reconstituted the $hilippine #onstabulary as ma;or service command of the A1$

T)e 1@ P)i$. Constit(tion

T)e 1@ P)i$. Constit(tion < 7ec. &, Article SS states that -the state shall establish and maintain an integrated national police force whose organiation administration and operation shall be provided by law,”

. R.A. ?

. R.A. ? 2 otherwise known as the $olice Act of &'::, enacted on August /, &'::@ created the $olice

#ommission ($C#C4) as a supervisory agency to oversee the training and professionaliation of the local police forces under the Cffice of the $resident@ later $C#C4 was renamed into Dational $olice

#ommission (DA$C#C4) PD No. ? +M! , 1@/

PD No. ? +M! , 1@/ < !ffected ma;or amendments to the police act of &':: providing for stronger powers for the #ommission in the pursuit of its mandated goal.

PD No. @- +A(#. ?, 1@-/

PD No. @- +A(#. ?, 1@-/ < otherwise known as the Inte#'!tion A4t of 1@-,Inte#'!tion A4t of 1@-,enacted on A(#(st ?, 1@- A(#(st ?, 1@-

established the Inte#'!ted N!tion!$ Po$i4e +INP/Inte#'!ted N!tion!$ Po$i4e +INP/ composed of the P)i$i33ine Const!&($!' +PC/ !s t)eP)i$i33ine Const!&($!' +PC/ !s t)e n(4$e(s !nd t)e inte#'!ted $o4!$ 3o$i4e fo'4es !s 4o3onents

n(4$e(s !nd t)e inte#'!ted $o4!$ 3o$i4e fo'4es !s 4o3onents, under the 4inistry of Dational *efense.

<transferred the DA$C#C4 from the Cffice of the $resident to the 4inistry of Dational *efense.

PD No.

PD No. 11119 +(ne ?, 9 +(ne ?, 1@@/1@@/< The overnor of metropolitan 4anila, the $rovincial overnors, the #ity and 4unicipal 4ayors were given power to e"ercise general supervision order units or elements of the ID$

stationed or assigned within their respective ;urisdictions.

T)e 1?@ P)i$i33ine Constit(tion

T)e 1?@ P)i$i33ine Constit(tion <7ec. :, Art. S>I provides that the state shall establish and maintain one police force which shall be national in scope and civilian in character.

R.A. 

R.A. @-@- 2 otherwise known as the De3!'tent of t)e Inte'io' !nd Lo4!$ Go5e'nent A4t of 1,De3!'tent of t)e Inte'io' !nd Lo4!$ Go5e'nent A4t of 1, enacted on *ecember &5, &''9@ reorganied the *I and established the Philippine <ational Police,

@ureau of &ire Protection, @ureau of ail 'anagement and Penology and the Philippine Public afety College.

R.A. ?--1 

R.A. ?--1  otherwise known as theP)i$i33ine N!tion!$ Po$i4e Refo' !nd Reo'#!ni>!tion A4t of 1?P)i$i33ine N!tion!$ Po$i4e Refo' !nd Reo'#!ni>!tion A4t of 1?, enacted on 1ebruary 0, &''/@ this law amended certain provisions of +A :'0.

RA @? <

RA @? < aw amending the provisions of +A :'0 and +A /00& on the minimum educational 3ualification for appointment to the $D$ and ad;usting the promotion system@ approved on & August 99'.

0An A4t E;tendin# Fo' Fi5e +-/ Ye!'s T)e Re#$eent!' Pe'iod Fo' Co3$in# 7it) T)e Mini(

0An A4t E;tendin# Fo' Fi5e +-/ Ye!'s T)e Re#$eent!' Pe'iod Fo' Co3$in# 7it) T)e Mini(

Ed(4!tion!$ (!$ifi4!tion Fo' A33ointent To T)e P)i$i33ine N!tion!$ Po$i4e +PNP/ And Ad(stin#

Ed(4!tion!$ (!$ifi4!tion Fo' A33ointent To T)e P)i$i33ine N!tion!$ Po$i4e +PNP/ And Ad(stin#

T)e P'ootion Sste T)e'eof, Aendin# Fo' T)e P('3ose Pe'tinent P'o5isions Of Re3(&$i4 A4t T)e P'ootion Sste T)e'eof, Aendin# Fo' T)e P('3ose Pe'tinent P'o5isions Of Re3(&$i4 A4t No. @- And Re3(&$i4 A4t No. ?--1 And Fo' Ot)e' P('3oses2

No. @- And Re3(&$i4 A4t No. ?--1 And Fo' Ot)e' P('3oses2

I2PORTANT !IIPINO PERSONAITIES IN THE E"O3TION O! PHIIPPINE POICIN@

Gen R!f!e$ C'!e Gen R!f!e$ C'!e

the first 1ilipino chief of the $hilippine #onstabulary on *ecember &, &'&

Co$ Antonio To''es Co$ Antonio To''es

the first 1ilipino chief of police of the 4anila $olice *epartment in &'50 Co$ L!&e'to !5!$e'!

Co$ L!&e'to !5!$e'!

the first chief of police of the 4anila $olice *epartment after the $hilippine Independence from the Fnited 7tates of America in &'6:

PDIR Gen Ces!' N!>!'eno PDIR Gen Ces!' N!>!'eno

the first chief of the $hilippine Dational $olice

THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND LOCAL GO8ERNMENT +DILG/

THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND LOCAL GO8ERNMENT +DILG/

< 1ormerly *epartment of ocal overnment (*)

<reorganied under +.A. :'0

!"isting bureaus and offices of the *

#ommunications and !lectronic 7ervice

#haplain 7ervice

egal 7ervice

Bead3uarters 7upport 7ervice

!ngineering 7ervice

Training 7ervice O3e'!tion!$ S(33o't Units O3e'!tion!$ S(33o't Units

4aritime roup

Intelligence roup

$olice 7ecurity and $rotection roup

#riminal Investigation and *etection roup

7pecial Action 1orce

Aviation 7ecurity roup

Bighway $atrol roup

$olice #ommunity +elations roup

#ivil 7ecurity roup

#rime aboratory POLICE REGIONAL OFFICES POLICE REGIONAL OFFICES

The $D$ is divided into seventeen (&) police regional offices ($+C), each headed by a Re#ion!$Re#ion!$

Di'e4to'

Di'e4to'

PRO 1  1, NCRPO, CAR, !nd ARMM PRO 1  1, NCRPO, CAR, !nd ARMM PRO8INCIAL POLICE OFFICES

PRO8INCIAL POLICE OFFICES

1or every region, there are provincial offices, each headed by aProvincial Director

In large provinces, police districts may be established to be headed by aDistrict Director

At the city or municipal levels or stations, each is headed by a Chief of Police DISTRICT OFFICES

DISTRICT OFFICES

NCRPO is di5ided into fi5e +-/ dist'i4ts, e!4) )e!ded & ! Dist'i4t Di'e4to':

NCRPO is di5ided into fi5e +-/ dist'i4ts, e!4) )e!ded & ! Dist'i4t Di'e4to':

a. M!ni$! Po$i4e Dist'i4t +MPD/M!ni$! Po$i4e Dist'i4t +MPD/ (formerly Eestern $olice *istrict)< 4anila b. E!ste'n Po$i4e Dist'i4t +EPD/E!ste'n Po$i4e Dist'i4t +EPD/ 2 4arikina, $asig, 7an %uan and 4andaluyong, c. No't)e'n Po$i4e Dist'i4t +NPD/No't)e'n Po$i4e Dist'i4t +NPD/ 2 #aloocan, 4alabon, Davotas, >alenuela d. Cent'!$ Po$i4e Dist'i4t +CPD/Cent'!$ Po$i4e Dist'i4t +CPD/ 2 Hueon #ity

e. So(t)e'n Po$i4So(t)e'n Po$i4e Dist'i4t +SPD/$ateros e Dist'i4t +SPD/ 2 $asay, 4akati, $arana3ue, as $inas, 4untinlupa, Taguig and

MANNING LE8ELS +POLICE<TO<POPULATION RATIO/

MANNING LE8ELS +POLICE<TO<POPULATION RATIO/

1:- 

1:-  nationwide average 1:1

1:1 2 minimum police<to<population ratio

RAN CLASSIFICATION AND ITS COUNTERPART IN THE MILITARY RAN CLASSIFICATION AND ITS COUNTERPART IN THE MILITARY

Coissioned Offi4e' Coissioned Offi4e' R

RAANN PPNNPP AAFFPP

1our 7tar *irector eneral eneral

Three 7tar *eputy *irector eneral ieutenant eneral

Two 7tar *irector 4a;or eneral

Cne 7tar #hief 7uperintendent rigadier eneral Three 7un 7enior 7uperintendent #olonel

Two 7un 7uperintendent ieutenant #olonel

Cne 7un #hief Inspector 4a;or

Two Anahaw eaf 7enior Inspector #aptain

Cne Anahaw eaf Inspector ieutenant

Non < Coissioned Offi4e' Non < Coissioned Offi4e' P

PNNPP AFAFPP

7enior $olice Cfficer 6 4aster 7ergeant 7enior $olice Cfficer 5 Technical 7ergeant

POLICE OFFICER EAMINATIONPOLICE OFFICER EAMINATION

SENIOR POLICE OFFICER EAMINATIONSENIOR POLICE OFFICER EAMINATION

INSPECTOR EAMINATIONINSPECTOR EAMINATION

SUPERINTENDENT EAMINATIONSUPERINTENDENT EAMINATION

NAPOLCOM MEMORANDUM CIRCULAR NO. 9?<

NAPOLCOM MEMORANDUM CIRCULAR NO. 9?<

T)e !33'o3'i!te e$i#i&i$ities fo' PO1 !'e t)ose !4=(i'ed f'o t)e fo$$o%in#:

T)e !33'o3'i!te e$i#i&i$ities fo' PO1 !'e t)ose !4=(i'ed f'o t)e fo$$o%in#:

DA$C#C4 $D$ !ntrance !"amination

+.A. Do. :09: (icensed #riminologist)

+.A. Do. &9/9 (ar and oard !"aminations of baccalaureate degree)

$.*. '9 (ranting #ivil 7ervice !ligibility to #ollege Bonor raduates)

#ivil 7ervice $rofessional

NAPOLCOM MEMORANDUM CIRCULAR NO. 9?<1

NAPOLCOM MEMORANDUM CIRCULAR NO. 9?<1

P'ootion!$ E;!in!tions P'ootion!$ E;!in!tions

<4embers of the ar and icensed #riminologists whose profession are germane to law enforcement and police functions are no longer re3uired to take promotional e"aminations.

< Fp to the rank of 7uperintendent.

APPOINTMENT OF UNIFORMED PNP PERSONNEL APPOINTMENT OF UNIFORMED PNP PERSONNEL PO1 to SPO

PO1 to SPO 2 Appointed by the $D$ +egional *irector for regional personnel or by the #hief $D$ for the Dational Bead3uarters personnel.

INSP to SUPT

INSP to SUPT 2 Appointed by the #hief of the $D$, as recommended by their immediate superiors.

SSUPT to DDG

SSUPT to DDG 2 Appointed by the $resident Di'e4to' Gene'!$

Di'e4to' Gene'!$ 2 Appointed by the $resident from among the senior officers down to the rank of #hief 7uperintendent.

INDS OF APPOINTMENT

INDS OF APPOINTMENT PERMANENT

PERMANENT 2 when an applicant possesses the upgraded general 3ualifications for appointment in the $D$.

TEMPORARY

TEMPORARY 2 Any $D$ personnel who is admitted due to the waiver of the educational or weight re3uirements.

Any members who will fail to satisfy any of the waived re3uirements with the specified time periods shall be dismissed from the service.

$ursuant to DA$C#C4 4emorandum #ircular Do. 99<99', a newly recruited $C& shall be appointed in te3o'!' te3o'!' st!t(sst!t(s in twelve (&) months pending compliance with the 1ield Training

$rogram (1T$) involving actual e"perience and assignment in patrol, traffic and investigation.

APPOINTMENT UNDER 7AI8ER PROGRAM APPOINTMENT UNDER 7AI8ER PROGRAM (<AP"C' 'C <o. 5>>2>>)

1/ Conditions on %!i5e's fo' initi!$ !33ointent to t)e PNP 1/ Conditions on %!i5e's fo' initi!$ !33ointent to t)e PNP

The age, height and weight for initial appointment to the $D$ may be waived only when the number of 3ualified applicants falls below the approved nationalregional 3uota.

The #ommission en banc may grant age, height and weight waiver. The DA$C#C4 +egional

*irector may grant height waiver to a member of an indigenous group.

Eaiver of the age re3uirement may be granted provided that the applicant shall not be less than twenty (9) nor more than thirty five (50) years of age.

Eaiver of the height re3uirement may be granted to a male applicant who is at least & meter and 0

cm (&.0m) and to a female applicant who is at least & meter and 0cm (&.0m). $rovided, that the minimum height re3uirement for applicants who belong to indigenous group duly certified by the

cm (&.0m) and to a female applicant who is at least & meter and 0cm (&.0m). $rovided, that the minimum height re3uirement for applicants who belong to indigenous group duly certified by the

In document Sociology of Crimes (Page 73-89)