AVEVA Plant (12 Series) HVAC Modelling Rev 1 3

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AVEVA Plant

(12 Series)

Heating, Ventilation &

Air Conditioning Modelling

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Revision Log

Date Revision Description of Revision Author Reviewed Approved

06/12/2007 0.1 Issued for Review IMP

08/05/2008 0.2 Reviewed IMP KMM

20/05/2008 1.0 Approved for Training 12.0.0.3 IMP KMM RP

Updates

All headings containing updated or new material will be highlighted.

Suggestion / Problems

If you have a suggestion about this manual or the system to which it refers please report it to the AVEVA Group Solutions Centre at gsc@aveva.com

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Visit our website at http://www.aveva.com

Disclaimer

Information of a technical nature, and particulars of the product and its use, is given by AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries without warranty. AVEVA Solutions Ltd. and its subsidiaries disclaim any and all

warranties and conditions, expressed or implied, to the fullest extent permitted by law.

Neither the author nor AVEVA Solutions Ltd or any of its subsidiaries shall be liable to any person or entity for any actions, claims, loss or damage arising from the use or possession of any information, particulars or errors in this publication, or any incorrect use of the product, whatsoever.

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Copyright and all other intellectual property rights in this manual and the associated software, and every part of it (including source code, object code, any data contained in it, the manual and any other documentation supplied with it) belongs to AVEVA Solutions Ltd. or its subsidiaries.

All other rights are reserved to AVEVA Solutions Ltd and its subsidiaries. The information contained in this document is commercially sensitive, and shall not be copied, reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Limited. Where such permission is granted, it expressly requires that this Disclaimer and Copyright notice is prominently displayed at the beginning of every copy that is made.

The manual and associated documentation may not be adapted, reproduced, or copied in any material or electronic form without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Ltd. The user may also not reverse engineer, decompile, copy or adapt the associated software. Neither the whole nor part of the product described in this publication may be incorporated into any third-party software, product, machine or system without the prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Limited or save as permitted by law. Any such unauthorised action is strictly prohibited and may give rise to civil liabilities and criminal prosecution.

The AVEVA products described in this guide are to be installed and operated strictly in accordance with the terms and conditions of the respective licence agreements, and in accordance with the relevant User Documentation. Unauthorised or unlicensed use of the product is strictly prohibited.

Printed by AVEVA Solutions on 22 May 2008

© AVEVA Solutions and its subsidiaries 2001 – 2007

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1 Introduction ... 7 1.1 Aim ... 7 1.2 Objectives ... 7 1.3 Prerequisites ... 7 1.4 Course Structure... 7

1.5 Using this guide ... 7

2 HVAC Design Features... 9

3 Getting started ... 10

3.1 Entering a Design Session (Exercise begins)... 10

4 Learning about the PDMS database hierarchy ... 11

4.1 How PDMS stores design data. ... 11

5 Routing a sequence of HVAC Components ... 12

5.1 HVAC Components representation in the catalogue ... 12

5.1.1 HVAC physical shape ... 12

5.1.2 HVAC variables ... 12

5.2 Setting HVAC defaults... 13

5.2.1 Setting a default HVAC specification ... 13

5.2.2 Choosing the HVAC form format... 13

5.2.3 Customising HVAC forms ... 14

5.3 Creating HVAC Administrative elements ... 15

5.3.1 Creating a HVAC System element... 15

5.3.2 Creating an HVAC Branch element ... 16

5.4 Creating HVAC Components ... 17

5.4.1 Creating a Fire Damper... 20

5.4.2 Moving the Fire Damper... 21

5.4.3 Creating a composite component ... 22

5.5 Adding more HVAC components to your Ductwork ... 23

5.5.1 Creating a rectangular radiused bend... 23

5.5.2 Repositioning the rectangular radiused bend ... 23

5.5.3 Creating a rectangular mitred offset... 23

5.5.4 Creating a second rectangular radiused bend ... 24

5.5.5 Adding a circular section silencer... 25

5.5.6 Adding a three-way component and terminating the branch ... 26

5.5.7 Defining the branch tail ... 29

6 Adding to the HVAC Model ... 30

6.1 The Grid / Tiling utility ... 30

6.2 Creating side branches ... 32

7 HVAC Splitting ... 39

7.1 Overview ... 39

7.2 The Split HVAC Form... 40

7.2.1 Branches to Split ... 40

7.2.2 Split Markers ... 41

7.2.3 Split ... 42

8 Completing the Design... 45

8.1 Filling ductwork gaps automatically ... 45

8.2 Adding Stiffening Flanges ... 47

8.3 Automatic item numbering and naming ... 48

8.4 Finishing off design details ... 48

8.4.1 Modifying joint types... 49

8.4.2 Inserting an access panel ... 49

8.5 Changing the view representation ... 50

9 Checking and Outputting Design Data ... 51

9.1 Querying data settings ... 51

9.2 Checking for design data inconsistencies... 52

9.3 Data check functions ... 52

9.4 Data Checker Utility ... 53

9.4.1 Insulation Check... 53

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9.5 Generating a data output report ... 57

9.5.1 Generating a tabulated data report ... 57

10 HVAC Items System Attribute ... 59

10.1 Creating / Modifying System Hierarchy ... 59

11 HVAC Spooling ... 61

11.1 Generating HVAC Spools using the HVAC Spool Manager ... 61

11.2 HVAC Spool Verification ... 62

11.3 Modifying an HVAC Spool... 62

12 HVAC Sketches ... 64

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1 Introduction

1.1 Aim

During the course participants will learn the basic functions required to design, create and modify HVAC elements, and HVAC reporting.

1.2 Objectives

ƒ To have a clear understanding of the basic features of AVEVA Plant HVAC Design.

ƒ To familiarise users with the screen layout and the workings of the user interface.

ƒ To create and manipulate HVAC administrative elements

ƒ To discover how to create a sequence of HVAC components

ƒ To understand how to modify existing HVAC components.

ƒ To understand how to use the Grid / Tiling Utility.

ƒ To be able to make Data Consistency checks

ƒ To discover how to Split HVAC elements and to generate HVAC spools.

ƒ To be able create HVAC sketches.

1.3 Prerequisites

Trainees should have attended the AVEVA Plant PDMS Foundations course and be familiar with Microsoft Windows

1.4 Course Structure

Training will consist of oral and visual presentations, demonstrations and set exercises. Each workstation will have a training project, populated with model objects. This will be used by the trainees to practice their methods, and complete the set exercises.

1.5 Using this guide

Certain text styles are used to indicate special situations throughout this document, here is a summary; Menu pull downs and button press actions. Are indicated by bold dark turquoise text.

Information the user has to Key-in will be in bold red text. Annotation for trainees benefit

L

Additional information

Refer to other documentation

System prompts should be bold and italic in inverted commas i.e. 'Choose function' Example files or inputs will be in the courier new font, colours and styles used as before.

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2 HVAC Design Features

AVEVA Plant HVAC has been designed by HVAC Engineers for HVAC Engineers. The HVAC application offers the following key benefits.

ƒ The HVAC Designer application lets you build up and detail complex ducting networks simply by selecting components from standard catalogues. By using standard default settings, a

conceptual layout can be created and analysed rapidly, leaving the design details to a later post-approval stage.

ƒ The application provides facilities form creating rectangular, circular and oval cross-sectional items. Individual design components can be selected from over 100 parametric catalogue items covering all likely requirements, including a range of auxiliary items such as stiffening frames, access panels, splitter plates etc., all of which will be accurately detailed in the design model. The catalogue also includes a range of inline plant items such as centrifugal and axial fans, air handling units, silencers, dampers etc. each ready for insertion into the design model in a single operation.

ƒ User-definable detailing specifications, such as those for construction materials, ductwork gauge, flange dimensions etc., define precise manufacturing requirements. User-definable default settings ensure compliance with company standards and a high level of design consistency throughout the project.

ƒ Accurate geometric representation of all design items ensure reliable clash checking during the design process, leading to good space management and the early elimination of positional errors.

ƒ Explicitly positioned design components are interconnected automatically with implied ductwork as the design of the ductwork sequence is built up. An auto filling facility is provided which can then calculate the optimum use of standard ducting straights to complete the material take-off for the entire network.

ƒ Several design aids are incorporated, including a facility for creating horizontal grids which can be used to position ceiling tiles. This can greatly aid the layout of building services in an architectural environment.

ƒ HVAC elements may be named in accordance with a predefined set of rules, so that their positions in the database hierarchy are always obvious without the user having to enter specific texts during the design process.

ƒ The applications user interface can be tailored readily to suit the level of experience of any individual user. In particular, graphical illustrations of all catalogue items can be displayed if required to simplify component selection and dimensioning.

ƒ The user can carry out multi-disciplinary clash checks at any stage of the design, thus avoiding spatial conflicts within the overall model which could be expensive to rectify at the construction stage. This is particularly important where different features of the design model are under the control of different designers.

ƒ At any stage of the design process, the user can create reports listing specified data from the current database. You can specify a standard report template, so you can derive lists of commonly required information very quickly, or you can design a one-off report format to suit special needs. The resultant output, which can include data from any design discipline, sorted in any way you require, can be either displayed on your screen or sent to a file for storage and / or for printing.

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3 Getting started

3.1 Entering a Design Session (Exercise begins)

1. To start AVEVA Plant, Select AVEVA > PDMS 12.0 > Run PDMS

2. Enter the name of the project: SAM

3. Enter the Username: HVAC

4. Enter the Password: HVAC

5. Enter the MDB: HVAC

6. Select the module required: DESIGN

When all the necessary details have been entered the Login form appears as shown.

Click OK

When PDMS has been loaded, a default screen layout will be displayed

7. Check that the HVAC application is running. In the Title Bar of the main display, the application running will be shown. If the HVAC application is not running , then select Design > HVAC Designer

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4 Learning about the PDMS database hierarchy

Although this guide is about the design of HVAC ducting networks, in practice you will usually route your ductwork with reference to predefined design items such as a frameworks, floors and ceilings. You will therefore learn how these other items are defined in PDMS as well as learning how to route sequences of HVAC components and ducting within them.

4.1 How PDMS stores design data.

All PDMS data is stored in the form of a hierarchy. A PDMS design database has:

ƒ A top level, World (Usually represented by the symbolic name /*)

ƒ Two principle administrative sublevels, Site and Zone

The names used to identify database levels below Zone depend on the specific engineering discipline for which the data is used. For HVAC design data, the lower administrative levels (and their PDMS

abbreviations) are:

ƒ HVAC (HVAC)

ƒ Branch (BRAN)

Each HVAC element can represent any position of the overall ducting network.

Each branch within a HVAC element represents a single sequence of components running between two, and only two points.

ƒ Branch Head

ƒ Branch Tail

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5 Routing a sequence of HVAC Components

In this chapter you will learn:

ƒ More about how the design data is stored and accessed in PDMS

ƒ How to route a HVAC network

ƒ How to position a selection of HVAC components within the ducting runs

5.1 HVAC Components representation in the catalogue

Each HVAC component is represented in the PDMS catalogue by the following types of data:

ƒ Physical shape

ƒ Parameters

5.1.1 HVAC physical shape

The Physical shape of a component is defined by a set of geometric primitives, so that a component can be manipulated and linked to adjacent HVAC items, all principle points needed to define the component position orientation and connectivity are identified by uniquely numbered tags. These tags, which have both position and direction, are called P-points:

ƒ Each P-point is identified by a number of the format P0. P1, P2 etc.

ƒ P0 always represents the components origin position.

The principle inlet and outlet points are also identified as P-Arrive (PA) and P-Leave (PL). P1 is the same as P-Arrive, and P2 is the same as P-Leave. The reason for this is that the logical flow statement is not true for HVAC (only piping flow).

5.1.2 HVAC variables

The setting of all variables needed to distinguish a component from others with the same geometry and P-point sets are defined by parameters. The values of these are defined to suit the specific design

requirements.

For example, a rectangular three way component (or branch connector) might be represented in the PDMS catalogue as follows:

ƒ The two curved duct sections form the component geometry set

ƒ The four P-points form its point set

ƒ P-point, P3, enables you to control the direction of the branch connection arm when you incorporate the component into your design.

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The dimensions of the component and other constructional details are represented in the catalogue by

parameters whose values are set to suit the design requirements.

5.2 Setting HVAC defaults

The following defaults will need to be set for the users to complete the exercises.

ƒ A default detailing specification

ƒ The format of the HVAC form

ƒ Customised HVAC forms.

5.2.1 Setting a default HVAC specification

The constructional detail of components that the user selects from the HVAC catalogue is determined by the default specification, which is shown on the HVAC application menu bar. The default specification is

automatically set to TUTORIAL. The current HVAC specification is displayed in the HVAC Design toolbar

The TUTORIAL specification gives access to a range of catalogue components that are suitable for use with this exercise. Although you can, select a different specification for each HVAC branch, you will use the same specification throughout this design exercise.

Exercise continues

8. Select the specification Tutorial from the HVAC Designer toolbar

5.2.2 Choosing the HVAC form format

All the principle functions for creating, positioning, orientating and connecting HVAC elements are available from within a single form, the Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning (HVAC) form.

The HVAC form has two display formats:

ƒ The brief from, the default, uses drop-down lists to show the elements available for selection when you are creating a design

ƒ The full form uses scrollable lists to show the elements available for selection, and also offers more complex positioning options.

It is preferable to use the full form whilst learning about PDMS. This guide uses examples of the full form.

Exercise continues

9. Display the HVAC form by selecting Create > HVAC

ƒ The HVAC form is displayed in Brief format

To use the full form move the mouse over the form, now press the right mouse button and select Use Full Form

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The full form will be displayed as shown above. The style of form can also be set by selecting:

Settings>Ductwork defaults, the HVAC Defaults form is displayed as shown

By selecting Style> Use Full Form, the HVAC form will be displayed as shown above. The training manual uses the brief form.

5.2.3 Customising HVAC forms

The appearance and behaviour of the forms for creating and modifying HVAC components can be customised. This enables you to modify forms to suit your preferences, or the type of design work you are doing.

You will apply settings that provide you with the support you need as you learn about the HVAC application

Exercise continues

10. Select Style>Style Options from the HVAC Defaults to display the HVAC Form Style window. Alternatively, use the right mouse button whilst hovering over the HVAC creation form. For the training toggle the options as shown:

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Show Local Views This displays a small 3D graphical view showing the current component in its design context.

Local Views Shade This shows local views in colour shaded as opposed to wire line representation

OK / Cancel Forms This gives component create and modify forms Apply and Dismiss buttons instead of Ok and Cancel buttons, so that they remain available for repeated use until dismissed explicitly.

Show Pixmaps This automatically displays diagrams showing components geometries to help you select items from the catalogue.

Show Forms This displays the Create / Modify form automatically when you add a new component to the design, so that you can adjust the default dimensions and / or orientation as required.

Exercise continues

11. Drag the zone /HVAC-BUILDING into the graphical view and remove the roof from the display

5.3 Creating HVAC Administrative elements

You are now ready to create administrative elements which govern the position of individual HVAC components within the database hierarchy. The first elements are:

ƒ A HVAC system element

ƒ A HVAC Branch Element (the branch head)

5.3.1 Creating a HVAC System element Exercise continues

12. Make sure that the current element is ZONE /HVACZONE

13. In the HVAC form, from categories select PDMS Branches and from the available types, select

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14. In the displayed Create HVAC form, enter ‘HTESTHVAC’ in the HVAC Name text box

15. Click OK to create the element.

5.3.2 Creating an HVAC Branch element

There are two types of HVAC branch element

ƒ Main branch

ƒ Side branch

These differ only in the way they are added to the design:

ƒ A main branch requires you to position and orientate its head explicitly

ƒ A side branch takes its head position and orientation from a branch connection point P3 on an existing three way component.

The first HVAC branch element will be a main branch element, the branch head.

Exercise continues

16. From the HVAC form, with categories still set to

PDMS Branches, select Main Branch Element from the Available Types

17. In the displayed HVAC main Branch Element form:

ƒ Enter Branch Name: ‘/HTESTB1’

ƒ Set Branch Head Shape to RECT (rectangular)

ƒ Set the Head Direction to ‘N’ (this is the direction looking along the ductwork run from the head position towards the first component).

ƒ Set the Duct width AA to ‘1000’.

ƒ Set the Duct Depth AB to ‘500’.

ƒ Set the insulation thickness to 50mm (this adds 50mm of insulation automatically to each surface of all components and ducting owned by the branch).

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Your last selection, ID Design PPoint, enables you to specify the position of the Branch Head by picking a p-point. You will pick the p-point at the centre of the hole on the front wall of the building

18. Leave the HVAC Main Branch Element form as it is, and go to the 3D graphical view

19. In the 3D graphical view tool bar, click , and zoom in on the hole in the front wall of the building 20. Select Settings>Graphics from the Main Tool bar and the Graphics settings form will be displayed

ƒ Select the Plines & PPoints Tab

ƒ Toggle the Display and Numbers for PPoints to be displayed

ƒ Click Apply

The ppoints of all the elements will be displayed

ƒ Select the Representation Tab

ƒ Toggle the Holes Drawn

ƒ Click OK

The holes (negative volumes) of all the elements will be displayed

21. Now go back to the HVAC Main Branch Element form, and click OK

A prompt is displayed ‘Identify Design Ppoint’

22. Hold down the left mouse button and move the cursor of the ppoint at the centre of the hole, and release the mouse button over it.

The Branch head is now defined

23. On the Graphics settings form toggle PPoints display and numbers to remove the ppoints from the display and click OK.

5.4 Creating HVAC Components

Starting at the branch head, you will now build up you HVAC design. You will add individual components sequentially, position and orientate each of these as you proceed.

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Exercise continues

24. The first component required is a rectangular straight, to be aligned with the hole in the southernmost wall:

25. In the HVAC form, Select Rectangular from the categories list

26. In the displayed HVAC Rectangular Ductwork form, click on the Straight

This displays the Rectangular Straight form, with data fields for all the parameters to define the component. The initial data settings on the component definition forms are determined by a set of default values.

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27. To see what the parameters mean in terms of the component geometry, click the Picture button on

the form. This displays the HVAC Component form containing a dimensioned and annotated diagram showing how the component is defined in the catalogue.

Compare the data categories on the Rectangular Straight form with the diagram, to see how these are related.

There is a full set of component geometry diagrams in the appendices of HVAC Design Using AVEVA Plant Volume 2

28. Close the HVAC Component form by selecting Control>Close

29. Click Ok on the Rectangular Straight form to accept the default parameters

The rectangular straight is created and positioned with its p-arrive at the branch head, so that it is inside the building. (as shown in the next diagram)

To move the straight to the required position, it will need to be moved south 5000mm and down 96mm.

30. Go to the POSITION: - area on the HVAC form. In the text box next to the move button, enter the displacement; ‘S5000D96’

31. The straight is moved as soon as you press the Return button to confirm the data

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32. The position of the straight can be checked by selecting Query>Position>Origin from the main bar

menu. The position displayed in the HVAC Command Output window, is:

33. To reposition the branch head so that it coincides with the PA of the straight, go to the drop down lists in the bottom row of the CONNECT:- area on the HVAC form:

ƒ Set HVAC Branch to Head

ƒ Set to First Member

This connects and therefore repositions the head of the current branch to PA of the first component. The branch head could have been positioned here when it was first created, but this would have required the explicit coordinates to be calculated. It is usually easier, to position a new item relative to an existing design point and then move it later.

5.4.1 Creating a Fire Damper

The next step in the construction of you HVAC design is to create a fire damper at the position where the ducting will pass through the hole in the wall.

Exercise continues

34. The last operation made the branch head the current element. Each new component is created immediately after the current component in the branch list order. So to create a component after the straight, you must navigate back to the straight. To do this, select the straight component in the 3D graphical view.

35. In the HVAC form,

ƒ from categories, select Inline Plant Equipment from the available types,

ƒ from the displayed HVAC Inline Plant Equipment form, select

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36. On the Rectangular Fire Damper form, enter the name FD1 and

leave all the other parameters the same, then click OK

5.4.2 Moving the Fire Damper

The fire damper is automatically positioned so that its PA is coincident with the PL of the preceding straight. It will now be moved so that it fits within the wall.

Exercise continues

37. In the POSITION: - area of the HVAC form, set Through to ID Element.

38. A prompt is displayed to Identify element, pick any part of the southernmost wall The fire damper is moved northward along its axis until it lies in the plane of the wall.

The gap between the straight and the fire damper is filled automatically by a length of implied ducting in the 3D graphical view. Note that implied ducting is not shown as an element in the Design Explorer

39. Change the 3D graphical view direction to Plan>North, so that the view appears similar to the diagrams shown here

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5.4.3 Creating a composite component

The HVAC components that have been created so far have each been represented by a single PDMS element. Some HVAC components, (composite components) are represented by more than one PDMS element.

You must be particularly careful that you are at the correct position in the Design Explorer when you refer to such a component. The next part of the exercise shows how the composite components are represented in the PDMS hierarchy.

Exercise continues

40. Use the HVAC form to create a Rectangular Square Bend

ƒ Select Rectangular from the categories on the HVAC

ƒ Select Square Bend form the displayed HVAC Rectangular Ductwork form On the displayed Rectangular Square Bend form

ƒ Set leave direction to ‘W’

ƒ Leave all other settings at their default 41. Click OK

42. A warning message is displayed stating the hierarchy has been affected by the creation of this component. Click OK on the warning message

43. The bend is created as shown:

The Design Explorer shows two new elements

ƒ BEND 1 represents the bend ducting

ƒ SPLR 1 represents the set of air deflectors within the bend (created because a square bend requires turning vanes) The message displayed when creating this component was a warning that this component comprises more than one PDMS element.

If you navigate to the square bend simply by picking it with the cursor, you are almost certain to elect the element representing the outer ducting. The deflector set (air turns) that also form part of the component, follows the bend in branch order (as viewed in the Design Explorer). When creating an element after the bend, you must ensure that the deflectors are the current element.

To view the deflectors inside the bend, switch the 3D graphical view temporarily to wireline mode. (Press F8 on the keyboard to toggle between colour shaded and wireline views)

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5.5 Adding more HVAC components to your Ductwork 5.5.1 Creating a rectangular radiused bend

Exercise continues

44. Using the design explorer, make sure that the deflector set of the rectangular square bend (SPLR 1) is the current element

45. Use the HVAC form to create a rectangular radiused bend;

ƒ Select Rectangular from the categories on the HVAC

ƒ Select Radius Bend form the displayed HVAC Rectangular Ductwork form On the displayed Rectangular Radiused Bend form

ƒ Set the inside radius to 100

ƒ Set leave direction to N

ƒ All the other defaults remain the same. 46. Click OK

5.5.2 Repositioning the rectangular radiused bend

The new bend needs to be positioned in the plane of the westernmost wall

Exercise continues

47. Position the new bend in the plane of the westernmost wall by using POSITION: - Through ID Element on the HVAC form. A prompt will be displayed Identify element. Pick the beam above the westernmost wall 48. Now move the bend to fit just inside the wall, and downwards so that the

ducting leaving it passes under the beam across the building roof. Go to the POSITION: - area on the HVAC form. In the text box next to the move button, enter the displacement; ‘E800D150’

5.5.3 Creating a rectangular mitred offset

Because the radiused bend has been moved downwards, its inlet (PA) is not vertically aligned with the outlet (PL) of the preceding component. This is indicated in the 3D graphical view by a broken line between the components, rather than implied ducting. To correct this problem, a mitred offset section will be inserted between the two components.

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Exercise continues

49. Remember that a new component is always added immediately after the current element, so navigate back to the deflector set (SPLR1) of the square bend

50. Create a Rectangular mitred offset

ƒ Select Rectangular from the categories on the HVAC

ƒ Select Mitred Offset form the displayed HVAC Rectangular Ductwork form

51. PDMS has a powerful facility that can calculate the length and the amount of offset needed to fit the new component automatically into the available space. Click the Fit button on the Rectangular Mitred Offset form. The calculated data is entered into the parameter data fields, then click OK

5.5.4 Creating a second rectangular radiused bend Exercise continues

52. Navigate back to the last component in the branch, the rectangular radiused bend.

ƒ Select Rectangular from the categories on the HVAC

ƒ Select Radius Bend form the displayed HVAC Rectangular Ductwork form On the displayed Rectangular Radiused Bend form

ƒ Leave the inside radius as the default value (0.5 means 0.5 x duct width)

ƒ Set leave direction to E

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53. Position the bend in the plane of the northernmost wall by using POSITION:

- Through ID Element on the HVAC form. A prompt will be displayed

Identify element. Pick the beam above the northernmost wall

54. Move the bend South by 1500mm (use Move by: S1500)

5.5.5 Adding a circular section silencer

To include a circular section silencer in your rectangular ductwork, you need a transformation piece either side of the silencer.

Exercise continues

55. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories select Transformations,

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Shape Transformation Items form, select Square to Round

ƒ In the displayed Square to Round Transformation form set the duct diameter to 750

ƒ Click OK

56. Position the transformation piece 300mm after the first beam reached in the branch creation direction.

Select Position>Move>clearance, the following form will be displayed

ƒ Set P1 as the reference point in the element,

ƒ Set the direction as E

ƒ Set the clearance to 300,

ƒ Select Behind

ƒ Select ID Cursor

ƒ Click Apply.

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57. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From Categories, select Inline Plant Equipment

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Inline Plant Equipment form select

Circular Silencer

ƒ In the displayed Circular form name the component SILE1

ƒ Set the Outer Diameter to 950

ƒ Click OK

Another transformation piece will be added to revert back to the rectangular ducting. However, instead of specifying this from first principles a copy will be created of the first transformation piece and reversed to achieve the desired round to square result.

58. On the HVAC form, select the Create Copy ID button.

ƒ A prompt will be displayed Identify element

ƒ Pick the square to round transformation that you want to copy.

ƒ On the displayed Square to Round Transformation form,

ƒ Set the Flip Circ / Rect option to Yes

ƒ Click Apply.

ƒ Click Dismiss

5.5.6 Adding a three-way component and terminating the branch

A three-way component enables you to connect one branch to another. You will need a three-way component so that you can connect a side branch into your existing main branch later in the exercise.

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Exercise continues

To create a three-way component 59. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From Categories, select Rectangular

ƒ From the HVAC Rectangular ductwork form select Square Threeway

ƒ Set Duct Width LA to 800

ƒ Set Second Width to 800

ƒ Set Leave Direction to S

ƒ ClickOK

A gap of 1500mm is required between the three-way component and the preceding component. The

Distance operation on the HVAC form enables you to do this by allowing you to specify the gap between the PL of one component and the PA of the next, thereby avoiding the need for you to calculate the movement required to reposition it.

60. Move the threeway a distance of 1500

61. To check that the gap is correct, navigate back to the round to square transformation and select

Query > Gap to next from the main menu bar

The value of the gap is displayed in the HVAC Command Output window 62. Navigate back to the square threeway component

63. Use the HVAC form to create a rectangular radiused bend;

ƒ Select Rectangular from the categories on the HVAC

ƒ Select Radius Bend form the displayed HVAC Rectangular Ductwork form On the displayed Rectangular Radiused Bend form

ƒ Set leave direction to E

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64. Click OK

65. In the 3D graphical view tool bar, click , and zoom in on the hole in the easternmost wall of the building

66. Select Settings>Graphics from the Main Tool bar and the Graphics settings form will be displayed

ƒ Select the Plines & PPoints Tab

ƒ Toggle the Display and Numbers for PPoints to be displayed

ƒ Click Apply

The ppoints of all the components will be displayed

67. Align the bend with the hole in the easternmost wall

ƒ Using the Through ID P-Point option from the HVAC form

ƒ A prompt will be displayed Identify Design ppoint

68. Hold down the left mouse button and move the cursor over the ppoint at the centre of the hole, and release the mouse button.

69. On the Graphics settings form toggle PPoints display and numbers to remove the ppoints from the display

70. Click OK

71. In the HVAC form,

ƒ From categories, select Inline Plant Equipment from the available types,

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Inline Plant Equipment form, select Rectangular fire Damper

72. On the displayed Rectangular Fire Damper form

ƒ Enter the name FD2

ƒ Leave all the other parameters as the default values

ƒ Click OK

73. Select Position>Move>Clearance, the following form will be displayed

74. Position the fire damper through the hole in the easternmost wall

ƒ Set P1 as the reference point in the element,

ƒ Set the direction as E

ƒ Set the clearance to 0

ƒ Select Behind

ƒ Select ID Cursor

ƒ Click Apply.

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5.5.7 Defining the branch tail

The definition of the main branch can be completed by defining the branch tail

Exercise continues

75. Connect the Branch tail to the fire damper (the last member of the branch)

ƒ Select Tail from the HVAC Connect menu at the foot of the HVAC form

ƒ Select Last member

The final configuration is as displayed below

76. Savework

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6 Adding to the HVAC Model

In the last chapter you created a sequence of components to form the main branch of your HVAC ductwork. In this chapter you will.

ƒ Learn how to position tiles using a working grid

ƒ Extend your model by adding some side branches.

6.1 The Grid / Tiling utility

You begin by using some facilities for setting out a working grid and positioning ceiling tiles within it, so that you can then use these tiles as references for positioning HVAC grilles.

With reference to your existing design model, the next part of the HVAC ducting network which you are going to design will feed two ceiling grilles above the small room in the northeast corner of the building. In order to position these grilles, you will use a facility which lets you set out a horizontal grid and a ceiling tile layout based on a specified datum point.

There are three stages to tiling:

Specify a setting out point (SOP) to represent the datum from which grid line positions are to be calculated.

Create grid lines at specified intervals, referenced from the SOP in a horizontal plane. Add tiles at specified positions in the plane of the grid.

Exercise continues

77. Navigate to the zone HVAC-BUILDING. The grid / tiles are created below this hierarchic level. 78. From the main menu bar, select Utilities > HVAC Tiles / Grid > Layout > Setting Out Points. This

displays the HVAC Grid Setting Out Point form.

ƒ Enter the S.O.P. Name: HTESTSOP1

ƒ Enter the Setting Out Point Height: 2700 (the elevation of the ceiling in which you will eventually position the grilles.).

ƒ The view direction of the displayed elements must a plan view

ƒ Click OK

A prompt is displayed Use the 2D cursor to Position a Datum. You want to position the SOP at the exact centre of the room’s ceiling. Rather than trying to pick this point precisely, you will pick a random point in the ceiling plane as the SOP, and then move this point to the exact position required.

79. Pick a point

80. To move this point to the centre of the room, select Position>Explicitly (AT) from the main menu. Enter the coordinates E15000 N9000 U2700 on the Explicit position form (ignore the positioning control form)

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The SOP appears in the 3D graphical view as a small sphere, and is represented by a DISH element in the PDMS hierarchy

81. Next define a grid in the plane of the ceiling (a horizontal reference grid) through the SOP datum, with the grid lines spaced out from the SOP in both directions.

82. Select Utilities > HVAC Tiles / Grid Layout > Grid from SOP,

This displays the HVAC Layout Grid from SOP form Leave the settings as the default values of 600 83. Click OK.

ƒ If the SOP is not the current element a prompt will be displayed Identify the Grid S.O.P. Identify the SOP in the graphical view. If the SOP is the current element this prompt will not be displayed

Now define the horizontal rectangular area which represents the grid boundaries.

84. A prompt will be displayed Position the Southwest Grid Extent. Pick the intersection of the beams at the southwest corner of the room.

85. Another prompt will be displayed Position the Northeast Grid Extent. Pick the intersection of the beams at the northeast corner of the room.

Since the room size is 6000mm x 6000mm, the 600 mm grid spacing will give 10 grid squares in each direction within the ceiling area.

To complete this part of the exercise, we will create two grid tiles in the ceiling grid where the HVAC grilles are to be installed.

86. Select Utilities > HVAC Tiles / Grid Layout > Apply Tiles in Grid,

This displays the HVAC Apply Tiles and Grid Form, leave the default settings

87. Click OK

88. A prompt is displayed Identify the Grid S.O.P. Pick the SOP to confirm your intentions.

89. A prompt will be displayed Position the tile centre point (2D cursor)

90. Pick the grid squares shown in the diagram below (the picked points snap to the nearest half tile, so you don’t have to be too precise.). Then press the Esc key on the key board to indicate that you have finished adding tiles.

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6.2 Creating side branches

Next we are going to create a side branch which runs from a start point on the main branch and which passes through the tile positions. Then two more side branches will be added, each running from a point on the first side branch to the tile positions. (remember that a separate branch is required for each length of ducting between two points)

First a suitable connector must be inserted into the main branch so there is a point to which the side branch can be connected.

Exercise continues

91. Navigate to the existing three way item. Another branch connector will be inserted immediately after it in branch sequence.

92. Use the HVAC form to create the next component

ƒ From Categories, select Branch Connectors

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Branch Connectors form select Flat Oval ‘A Plane Boot’ Branch

In the displayed Oval ‘A’ Boot Brco form

ƒ Set Boot Width to 610

ƒ Set Boot Depth to 152

ƒ Set B Offset to 100

ƒ Set Boot Direction to E 93. Click OK

The oval ducting is to pass along the centreline of the ceiling, the boot must be positioned so that the outlet is aligned with the SOP datum at the ceiling centre.

(using Through ID Element on the HVAC form) 94. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From Categories, select PDMS Branches

ƒ From Available Types. Select Side Branch (off main)

95. From the HVAC Side Branch form:

ƒ Set Branch Name to HTESTB1.1

ƒ Set Insulation Thickness to 50mm

ƒ Leave specification set to the current default

ƒ Set Connect Head to Branch Connector

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96. A prompt will be displayed Identify Branch Connector. Pick the branch connector

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Any part of the component can be picked, the new branch head will always be connected to the P3

point

97. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories, select Flat Oval

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Flat Oval Ductwork form select Straight

98. From the displayed Oval Straight form

ƒ Set the Width Direction to N 99. Click OK

Two circular boot connectors are now going to be created, from which to route outlets to the two tile positions. These will be created and positioned before the straight is created to which they connect, so that the boots can be positioned relative to the tiles and the length of straight can be adjusted to suit the boot positions.

100. Make the oval straight the current element 101. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From Categories, select Branch Connectors

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Branch Connectors form select Circular Boot Branch

In the displayed Boot Brconnector form

ƒ Set Boot Diameter to 150

ƒ Set Inner Extension to 76

ƒ Set Dist from Leave to 100

ƒ Leave Boot Direction set to N

The boot is positioned 100mm back from the PL of the straight on which it is mounted (which is only implied at this stage)

102. Move the boot so that it is aligned through the northernmost tile shown in the diagram above using Position Through ID Element from the HVAC form

103. Create a second circular boot

ƒ From Categories, select Branch Connectors

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Branch Connectors form select Circular Boot Branch

In the displayed Boot Brconnector form

ƒ Set Boot Diameter to 150

ƒ Set Inner Extension to 76

ƒ Set Dist from Leave to 700

ƒ Set Boot Direction to S

The Dist from Leave dimension positions the boot 700mm back from the PL of the previous boot. Since the previous boot was set back 100mm from the PL, the difference between the boot positions corresponds to the 600mm offset between the tile positions. The result is as shown

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The implied ducting between the circular boots can now be replaced with a straight component.

Because the boots are sub components, navigate back to the existing straight in this side branch. 104. Navigate back two positions (to STRT1 in HTESTB1.1) in the Design Explorer

105. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories, select Flat Oval

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Flat Oval Ductwork form select Straight

ƒ Click the FIT button to achieve the required length between the PL of the first straight and the PL of the circular boot.

ƒ Click OK

The calculated length is 2375mm

106. To complete this first side branch, add a cap to the closed end of the last straight; navigate to the last component of HTESTB1.1 in the Design Explorer (the southernmost circular boot) and create a Flat Oval Cap End

107. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories, select Flat Oval

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Flat Oval Ductwork form select Cap End

ƒ Click OK on the displayed Flat Oval Cap End form

108. Connect the HVAC branch Tail to the Last Member of the branch (the cap).

ƒ Select Tail from the HVAC Connect menu at the foot of the HVAC form

ƒ Select Last member

The second side branch will run from the northernmost circular boot to a grille in the adjacent tile. 109. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From Categories, select PDMS Branches

ƒ From Available Types. Select Side Branch (off main)

110. From the HVAC Side Branch form:

ƒ Set Branch Name to HTESTB1.1.1

ƒ Set Insulation Thickness to 50mm

ƒ Leave specification set to the current default

ƒ Set Connect Head to Branch Connector

ƒ Click OK.

111. A prompt will be displayed Identify Branch Connector. Pick the branch connector

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Any part of the component can be picked, the new branch head will always be connected to the P3

point

112. Create a Circular Straight with Length set to 750 113. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories, select Circular

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Circular Ductwork form select Straight

114. From the displayed Circular Straight form

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ƒ To see what types of leave joint are available, click the Choose button next to the Leajoint field. from the resulting Choose Joint form, select Male Socket & Spigot Joint

ƒ Click OK on the Choose Joint form The Leajoint field is updated to show MALE.

ƒ Click OK on the Circular Straight form

115. Create a Circular Internal Damper with default settings. The Circular Internal Damper is created 150mm from the leave end of the straight

116. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories, select Circular

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Circular Ductwork form, select Internal Damper

ƒ Leave the default values

ƒ Click OK

117. Create a Circular Flexible Bend 118. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories, select Circular

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Circular Ductwork form, select Flexible Bend

ƒ Set the Leave Direction to D

ƒ Click OK

Position the bend so that it is aligned through the appropriate tile. (the bend dimensions will be adjusted later)

119. Move the flexible bend so that it is aligned through the northernmost tile using Position Through ID Element from the HVAC form

120. Use the HVAC form to create a circular to rectangular spigot box

ƒ From Categories, select Transformations

ƒ From the displayed HVAC shape transformation items, select Spigot box

In the displayed Spigot Box form

ƒ Set Duct width LA = 300

ƒ Set Duct Depth LB = 300

ƒ Set Rectangular Box Height = 75

ƒ Set Circ Extension = 50

ƒ Set Circ Jnt = MALE

ƒ Click OK

121. Use the HVAC form to create a Rectangular Grille in line

ƒ From Categories, select Inline Plant Equipment

ƒ From the displayed HVAC Inline Plant Equipment form, select Rectangular grille in Line

In the displayed In line grille form

ƒ Set Name = GRIL1

ƒ Set End width = 400

ƒ Set End depth = 400

ƒ Set Grille Length = 50

ƒ Set ‘A’ Extension = 0

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The grille is to fit within the tile volume.

122. In the HVAC form:

ƒ Set the Position At option to ID Element

ƒ A prompt will be displayed Identify Element,

ƒ Pick the tile, the origin of the grille will be positioned at the origin of the tile.

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At this stage the PL of the spigot box and the PA of the grille have become misaligned, so you see a

broken line between them rather than a length of implied ducting.

Having positioned the grille correctly, go back along the current side branch and adjust the other components to fit, starting with the spigot box, which will be positioned directly on top of the grille.

123. Navigate to the spigot box (PLEN 1 in the Design Explorer) 124. Select Position At Next from the HVAC form positioning options

125. Navigate to the flexible bend and from the HVAC form Select Modify CE so that you can adjust the dimensions of the flexible bend so that it fits correctly between the internal damper (at its PA) and the spigot box (at its PL).

126. Click the Fit button on the displayed circular Flexible Bend form to recalculate the dimensions necessary for a correct fit.

127. Click Apply and then Click Dismiss

128. Complete the definition of the side branch by connecting the tail to the grille The side branch HTESTB1.1.1 is now as shown in the diagram below

Use the method given above to create a similar side branch, named HTESTB1.1.2 from the second circular boot to a grille (GRIL2) positioned in the other tile. (Remember to navigate up to the level of the branch HTESTB1.1 first)

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The overall layout of the HVAC ducting in the vicinity of the room will be as shown in the diagram below

129. The network will now be completed by connecting an angled outlet grille to the side arm of the square three way component (bottom left in the preceding view). A fourth side branch must be created.

130. Navigate to the three way component 131. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From Categories, select PDMS Branches

ƒ From Available Types. Select Side Branch (off main)

132. From the HVAC Side Branch form:

ƒ Set Branch Name to HTESTB1.2

ƒ Set Insulation Thickness to 50mm

ƒ Leave specification set to the current default

ƒ Set Connect Head to Threeway Item

ƒ Click OK.

133. Create a Rectangular Radiused Bend 134. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories select Rectangular

ƒ From the displayed HVAC rectangular ductwork form select Radius bend

The bend is to turn in the B direction (click the Picture button for clarification). In the displayed radius bend form

ƒ Click the transpose width/depth button.

ƒ Set the Angle to 135

ƒ Set the Inside Radius to 100

ƒ Set the Leave Direction to D.

ƒ Click OK

135. Create a Rectangular Radiused Splitter which fits inside the bend (it is a sub component of the bend).

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136. In the HVAC form:

ƒ From categories, select Rectangular

ƒ From the displayed HVAC rectangular ductwork form select Radius splitter

in the displayed radius splitter form

ƒ Set Splitter Radius to 200

ƒ Click OK

Switch to wireline mode (Graphics>shaded or the F8 key) to view the splitter

137. Create a Rectangular Mesh End using default settings, to complete the branch. 138. In the HVAC form

ƒ From categories, select Rectangular

ƒ From the displayed HVAC rectangular ductwork form select Mesh End

ƒ Click OK

139. Connect the branch tail to the last member in the usual way. This side branch is now as shown in the diagram below

This completes the conceptual design of the basic HVAC network.

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7 HVAC Splitting

7.1 Overview

HVAC systems are created as a series of branches and components along the full length of the structure. When the HVAC route is well defined and stable, the HVAC Splitting utility allows the user to split the HVAC system at either logical breaks based on topographical features or at specific points along the HVAC route. The relevant workflow for HVAC is to define the whole route of the HVAC using key elements only i.e. bends, dampers reducers etc. and not filling the implied duct. The splitting can then be done while the implied duct is still present:

Auto-filling gaps can be done after splitting Split line

Split line

Original Split line

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7.2 The Split HVAC Form

To display the Split HVAC form, in Design - HVAC Designer Application select Modify > Split HVAC…

The Split HVAC form consists of three sections –

ƒ Branches to Split

ƒ Split Markers

ƒ Split Branches and Move elements into

7.2.1 Branches to Split

This section allows the user to define a list of HVAC branches to be split. It consists of a list pane with a popup menu of options, a drop-down list of options and an Add button. The drop-down list has the following options to be selected in conjunction with the Add button:

1. CE – Adds to the list the HVAC branch element if the CE (Current Element) is an HVAC branch, or adds the owning branch if the CE is an HVAC branch member, or adds all the HVAC branches if the CE is an HVAC main element

2. List – Adds all the HVAC branches from the active list 3. Graphical Pick – Prompts the user to pick an HVAC element using graphical pick and adds the owner branch to the list

4. Window Selection – Allows the user to add HVAC branches from the elements selected using Window selection in graphical window. Only HVAC branches in the selection are added to the list. The user will have to first do the window selection and then select this menu.

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The list pane, as well as having similar options as the four above, has the following additional options all

available from a right click popup menu:

ƒ Remove Selected – Removes selected elements from the list. Single or Multiple selection is possible

ƒ Remove All – Removes all the elements from the list

ƒ Highlight Selection – Toggle menu used to specify whether the selected branch in the list needs to be highlighted or not. Default option is toggle ON. Highlight colour is WHITE.

7.2.2 Split Markers

This section allows the user to define and modify a plane, at which to split the branches, and create and position split markers.

Plane definition

ƒ The Plane Size text box is used to set/modify the size of the plane.

ƒ The Fill toggle is used to set/modify the plane filling.

Define Plane using

The drop-down list has the following options in which a plane can be created:

ƒ DB Planar Element – PDMS Database element which can be translated into a plane, e.g., panel.

ƒ Ppoints – Standard ppoint

ƒ Pline – Standard pline

ƒ Reference Grid – Grid Section

ƒ Explicitly… - Allows the user to create a plane explicitly using graphical plane edit form Modify Plane

The drop-down list has the following two options to modify a defined plane:

ƒ Definition… – The system prompts the user to pick the plane to be modified. When a plane is picked the system displays the Modify Plane form for the user to the plane definition.

ƒ Position – Prompts the user to pick the plane to be modified and the new position of the plane.

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Create Marker

This button creates the split markers at the intersection points between the defined plane and the implied tubes of the HVAC branch elements that are added in the Branches to Split list

Reposition Marker

The drop-down list has the following two options,

ƒ Explicitly At...

ƒ Relatively By... each displaying a standard Position form to reposition the created split markers.

7.2.3 Split

This section allows the user to specify the hierarchy into which the split elements will be placed. It consists of the following options:

ƒ Current HVAC – Creates new branch for each split marker under the HVAC system where the branch to be split is located.

ƒ New HVAC – Creates a new HVAC system and a branch under it for each split marker.

ƒ Existing HVAC – Creates new branch under the HVAC system specified in the adjacent text. The existing HVAC system can be specified by typing the name in the text box, or by navigating to the HVAC system and typing ce (case insensitive) in the text box, or by copying and pasting the name of the HVAC system into the text box.

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Exercise continues

140. Split the HVAC element below as shown at the intersection of the roof beams and centreline of ductwork

141. Select Modify>Split HVAC from the main bar menu, the Split HVAC form will be displayed 142. Click on any element in the main branch and click the ADD

button on the Split HVAC form. The branch will be added to the Branches to Split

143. Set the Plane Size to 2000

144. Set the Define Plane using Ppoints

ƒ A prompt is displayed Pick a P-point that can be

translated into a plane

ƒ Identify the ppoint on the PL of the first radiused bend, and a plane is displayed at the PL point

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145. Set the Modify Plane to Definition

ƒ The position control form is displayed

ƒ Select Element and Intersect

ƒ A prompt is displayed Modify Plane (Intersection[1]) Snap

ƒ Identify the centre of the duct

ƒ A prompt is displayed Modify Plane (Intersection[2]) Snap

ƒ Identify the steel beam over the duct

ƒ Click OK on the Modify Plane form

The Plane has now been positioned at the intersection of the duct and the beam

146. click on the Create Marker button

ƒ An attachment is created in the HVAC branch at this point

Because the Current HVAC option is selected, the split will create a new branch in the current HVAC element

147. Click Apply and the split function is now complete

A new branch has been created, and the components have been included into this branch as required by the system. The branch can be renamed if required.

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8 Completing the Design

In this chapter we will look at some facilities for enhancing the basic HVAC design model. The main features described are.

ƒ Automatic replacement of implied ducting in gaps by catalogue straights.

ƒ Automatic addition of stiffening flanges to ductwork items.

ƒ Automatic item numbering of HVAC components.

8.1 Filling ductwork gaps automatically

When you created the main branch HTESTB1, you concentrated on specifying components with specific functions, such as bends, side connection points, silencers and dampers. Most of the gaps between these components were left undefined and were filled by length of implied ducting to complete the representation shown in the 3D view.

To enable the design to be prefabricated, it is necessary to specify the fixed lengths of ductwork (ductwork straights) required between these components, so that a full material take-off list can be generated. The HVAC application is able to calculate the optimum combination of standard and non-standard straights needed to fill each gap and then create the corresponding components in the design database

automatically.

Exercise continues

148. Navigate to the HVAC element HTESTHVAC

149. To identify what gaps exist in the branch, select Utilities > Autofill with Straights > Show Gaps

150. Click Apply on the displayed Highligh Implied Ductwork form

For each gap in the named branch, the scrollable list area of the form shows the:

ƒ Location (the preceding component)

ƒ Length

ƒ Calculated combination of straights to fill it

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151. Make sure you are still at HTESTHVAC, then select Utilities > Autofill With Straights > Fill Gaps

152. This displays the form Autofill with Straights (HVAC). 153. Click Apply

A list of all identified gaps is displayed and the specified straight lengths are created automatically to replace the implied ducting. The design explorer shows the new elements.

154. To ensure that the autofilling operation was carried out correctly, repeat steps 149 and 150. The message No gaps to Show confirms this. There is no need to dismiss the

form immediately because you still need to check that there are no gaps in any of the four side branches

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155. To do so, navigate to each in turn, click the CE button at the top of the Highlight Implied Ductwork

form, then click the Apply button. In each case you should see the No Gaps to Show message.

8.2 Adding Stiffening Flanges

PDMS provides a utility for calculating the optimum number and positions of stiffening flanges needed to support ductwork items. The configuration of the flanges is tailored to suit the component geometry in each case. You can then create and position such flanges automatically.

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Note that, in the branch hierarchy, they are treated as subcomponents of the straight.

Exercise continues

156. Add flanges to the ductwork in branch order, starting at the branch head; navigate to the first straight in the main branch (the southernmost straight) and make it the current element

157. Use the HVAC form to calculate the number of stiffeners required for this length of ducting

ƒ From Categories, select Rectangular

ƒ From the available types in the displayed HVAC rectangular ductwork form select Stiffener

The stiffening requirements are calculated, and displayed in the Rectangular stiffening form. PDMS has calculated that this component has a spec requirement of 5 stiffening flanges.

158. To create all 5 stiffening flanges, press the OK the Spec Requirement button, the flanges are created and positioned automatically.

159. Navigate to the next straight and apply the stiffening flanges. 160. Proceeding along the branch, add stiffeners in turn to the

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ƒ Mitred offset

ƒ Radiused bend

The stiffening flanges are configured to suit each different component shape

8.3 Automatic item numbering and naming

The item numbering facility automatically allocates sequential item numbers to all HVAC components and gives each item a name of the format /PREFIXnumber, where /PREFIX is a user definable string and number is the allocated number. Subcomponents (air deflectors, stiffening flanges, etc.) are numbered as decimalised subsets of their owning components.

Inline plant items, which are usually named, do not have their names changed.

Exercise continues

161. To autonumber all HVAC items in your current design model, navigate to the owning HVAC element, HTESTHVAC

162. Select Utilities > Automatic Itemising from the main menu. The HVAC Itemising form is displayed

ƒ Enter Naming Prefix HTEST/ITEM

ƒ Leave the Start Number set to 1,

ƒ Click Apply

The HVAC command Output window is displayed, listing all HVAC items and their allocated numbers. When you compare the entries in this itemising list with those in the Design Explorer, you can see that each item (except any inline component) is now named in the design explorer using the specified prefix

/HTEST/ITEM suffixed by the item number. For example, the straights in the main branch, and there stiffening flange subcomponents, appear as follows (the number like =16385/45612 etc. are internal database reference numbers, which you can ignore).

8.4 Finishing off design details

You can now complete the design details for the ductwork straights you have created to replace the implied ducting. To do this you will.

ƒ Modify joint types to suit the final design

Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects :