The Oncogenic Small Tumor Antigen of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Is an Iron-Sulfur Cluster Protein That Enhances Viral DNA Replication

13 

(1)crossmark The Oncogenic Small Tumor Antigen of Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Is an Iron-Sulfur Cluster Protein That Enhances Viral DNA Replication Sabrina H. Tsang,a Ranran Wang,a Eiko Nakamaru-Ogiso,b Simon A. B. Knight,c Christopher B. Buck,d Jianxin Youa Department of Microbiology,a Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics,b and Department of Medicine,c University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Tumor Virus Molecular Biology Section, Laboratory of Cellular Oncology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USAd ABSTRACT IMPORTANCE MCPyV is associated with a highly aggressive form of skin cancer in humans. Epidemiological surveys for MCPyV seropositivity and sequencing analyses of healthy human skin suggest that MCPyV may represent a common component of the human skin microbial flora. However, much of the biology of the virus and its oncogenic ability remain to be investigated. In this report, we identify MCPyV sT as a novel Fe/S cluster protein and show that conserved cysteine clusters are important for sT’s ability to enhance viral replication. Moreover, we show that sT sensitizes MCPyV replication to cidofovir inhibition. The discovery of Fe/S clusters in MCPyV sT opens new avenues to the study of the structure and functionality of this protein. Moreover, this study supports the notion that sT is a potential drug target for dampening MCPyV infection. A ccumulating evidence has suggested a role for Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in the development of a lethal skin cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), making it the first polyomavirus to be conclusively associated with human cancer (1). MCC tumors develop rapidly and are highly metastatic. It is one of the most aggressive skin cancers with a high mortality rate of 33% (which exceeds the rate of melanoma) (2), and a 5-year observed survival rate of less than 45% (3). High seroprevalence for MCPyV in the adult human population and analyses of healthy human skin suggest that MCPyV is a common component of the normal skin flora (4, 5). MCPyV has a circular, double-stranded DNA genome of ⬃5 kb (6). A regulatory region (RR) separates the early and late regions of the viral genome (6). The RR contains the viral origin of replication (Ori) and bidirectional promoters for viral transcription. The early region encodes large T (LT) and small T (sT) antigens, the 57kT antigen, and a recently discovered protein called alternative LT open reading frame (ORF) (ALTO) (6, 7). The late region encodes the capsid proteins, VP1 and VP2 (8, 9). It is well established that clonal integration of the MCPyV genome into the host genome is a key event in the development of MCPyV-associated MCC tumors (10). Integration or other mutagenic events almost invariably result in truncation of LT upstream of its C-ter- 1544 jvi.asm.org minal helicase domain, rendering the mutant protein defective for mediating viral replication (10). Although both LT and sT antigens are often required for MCPyV-positive MCC cell survival and proliferation (11, 12), sT has emerged as the key oncogenic driver in MCC carcinogenesis. This is supported by the observation that sT expression can transform rodent fibroblasts, whereas the expression of LT, or truncated LT found in MCC tumors, cannot (12). MCPyV sT also demonstrates robust transforming activity in transgenic mouse model systems (13). Due to differential splicing, LT and sT share an N-terminal domain with homology to cellular DnaJ chaperone proteins. In sT, the DnaJ motif is followed by an sT-unique C-terminal do- Received 20 August 2015 Accepted 17 November 2015 Accepted manuscript posted online 25 November 2015 Citation Tsang SH, Wang R, Nakamaru-Ogiso E, Knight SAB, Buck CB, You J. 2016. The oncogenic small tumor antigen of Merkel cell polyomavirus is an iron-sulfur cluster protein that enhances viral DNA replication. J Virol 90:1544 –1556. doi:10.1128/JVI.02121-15. Editor: L. Banks Address correspondence to Jianxin You, jianyou@mail.med.upenn.edu. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Journal of Virology February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) plays an important role in Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). MCPyV small T (sT) antigen has emerged as the key oncogenic driver in MCC carcinogenesis. It has also been shown to promote MCPyV LT-mediated replication by stabilizing LT. The importance of MCPyV sT led us to investigate sT functions and to identify potential ways to target this protein. We discovered that MCPyV sT purified from bacteria contains iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters. Electron paramagnetic resonance analysis showed that MCPyV sT coordinates a [2Fe-2S] and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. We also observed phenotypic conservation of Fe/S coordination in the sTs of other polyomaviruses. Since Fe/S clusters are critical cofactors in many nucleic acid processing enzymes involved in DNA unwinding and polymerization, our results suggested the hypothesis that MCPyV sT might be directly involved in viral replication. Indeed, we demonstrated that MCPyV sT enhances LT-mediated replication in a manner that is independent of its previously reported ability to stabilize LT. MCPyV sT translocates to nuclear foci containing actively replicating viral DNA, supporting a direct role for sT in promoting viral replication. Mutations of Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteines in MCPyV sT abolish its ability to stimulate viral replication. Moreover, treatment with cidofovir, a potent antiviral agent, robustly inhibits the sT-mediated enhancement of MCPyV replication but has little effect on the basal viral replication driven by LT alone. This finding further indicates that MCPyV sT plays a direct role in stimulating viral DNA replication and introduces cidofovir as a possible drug for controlling MCPyV infection.

(2) MCPyV sT Sensitizes Viral Replication to Cidofovir February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 ence 36). It is thought that cidofovir can act as a competitive inhibitor to natural nucleotide substrates and be incorporated into the newly synthesized DNA chain (37). Consecutive incorporation of this analogue can result in DNA chain termination. Cidofovir has been shown to be effective at targeting murine polyomavirus and SV40 replication in cell culture (38). BK polyomavirus replication is also inhibited upon cidofovir treatment (39). Interestingly, there is a recent case study on MCPyV-associated Stevens-Johnson syndrome in an immuno-suppressed patient, in which a high viral load of MCPyV was cleared, along with the skin lesions, after cidofovir treatment (40). These findings led us to investigate how cidofovir affects MCPyV replication at the LTmediated basal level of replication and at the enhanced level of replication stimulated by sT. MATERIALS AND METHODS Cell culture, cell lines, and DNA transfection. C33A cervical carcinoma cells and HEK293 cells were maintained in Dulbecco modified Eagle medium (DMEM; Invitrogen) containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS; HyClone). For immunofluorescent staining, C33A cells were transfected at 40 to 50% confluence using FuGENE6 transfection reagent (Promega) according to the manufacturers’ instructions and fixed at 48 h posttransfection (hpt). For Southern blotting, C33A cells were transfected using the calcium phosphate method (41). Recombinant plasmid construction. Plasmids pcDNA4C-MCPyV LT, pcDNA4C-MCPyV Ori, pADL*, pwM (MCPyV VP1), and pMMt (MBP-MCPyV sT) have been previously described (4, 8, 34). The plasmid pMtw was generated by moving an sT ORF carrying a silent mutation in the LT major splice donor (from plasmid pMtBS [8]) into pwM, replacing the VP1 ORF. Plasmid maps are posted online (http://home.ccr.cancer .gov/Lco/). All MCPyV sT mutants were modified from pMMt and pMtw using site-directed mutagenesis. Plasmid pMBP-SV40sT encoding MBPSV40 sT was made by PCR amplification of SV40 sT from pMIG-SV40 sT (Addgene), followed by digestion with SacI and XhoI to replace MCPyV sT in pMMt. The plasmids pMe1t (MBP-HPyV6 sT) and pMe2t (MBPHPyV7 sT) were generated by cloning PCR products into the SacI-PstI sites of pMXB10 (NEB). For generating the construct encoding MCPyV sT fused to two IgG binding domains of Staphylococcus aureus protein A through a tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease cleavage site (sT-TII), PCRamplified coding DNA fragment was cloned into pMtw using the MluI and EcoRV sites. Recombinant protein production. BL21(DE3)pLysS competent cells (Promega) were transformed with plasmids as indicated in the figure legends. Bacterial cultures were grown in 2⫻YT medium to an A600 of ⬃0.6 before 0.4 mM IPTG (isopropyl-␤-D-thiogalactopyranoside) induction at 37°C for 4 h. Bacteria were collected, and sT purification was performed using solutions that were degassed and purged with oxygen-free nitrogen. The cells were lysed with column buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl [pH 7.4], 200 mM NaCl, 1 mM DTT, 1 mM EDTA, 10 mM MgCl2, 10% glycerol, 20 ␮g/ml DNase, and 0.4 mg/ml lysozyme, supplemented with protease inhibitors) before incubation with amylose resin (NEB) at 4°C for 2 h. The resin was then washed five times with wash buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl [pH 7.4], 200 mM NaCl, 1 mM dithiothreitol [DTT], 1 mM EDTA, 10% glycerol, supplemented with protease inhibitors) before elution with the same buffer with an addition of 10 mM maltose. The eluted proteins were concentrated using Centricon (Millipore). EPR spectroscopy. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) samples were prepared under strict anaerobic conditions on the same day after MCPyV sT proteins were isolated. MCPyV sT proteins were reduced with 20 mM anaerobically prepared neutralized sodium dithionite and incubated at room temperature for 10 min. The protein samples were then transferred to EPR tubes, quickly frozen in a dry ice-ethanol mixture, and stored in liquid nitrogen until EPR analyses. EPR spectra were recorded by a Bruker Elexsys E500 spectrometer at X-band (9.4 GHz) using an Oxford Journal of Virology jvi.asm.org 1545 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest main that has been shown to interact with cellular PP2A phosphatases (14). The interaction between PP2A and the well-studied simian virus 40 (SV40) sT contributes to cellular transformation by preventing PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation of Akt, resulting in the constitutive activation of the mTOR pathway (15, 16). In contrast, independent of PP2A binding, MCPyV sT acts further downstream in the mTOR pathway to induce hyperphosphorylation of the translation initiation factor eIF4E-BP1. This sT activity results in a global stimulation of cap-dependent translation (12). In addition, binding of MCPyV sT to PP4C has been implicated in the destabilization of microtubules and increased cell motility, possibly contributing to the metastatic nature of MCC (17). Besides its oncogenic role, MCPyV sT is also important for promoting MCPyV LT-mediated viral DNA replication (18, 19). MCPyV LT has an Ori-binding domain that recognizes specific pentanucleotides at the viral Ori, subsequently leading to Ori unwinding and replication of the viral DNA by host cell polymerases (18). Interestingly, for MCPyV (18, 19) and JC polyomavirus (20), the presence of sT dramatically enhances LT-mediated DNA replication. It has been shown that MCPyV sT indirectly enhances replication by stabilizing LT through binding and inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFFbw7 (21). More recent in vivo study has shown that MCPyV sT binding to SCFFbw7 is also essential for its transforming activity in transgenic mouse models (13). The importance of MCPyV sT in the viral life cycle and its association with MCPyV-positive MCC led us to investigate potential ways to target this protein to dampen viral growth. Serendipitously, we observed that MCPyV sT proteins expressed and purified from bacteria consistently showed a dark brown color, suggesting the possible presence of metal ions in the protein. It has been reported that the highly conserved cysteines in SV40 sT are organized in two CXCXXC clusters essential for the coordination of zinc ions and the stability of the protein (22, 23). However, in vitro studies suggested that ions other than zinc could be incorporated into the protein (23). By utilizing electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis, we show in this report that MCPyV sT expressed in bacteria coordinates two iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters, identifying MCPyV sT as a novel viral Fe/S cluster protein. Fe/S clusters are ubiquitous ancient protein cofactors (24–26). Fe/S cluster domains play critical roles in many cellular nucleic acid processing enzymes, including those involved in DNA unwinding, endonuclease activity, reduction of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, and DNA polymerization (24, 27–33). In light of the observation that MCPyV sT stimulates LT viral replication (18, 19), we tested how mutating the Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteines in MCPyV sT affects its function in viral DNA replication. Using our previously established system to study MCPyV replication in cultured cells (34, 35), we demonstrated that MCPyV sT markedly stimulates LT-mediated viral DNA replication and that the MCPyV sT Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteines are important for this sT function. In the present study, we also show that MCPyV sT can promote LT-mediated replication without stabilizing LT protein level. Moreover, sT translocates to the sites of actively replicating LT and viral Ori replication foci, suggesting a possible direct role of sT in enhancing viral DNA replication. A number of published studies have shown that cidofovir (CDV or HPMPC), a nucleoside analogue similar to dCMP, is an effective drug against many DNA viruses, including herpes-, adeno-, polyoma-, papilloma-, and poxviruses (reviewed in refer-

(3) Tsang et al. 1546 jvi.asm.org instructions. Western blots were developed using enhanced chemiluminescence solution, and images were captured using a Fuji imaging system. RESULTS MCPyV sT is an Fe/S cluster protein. When we first expressed MCPyV sT as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion in Escherichia coli, we noticed that the pellet of sT-expressing bacteria collected after IPTG induction showed a striking dark-brown color (Fig. 1A), whereas a control pellet of bacteria expressing an unrelated protein fused to MBP was the usual beige color (Fig. 1A, MBP-Gyrase). A possible explanation for the surprising brown color might be the presence of Fe/S cluster(s) in MCPyV sT. Because Fe/S clusters are sensitive to oxidation, we performed sT purification and related experiments under semianaerobic conditions in which all solutions were degassed and purged with oxygen-free nitrogen before use. Interestingly, the white amylose resin used to purify MBP-tagged fusion proteins turned brown after incubation with sT-containing lysate (Fig. 1A, Bound MBPsT). This brown-colored resin returned to white when the bound MBP-sT was eluted off the resin upon the addition of maltose (Fig. 1A, Eluted MBP-sT). After the eluted MBP-sT was concentrated, it showed a dark brown color (Fig. 1A, Purified MBP-sT). Coomassie blue staining and Western blotting confirmed that MCPyV sT is the major protein present in the purified sample (Fig. 1B). Furthermore, the intensity of the brown color is proportional to the MBP-sT protein concentration, affirming that sT is indeed the source of this color. In contrast, the MBP tag purified in the same manner and concentrated to the same concentration was colorless (see below). A His6-tagged protein encoding the common DnaJ domain of MCPyV sT and LT (residues 1 to 78) was also colorless (data not shown). UV-visible absorption spectrum of the purified brown full-length sT exhibited broad 325/420-nm absorbance peaks, which were quenched by reduction with sodium dithionite (Fig. 1C). The unique absorption spectrum of the purified MCPyV sT and its sensitivity to dithionite reduction suggest the likely presence of Fe/S cluster(s) in MCPyV sT. To confirm the presence of Fe/S clusters in recombinant MCPyV sT, we used the EPR technique, which not only can show definitely the presence of Fe/S cluster(s) but also can identify the type(s) of cluster present in the protein. At 12 K and 1 mW, the reduced MCPyV sT protein showed EPR signals characteristic of a [4Fe-4S] cluster (Fig. 2A). At higher temperatures (40 K) with microwave power at 5 mW, the protein exhibited a new EPR signal at g ⫽ 2.015, together with the overlapped EPR signals from a [4Fe-4S] cluster (Fig. 2B). Since this new signal was barely detectable at lower temperatures, the signal is highly likely a [2Fe-2S] cluster, which has a slower relaxation time compared to a [4Fe-4S] cluster. These EPR data strongly suggest the presence of two separate Fe/S clusters in MCPyV sT. MCPyV sT contains a [2Fe-2S] and a [4Fe-4S] cluster. Fe/S clusters are typically integrated into proteins via tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms by cysteine residues (25, 26). To identify candidate Fe/S cluster binding motifs in MCPyV sT, we aligned the amino acid sequences of mammalian polyomavirus sT proteins. From this analysis, we identified a number of highly conserved residues near the sT-unique C-terminal half of the proteins, including two CXCXXC motifs that are reminiscent of known Fe/S cluster-coordinating motifs (43). We designated these motifs CA (for CACISC in MCPyV sT) and CF (for CFCYQC in MCPyV sT) (Fig. 3A and B). In addition to the CXCXXC motifs, Journal of Virology February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest Instrument ESR900 helium flow cryostat. EPR spectra of the Fe/S cluster signals were simulated by SimFonia (Bruker, Germany) and Easyspin (http://www.easyspin.org). 55 Fe labeling in mammalian cells. HEK293 cells were transfected with the indicated plasmids using the calcium phosphate method. At 12 hpt, the cells were washed three times with DMEM to remove transfection reagents. Fresh culture medium (DMEM with 10% FBS) supplemented with 50 ␮M desferoxamine (DFO; Ciba Geigy Corp.) was then added to chelate iron in the media. At 28 hpt, cells were washed three times with DMEM to remove DFO. Fresh culture medium (DMEM with 10% FBS) supplemented with 1 ␮M 55Fe (Cyclotron Co., Ltd., Obninsk, Russia; specific activity, ⬃100 mCi/mg) was added to the cells. At 50 hpt, the cells were harvested and lysed by sonication in resuspension buffer (20 mM HEPES [pH 7.5] and 150 mM NaCl supplemented with protease inhibitors). Whole-cell lysates were incubated with IgG beads (GE Healthcare) for 2 h at 4°C. Unbound proteins were washed away with wash buffer (10 mM Tris-HCl [pH 7.5], 150 mM NaCl, and 0.1% NP-40, supplemented with protease inhibitors) before the addition of sample buffer to the beads. The 55Fe signal from two-thirds of the purified protein sample was measured by liquid scintillation counting (Beckman LS 6500). Antibodies and chemicals. The following antibodies were used for immunofluorescent staining: mouse anti-Xpress (Invitrogen), goat antiATR (N-19) (Santa Cruz), rabbit anti-RPA70 (Cell Signaling), Alexa Fluor 594-goat anti-rabbit IgG (Invitrogen), Alexa Fluor 594-donkey anti-goat IgG (Invitrogen), and Alexa Fluor 488-donkey anti-mouse IgG (Invitrogen). The following antibodies were used for Western blotting: mouse anti-MCPyV LT (CM2B4; Santa Cruz) (42), mouse anti-MCPyV sT/LT J-domain 2t2 (34), mouse anti-actin (Chemicon), horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated donkey anti-mouse (Cell Signaling), and HRP-conjugated donkey anti-rabbit (Cell Signaling). SuperSignal West Pico chemiluminescent substrate solution was purchased from Thermo Scientific. DFO and 55Fe were provided by courtesy of Andrew Dancis (University of Pennsylvania). Cidofovir was purchased from Sigma and dissolved in water. Immunofluorescent staining. Immunofluorescent staining was performed as previously described (34). C33A cells were fixed with 3% paraformaldehyde in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) for 20 min. Cells were incubated in blocking/permeabilization buffer (0.5% Triton X-100 and 3% BSA in PBS) for 10 min at room temperature and stained with primary antibodies (as indicated in the figure legends) at room temperature for 1 h. The cells were washed three times with blocking/permeabilization buffer and incubated with secondary antibodies for an additional hour. Cells were then counterstained with DAPI (4=,6=-diamidino-2-phenylindole) and examined with an Olympus IX81 inverted fluorescence microscope. Microscopy and image analysis. All immunofluorescent images were collected using an inverted fluorescence microscope (Olympus, IX81) connected to a high-resolution charge-coupled device camera (QImaging, FAST1394). Images were analyzed and presented using SlideBook 5.0 software (Intelligent Imaging Innovations, Inc.). Southern blotting. Southern blotting was performed as previously described (34) with slight modification. For cidofovir treatment, at 24 hpt, C33A cells were incubated in medium containing different doses of cidofovir as indicated. The cells were harvested at 48 hpt. About 15 ␮g of total DNA was digested with DpnI and BamHI before being subjected to Southern blotting, while 2 ␮g of total DNA was digested with BamHI and used as a loading control. The phosphor screen was scanned with Typhoon FLA 7000 (GE Healthcare Life Sciences), and the data were quantified with ImageQuant TL software (GE Healthcare Life Sciences). Western blotting. Cells were lysed in lysis buffer (10 mM HEPES [pH 7.9], 300 mM NaCl, 3 mM MgCl2, and 0.5% Triton X-100, supplemented with protease inhibitors). After a 30-min incubation on ice, the soluble and insoluble fractions were separated by centrifugation at 15,000 rpm for 5 min at 4°C. The soluble proteins (30 ␮g) were resolved on an SDS-PAGE gel. Membranes were blotted according to the antibody manufacturers’

(4) MCPyV sT Sensitizes Viral Replication to Cidofovir we also identified C109 and H130 as highly conserved residues that might be involved in Fe/S cluster coordination (Fig. 3A and B). Although these CXCXXC cysteine motifs in SV40 sT have been proposed to support two distinct Zn binding pockets (44), in vitro studies suggested that sT may bind other metal ions as well (23). Furthermore, some bona fide Fe/S cluster proteins are known to be capable of binding Zn in place of the Fe/S cluster (reviewed in reference 45). Modeling of MCPyV sT structure using Phyre2 (46) and PyMOL (47) showed that the cysteine residues in the CA (C119, C121, and C124) and CF (C147, C149, and C152) clusters point toward each other to form pocket-like structures (Fig. 3C). The modeling results and our UV-visible spectra and EPR analyses are consistent with the idea that the predicted CA and CF motifs in MCPyV sT might function as Fe/S cluster-binding pockets. We then performed mutagenesis and EPR analysis to identify ligands for the [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-4S] clusters present in MCPyV sT. As shown in Fig. 3B, we generated a variety of MCPyV sT mutants in which conserved cysteine(s) and/or histidine residues were replaced with alanine. In the CA mutant, C119, C121, and C124 were mutated to alanines, while in the CF mutant, C147, C149, and C152 were mutated to alanines. The CAF mutant contains six mutations in which all of the cysteines in the CA and CF clusters were mutated to alanines. The MBP-tagged CA and CF February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 mutants were expressed at levels similar to wild-type sT in E. coli, but the purified mutant proteins both showed partially reduced brown color compared to wild-type sT. UV-visible spectra of these two cluster mutants had similar characteristics and sensitivity to dithionite reduction as the wild-type MCPyV sT (data not shown), suggesting that the CA and CF mutants still contain Fe/S clusters. In contrast, the CAF mutant protein was entirely colorless and was expressed at a much lower level than wild-type sT in E. coli. The EPR spectra showed that the CA and CF mutants likely lost a [2Fe-2S] cluster and a [4Fe-4S] cluster, respectively (Fig. 4Aa and b). Using the EPR spectra of CA and CF mutants carrying a single Fe/S cluster, we were able to perform spin simulation and obtain the g values of each cluster. The CF cluster seen in the CA mutant is a [4Fe-4S] cluster with g values of gz,y,x ⫽ 1.989, 1.930, and 1.915 (Fig. 4Ac), while the CA cluster seen in the CF mutant is a [2Fe-2S] cluster with the g values of gz,y,x ⫽ 2.015, 2.005, and 1.91 (Fig. 4Ad). Introduction of a C109A mutation into the wild-type or CA mutant MCPyV sT led to a drastic reduction and a shift in the EPR signals of the 4Fe-4S cluster occupying the CF pocket (Fig. 4B). At face value, this might seem to suggest that MCPyV sT C109 might be involved in coordinating the tetrahedral CF pocket. However, Journal of Virology jvi.asm.org 1547 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest FIG 1 MCPyV sT has characteristics of an Fe/S cluster protein. (A) BL21(DE3)pLysS bacteria were transformed with a plasmid encoding MBP-MCPyV sT. The fusion protein was expressed upon the addition of IPTG. After 4 h of induction, bacteria were collected. Clarified bacterial lysate was incubated with amylose resin. Bound proteins were eluted with maltose and then concentrated using an Amicon spin column. Representative pictures from at least three experiments are shown. (B) Purified MCPyV sT (marked by asterisk) was resolved by SDS-PAGE and visualized by Coomassie blue staining and Western blotting. (C) UV-visible absorbance spectrum of purified MCPyV sT before (solid line) and after (dotted line) dithionite reduction. The Fe/S cluster characteristic peak at 420 nm was sensitive to dithionite reduction.

(5) Tsang et al. at 40 K and 5 mW (B). The sample (17 mg/ml) in 20 mM Tris-HCl at pH 7.4 containing 200 mM NaCl, 1 mM DTT, 10 mM maltose, and 10% glycerol was reduced with 20 mM dithionite. EPR conditions: microwave frequency, 9.45 GHz; modulation amplitude, 6 G; modulation frequency, 100 kHz; time constant, 82 ms. Major g values are indicated. the C109A mutation also partially destabilized the CA cluster in the wild-type sT (i.e., the g ⫽ 2.015 signal disappeared in the C109A/WT mutant) (Fig. 4C, top). The CA cluster signal was further diminished in the EPR spectra of the C109A/CF mutant, although the gz and gy signals of the CA cluster were still recognizable (Fig. 4C, bottom). It seems possible that C109 is not specifically essential for either the CA or the CF pocket and the mutation might instead simply cause global misfolding of the protein, which led to distortion of both CA and CF clusters. An alternative hypothesis is that, in MCPyV sT, the poorly conserved C104 (Fig. 3) forms the apex of the CA pocket. This hypothesis is consistent with the fact that the homologous residue in SV40 sT, C97, falls very close to the apex of the CA pocket. In SV40 sT, the tetrahedral apex of CF pocket involves a highly conserved histidine residue homologous to H130 in MCPyV. Introducing the H130A mutation into the wild type or CA mutant did not cause any major spectral change (Fig. 4B), suggesting that the H130 residue is not involved in the coordination of the CF cluster. Although an H130A mutation slightly changed the shape of the gz and gx signals of the CA cluster, the EPR signal for the [2Fe-2S] cluster associated with the CA pocket remained strong in the H130A/WT and H130A/CF mutants (Fig. 4C). This suggests that H130 is not essential for the coordination of the CA cluster either. An alternative possibility is that C131 (which is conserved only in MCPyV and a few closely related PyV species) forms the tetrahedral apex of the CF cluster in MCPyV sT. Based on comparison to the SV40 sT crystal structure, the partially conserved C141 in MCPyV (homologous to P132 in SV40) might also be a candidate for the fourth tetrahedral coordinating residue of the 1548 jvi.asm.org Journal of Virology February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest FIG 2 EPR spectra of purified wild-type MCPyV sT at 12 K and 1 mW (A) and CF pocket. X-ray crystallography of MCPyV sT will likely be needed to resolve this question. Taken together, the data suggest that MCPyV sT likely contains one [2Fe-2S] coordinated with C119, C121, C124, and an unknown fourth residue, and one [4Fe4S] cluster coordinated with C147, C149, C152, and an unknown fourth residue. Iron incorporation suggests the presence of Fe/S cluster(s) in MCPyV sT expressed in mammalian cells. Due to the low level of protein expression in mammalian cells, it is not possible to use the EPR technique to analyze MCPyV sT expressed in cultured cells. This is a common technical limitation in the Fe/S cluster protein field (48, 49), and researchers tend to overexpress their protein of interest in bacteria or yeast to detect the presence of Fe/S clusters. In order to obtain supportive evidence in a mammalian cell culture system, we transfected HEK293 cells with either the vector control or a plasmid encoding MCPyV sT fused to two IgG binding domains of S. aureus protein A. The cells are treated with DFO, an iron chelator, to deplete iron in the media, followed by incubation with radioactive 55Fe. Cells were lysed and subjected to immunoprecipitation with IgG beads. We then counted the amount of 55Fe incorporated by liquid scintillation. We observed a 5-fold-higher signal in immunoprecipitates of sT-transfected cells relative to control vector-transfected cells (Fig. 5A). Efficient purification of sT was confirmed by Western blotting (Fig. 5B). Although we cannot rule out the possibility that MCPyV sT copurifies with a cellular binding partner that is also a Fe/S cluster protein, in light of the evidence obtained from MCPyV sT expressed in E. coli, this finding is consistent with the conclusion that MCPyV sT expressed in mammalian cells also coordinates Fe/S cluster(s). MCPyV sT coordinates more stable Fe/S clusters than other sT proteins. Our EPR analysis shows that MCPyV sT is a Fe/S cluster protein (Fig. 2 and 4). Since the cysteines essential for coordinating the Fe/S clusters are highly conserved among human polyomavirus sTs (Fig. 3), we investigated whether the Fe/S cluster features seen in MCPyV sT is also conserved in the recently discovered human polyomavirus 7 (HPyV7) (50). We chose to test the sT of this polyomavirus because it has recently been shown to be associated with thymic tumors (51) and with pruritic skin rashes seen in immunosuppressed transplant patients (52). HPyV7 sT not only contains the conserved Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteine motifs (Fig. 3) but also showed dark brown color when purified from E. coli as an MBP fusion. These observations suggest that HPyV7 sT also carries Fe/S cluster(s). In addition, MBP-tagged HPyV7 sT expressed in and purified from E. coli produced a similar UV-visible spectrum as MBP-MCPyV sT (Fig. 6A). The characteristic shoulder around 330 nm and a peak at around 420 nm suggest the presence of Fe/S cluster(s) in this protein (Fig. 6A). However, UV-visible absorption spectrum of the purified HPyV7 sT consistently showed dramatically reduced absorbance at the characteristic Fe/S cluster 325/420-nm peaks compared to MCPyV sT (Fig. 6A), even though the expression level and purification efficiency of MBP-MCPyV sT and MBP-HPyV7 sT were similar (Fig. 6B). Compared to MCPyV sT, we also detected a much lower Fe/S cluster associated 325/420 nm absorbance in the sTs of HPyV6 and SV40 (Fig. 6C and D). The results suggest that, although all of the sTs shown in Fig. 3 carry the same cysteine sequence motifs for Fe/S cluster binding, the Fe/S clusters in MCPyV sT expressed in bacteria are more stable compared to the ones in other polyomavirus sTs.

(6) MCPyV sT Sensitizes Viral Replication to Cidofovir Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest FIG 3 Sequence alignment of various polyomavirus sTs. (A) Amino acid sequences of selected polyomavirus sTs were obtained from NCBI and aligned using MacVector 13. Conserved residues are highlighted with gray shading. The potential CXCXXC Fe/S clusters are highlighted in red (CA) and blue (CF) boxes. Boxed cysteines were mutated to alanine for subsequent experiments. The cysteine and histidine residues marked with asterisks were also mutated to alanine for electron paramagnetic resonance analysis. (B) MCPyV sT mutants generated for this study. (C) Modeling of MCPyV sT structure. The MCPyV sT sequence was obtained from NCBI and its structure was modeled using Phyre2 and PyMOL. The three cysteines in the CA cluster are labeled in green, and those in the CF cluster are labeled in red. February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Journal of Virology jvi.asm.org 1549

(7) Tsang et al. Mutation of the Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteines in MCPyV sT abolishes its ability to stimulate LT-mediated viral DNA replication. A variety of Fe/S proteins are involved in many aspects of nucleic acid metabolism such as DNA replication, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transcription (24). The specific roles of Fe/S clusters include electron transport, sensing oxidative stress, detecting DNA damage, stabilizing protein structure, forming enzymatic active sites, and functioning as regulatory cofactors 1550 jvi.asm.org (24, 29, 53). Fe/S cluster domains have also been proposed to act as part of a molecular “plowshare” in unwinding DNA duplex to support the function of many DNA helicases (30–32, 54–56). We therefore set out to examine the possible physiological significance of MCPyV sT Fe/S clusters. Because of the possible sT function in stimulating LT-mediated viral replication (18), we speculated that sT Fe/S clusters might play direct mechanistic roles to promote LT mediated viral DNA replication. To test this, we Journal of Virology February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest FIG 4 EPR spectra of purified MCPyV sT proteins. (A) EPR spectra of purified CA and CF-knockout MCPyV sT mutants at 12 K and 1 mW (a) and at 40 K and 5 mW (b). Black, red, and blue lines are the data from the wild-type (17 mg/ml), CA mutant (14 mg/ml), CF mutant (11 mg/ml) samples, respectively. The simulated spectra of the CF cluster in the CA mutant and CA cluster in the CF mutant are shown in panels c and d, respectively, with principal g values. (B and C) Effects of additional mutations at conserved C109 and H130 residues on the EPR spectra of the wild type (WT), CA-knockout mutants, and CF-knockout mutants. EPR spectra were recorded at 12 K and 1 mW (B) and at 40 K and 5 mW (C). Thick red, thin red, and blue lines are data from the samples where H130A, H130C, or C109A mutations were introduced in the wild type (Fig. 4B and C, upper panels) or in the CA and CF knockouts (Fig. 4B and C, lower panels), respectively. For comparison, the data for the wild type and the CA and CF knockouts shown in Fig. 4Aa and b are added as dotted black, dotted red, and dotted blue lines, respectively. Other EPR conditions are the same as described in Fig. 2.

(8) MCPyV sT Sensitizes Viral Replication to Cidofovir FIG 6 MCPyV sT coordinates more stable Fe/S clusters than other sT proteins. (A) MBP tag (negative control), MBP-MCPyV sT, and MBP-HPyV7 sT were purified as described in Fig. 1. The UV-visible spectra of the purified proteins were measured and normalized to their respective protein concentration. Representative data from three experiments are shown. (B) Purified proteins (marked by asterisks) were resolved by SDS-PAGE and visualized by Coomassie blue staining. (C) MBP-MCPyV sT, MBP-SV40 sT, and MBP-HPyV6 sT were purified as described in Fig. 1. The UV-visible spectra of the purified proteins were measured and normalized to their respective protein concentrations. Representative data from two experiments are shown. (D) Purified proteins (marked by asterisks) were resolved by SDS-PAGE and visualized by Coomassie blue staining. February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Journal of Virology jvi.asm.org 1551 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest 55 Fe with MCPyV sT expressed in mammalian cells. HEK293 cells were transfected with either the vector control (Vec) or a plasmid carrying sT-TII (sT). After labeling the cells with culture medium supplemented with 1 ␮M 55Fe for 22 h, the cells were harvested and lysed by sonication. Wholecell lysates were incubated with IgG beads for 2 h. Unbound proteins were washed off before the addition of sample buffer to the beads. (A) The 55Fe signal from two-thirds of the purified protein sample was measured by liquid scintillation counting. Data represent means and the standard errors of the mean from three experiments. (B) One-third of the purified protein sample was resolved using SDS-PAGE to confirm sT immunoprecipitation by Western blotting. FIG 5 Association of cotransfected C33A cells with a construct encoding wild-type MCPyV sT or the Fe/S mutants, a plasmid encoding MCPyV LT, and a plasmid carrying the MCPyV replication Ori. We then analyzed the effect of sT expression on LT-mediated MCPyV Ori⫹ plasmid replication, as described previously (34, 35). Although the expression of LT alone can drive replication of the Ori⫹ plasmid, the level of replication was significantly enhanced in the presence of wild-type sT (Fig. 7A, newly synthesized DNA). This is consistent with previous reports showing that sT has the ability to promote viral replication (18). Interestingly, the CA, CF, and CAF cluster mutants all lost their ability to stimulate LT-mediated replication, even though they were expressed at nearly the same level as wild-type sT (Fig. 7). The amount of replicated Ori plasmid detected in the presence of these mutants was reduced to the basal level supported by LT-only (Fig. 7A). We also blotted for green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is expressed from the SV40 promoter in the sT vectors to confirm similar transfection efficiency in all of the samples (Fig. 7B, GFP panel). This experiment was repeated in HEK293 cells, and similar results were observed, although the Fe/S mutants were expressed at a lower level compared to the C33A experiment (data not shown). The results suggest that the presence of Fe/S clusters may be essential for the ability of sT to stimulate MCPyV replication. It has been reported previously that sT can stabilize LT by interfering with the interaction between LT and the cellular ubiq-

(9) Tsang et al. uitin ligase SCFFbw7 (21). In this scenario, sT might enhance replication simply by increasing the abundance of LT. However, in our C33A replication system, we did not detect any stabilization of LT in the presence of sT (Fig. 7B). Our studies therefore show that, in some cell lines, the ability of sT to enhance viral DNA replication is independent of its ability to stabilize LT. MCPyV sT translocates to LT/Ori replication factories in cells. To further explore the idea that sT plays a direct role in viral DNA replication, we tested the subcellular localization of sT to determine whether it could be part of the LT/Ori replication complexes that we have described in previous studies (34, 35). We first transfected C33A cells with a plasmid encoding Xpress-tagged sT and observed a diffuse staining pattern in the nucleus (Fig. 8A, top panel). This diffuse staining of sT was also seen when C33A cells were cotransfected with the sT plasmid and the MCPyV Ori plasmid (Fig. 8A, bottom panel). This is expected, since sT does not have an Ori-binding domain, and it has been shown to lack the capacity to drive replication of viral DNA when expressed alone (18). MCPyV LT-mediated replication complexes can be observed in cells cotransfected with MCPyV LT and the Ori, as described in our previous studies (34, 35). We therefore adopted this LT/Ori 1552 jvi.asm.org cotransfection system in C33A cells to see whether sT is recruited to the sites of actively replicating viral Ori. Since the LT CM2B4 antibody and the anti-Xpress antibody that could recognize tagged-sT are both mouse antibodies, we could not perform double staining for colocalization analysis using these two antibodies. We therefore decided to examine whether sT colocalizes with the MCPyV LT/Ori replication factories by performing immunofluorescent staining of MCPyV sT and either RPA70, a host protein required for the stabilization of single-stranded DNA during polyomavirus replication, or ATR, a host DNA damage response factor important for optimal MCPyV replication (35). Both of these factors have been used in our previous studies to visualize the actively replicating MCPyV LT/Ori complexes (35). Interestingly, in the presence of LT-mediated replication (as marked by the formation of nuclear foci with RPA70 or ATR), sT translocated to the putative sites of active viral DNA replication (Fig. 8B). The change in the subcellular localization of sT from a diffuse nuclear pattern to a punctate staining pattern showing colocalization with host factors involved in MCPyV replication suggests a possible direct role of sT in promoting viral replication. Enhancement of MCPyV LT-mediated replication by sT is abolished upon cidofovir treatment. Cidofovir is a potent inhibitor of polyomavirus replication (38, 39, 57). Although its active metabolite, cidofovir diphosphate, is known to inhibit viral DNA replication by selectively inhibiting virally encoded DNA polymerases, polyomaviruses do not encode any polymerases. Thus, Journal of Virology February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest FIG 7 Mutation of the Fe/S cluster-coordinating cysteines in MCPyV sT abolishes its ability to enhance LT-mediated viral DNA replication. (A) C33A cells were cotransfected with plasmids encoding MCPyV LT, sT as indicated, and a plasmid carrying the MCPyV Ori. At 48 hpt, the total cellular DNA was extracted for Southern blotting to analyze the Ori plasmid. A total of 15 ␮g of DNA was digested with BamHI and DpnI to detect newly replicated DNA, while 2 ␮g of DNA was digested with only BamHI to show equal loading. (B) Total protein extractions were used in Western blotting to detect MCPyV LT, sT, and actin. GFP was blotted as a transfection control for the sT plasmid. Representative data from three experiments are shown. FIG 8 MCPyV sT translocates to viral DNA replication factories in the presence of the viral Ori and LT. (A) C33A cells were cotransfected with a plasmid encoding Xpress-tagged wild-type sT and a plasmid carrying the MCPyV Ori as indicated. At 48 hpt, the cells were stained for Xpress (green). The cells were counterstained with DAPI. (B) C33A cells were cotransfected with a plasmid encoding Xpress-tagged wild-type sT, a plasmid encoding LT, and a plasmid carrying the MCPyV Ori. At 48 hpt, the cells were stained for Xpress (green) and the DNA damage response proteins (red) as indicated. The cells were counterstained with DAPI. The DNA damage response protein staining was used to mark the MCPyV DNA replication complexes. Representative pictures from at least three experiments are shown. Bars, 5 ␮m.

(10) MCPyV sT Sensitizes Viral Replication to Cidofovir and sT expression levels (Fig. 9C). The results show that cidofovir specifically inhibits the sT-mediated enhancement of MCPyV DNA replication and has little effect on the basal viral DNA replication induced by LT alone. Furthermore, by performing immunofluorescent staining of MCPyV LT replication foci in cells treated either with or without MCPyV sT and/or cidofovir, we found that cotransfection of MCPyV sT increased the intensity of LT-induced replication foci and that cidofovir treatment moderately reduced the intensity of these replication foci without affecting the number of the foci (data not shown). These findings confirm that MCPyV sT plays a cidofovir-sensitive direct role in stimulating viral DNA replication. FIG 9 Enhancement of MCPyV LT-mediated viral DNA replication by sT is abolished upon cidofovir treatment. (A) C33A cells were cotransfected with a plasmid encoding MCPyV LT, a plasmid carrying the MCPyV Ori, and either the vector control (Vec) or wild-type sT. At 24 hpt, increasing amounts of cidofovir (CDV) were added as indicated. At 48 hpt, the total cellular DNA was extracted for Southern blotting. A total of 15 ␮g of DNA was digested with BamHI and DpnI to detect newly replicated DNA, while 2 ␮g of DNA was digested with only BamHI to show equal loading. (B) Quantification of the replicated DNA bands. The value from no drug control was arbitrarily set to 1. Data represent means and the standard errors of the mean from three experiments. (C) Total protein extractions were used in Western blotting to detect MCPyV LT, sT, and actin. the mode of action of cidofovir against polyomaviruses remains entirely unknown. To test how cidofovir affects MCPyV DNA replication in the presence or absence of sT, we cotransfected C33A cells with a plasmid encoding MCPyV LT, a plasmid encoding MCPyV sT, and a plasmid carrying the MCPyV Ori. At 24 hpt, the cells were treated with increasing doses of cidofovir for another 24 h (Fig. 9). In the absence of sT, LT-mediated replication remained at a steady basal level and was only slightly inhibited by the highest concentration of cidofovir tested (Fig. 9A, newly synthesized DNA). Intriguingly, a dramatic cidofovir dose-dependent reduction of Ori⫹ plasmid replication was seen in the presence of sT (Fig. 9A and B). Cidofovir treatment did not affect LT February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 The link between MCPyV and MCC opens a new avenue for investigating how polyomaviruses induce cancer. A vital question in MCPyV research has been how the virally encoded proteins regulate the viral life cycle and, in rare cases, trigger MCC development. While studies on LT have mostly been focused on its role in viral replication, studies on sT cover a number of stages in the viral life cycle and associated tumorigenesis, reflecting the important role this protein plays in the biology of the virus and human cancer. Our previous effort in studying the host factors required for efficient MCPyV DNA amplification has established a platform to investigate the roles of other proteins involved in replication (34, 35). In the present study, we sought to better understand the nature of MCPyV sT function and to target this protein in an effort to dampen viral growth. We discovered that MCPyV sT purified under semianaerobic conditions from bacteria contains Fe/S clusters (Fig. 1 to 4). Sequence analysis identified two CXCXXC Fe/S cluster-coordinating motifs in the sT-unique C-terminal half of MCPyV sT (Fig. 3). Our EPR analysis provides evidence for the presence of a [2Fe-2S] and a [4Fe-4S] cluster in MCPyV sT (Fig. 2 and 4). Using an 55Fe incorporation assay, we obtained additional evidence suggesting that MCPyV sT expressed in mammalian cells also coordinates Fe/S cluster(s) (Fig. 5). We note that the key cysteine motifs required for MCPyV sT incorporation of Fe/S clusters are well conserved in mammalian polyomaviruses. One minor exception is that members of a small clade of species encompassing the recently discovered human polyomavirus New Jersey polyomavirus (NJPyV) lack the conserved third cysteine of the CA motif (Fig. 3). It is also worth noting that the sT proteins of avian polyomaviruses are devoid of conserved cysteine-rich motifs. We were able to observe phenotypic conservation of Fe/S clusters in the sTs of HPyV6, HPyV7, and SV40 (Fig. 6). Notably, these sT proteins purified from bacteria all showed a similar UV-visible spectrum as MCPyV sT, but at a much lower intensity. These interesting observations suggest the possibility that the Fe/S clusters coordinated by these sTs may have different sensitivities to oxygen oxidation, with the MCPyV sT Fe/S clusters displaying the highest stability. This result also implies that, although the sTs shown in Fig. 3 carry the same highly conserved cysteine sequence motifs that are important for coordinating Fe/S clusters in MCPyV sT, other variations in the surrounding amino acid sequences may render greater oxygen sensitivity of the Fe/S clusters in the sT of HPyV6, HPyV7, and SV40. This phenomenon has been observed in other Fe/S cluster proteins such as the transcriptional regulator FNR, in which a single amino acid replacement near an Fe/S cluster-coordinating Journal of Virology jvi.asm.org 1553 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest DISCUSSION

(11) Tsang et al. 1554 jvi.asm.org suggests that Fe-S clusters are present in MCPyV sT expressed in mammalian cells. In summary, we find that polyomavirus sTs carry Fe/S clusters and demonstrate that, in MCPyV sT, residues that coordinate these clusters are needed for sT-mediated enhancement of LTdriven viral DNA replication. The replication enhancement function of sT does not appear to involve the stabilization of LT and instead seems likely to be a direct activity, since sT colocalizes with viral replication factories. Moreover, we have discovered that cidofovir treatment can specifically inhibit sT-enhanced MCPyV replication, suggesting that sT sensitizes the cells to cidofovir, possibly at the level of deleterious incorporation of the nucleoside analog into the nascent viral DNA strand. Our current report provides new insights into the biology of MCPyV and introduces possible drug targets for controlling MCPyV infection. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS We thank Carolina Sepulveda Nunez and former undergraduate students Ji Ho Ahn and Kalina Slavkova for their technical support. For the 55Felabeling experiment, we thank Andrew Dancis for providing related reagents and facilities to conduct the experiments. We also thank the members of our laboratories for helpful discussions and critical reviews of the manuscript. This study was supported by the HIV-Associated Malignancies Pilot Project Award (National Cancer Institute), National Institutes of Health (NIH) grants R01CA148768, R01CA142723, and R01CA187718-01A1, Tumor Virology Training Grant 2-T32-CA-115299-07, and the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, National Cancer Institute, Center for Cancer Research. This study was also partially supported by NIH grant R01GM097409 (to E.N.-O.). FUNDING INFORMATION HHS | National Institutes of Health (NIH) provided funding to Jianxin You under grant number R01CA187718-01A1. HHS | National Institutes of Health (NIH) provided funding to Eiko Nakamaru-Ogiso under grant number R01GM097409. REFERENCES 1. Feng H, Shuda M, Chang Y, Moore PS. 2008. Clonal integration of a polyomavirus in human Merkel cell carcinoma. Science 319:1096 –1100. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1152586. 2. Lemos B, Nghiem P. 2007. Merkel cell carcinoma: more deaths but still no pathway to blame. J Investig Dermatol 127:2100 –2103. http://dx.doi .org/10.1038/sj.jid.5700925. 3. Agelli M, Clegg LX. 2003. Epidemiology of primary Merkel cell carcinoma in the United States. J Am Acad Dermatol 49:832– 841. http://dx.doi .org/10.1016/S0190-9622(03)02108-X. 4. Tolstov YL, Pastrana DV, Feng H, Becker JC, Jenkins FJ, Moschos S, Chang Y, Buck CB, Moore PS. 2009. Human Merkel cell polyomavirus infection II. MCV is a common human infection that can be detected by conformational capsid epitope immunoassays. Int J Cancer 125:1250 – 1256. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.24509. 5. Foulongne V, Sauvage V, Hebert C, Dereure O, Cheval J, Gouilh MA, Pariente K, Segondy M, Burguiere A, Manuguerra JC, Caro V, Eloit M. 2012. Human skin microbiota: high diversity of DNA viruses identified on the human skin by high throughput sequencing. PLoS One 7:e38499. http: //dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0038499. 6. Gjoerup O, Chang Y. 2010. Update on human polyomaviruses and cancer, p 1–51. In George FVW, George K (ed), Advances in cancer research, vol 106. Academic Press, Inc, New York, NY. 7. Carter JJ, Daugherty MD, Qi X, Bheda-Malge A, Wipf GC, Robinson K, Roman A, Malik HS, Galloway DA. 2013. Identification of an overprinting gene in Merkel cell polyomavirus provides evolutionary insight into the birth of viral genes. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 110:12744 –12749. http: //dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1303526110. 8. Schowalter RM, Pastrana DV, Buck CB. 2011. Glycosaminoglycans and sialylated glycans sequentially facilitate Merkel cell polyomavirus infec- Journal of Virology February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest site leads to a drastic change in its oxygen sensitivity (58–60). The strong MCPyV sT Fe/S cluster stability might hypothetically account for its unique function in the viral life cycle and cellular transformation established in previous studies (12, 13, 61). Future structural analysis and mutagenesis studies would delineate the differences between MCPyV sT and the other sTs tested in this study to define the molecular details that support the high MCPyV sT Fe/S cluster stability. In addition, functional comparison of MCPyV sT and other sTs displaying a lower Fe/S cluster stability could provide important clues for understanding the unique MCPyV sT biological functions established in previous studies (12, 13, 61). A previous report from the Chang and Moore group elegantly demonstrates that sT boosts MCPyV replication by interacting with the SCFFbw7 E3 ubiquitin ligase, consequently stabilizing LT (21). We also observed the MCPyV sT-mediated LT stabilization in 293 cells (data not shown). However, in our C33A replication system, MCPyV sT is able to enhance LT-mediated DNA amplification without any apparent stabilization of LT (Fig. 7). It thus appears that the sT-induced LT stabilization is cell type specific. Our results also indicate that sT translocates to the foci of actively replicating viral DNA in the nucleus (Fig. 8), suggesting the possibility of a more direct role for sT in promoting viral replication. Many DNA polymerases depend on Fe/S clusters for replisome processivity (28, 29). It is possible that sT works in conjunction with LT and functions as part of a processive helicase that continues to melt apart and/or extend the replication fork after the initial Ori unwinding and replication fork formation induced by MCPyV LT. Future studies will test this model to elucidate the mechanisms by which MCPyV sT directly affects the LT-mediated viral DNA replication. Although cidofovir has long been known to inhibit the replication of polyomaviruses in culture, its mechanism of action has remained uncertain (38, 39, 57). Here, we show that cidofovir can inhibit MCPyV replication. Interestingly, the reduction in replication is more dramatic in the presence of sT, while only a modest decrease in replication is seen in LT-only basal level of replication (Fig. 9). Future studies will be needed to investigate whether cidofovir acts directly on sT, inhibits a cellular binding partner of sT, or acts on LT that has been directly or indirectly modified by an sT-dependent activity. In any event, our results show that, when screening for MCPyV DNA replication inhibitors, inclusion of MCPyV sT in the replication assay would allow detection of a broader spectrum of effective drugs that might be missed if the assay only detects the LT-mediated basal level of viral replication. We attempted to confirm the presence of Fe/S clusters in sT expressed and purified from mammalian cells by performing a colorimetric iron content assay with immunoprecipitated sT. However, the measurements for sT were only slightly above the negative control (data not shown), an observation likely due to the technical limitation of the assay to detect very low iron levels in sT from mammalian cells. Similar technical issues may help explain why it has not been possible to directly detect iron in any of the known cellular Fe/S cluster proteins purified from mammalian cells (48). However, after 55Fe labeling of HEK293 cells transfected with a plasmid encoding MCPyV sT, we were able to detect 55Fe in the immunoprecipitated MCPyV sT sample. Although it is not possible to rule out the possibility that a cellular Fe/S cluster protein coimmunoprecipitated with MCPyV sT, the result strongly

(12) MCPyV sT Sensitizes Viral Replication to Cidofovir 9. 10. 11. 12. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. Biochem 77:669 –700. http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.biochem.76 .052705.162653. Wu Y, Brosh RM, Jr. 2012. DNA helicase and helicase-nuclease enzymes with a conserved iron-sulfur cluster. Nucleic Acids Res 40:4247– 4260. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gks039. Netz DJ, Stith CM, Stumpfig M, Kopf G, Vogel D, Genau HM, Stodola JL, Lill R, Burgers PM, Pierik AJ. 2012. Eukaryotic DNA polymerases require an iron-sulfur cluster for the formation of active complexes. Nat Chem Biol 8:125–132. Jain R, Vanamee ES, Dzikovski BG, Buku A, Johnson RE, Prakash L, Prakash S, Aggarwal AK. 2014. An iron-sulfur cluster in the polymerase domain of yeast DNA polymerase epsilon. J Mol Biol 426:301–308. http: //dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmb.2013.10.015. Singleton MR, Dillingham MS, Wigley DB. 2007. Structure and mechanism of helicases and nucleic acid translocases. Annu Rev Biochem 76: 23–50. http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.biochem.76.052305.115300. Pugh RA, Honda M, Leesley H, Thomas A, Lin Y, Nilges MJ, Cann IK, Spies M. 2008. The iron-containing domain is essential in Rad3 helicases for coupling of ATP hydrolysis to DNA translocation and for targeting the helicase to the single-stranded DNA-double-stranded DNA junction. J Biol Chem 283:1732–1743. http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M707064200. White MF. 2009. Structure, function and evolution of the XPD family of iron-sulfur-containing 5=¡3= DNA helicases. Biochem Soc Trans 37:547– 551. http://dx.doi.org/10.1042/BST0370547. Paul VD, Lill R. 2015. Biogenesis of cytosolic and nuclear iron-sulfur proteins and their role in genome stability. Biochim Biophys Acta 1853: 1528 –1539. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamcr.2014.12.018. Wang X, Li J, Schowalter RM, Jiao J, Buck CB, You J. 2012. Bromodomain protein Brd4 plays a key role in Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication. PLoS Pathog 8:e1003021. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal .ppat.1003021. Tsang SH, Wang X, Li J, Buck CB, You J. 2014. Host DNA damage response factors localize to Merkel cell polyomavirus DNA replication sites to support efficient viral DNA replication. J Virol 88:3285–3297. http: //dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.03656-13. Andrei G, Topalis D, De Schutter T, Snoeck R. 2015. Insights into the mechanism of action of cidofovir and other acyclic nucleoside phosphonates against polyoma- and papillomaviruses and non-viral induced neoplasia. Antiviral Res 114:21– 46. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2014 .10.012. De Clercq E. 2003. Clinical potential of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonates cidofovir, adefovir, and tenofovir in treatment of DNA virus and retrovirus infections. Clin Microbiol Rev 16:569 –596. http://dx.doi.org /10.1128/CMR.16.4.569-596.2003. Andrei G, Snoeck R, Vandeputte M, De Clercq E. 1997. Activities of various compounds against murine and primate polyomaviruses. Antimicrob Agents Chemother 41:587–593. Bernhoff E, Gutteberg TJ, Sandvik K, Hirsch HH, Rinaldo CH. 2008. Cidofovir inhibits polyomavirus BK replication in human renal tubular cells downstream of viral early gene expression. Am J Transplant 8:1413– 1422. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-6143.2008.02269.x. Maximova N, Granzotto M, Kiren V, Zanon D, Comar M. 2013. First description of Merkel Cell polyomavirus DNA detection in a patient with Stevens-Johnson syndrome. J Med Virol 85:918 –923. http://dx.doi.org/10 .1002/jmv.23550. Yan J, Li Q, Lievens S, Tavernier J, You J. 2010. Abrogation of the Brd4-positive transcription elongation factor b complex by papillomavirus E2 protein contributes to viral oncogene repression. J Virol 84:76 – 87. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01647-09. Shuda M, Arora R, Kwun HJ, Feng H, Sarid R, Fernandez-Figueras MT, Tolstov Y, Gjoerup O, Mansukhani MM, Swerdlow SH, Chaudhary PM, Kirkwood JM, Nalesnik MA, Kant JA, Weiss LM, Moore PS, Chang Y. 2009. Human Merkel cell polyomavirus infection I. MCV T antigen expression in Merkel cell carcinoma, lymphoid tissues, and lymphoid tumors. Int J Cancer 125:1243–1249. Hanzelmann P, Hernandez HL, Menzel C, Garcia-Serres R, Huynh BH, Johnson MK, Mendel RR, Schindelin H. 2004. Characterization of MOCS1A, an oxygen-sensitive iron-sulfur protein involved in human molybdenum cofactor biosynthesis. J Biol Chem 279:34721–34732. http: //dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M313398200. Cho US, Morrone S, Sablina AA, Arroyo JD, Hahn WC, Xu W. 2007. Structural basis of PP2A inhibition by small t antigen. PLoS Biol 5:e202. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0050202. Journal of Virology jvi.asm.org 1555 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest 13. tious entry. PLoS Pathog 7:e1002161. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal .ppat.1002161. Schowalter RM, Reinhold WC, Buck CB. 2012. Entry tropism of BK and Merkel cell polyomaviruses in cell culture. PLoS One 7:e42181. http://dx .doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0042181. Shuda M, Feng H, Kwun HJ, Rosen ST, Gjoerup O, Moore PS, Chang Y. 2008. T antigen mutations are a human tumor-specific signature for Merkel cell polyomavirus. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 105:16272–16277. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0806526105. Houben R, Adam C, Baeurle A, Hesbacher S, Grimm J, Angermeyer S, Henzel K, Hauser S, Elling R, Brocker EB, Gaubatz S, Becker JC, Schrama D. 2012. An intact retinoblastoma protein-binding site in Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen is required for promoting growth of Merkel cell carcinoma cells. Int J Cancer 130:847– 856. http://dx .doi.org/10.1002/ijc.26076. Shuda M, Kwun HJ, Feng H, Chang Y, Moore PS. 2011. Human Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen is an oncoprotein targeting the 4E-BP1 translation regulator. J Clin Invest 121:3623–3634. http://dx.doi.org/10 .1172/JCI46323. Verhaegen ME, Mangelberger D, Harms PW, Vozheiko TD, Weick JW, Wilbert DM, Saunders TL, Ermilov AN, Bichakjian CK, Johnson TM, Imperiale MJ, Dlugosz AA. 2014. Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen is oncogenic in transgenic mice. J Investig Dermatol 135:1415– 1424. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/jid.2014.446. Kwun HJ, Shuda M, Camacho CJ, Gamper AM, Thant M, Chang Y, Moore PS. 2015. Restricted protein phosphatase 2A targeting by Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen. J Virol 89:4191– 4200. http://dx.doi.org /10.1128/JVI.00157-15. Sontag E, Fedorov S, Kamibayashi C, Robbins D, Cobb M, Mumby M. 1993. The interaction of SV40 small tumor antigen with protein phosphatase 2A stimulates the map kinase pathway and induces cell proliferation. Cell 75:887– 897. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0092-8674(93)90533-V. Rodriguez-Viciana P, Collins C, Fried M. 2006. Polyoma and SV40 proteins differentially regulate PP2A to activate distinct cellular signaling pathways involved in growth control. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 103: 19290 –19295. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0609343103. Knight LM, Stakaityte G, Wood JJ, Abdul-Sada H, Griffiths DA, Howell GJ, Wheat R, Blair GE, Steven NM, Macdonald A, Blackbourn DJ, Whitehouse A. 2015. Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen mediates microtubule destabilization to promote cell motility and migration. J Virol 89:35– 47. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02317-14. Kwun HJ, Guastafierro A, Shuda M, Meinke G, Bohm A, Moore PS, Chang Y. 2009. The minimum replication origin of Merkel cell polyomavirus has a unique large T-antigen loading architecture and requires small T-antigen expression for optimal replication. J Virol 83:12118 –12128. http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01336-09. Feng H, Kwun HJ, Liu X, Gjoerup O, Stolz DB, Chang Y, Moore PS. 2011. Cellular and viral factors regulating Merkel cell polyomavirus replication. PLoS One 6:e22468. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone .0022468. Prins C, Frisque RJ. 2001. JC virus T’ proteins encoded by alternatively spliced early mRNAs enhance T antigen-mediated viral DNA replication in human cells. J Neurovirol 7:250 –264. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080 /13550280152403290. Kwun HJ, Shuda M, Feng H, Camacho CJ, Moore PS, Chang Y. 2013. Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen controls viral replication and oncoprotein expression by targeting the cellular ubiquitin ligase SCFFbw7. Cell Host Microbe 14:125–135. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j .chom.2013.06.008. Goswami R, Turk B, Enderle K, Howe A, Rundell K. 1992. Effect of zinc ions on the biochemical behavior of simian virus 40 small-t antigen expressed in bacteria. J Virol 66:1746 –1751. Turk B, Porras A, Mumby MC, Rundell K. 1993. Simian virus 40 small-T antigen binds two zinc ions. J Virol 67:3671–3673. White MF, Dillingham MS. 2012. Iron-sulphur clusters in nucleic acid processing enzymes. Curr Opin Struct Biol 22:94 –100. http://dx.doi.org /10.1016/j.sbi.2011.11.004. Johnson DC, Dean DR, Smith AD, Johnson MK. 2005. Structure, function, and formation of biological iron-sulfur clusters. Annu Rev Biochem 74:247–281. http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev.biochem.74 .082803.133518. Lill R, Muhlenhoff U. 2008. Maturation of iron-sulfur proteins in eukaryotes: mechanisms, connected processes, and diseases. Annu Rev

(13) Tsang et al. 1556 jvi.asm.org 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. sulfur proteins required for DNA metabolism and genomic integrity. Science 337:195–199. http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1219723. Liu H, Rudolf J, Johnson KA, McMahon SA, Oke M, Carter L, McRobbie AM, Brown SE, Naismith JH, White MF. 2008. Structure of the DNA repair helicase XPD. Cell 133:801– 812. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j .cell.2008.04.029. Rudolf J, Makrantoni V, Ingledew WJ, Stark MJ, White MF. 2006. The DNA repair helicases XPD and FancJ have essential iron-sulfur domains. Mol Cell 23:801– 808. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.molcel.2006.07.019. Wolski SC, Kuper J, Hanzelmann P, Truglio JJ, Croteau DL, Van Houten B, Kisker C. 2008. Crystal structure of the FeS cluster-containing nucleotide excision repair helicase XPD. PLoS Biol 6:e149. http://dx.doi .org/10.1371/journal.pbio.0060149. Momper JD, Zhao Y, Shapiro R, Schonder KS, Gao Y, Randhawa PS, Venkataramanan R. 2013. Pharmacokinetics of low-dose cidofovir in kidney transplant recipients with BK virus infection. Transpl Infect Dis 15:34 – 41. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tid.12014. Beinert H. 2000. Iron-sulfur proteins: ancient structures, still full of surprises. J Biol Inorg Chem 5:2–15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s007750050002. Popescu CV, Bates DM, Beinert H, Munck E, Kiley PJ. 1998. Mossbauer spectroscopy as a tool for the study of activation/inactivation of the transcription regulator FNR in whole cells of Escherichia coli. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 95:13431–13435. http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.95.23.13431. Bruska MK, Stiebritz MT, Reiher M. 2013. Analysis of differences in oxygen sensitivity of Fe-S clusters. Dalton Trans 42:8729 – 8735. http://dx .doi.org/10.1039/c3dt50763g. Griffiths DA, Abdul-Sada H, Knight LM, Jackson BR, Richards K, Prescott EL, Peach AH, Blair GE, Macdonald A, Whitehouse A. 2013. Merkel cell polyomavirus small T antigen targets the NEMO adaptor protein to disrupt inflammatory signaling. J Virol 87:13853–13867. http://dx .doi.org/10.1128/JVI.02159-13. Journal of Virology February 2016 Volume 90 Number 3 Downloaded from http://jvi.asm.org/ on November 7, 2019 by guest 45. Meyer J. 2008. Iron-sulfur protein folds, iron-sulfur chemistry, and evolution. J Biol Inorg Chem 13:157–170. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00775 -007-0318-7. 46. Kelley LA, Sternberg MJ. 2009. Protein structure prediction on the Web: a case study using the Phyre server. Nat Protoc 4:363–371. http://dx.doi .org/10.1038/nprot.2009.2. 47. PyMOL. 2015. PyMOL: a molecular visualization system on an open source foundation, maintained and distributed by Schrödinger. http: //www.pymol.org. 48. Hoff KG, Culler SJ, Nguyen PQ, McGuire RM, Silberg JJ, Smolke CD. 2009. In vivo fluorescent detection of Fe-S clusters coordinated by human GRX2. Chem Biol 16:1299 –1308. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chembiol .2009.11.011. 49. Rouault TA. 2015. Mammalian iron-sulphur proteins: novel insights into biogenesis and function. Nat Rev Mol Cell Biol 16:45–55. 50. Schowalter RM, Pastrana DV, Pumphrey KA, Moyer AL, Buck CB. 2010. Merkel cell polyomavirus and two previously unknown polyomaviruses are chronically shed from human skin. Cell Host Microbe 7:509 – 515. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2010.05.006. 51. Rennspiess D, Pujari S, Keijzers M, Abdul-Hamid MA, Hochstenbag M, Dingemans AM, Kurz AK, Speel EJ, Haugg A, Pastrana DV, Buck CB, De Baets MH, Zur Hausen A. 2015. Detection of human polyomavirus 7 in human thymic epithelial tumors. J Thorac Oncol 10:360 –366. http://dx .doi.org/10.1097/JTO.0000000000000390. 52. Ho J, Jedrych JJ, Feng H, Natalie AA, Grandinetti L, Mirvish E, Crespo MM, Yadav D, Fasanella KE, Proksell S, Kuan SF, Pastrana DV, Buck CB, Shuda Y, Moore PS, Chang Y. 2015. Human polyomavirus 7-associated pruritic rash and viremia in transplant recipients. J Infect Dis 211: 1560 –1565. http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/infdis/jiu524. 53. Stehling O, Vashisht AA, Mascarenhas J, Jonsson ZO, Sharma T, Netz DJ, Pierik AJ, Wohlschlegel JA, Lill R. 2012. MMS19 assembles iron-

(14)

New documents

Human Right Ending We used the human- written “right ending” in SCT as the ground truth.. Two candidates in SCT are written by a person that did not write the original story

The first stage planning maps the input facts encoded as a directed, labeled graph, where nodes represent entities and edges represent relations to text plans, while the second stage

There had been improvements in the overall governance and management of the centre since the previous inspection and a number of systems had been put in place to ensure that the service

In conclusion, we demonstrated in this study for the first time that the newly discovered cyto- kine IL-34 is expressed by the periprosthetic membranes of patients with aseptic

While automatic output quality estimation QE is an established field of research in other areas of NLP, such as machine translation MT Specia et al., 2010, 2018, research on QE in

There had been continued improvements in the overall governance and management of the centre since the previous inspection and a number of systems had been put in place to ensure that

Eligible studies should provide the number of patients with a short and long RFI 24-months as a cutoff usu- ally and their corresponding 5-year PRS.. The pooled relative risk RR with

Human evaluation of natural language generation systems can be done using intrinsic and extrinsic methods Sparck Jones and Galliers, 1996; Belz and Reiter, 2006.. Intrinsic approaches

Outcome 01: Statement of Purpose Outcome 02: Contract for the Provision of Services Outcome 03: Suitable Person in Charge Outcome 04: Records and documentation to be kept at a

Goodman and Kruskal’s Gamma was measured with the GoodmanKruskalGamma function sup- plied by the R software.14 In order to interpret the values obtained in the analysis, we use the