B. Course Outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to

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A. Introduction: This course is offered by the Department of Psychology as a Core course for fulfilment of their BA (Hons.) degree. This course is Part I of Fundamentals in Psychology. It introduces students to the basic concepts in Psychology, such as schools of Psychology, research methods, and mental processes such as attention, sensation, perception, learning, and memory. The course is taught in a manner so that students can learn to think about how these psychological concepts can be applied in daily life.

B. Course Outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to [1101.1] Understand the history and science of Psychology.

[1101.2] Compare and contrast the different theoretical perspectives in Psychology. [1101.3] Identify the different research methods in Psychology.

[1101.4] Understand, explain and describe psychological concepts such as attention, sensation, perception, learning, memory and forgetting

[1101.5] Understand and explain how psychological constructs apply to daily life.

C. Program Outcomes

PO1. Critical Thinking: Take informed actions after identifying the assumptions that frame our thinking and actions, checking out the degree to which these assumptions are accurate and valid, and looking at our ideas and decisions (intellectual, organizational, and personal) from different perspectives.

PO2. Effective Communication: Speak, read, write and listen clearly in person and through electronic media in English and in one Indian language, and make meaning of the world by connecting people, ideas, books, media and technology.

PO3. Social Interaction: Elicit views of others, mediate disagreements and help reach conclusions in group settings. PO4. Effective Citizenship: Demonstrate empathetic social concern and equity centred national development, and the ability to act with an informed awareness of issues and participate in civic life through volunteering.

PO5. Ethics: Recognize different value systems including your own, understand the moral dimensions of your decisions, and accept responsibility for them.

PO6. Environment and Sustainability: Understand the issues of environmental contexts and sustainable development.

PO7. Self-directed and Life-long Learning: Acquire the ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context socio- technological changes

D. Program Specific Outcomes

[PSO.1.] Understand the foundational principles and theories of human behaviour as well as apply them to examine and evaluate the bio-psycho-social bases of human behaviour through the human life span.

[PSO.2.] Understand, analyse and evaluate individual differences based on various perspectives and theories of personality and intelligence. As well, apply and test individual differences in real life outcomes.

MANIPAL UNIVERSITY JAIPUR School of Social Sciences and Humanities

Department of Psychology Course Hand-out

Fundamentals of Psychology I | PS 1101 | 4 Credits | 3 1 0 4

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[PSO.3.] To understand the statistical concepts of how data are classified, organized, measured and analysed using different statistical methods and develop ability to draw inferences about variables under study.

[PSO.4.] Investigate different aspects of human behavior with an understanding of various research methods and demonstrate their application in psychosocial and professional settings.

[PSO.5.] To identify the social and cultural influences on human behaviour and demonstrate the skill to use psychological tools and tests to examine the variations in human behaviour in clinical, organizational, and educational settings.

[PSO.6.] Identify, classify and diagnose different psychological disorders and examine and apply the different treatment programs for various psychological disorders.

[PSO.7.] To develop an multi-disciplinary approach in understanding behaviour from the perspective of other social sciences like political science, economics, philosophy , literature etc.

E. Assessment Rubrics:

Criteria Description Maximum Marks

Internal Assessment (Summative)

Sessional Exam I 20

Sessional Exam II 20

In class Quizzes and Assignments , Activity feedbacks (Accumulated and

Averaged)

20

End Term Exam

(Summative) End Term Exam 40

Total 100

Attendance

(Formative) A minimum of 75% Attendance is required to be maintained by a student to be qualified for taking up the End Semester examination. The allowance of 25% includes all types of leaves including medical leaves.

Homework/ Home Assignment/ Activity Assignment

(Formative)

There are situations where a student may have to work in home, especially before a flipped classroom. Although these works are not graded with marks. However, a student is expected to participate and perform these assignments with full zeal since the activity/ flipped classroom participation by a student will be assessed and marks will be awarded.

F. Syllabus

Origin of Psychology: History and science of psychology, theoretical perspectives, goals of Psychology; Applications of psychology in 21st century;

Methods of study- Observation, Experiments, Case study, Interview, cross-sectional and longitudinal methods. Sensation and Perception: Sensory processes –five senses, Nature, meaning and determinants of attention, Nature and meaning of perception, Principles of perceptual organization, figure and ground distinction, form and movement perception, constancies and illusions;

Learning and Conditioning: Definition of learning, learning curve, conditioning, cognitive learning theory, observational learning, skill acquisition;

Memory and Forgetting: Basic processes of memory, Stages and models of memory, types of memory, measurement of memory, Nature, causes and theories of forgetting, mnemonics.

G. References:

1. S.N. Ciccarelli, J.N. White, Psychology: An exploration (5th e.). Pearson Publications, (2017). 2. R.A. Baron, G. Misra, Psychology, (5th e). India: Pearson, 2015).

3. R.S. Feldman, Understanding psychology (12th e). India. McGraw Hill ( 2017).

4. P. Zimbardo, R.L. Johnson, M.C. Vivian, Psychology: Core concepts (7the.). India. Pearson Education (2012). .

5. D. Coon, J. Mitterer, Introduction to psychology: Gateways to mind and behavior, (12the.). United States. Cengage Learning (2008).

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H. Lecture Plan:

Lec No Topics Session Objective Mode of

Delivery Corresponding CO Mode of Assessing the Outcome 1 Introduction and Course

Hand-out briefing To acquaint and clear teachers expectations and understand student expectations

Lecture NA

2,3 History and Science of Psychology

To know about the development of Psychology as a scientific discipline

Lecture PS1101.1 Assignment

4,5 Theoretical Perspectives To learn about the

different schools and theories in Psychology

Lecture PS1101.2 Assignment

6 Goals of Psychology To learn about the

goals of Psychology Lecture PS1101.2 7 Applications of

Psychology in 21st Century

To learn to apply the principles of Psychology in the current century Lecture PS1101.5 Presentation 8- 11 Methods of study: Observation, Experiments, Case study, Interview, cross-sectional and longitudinal methods.

To learn about research methods

used in Psychology Lecture and Discussio n

PS1101.3 Assignment Flipped class and

11-13 Sensory processes five senses, Nature, meaning and determinants of attention,

To gain clarity about

what is attention Lecture [1101.4] Class Quiz

14 - 20 Nature and meaning of perception, Principles of perceptual organization, figure and ground distinction, form and movement perception,

constancies and illusions;

To learn about the perception and principles of perceptual organisation, perception, constancies and illusions

Lecture [1101.4] Class Quiz

21- 27 Learning and conditioning: Definition of learning, learning curve, conditioning, cognitive learning theory, observational To be able to comprehend the concept of learning and conditioning

Lecture [1101.4] Presentation & Assignment

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learning, skill acquisition;

28- 39 Basic processes of memory, Stages and models of memory, types of memory,

measurement of

memory

To learn basic processes and stages and how to measure memory through various instruments

Lecture [1101.4] Class Quiz

40 Class Quiz To test the

understanding of the content of Unit 5

Quiz [1101.4] Class Quiz

41- 49 Nature, causes and theories of forgetting

To enumerate and explain the concept, theories and various causes of forgetting Lecture & Discussio n Class Quiz 50 mnemonics. 51-52 Revision

I. Course Articulation Matrix: (Mapping of COs with POs)

CO STATEMENT

CORRELATION WITH PROGRAM OUTCOMES

CORRELATION WITH PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES PO 1 PO 2 PO 3 PO 4 PO 5 PO 6 PO 7 PSO 1 PSO 2 PSO 3 PSO 4 PSO 5 PSO 6 PSO 7 PS 1101.1

Understand the history and science of

Psychology.

2

PS 1101.2

Compare and contrast

the different theoretical perspectives in Psychology 2 2 3 3 PS 1101.3

Identify the different research methods in Psychology 2 2 2 PS 1101.4 Understand, explain and describe psychological concepts such as attention, sensation, perception, learning, memory and forgetting

2 2 3 PS 1101.5 Understand and explain how psychological 2 2 2 2 2

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constructs apply to daily life

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A. Introduction: This course is offered by Dept. of Psychology as a core course, targeting students who wish to pursue research & higher studies in psychology. Offers in depth knowledge of scientific research, steps of research process, construction research problem, hypotheses and various techniques of controlling relevant variables. Understand how to write a research report.

B. Course Outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to

[1102.1] Understand the basic concepts of scientific research and the use of statistics to conduct research

[1102.2] Understand the basic components of normality and its relevance in research methods [1102.3] Understand the theory and application of descriptive methods to enhance statistical skills

[1102.4] Understand the theory and application of inferential methods to enhance research skills

[1102.5]. Understand the various non parametric methods to analyze data [1102.6]. Understand the application of correlation to research data C. Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes

PO1. Critical Thinking: Take informed actions after identifying the assumptions that frame our thinking and actions, checking out the degree to which these assumptions are accurate and valid, and looking at our ideas and decisions (intellectual, organizational, and personal) from different perspectives.

PO2. Effective Communication: Speak, read, write and listen clearly in person and through electronic media in English and in one Indian language, and make meaning of the world by connecting people, ideas, books, media and technology.

PO3. Social Interaction: Elicit views of others, mediate disagreements and help reach conclusions in group settings.

PO4. Effective Citizenship: Demonstrate empathetic social concern and equity centered national development, and the ability to act with an informed awareness of issues and participate in civic life through volunteering.

MANIPAL UNIVERSITY JAIPUR School of Social Sciences and Humanities

Department of Psychology Course Hand-out

Statistical Methods for Psychological Research | PS1102 | 4 Credits 3104 Session: July-19-Dec-19| Faculty: Dr. Bhavana Arya| Class: B.A/B.Sc.(Hons)

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PO5. Ethics: Recognize different value systems including your own, understand the moral dimensions of your decisions, and accept responsibility for them.

PO6. Environment and Sustainability: Understand the issues of environmental contexts and sustainable development.

PO7. Self-directed and Life-long Learning: Acquire the ability to engage in independent andlife-long learning in the broadest context socio- technological changes.

D. PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES

[PSO.1.] Understand the foundational principles and theories of human behaviour as well as apply them to examine and evaluate the bio-psycho-social bases of human behaviour through the human life span.

[PSO.2.] Understand, analyse and evaluate individual differences based on various

perspectives and theories of personality and intelligence. As well, apply and test individual differences in real life outcomes.

[PSO.3.] To understand the statistical concepts of how data are classified, organized, measured and analysed using different statistical methods and develop ability to draw inferences about variables under study.

[PSO.4.] Investigate different aspects of human behavior with an understanding of various research methods and demonstrate their application in psychosocial and professional settings. [PSO.5.] To identify the social and cultural influences on human behaviour and demonstrate the skill to use psychological tools and tests to examine the variations in human behaviour in clinical, organizational, and educational settings.

[PSO.6.] Identify, classify and diagnose different psychological disorders and examine and apply the different treatment programs for various psychological disorders.

[PSO.7.] To develop an multi-disciplinary approach in understanding behaviour from the perspective of other social sciences like political science, economics, philosophy , literature etc.

E. Assessment Rubrics:

Criteria Description Maximum Marks

Internal Assessment (Summative)

Sessional Exam I (Close Book) 20

Sessional Exam II (Close Book) 20

In Class Testes and Assignments, Activity feedbacks (Accumulated and Averaged)

20

End Term Exam (Summative)

End Term Exam (Close Book) 40

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Attendance (Formative)

A minimum of 75% Attendance is required to be maintained by a student to be qualified for taking up the End Semester examination. The allowance of 25% includes all types of leaves including medical leaves.

Homework/ Home

Assignment/ Activity Assignment

(Formative)

There are situations where a student may have to work in home, especially before a flipped classroom. Although these works are not graded with marks. However, a student is expected to participate and perform these assignments with full zeal since the activity/ flipped classroom participation by a student will be assessed and marks will be awarded.

F. SYLLABUS

Statistics and Psychology- Psychological Research, Relevance of Statistics in Psychological Research; Descriptive and Inferential Statistics, Scales of Measurement.Normal Probability: Concept and principles, characteristics of NPC, divergence from normality, applications of normal distribution curve; Descriptive Statistics: Graphical representation of data, measures of central tendency and variability; Percentiles, percentile ranks; Inferential Statistics: Standard error of mean and other statistics, significance of difference between means (t test), One-way ANOVA; Non-Parametric Statistics- Difference between parametric and non-parametric statistics; chi Square tests and median test. Correlation: Concept and meaning of correlation, Pearson’s product-moment correlation, rank-order correlation;

G. References :

1. H.E. Garret, R.S Woodworth, Statistics in psychology and education. Bombay: Vakils Feffer& Simons Ltd(2005).

2. B. Mohanty, S. Misra, Statistics for behavioral and social sciences. New Delhi: Sage Publications India (2016).

3. V .Veeraraghavan, S. Shetgovekar Textbook of parametric and non-parametric statistics. New Delhi: Sage Publications India (2016).

4. A.E.N. Aron, A.E. Coups, Statistics for psychology, (6thed.). New Delhi: Pearson Education (2006).

5. S.K. Mangal, Statistics in psychology and education, New Delhi: PHI (2012). 6. E.W. Minium, B.M. King, G. Bear, Statistical reasoning in psychology and

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H. Lecture Plan: Lec

No.

Topics Session Objective Mode of

Delivery Corresponding CO Mode of Assessing the Outcome 1 Introduction and Course Hand-out briefing

To acquaint and clear teachers expectations and understand student expectations Lecture & Discussion NA 2 Overview of Statistics & Psychology Recall previous knowledge of basic concepts of statistics and it importance in psychology.

Lecture & PPT 1102.1 In Class

interaction through Q & A 3 Relevance of Statistics in Psychological Research Lecture & Discussion 1102.1 Class Test/ Sessional I 4-5 Descriptive and Inferential Statistics Lecture & Discussion 1102.1 Class Test/ Sessional I 6 -8 Scales of Measurement. Lecture & Discussion 1102.1 Class Test/ Sessional I 9-10 Concept and principles, Characteristics of normal distribution curve

Understand the concept of Normal probability and Bell shaped curve

PPT & discussion 1102.2 Class Problem solving

11-14 Divergence from normality

Understand the

divergence and methods of calculating the skewedness, kurtosis.

Lecture & Black board teaching 1102.2 Class Problem solving 15-16 Applications of normal distribution curve;

Lecture & Black board teaching 1102.2 Class Problem solving 17,18 Descriptive Statistics Lecture 1102.3

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19-22

Graphical representation of data

Explain the basics of making a frequency distribution and drawing different types of graphs

Lecture & Black board

1102.3 In Class practice & home assignment 23-27 Measures of Central tendency

To make the students understand the method of calculating the different measures of central tendency

Lecture & Black board teaching 1102.3 Home Assignment 28-32 Percentiles, percentile ranks

To make the students understand the method

of calculating

percentiles and

percentile ranks

Lecture & Black board teaching 1102.3 In Class Practice 33,34 Standard error of mean and other statistics To understand and practice the different methods of calculating Standard Error

Lecture & Black board teaching 1102.4 Class Problem solving 35-36 Significance of difference between means (t test); To understand and practice the different methods of calculating t-test under different conditions.

Lecture & Black board teaching 1102.4 Home assignment/ Class test 37,38 Meaning & uses of one-way ANOVA

To explain and practice the method of

calculating ANOVA

Lecture & Black board teaching

1102.4 Class problem

solving/ Class test

39-40 Difference between Parametric & Non-parametric statistics;

Explain the difference between the two techniques and their uses.

Lecture & Black board teaching

1102.5 Home assignment/

Class test

41-42

Chi Square test To explain and practice the method of Chi square and assumptions of applying the chi square test

Lecture & Black board teaching

1102.5 Class test

42-44

Median test To explain and practice the method of

calculating Median test

Lecture & Black board teaching

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45 Concept and meaning of correlation, Pearson’s Product-Moment Correlation,

To make the students understand and practice

the method of

calculating correlation

Lecture & Black board teaching 1102.6 Class Problem solving 46-48 Rank-order correlation

To make the students understand and practice

the method of

calculating correlation

Lecture & Black board teaching

1102.6 Home Assignment

I. Course Articulation Matrix: (Mapping of COs with POs)

CO STATEMENT

CORRELATION WITH PROGRAM OUTCOMES CORRELATION WITH PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES PO 1 PO 2 PO 3 PO 4 PO 5 PO 6 PO 7 PSO 1 PSO 2 PSO 3 PSO 4 PSO 5 PSO 6 PSO 7 [1102.1] Understand the basic

concepts of scientific research and the use of statistics to conduct research

2 2 3

[1102.2] Understand the basic components of normality and its relevance in research methods

2 2 3

[1102.3] Understand the theory and application of descriptive methods to enhance statistical skills

2 2 3

[1102.4] Understand the theory and application of inferential methods to enhance research skills

2 2 3

[1102.5] Understand the various non parametric methods

to analyse data 2 2 3

[1102.6] Understand the application of correlation

to research data 2 2 3

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A.Introduction: This course is offered by Department of Psychology as a skill enhancement course. This course aims at training students for developing skills and competencies related to emotional intelligence. The course of skill development to perform effectively in personal and professional domains of life. The students will learn to apply interpersonal and intrapersonal skills and strategies to adapt effectively to the environment.

B. Course Objectives: At the end of the course, students will be able to :

[PS1141.1] Understand the concept of emotional intelligence and its theoretical perspectives [PS1141.2] Develop the competencies and skills related to emotional intelligence

[PS1141.3] Apply the skills of emotional intelligence in various domains C. Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes

PO1. Critical Thinking: Take informed actions after identifying the assumptions that frame our thinking and actions, checking out the degree to which these assumptions are accurate and valid, and looking at our ideas and decisions (intellectual, organizational, and personal) from different perspectives.

PO2. Effective Communication: Speak, read, write and listen clearly in person and through electronic media in English and in one Indian language, and make meaning of the world by connecting people, ideas, books, media and technology.

PO3. Social Interaction: Elicit views of others, mediate disagreements and help reach conclusions in group settings.

PO4. Effective Citizenship: Demonstrate empathetic social concern and equity centered national development, and the ability to act with an informed awareness of issues and participate in civic life through volunteering.

PO5. Ethics: Recognize different value systems including your own, understand the moral dimensions of your decisions, and accept responsibility for them.

PO6. Environment and Sustainability: Understand the issues of environmental contexts and sustainable development.

PO7. Self-directed and Life-long Learning: Acquire the ability to engage in independent andlife-long learning in the broadest context socio- technological changes.

MANIPAL UNIVERSITY JAIPUR School of Social Sciences and Humanities

Department of Psychology Course Hand-out

Emotional Intelligence | PS1141 | 2 Credits 2002

Session: August -19-Dec-19| Faculty: Dr. Prashasti Jain| Class: B.A./ B.Sc. Hons I Semester

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D. PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOME

[PSO.1.] Understand the foundational principles and theories of human behaviour as well as apply them to examine and evaluate the bio-psycho-social bases of human behaviour through the human life span.

[PSO.2.] Understand, analyse and evaluate individual differences based on various

perspectives and theories of personality and intelligence. As well, apply and test individual differences in real life outcomes.

[PSO.3.] To understand the statistical concepts of how data are classified, organized, measured and analysed using different statistical methods and develop ability to draw inferences about variables under study.

[PSO.4.] Investigate different aspects of human behavior with an understanding of various research methods and demonstrate their application in psychosocial and professional settings. [PSO.5.] To identify the social and cultural influences on human behaviour and demonstrate the skill to use psychological tools and tests to examine the variations in human behaviour in clinical, organizational, and educational settings.

[PSO.6.] Identify, classify and diagnose different psychological disorders and examine and apply the different treatment programs for various psychological disorders.

[PSO.7.] To develop an multi-disciplinary approach in understanding behaviour from the perspective of other social sciences like political science, economics, philosophy , literature etc.

E. Assessment Rubrics:

Criteria Description Maximum Marks

Internal Assessment (Summative)

Sessional Exam I (Close Book) 20 Sessional Exam II (Close Book) 20 In Class Testes and Assignments, Activity feedbacks (Accumulated and Averaged)

20

End Term Exam (Summative)

End Term Exam (Close Book) 40

Total 100

Attendance (Formative)

A minimum of 75% Attendance is required to be maintained by a student to be qualified for taking up the End Semester examination. The allowance of 25% includes all types of leaves including medical leaves.

Homework/ Home Assignment/ Activity Assignment

(Formative)

There are situations where a student may have to work in home, especially before a flipped classroom. Although these works are not graded with marks. However, a student is expected to participate and perform these assignments with full zeal since the activity/ flipped classroom participation by a student will be assessed and marks will be awarded.

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F. SYLLABUS

Introduction: Emotional Intelligence; Models of Emotional Intelligence; EQ competencies: self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and interpersonal skills; Importance of Emotional Intelligence; Applications of emotional intelligence: Workplace; Relationships; Conflict Management; Effective Leadership

G. References:

1. D. Goleman, Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantam Book (1995).

2. D. Goleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence. New York: Bantam Books (1998). 3. R.Bar-On, J.D.A. Parker, The handbook of emotional intelligence. San Francisco,

California: Jossey Bros (2000).

4. D. Singh, Emotional intelligence at work (2nd Ed.) New Delhi: Response Books (2003).

H. Lecture Plan: Lec

No.

Topics Session Objective Mode of

Delivery

Corresponding CO

Mode of Assessing the Outcome

1 Introduction To state and understand teachers expectations and student expectations

Lecture & Discussion

NA

2 Emotional Intelligence

Explain the concept of Emotional Intelligence

Lecture & PPT PS1141.1 In Class interaction through Q & A 3-6 Models of

Emotional Intelligence

To acquaint the students with the development of EI as a concept

Lecture & Discussion

PS1141.1 Class Test/ Sessional I

7

Activity Skill development Lecture & Discussion Classroom activity 8-9 EQ competencies: self-awareness,

To make students aware of their own selves

Lecture & Discussion

PS1141.2 In Class interaction through Q & A

10 Activity Skill development PPT &

discussion Classroom activity 11-12 EQ competencies: self-regulation To make students understand how to regulate their behavior according to the situational demands Lecture & Discussion PS1141.2 Class Problem solving

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14-15 EQ competencies: motivation, To understand the concept of self motivation and the role that it plays in human behaviour Lecture & Discussion PS1141.2 In Class interaction through Q & A

16 Activity Skill development Classroom activity

17-18

EQ

competencies - empathy,

To help students develop empathetic skills and to understand its role in interpersonal interaction Lecture & Discussion PS1141.2 In Class interaction through Q & A 19

Activity Skill development Classroom Activity Classroom activity 20-21 EQ competencies: interpersonal skills; To help students enhance interpersonal skills of students and apply when required

Lecture & Discussion

PS1141.2 Class Problem solving

22

Activity Skill development Classroom activity

23 Importance of Emotional Intelligence;

To make students aware of the importance EI in daily life

Lecture & Discussion

PS1141.2 Class problem solving/ Class test

24-25 Applications of Emotional Intelligence To help students identify, develop and apply skills related to EI to various domains of life. Lecture & Discussion PS1141.3 In Class interaction through Q & A

26 Activity Skill development Classroom activity

Classroom activity

I. Course Articulation Matrix: (Mapping of COs with POs)

CO STATEMENT

CORRELATION WITH PROGRAM OUTCOMES

CORRELATION WITH PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES

PO1 PO2 PO3 PO4 PO5 PO6 PO7 PSO 1 PSO 2 PSO 3 PSO 4 PSO 5 PSO 6 PS O7 [1141.1] Understand the concept of emotional intelligence and its theoretical

perspectives

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[1141.2] Develop and enhance the competencies and skills related to

emotional intelligence 2 1 1 1 2

[1141.3] Apply the skills of emotional intelligence in various domains

2 3 2 2

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[Type here]

A. Introduction: This course is offered by Department of Arts as a subsidiary course to the B.A. Hons. students in their Ist Semester. Philosophy is a conscious and loving awareness of the human journey on the Earth and under the Sky. As the love of wisdom, Philosophy implies three dimensions of human knowing and being that is, body, mind and heart which in turn correspond to three dimensions of their being - cosmic, human and divine. In our times, there is a need for not only love of wisdom, but also a wisdom of love. Essentially this would entail an intercultural approach to tackling any of many problems that beset contemporary human societies. An introduction to Philosophy characterises as a crucial inward turn towards, intuition, insight, intelligence and intensity.

B. Course Outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to-

[1141.1]. Recognize and evaluate various philosophical definitions, issues, branches, methods, problems and standpoints.

[1141.2]. Compare and analyse the Indian, Western and other philosophical traditions and concepts. [1141.3]. Nurture an intercultural orientation in Philosophy and Life.

[1141.4]. Develop the skills of imaginative and creative thinking necessary in today’s entrepreneurial context.

C. PROGRAM OUTCOMES AND PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES

PO.1]. Critical Thinking: Take informed actions after identifying the assumptions that frame our thinking and actions, checking out the degree to which these assumptions are accurate and valid, and looking at our ideas and decisions (intellectual, organizational, and personal) from different perspectives

[PO.2]. Effective Communication: Speak, read, write and listen clearly in person and through electronic media in English and in one Indian language, and make meaning of the world by connecting people, ideas, books, media and technology

[PO.3]. Social Interaction: Elicit views of others, mediate disagreements and help reach conclusions in group settings

[PO.4]. Effective Citizenship: Demonstrate empathetic social concern and equity centred national development, and the ability to act with an informed awareness of issues and participate in civic life through volunteering

[PO.5]. Ethics: Recognize different value systems including your own, understand the moral dimensions of your decisions, and accept responsibility for them

MANIPAL UNIVERSITY JAIPUR

School of Humanities and Social Sciences

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS

Course Hand-out

INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY| AT1141 | 4 Credits | 3 1 0 4

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[Type here]

[PO.6]. Environment and Sustainability: Understand the issues of environmental contexts and sustainable development.

[PO.7]. Self-directed and Life-long Learning: Acquire the ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context socio-technological changes

PROGRAM SPECIFIC OUTCOMES

[PSO.1.] Understand the foundational principles and theories of human behaviour as well as apply them to examine and evaluate the bio-psycho-social bases of human behaviour through the human life span.

[PSO.2.] Understand, analyse and evaluate individual differences based on various perspectives and theories of personality and intelligence. As well, apply and test individual differences in real life outcomes.

[PSO.3.] To understand the statistical concepts of how data are classified, organized, measured and analysed using different statistical methods and develop ability to draw inferences about variables under study.

[PSO.4.] Investigate different aspects of human behavior with an understanding of various research methods and demonstrate their application in psychosocial and professional settings.

[PSO.5.] To identify the social and cultural influences on human behaviour and demonstrate the skill to use psychological tools and tests to examine the variations in human behaviour in clinical, organizational, and educational settings.

[PSO.6.] Identify, classify and diagnose different psychological disorders and examine and apply the different treatment programs for various psychological disorders.

[PSO.7.] To develop an multi-disciplinary approach in understanding behaviour from the perspective of other social sciences like political science, economics, philosophy , literature etc.

D. Assessment Plan:

Criteria Description Maximum Marks

Internal Assessment (Summative)

Sessional Exam I (Closed Book) 20

Sessional Exam II (Closed Book) 20

In class Quizzes and Assignments 20

End Term Exam (Summative)

End Term Exam (Closed Book) 40

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[Type here]

Attendance (Formative)

A minimum of 75% Attendance is required to be maintained by a student to be qualified for taking up the End Semester examination. The allowance of 25% includes all types of leaves including medical leaves.

Make up Assignments (Formative)

Students who miss a class will have to report to the teacher about the absence. A makeup assignment on the topic taught on the day of absence will be given which has to be submitted within a week from the date of absence. No extensions will be given on this. The attendance for that particular day of absence will be marked blank, so that the student is not accounted for absence. These assignments are limited to a maximum of 5 throughout the entire semester.

Homework/ Home Assignment/ Activity Assignment

(Formative)

There are situations where a student may have to work at home, especially before a flipped classroom. Although these works are not graded with marks. However, a student is expected to participate and perform these assignments with full zeal since the activity/ flipped classroom participation by a student will be assessed and marks will be awarded.

E. SYLLABUS

The WHAT of Philosophy: Who are Philosophers? Definition of “Philosophy,” The Issues of Philosophy, The Method to deal with these Issues, The Characteristics of Philosophy, Philosophy, Religion and Culture. The WHY of Philosophy: Why Study Philosophy? Is Philosophy Avoidable? The BRANCHES of Philosophy: Logic, Epistemology, Ethics, Metaphysics, Aesthetics, Applied Philosophy. The HOW (Method) of Philosophy: Rational and Analytic, Intuitive and Experiential. The GEOGRAPHY of Philosophy (Philosophies in the World): Tribal Philosophy, Indian Philosophy, Western Philosophy, Chinese Philosophy, Islamic Philosophy, African Philosophy. The PROBLEMS of Philosophy: Problems in Metaphysics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Mind, Moral Philosophy, Philosophy of Science and of Nature, Philosophy of Religion, Philosophy of God, Social Philosophy, Aesthetics.

F. Reference Books

1. Perumalil, A. An Introduction to Philosophy, ISPCK, New Delhi. 2001.

2. Datta, D. M. & S.C. Chatterjee, An Introduction to Indian Philosophy, University of Calcutta, Calcutta, 1968.

3. Harold, T. Living Issues in Philosophy, Oxford University Press, New York, 1995.

4. Sarukkai S. “Indian Philosophy and Philosophy of Science,” PHISPC, Motilal Banarsidass, New Delhi, 2005.

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[Type here]

DAY TOPICS Programme

objective Mode of Delivery Corresponding CO Mode of Assessing the Outcome Day 1 Introduction and Course

Hand-out briefing Provide a brief of the contents of the course Lecture, PPT, Discussion Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination Day 2 The WHAT of Philosophy Introduce the

concept of Philosophy Lecture, PPT, Discussion 1141.1 Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination Day 3 Who are Philosophers? Indicate the

characteristics of Philosophers Lecture, PPT, Discussion 1141.1, 1141.3 Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination Day 4-5 Definition of “Philosophy” Explain the

origin and context and meaning of the topic Lecture, PPT, Discussion 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination

Day 5-6 The Issues of Philosophy Lay out philosophical issues Lecture, PPT, Discussion 1141.4 Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination Day 7-8 The Method to deal with

these Issues

Lay out the method of Philosophy Lecture, PPT, Discussion 1141.1, 1141.4 Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination Day 9-10 The Characteristics of

Philosophy, Philosophy, Religion and Culture

Relate Philosophy to Religion and Culture Lecture, Discussion 1141.2, 1141.3 Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination Day 11 The WHY of Philosophy Establish the

relevance of the discipline Lecture, Discussion 1141.1 Quizzes, Sessional I, End Term Examination Day 12- Why Study Philosophy? Establish the

necessity of

Lecture, 1141.1, 1141.4 Quizzes, Sessional I,

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[Type here]

13 the discipline Discussion End Term

Examination Day 14 The BRANCHES of

Philosophy Explain the sub-disciplines of the field Lecture, Discussion 1141.1 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination

Day 15 Logic Demonstrate

the foundations of Logic in language Lecture, Discussion 1141.1, 1141.4 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination

Day 16 Epistemology Explain the

history of knowledge systems Lecture, Discussion, Video resource 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination

Day 17 Ethics Relate

morality to reason vis-à-vis philosophy Lecture, Discussion, Video resource 1141.1. 1141.2, 1141.4 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination

Day 18 Metaphysics Introduce the

evolution of human thinking Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 19 Aesthetics, Applied

Philosophy Introduce students to the human notion of beauty nd justice Lecture, Discussion, Case Studies 1141.1, 1141.4 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination

Day 21 The HOW (Method) of Philosophy Contextualise the role of Philosophy today Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 22-23

Rational and Analytic Introduce dominant approaches to Philosophy Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 24- Intuitive and Experiential Introduce

dominant

Lecture, 1141.1, 1141.1 Quizzes, Sessional II,

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[Type here]

25 approaches to

Philosophy

Discussion, End Term

Examination Day 26 The GEOGRAPHY of

Philosophy (Philosophies in the World Reveal the cross-cultural origins of Philisophy Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1. 1141.3 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 26-27

Indian Philosophy Introduce seminal concepts of Indian thought Lecture, Discussion, Video resource 1141.1 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 28-29

Indian Philosophy Introduce seminal concepts of Indian thought Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 31-32

Western Philosophy Introduce seminal concepts of Western thought Lecture, Discussion 1141.1, 1141.3 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 33-34

Western Philosophy Introduce seminal concepts of Western thought Lecture, Discussion, Video resource 1141.1, 1141.4 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination

Day 35 Chinese Philosophy Introduce seminal concepts of Asian thought Lecture, Discussion 1141.1, 1141.3 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination Day 36 Islamic Philosophy Introduce

seminal concepts of Middle eastern thought Lecture, Discussion, Video resource 1141.1, 1141.3 Quizzes, Sessional II, End Term Examination

Day 37 African Philosophy Introduce seminal concepts of African thought Lecture, Discussion, Video resource 1141.1, 1141.3 Quizzes, End Term Examination

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[Type here]

Day 38 Tribal Philosophy Introduce seminal concepts of tribal ways of life Lecture, Thought experiment 1141.1, 1141.3 Quizzes, End Term Examination

Day 39 The PROBLEMS of Philosophy Introduce perennial issues in Philosophy Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, End Term Examination Day 40 Problems in Metaphysics Introduce

intractable Metaphysical problems Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, End Term Examination

Day 41 Epistemology Revel the

foundations of how we know, what we know Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, End Term Examination Day 42 Philosophy of Mind Introduce the

modern idea of the mind Lecture, Discussion, Video resource 1141.1, 1141.2 Quizzes, End Term Examination Day 43 Moral Philosophy Explain the

relationship between Philosophy and morality Lecture, Discussion, Case studies 1141.1, 1141.4 Quizzes, End Term Examination

Day 44 Philosophy of Science and of Nature Reflect on the evolution of Science as a discipline Lecture, Discussion 1141.1, 1141.1 Quizzes, End Term Examination Day 45 Philosophy of Religion Reflection on

cultural understandings of the divine Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2, 1141.3 Quizzes, End Term Examination Day 46 Philosophy of God Reflection on

human understandings of the divine Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2, 1141.3 Quizzes, End Term Examination

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[Type here] Day

47-48

Social Philosophy Explain the social basis of all philosophy Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.2, 1141.3, 1141.4 Quizzes, End Term Examination Day 49-50 Aesthetics Introduce philosophical concerns on the idea of beauty Lecture, Discussion, 1141.1, 1141.4 Quizzes, End Term Examination

Day 51 Conclusion and Course Summarization Clear doubts and summarise the course Lecture, Discussion, Quizzes, End Term Examination

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[Type here]

G. Course Articulation Matrix: (Mapping of COs with POs)

1-Low Correlation; 2- Moderate Correlation; 3- Substantial Correlation

CO STATEMENT Correlation with Program Outcomes (POs) Correlation with

Program Specific Outcomes (PSOs) P O1 P O2 P O3 P O4 P O5 P O6 P O7 PO 8 PO 9 PO 10 PO1 1 PO1 2 PSO 1 PSO 2 PSO 3 [1141.1] Recognize and evaluate various

philosophical definitions, issues, branches, methods, problems and standpoints.

2 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[1141.2] Compare and analyse the Indian, Western and other philosophical traditions and concepts

3 1 2 3 2 3 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[1141.3] Nurture an intercultural orientation in Philosophy and Life.

2 1 2 1 3 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[1141.4] Develop the skills of imaginative and creative thinking necessary in today’s entrepreneurial context.

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A.

Introduction:

The aim of this paper is to offer the students an understanding of the basic nature and elements of Political Science in order to help them grasp such basic concepts.

B.

Course Outcomes

At the end of the course, the students will be able:

[1101. 1] To understand the nature and scope of Political Science

[1101. 2] To identify and explain traditional and modern perspectives of Political Science study. [1101. 3] To understand various organs and functions of government and articulate the theories of state.

[1101. 4] To develop an analytical, social scientific disposition toward elements of Political Science. [1101. 5] To render students professionally capable for administrative services, higher education or research in think tanks and organizations

C.

Program Outcomes

[PO.I] Critical Thinking: Take informed actions after identifying the assumptions that frame our thinking and actions, checking out the degree to which these assumptions are accurate and valid, and looking at our ideas and decisions (intellectual, organizational, and personal) from different perspectives.

[PO.2] Effective Communication: Speak, read, write and listen clearly in person and through electronic media in English and in one Indian language, and make meaning of the world by connecting people, ideas, books, media, and technology.

[PO.3] Social Interaction: Elicit views of others, mediate disagreements and help reach conclusion in group settings.

[PO.4] Effective Citizenship: Demonstrate empathetic social concern and equity centred national development, and the ability to act with an informed awareness of issues and participate in civic life through volunteering.

[PO.5] Ethics: Recognize different value systems including your own, understand the moral dimensions of your decisions, and accept responsibility for them.

MANIPAL UNIVERSITY JAIPUR School of Humanities and Social Sciences

Department of Arts Course Hand-out

Elements of Political Science| AT1151 | 4 Credits | 3 1 0 4 Session: July 19 - Nov 19 | Faculty: Dr. Aditi Priya| Class: B.A.(Hons)

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[PO.6]Environment and Sustainability: Understand the issues of environmental contexts and sustainable development.

[PO.7]Self-directed and Life-long Learning: Acquire the ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context socio-technological changes.

[PSO.1.] Understand the foundational principles and theories of human behaviour as well as apply them to examine and evaluate the bio-psycho-social bases of human behaviour through the human life span.

[PSO.2.] Understand, analyse and evaluate individual differences based on various perspectives and theories of personality and intelligence. As well, apply and test individual differences in real life outcomes.

[PSO.3.] To understand the statistical concepts of how data are classified, organized, measured and analysed using different statistical methods and develop ability to draw inferences about variables under study.

[PSO.4.] Investigate different aspects of human behavior with an understanding of various research methods and demonstrate their application in psychosocial and professional settings.

[PSO.5.] To identify the social and cultural influences on human behaviour and demonstrate the skill to use psychological tools and tests to examine the variations in human behaviour in clinical, organizational, and educational settings.

[PSO.6.] Identify, classify and diagnose different psychological disorders and examine and apply the different treatment programs for various psychological disorders.

[PSO.7.] To develop an multi-disciplinary approach in understanding behaviour from the perspective of other social sciences like political science, economics, philosophy , literature etc.

D.

Assessment Rubrics

Criteria Description Maximum Marks

Internal Assessment (Summative)

Sessional Exam I 20

Sessional Exam II 20

In class Quizzes and Assignments , Activity feedbacks (Accumulated

and Averaged)

20 End Term Exam

(Summative) End Term Exam 40

Total 100

Attendance

(Formative) A minimum of 75% Attendance is required to be maintained by a student to be qualified for taking up the End Semester examination. The allowance of 25% includes all types of leaves including medical leaves.

Homework/ Home Assignment/ Activity Assignment

(Formative)

There are situations where a student may have to work in home, especially before a flipped classroom. Although these works are not graded with marks. However, a student is expected to participate and perform these assignments with full zeal since the activity/ flipped classroom participation by a student will be assessed and marks will be awarded.

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E.

Syllabus: Introduction: Meaning, Definition, Scope and Nature of Political Science, Traditional and Modern Perspective of Political Science, Behaviouralism and Post Behaviouralism, The State: Elements, The Government: Organs: Executive: Functions, Characteristics, Expansion in the functions of the Executive, Legislature : Functions, Characteristics, its decline, Judiciary : Functions, Characteristics, Independence of the Judiciary, Its greater role, Separation of Powers, Recent trends, Parliamentary and Presidential Governments , Unitary and Federal forms of Government, Evolution of the State: Theories : Divine, Force, Social Contract, Evolutionary.

F.

Reference books:

1. Ray, Amal & Mohit Bhattacharya, Political Theory: Ideas & Institutions, The World Press Pvt.Ltd., Kolkata, 2014.

2. Eddy Asirvatham & K.K. Misra Political Theory ; S.Chand & Company Ltd., Delhi, 2012. 3. Kapur, A.C. Principles of Political Science, S. Chand & Co., New Delhi, 2008.

4. Verma, S.P. Modern Political Theory, Paperback, 1975.

5. Verma, S. L. Advanced Modern Political Theory: Analysis and Technologies, Rawat Publications, 2008.

6. Gauba, O.P. An Introduction to Political Theory, MacMillan, New Delhi, 2013, 2nd edition.

G.

Lecture Plan Lectur e No. Topics Session Objective Mode of Delivery Correspo nding CO Mode of assessing the Outcome 1 Basic Concepts of Political Science

Basic understanding Lecture 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 2 Meaning and Definition of Political Science

Basic understanding Lecture 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 3 Nature and Significance of Political Science

Basic understanding Lecture 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term

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s 4 Traditional Perspective of Political Science To understand traditional and modern perspective PPT 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 5 Modern Perspective of Political Science To understand traditional and modern perspective PPT 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 6 Behavioralism and its Limitations To understand traditional and modern perspective Lecture 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 7 David Easton's Eight basic tenets of Behaviouralism To understand traditional and modern perspective Lecture 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 8 Post-Behaviouralism and its significance To understand traditional and modern perspective Lecture 1101.1 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 9 State: Significance of State, State and Society, State and Government, State and Nation To understand the State: Significance of State PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examination s 10 Elements of State To understand traditional and modern perspective PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End

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Term Examination s 11 Organs of Government: Meaning and basic understanding

Organs of Government: Meaning and basic understanding Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 12 Executive: Meaning and characteristics of Executive Executive: Meaning and characteristics of Executive Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 13 Executive: Functions of the Executive Executive: Functions of the Executive Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 14 Executive: Expansion in the functions of the Executive Executive: Expansion in the functions of the Executive Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 15 Legislature: Meaning and Characteristics Legislature: Meaning and Characteristics Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 16 Legislature: Functions of Legislature Legislature: Functions of Legislature Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 17 Delegated Legislation, Decline of Legislature Delegated Legislation, Decline of Legislature Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Student Recap of previous class, Mid Term Examination II 18 Judiciary: Meaning

and Characteristics Judiciary: Meaning and Characteristics

Lecture 1101.2 and

1101.3 Student Recap of previous class, Mid Term

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Examination II 19 Judiciary: Functions of Judiciary Judiciary: Functions of Judiciary Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term

Examinations 20

Independence of Judiciary and its greater role

Independence of Judiciary and its greater role Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 21 Legislature, Executive and Judiciary in the Indian Perspective Legislature, Executive and Judiciary in the Indian Perspective Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 22 Legislature, Executive and Judiciary in the Indian Perspective Legislature, Executive and Judiciary in the Indian Perspective Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 23 Separation of Powers: Meaning and Nature Separation of Powers: Meaning and Nature Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz previous of class, End Term Examination s 24 Montesquieu's Separation of Powers Montesquieu's Separation of Powers Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examination s 25 Recent trends in Separation of Powers Recent trends in Separation of Powers Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examination s 26 Separation of Powers in Parliamentary form of Government Separation of Powers in Parliamentary form of Government Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examination s 27 Separation of

Powers in Separation of Powers in

Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3

Quiz of

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Presidential form of

Government Presidential form of Government class, Term End Examination s 28 Parliamentary Government: Meaning and Characteristics Parliamentary Government: Meaning and Characteristics Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz previous of class, End Term Examination s 29 Parliamentary Government: Pros and Cons Parliamentary Government: Pros and Cons Lecture 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 30 Presidential Government: Meaning and Characteristics Presidential Government: Meaning and Characteristics PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 31 Presidential Government: Pros and Cons Presidential Government: Pros and Cons PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 32 Difference between Parliamentary and Presidential Government Difference between Parliamentary and Presidential Government PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 33 Unitary Government: Meaning and Features Unitary Government: Meaning and Features PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, End Term Examinations 34 Unitary Government: Pros and Cons Unitary Government: Pros and Cons PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examinations 35 Federal Government: Meaning and Features and types of Federalism

Federal Government: Meaning and Features and types of Federalism PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examinations 36 Federal Government: Pros and Cons Federal Government: Pros and Cons PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid

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Term I, End Term

Examinations 37

Difference between Unitary and Federal Government Difference between Unitary and Federal Government PPT 1101.2 and 1101.3 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examinations 38

Evolution of State Evolution of State

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examinations 39 Rise and Government of Modern Nation State Rise and Government of Modern Nation State Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 40 Divine theory of

the origin of State Divine theory of the origin of State

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examination s 41 Limitations of

Divine Theory Limitations of Divine Theory

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term I, End Term Examinations 42 Relevance of Divine theory in the present times Relevance of Divine theory in the present times

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5

Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term

Examinations 43

Force theory of the origin of the State

Force theory of the origin of the State Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term

Examinations 44

Limitations of the

Force Theory Limitations of the Force Theory

Lecture 1101.4 &

1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid

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Term II, End Term Examinations 45 Significance of Force Theory in the present times

Significance of Force Theory in the present times

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5

Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term

Examinations 46

Social Contract

Theory: Hobbes Social Contract Theory: Hobbes

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5

Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term

Examinations 47

Social Contract

Theory: Locke Social Contract Theory: Locke

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5

Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 48 Social Contract Theory: Rousseau Social Contract Theory: Rousseau Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 49 Limitations of Social Contract theory Limitations of Social Contract theory Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Quiz of previous class, Mid Term II, End Term Examinations 50 Evolutionary Theory of the origin of State Evolutionary Theory of the origin of State Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Student Recap of previous class, Mid Term Examination II 51 Limitations of Evolutionary Theory Limitations of Evolutionary Theory Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5 Student Recap of previous class, Mid Term Examination II 52 Doubts Clearing

Class Doubts Clearing Class

Lecture 1101.4 & 1101.5

Quiz of

previous class, Mid Term II, End Term

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Examination s

H.

Course Articulation Matrix: (Mapping of COs with POs)

CO

STATEMENT

Program Outcomes

PO 1 PO 2 PO 3 PO 4 PO 5 PO 6 PO 7 AT1151.1 To understand the nature

and scope of Political Science

3

AT1151.2 To identify and explain traditional and modern perspectives of Political Science study.

3

AT1151.3 To understand various organs and functions of government and

articulate the theories of state.

3

AT1151.4 To develop an analytical, social scientific

disposition toward elements of Political Science.

3

AT1151.5 To render students professionally capable for administrative services, higher education or research in think tanks and organizations

1 2 1 2

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A. Introduction: This course is offered by Dept. of Arts as a Generic Elective. Students enrolled in Department of Economics, English and Psychology can opt for Sociology as Subsidiary and this forms their introductory course. This course gives an introduction to core concepts of Sociology.

B. Course Outcomes: At the end of the course, students will be able to 1161.1 Have knowledge of concepts central to sociology.

1161.2 Understand the scientific method used in sociological method and how it is deployed. 1161.3 Equip students to conduct sociological analysis of social groups.

1161.4 Learn the sociological explication of social deviance and social control

1161.5 Develops the skill to scientifically study social issues confronting the society and formulate effective social policies to address them.

C. Program Outcomes and Program Specific Outcomes

[PO.1].Critical Thinking: Take informed actions after identifying the assumptions that frame our thinking and actions, checking out the degree to which these assumptions are accurate and valid, and looking at our ideas and decisions (intellectual, organizational, and personal) from different perspectives

[PO.2].Effective Communication: Speak, read, write and listen clearly in person and through electronic media in English and in one Indian language, and make meaning of the world by connecting people, ideas, books, media and technology

[PO.3].Social Interaction: Elicit views of others, mediate disagreements and help reach conclusions in group settings [PO.4].Effective Citizenship: Demonstrate empathetic social concern and equity centred national development, and

the ability to act with an informed awareness of issues and participate in civic life through volunteering

[PO.5].Ethics: Recognize different value systems including your own, understand the moral dimensions of your decisions, and accept responsibility for them

[PO.6].Environment and Sustainability: Understand the issues of environmental contexts and sustainable development.

[PO.7].Self-directed and Life-long Learning: Acquire the ability to engage in independent and life-long learning in the broadest context socio-technological changes

[PSO.1]. Apply design, critical, and mathematical thinking in communication, real life issues and in problem solving. [PSO.2]. Recognize and understand basics of empirical research, economics, psychology, social sphere and heritage. [PSO.3]. Develop listening, speaking, creative writing, designing, artistic, theatrical, musical, dancing and concentration

skills.

[PSO.4]. Demonstrate knowledge of international and intercultural relations, law and society, holistic fitness, and film appreciation.

MANIPAL UNIVERSITY JAIPUR School of Humanities and social science

Department of Arts Course Hand-out

Introduction to Sociology | AT 1161/ SO 1101| 4 Credits | [3104] Session: July- November 2019 | Faculty: Mrs. Chhavi Sharma| Class: B.A. Subsidiary

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D. Assessment Rubrics:

Criteria Description Maximum Marks

Internal Assessment (Summative)

Sessional Exam I 20

Sessional Exam II 20

In class Quizzes and Assignments , Activity feedbacks (Accumulated and

Averaged)

20

End Term Exam

(Summative) End Term Exam 40

Total 100

Attendance

(Formative) A minimum of 75% Attendance is required to be maintained by a student to be qualified for taking up the End Semester examination. The allowance of 25% includes all types of leaves including medical leaves.

Homework/ Home Assignment/ Activity Assignment

(Formative)

There are situations where a student may have to work in home, especially before a flipped classroom. Although these works are not graded with marks. However, a student is expected to participate and perform these assignments with full zeal since the activity/ flipped classroom participation by a student will be assessed and marks will be awarded.

E. Syllabus

Origin of Sociology as a discipline: Nature and Scope of Sociology, Difference between Sociology and other Social Sciences; Sociological Methods; The Individual and Society; Community and Association; Culture, Social Organization; Social Institutions: Family, Marriage, Kinship, Religion; Socialisation; Social Control and deviance; Social Roles and Identity, Groups and Network, Social Capital; Social Issues: Inequality and Stratification in India; Race and Ethnicity; Religion and Society; Education and Society; Gender.

F. References:

1. Atal, Y. (2008). Changing Indian Society, Jaipur: Rawat Publications.

2. Beteille, A. (2002). Sociology: Essay on Approach and Method, New Delhi: OUP.

3. Bottomore, T.B. (1972). Sociology: A guide to problems and literature, Bombay: George Allen and Unwin. 4. Davis, K. (1981). Human Society, Delhi: Surjeet Publications.

5. Giddens, A. (2005). Sociology, London: Polity Press.

6. Inkless, A. (1987). What is sociology? New Delhi: Prentice Hall of India Pvt. Ltd. 7. Jayaram, N. (1988). Introductory Sociology, Madras: Macmillan India.

8. Johnson, H. M. (1995). Sociology: A Systematic Introduction, New Delhi: Allied Publishers. 9. Macionis, J. (1996). Sociology, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Figure

Updating...

References