CASE STUDY. European Master in Law and Economics. With the support of the Erasmus Mundus programme of the European Union

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CASE

European Master in

Law and Economics

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CASE STUDY

European Master in Law and Economics

The programme

The European Master in Law and Economics (EMLE) is designed to provide students with advanced knowledge in Economic Analysis of Law: the use of economic methods to explain and assess the effects of law. A comparative approach is used to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of alternative legal rules from an economic perspective. The Consortium has nine members: the Erasmus University Rotterdam (the Co-ordinating institution in Nederland), Aix-Marseille University (France), Bologna (Italy), Ghent (Belgium), Haifa (Israel), Hamburg (Germany), Vienna (Austria), the Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research at Mumbai (India), and the Warsaw School of Economics (Poland).

Recruitment performance and ambition

EMLE recognizes that like other Erasmus Mundus (EM) programmes, the biggest challenge in recruitment is reaching out to as many students as possible worldwide and also attracting the very best. The coordination of the programme is run by the Erasmus University of Rotterdam, whereas its marketing activities are coordinated by Janina Satzer, the manager at the University of Hamburg Institute of Law and Economics.

When it first started, this EM programme used much more printed media to advertise itself. This has now shifted significantly to online marketing.

Marketing approach

EMLE believes that in order to recruit the best worldwide, one single marketing technique does not suffice. Instead, you need the perfect mix of techniques and tools to effectively advertise the programme to the very best. This proves even more difficult in the EM context because you need to adjust your marketing to what best works in the targeted countries. For instance, EMLE has found that in developing countries, the internet is important but print still plays a key role. In their experience, this is no longer the case in Europe, where internet is the main method of advertising. EMLE measures the success of its marketing strategy regularly through applicant feedback. Over the years, EMLE has found that there are regular trends but also variances year by year. Janina keeps on top of this and makes sure that each year she makes adjustments for the variances she notices in student feedback.

An increasingly important trend so far has been online marketing. This includes different online platforms where students search for MA programmes, websites of non-profit students associations in law and economics, Google AdWords and social media. EMLE is finding online marketing much more cost-effective than print. The programme still uses posters and flyers but the budget dedicated to this has been reduced and it has been very much replaced by direct mailing. The European Commission website which lists all EM programmes is very important for this programme. If listed as a course on this website, students get to know about you and what your programme has to offer.

The second most important marketing technique in Janina’s experience is word of mouth via friends/alumni and professors. EMLE keeps in touch with its alumni via a Facebook group which

is managed by its partner in Rotterdam. However, Janina works closely with her colleagues in Rotterdam to ensure that this is in line with the brand and image of the EMLE programme. EMLE is also aware that its alumni move constantly and their contacts database is not always up to date. To keep this fresh, EMLE hires a company which helps find out where alumni are. This enables EMLE to keep in touch with them and let them know when the applications are open for their friends, families and contacts. EMLE also pays special attention to keep the information for students easy to read. Although their website was evaluated as a very good one by various stakeholders, EMLE realised that the webpage needs to be ‘leaner’ and they decided to offer the same content but in a different, easier to read text with as few clicks as possible. In EMLE’s experience, it is crucial for them to adjust their message to the new generations and to how students read or intake information.

Good practice

EMLE’s marketing calendar is carefully planned to suit a sophisticated and well-thought online marketing campaign. These campaigns include advertising on online platforms and Google AdWords and Facebook campaigns. Fee-based and free of charge adverts on various online platforms are made available throughout the year whereas Google AdWords and Facebook campaigns are run on peak traffic times when students in Europe and elsewhere are known to look for master programmes. These peak times include the day when applications are open. You then reduce the amount you spent per day and increase it again when you want to generate more traffic at other peak times. Janina is also keen to emphasise that with Google AdWords it is not only about the money you invest in advertising but also the reputation you build yourself on google and this is always a bit more complicated. Janina thinks this is very important because advertising before the application opening day leads to wastage. Facebook campaigns are one of the most innovative techniques that this programme uses as from last year. EMLE finds it very cost-effective, since with only EUR 500 it enables them to choose the audiences they want to advertise to (this includes demographics; interests; English speaking). In fact, based on this approach, by running one campaign per week for about three to four weeks, Janina estimates that it reaches almost 100,000 people.

The future

EMLE is one of those dynamic master programmes that continuously adapts to its customers’ needs as well as to worldwide marketing trends. They have already shown how they successfully change their marketing techniques to reach their respective audiences. Their main priority for the future is to continue being flexible while keeping their look modern and fresh!

“When it comes to reaching the best in the world, you need the perfect mix of marketing techniques”

With the support of the Erasmus Mundus programme of the European Union www.em-ace.eu

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CASE

Master in Strategic

Project Management

(European)

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CASE STUDY

Master in Strategic Project Management (European)

The programme

The Erasmus Mundus Master in Strategic Project Management (MSPME) is a programme in the field of Business Management. It takes an international perspective to the demand for strategic thinkers who can deliver core business activities and realise competitive strategies in public, private and voluntary sector organisations through the implementation of strategic projects. The aim of MSPME is to fulfil this demand by developing graduates that have a systematic understanding of knowledge that combines ‘project management’ as process to deliver complex change and ‘strategic management’ as process of formulating and implementing organisational strategy.

Partners:

Heriot Watt University, United Kingdom Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Umea University, Sweden

Recruitment performance and ambition

The Master in Strategic Project Management is one of the most popular master programmes for which the Politecnico di Milano manages the marketing. The programme board thinks this is very much due to the quality of the programme as well as the availability of full scholarships. However, the programme is always looking at ways to recruit and support during their studies other excellent students who are not eligible for scholarships. One way of doing this has been through the provision of loans and other financial aid to students.

Because of the popularity of applications, the MSPME does not run any specific marketing campaigns for Erasmus Mundus programmes. Instead, their campaigns for prospects are generic and they tend to include Erasmus Mundus programmes as well.

Marketing approach

The Master in Strategic Project Management is marketed by the International Masters Office of Politecnico di Milano, School of Management. This office is responsible for pooling of resources and making savings.

This office works on building the value proposition of the programme. It does this by using feedback from a range of stakeholders involved in the programme, e.g. students, alumni, academic and administrative staff.

The programme is then advertised via a mix of channels ranging from events to direct marketing. Marketing activities start 10 months before the programme kick-off. Events are organised because students like to meet face to face. MSPME organises mostly activities such as on campus events, online presentations and information sessions and fairs.

According to Greta Maiocchi who looks after the marketing of MSPME, the internet is becoming increasingly important in advertising the programme. MSPME online marketing is proactive and reactive. Proactive marketing activities include online presentations and direct mailing. Reactive marketing online activities consist mostly in follow up with students’ queries or informational sessions provided upon request online.

Word of mouth is also very important for MSPME. Many of their

students report that they heard about the programme from a friend or colleague.

That is why the programme focuses a lot of its efforts on keeping in touch with alumni and engaging them where possible in advertising the programme. Alumni are invited to attend fairs and represent the programme; they are also interviewed in videos and other testimonials, which are shared online via the programme website, other websites where the programme is advertised and in direct mailings. The database of these prospects is usually populated through contacts collected in fairs/events/other queries directly from DEM (Direct Marketing)/magazines/newspapers. The EC website is a regular point through which candidates are directed to the MSPME website. The university then follows up with further information.

Good practice

Politecnico di Milano attends 50-70 fairs worldwide. Whenever university staff cannot travel, Politecnico di Milano asks alumni to attend on their behalf. MSPME strongly believes that alumni are their best ambassadors in promoting the master programmes. Because Politecnico di Milano’s marketing approach is a generic one rather than specific to MSPME, alumni are briefed prior to the event on MSPME if they are not themselves graduates of this programme. This has proved very successful; indeed the take up from alumni is always very good because of their positive experience in the programme.

The future

MSPME is looking at integrating other techniques to its marketing strategy such as blogs to help students find information in a friendly way. MSPME finds the EC website very useful for attracting new students and believes that more universities need to work together with the EC to improve this website and potentially provide more information for students who navigate this webpage.

“Alumni are our best ambassadors”

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CASE

International MSC

in Marine Biodiversity

and Conservation

(EMBC+)

STUDY

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CASE STUDY

International MSC in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation

(EMBC+)

The programme

The International Msc in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation (EMBC+) is offered by 6 full partners and a supporting network of over 30 associate partners playing a role as internship and thesis work providers.

• Year 1 Universities: Ghent University (Belgium), University of Bremen (Germany), University of the Algarve (Portugal) • Year 2 Universities: University Pierre et Marie Curie (France),

University of Oviedo (Spain), and Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology.

The study programme is divided in 7 modules, namely understanding the structure and function of marine biodiversity, toolbox for investigating marine biodiversity, conservation and restoration of marine biodiversity, transferable skills, internship, Spring School and thesis work.

Recruitment performance and ambition

Dr. Tim Deprez is the coordinator of the programme at the coordinating university. He is very passionate about international education and strongly believes that the quality of the programme is key to its success. The coordinating university of EMBC+ has recorded two main recruitment trends. The first trend is that, at the beginning, students were mostly drawn into the programme because of the scholarships made available. This is no longer the case and students are now interested in the International MSC in Marine Biodiversity and Conservation programme although there are no longer Erasmus Mundus scholarships available. The second trend is a most recent one and it shows how in the past few years an increasing number of European students have attended the programme.

Marketing approach

At the start of the programme, EMBC+ marketing was mostly focused on print materials such as leaflets and posters. Now, there is less of a need to run targeted campaigns or do further marketing because the student applications are many and of good quality. The programme regularly monitors student feedback to understand how applicants heard about EMBC+. The main channels reported are: word of mouth, social media, special events such as symposiums; blogs and other alumni.

EMBC+ has a large consortium and the programme coordinator credits the success of its wide reach to the size of its consortium and its worldwide networks of students; alumni and researchers who help spread the word about the quality of this programme.

Good practice

Dr. Deprez thinks that being as open and honest as possible about the content and structure of the programme is a very good way to attract students. For instance, students often have questions about the degree-awarding and accreditation, therefore the programme coordination places a special emphasis on providing accurate and comprehensive information about this.

The future

Although the need for marketing is reducing by the day – the available places are being filled by good quality students -, prof. Deprez thinks that it remains important for international programmes like this one to earmark resources for marketing as it often proves very difficult for academics to oversee the marketing strategy and run various promotion activities, while being first and foremost compelled to academic duties.

“Over the years, the need to advertise the programme has reduced. It is now the quality

of the programme that helps to spread the word through alumni and academics ”

With the support of the Erasmus Mundus programme of the European Union www.em-ace.eu

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CASE

Erasmus Mundus Master

in Nanoscience

and Nanotechnology

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CASE STUDY

Erasmus Mundus Master in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology

The programme

This two-year Master’s Course provides a broad multidisciplinary education in the emerging field of nanoscience and nanotechnology, coupled with an individual specialization in nanophysics, nanochemistry, nanoelectronics, biophysics or nanobiotechnology. The Course is organized by the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium), Chalmers Tekniska Högskola, Göteborg (Sweden), Technische Universität Dresden (Germany) and The Université Joseph Fourier in Grenoble (France) and with the support of three associated partners: IMEC in Leuven (Belgium), CEA-LETI in Grenoble (France) and Leibniz Institute for Solid State Materials Research in Dresden (Germany).

Recruitment performance and ambition

The Erasmus Mundus Master in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (EMM-NANO) started in 2005. At the outset, the programme did not receive many applications. Also, although there were many scholarships available from the European Commission (EC), the quality of these applications was good, yet not the very best. Another initial challenge for the programme was the attraction and recruitment of European students. This was mostly due to the education culture in Europe where students tend to attend both undergraduate and postgraduate degrees in the same university or in the same country. European students also did not know much about the Erasmus Mundus programme and their exchange experience went only as far as doing an Erasmus exchange abroad.

In order to recruit more students, the coordinator attended fairs in Asia that were organised by the EC. The programme coordinator also printed approximately 2,000 leaflets, which programme partners and associates shared with their networks of university staff and researchers. The leaflet heavily featured the website to generate more traffic and potentially reach a broad worldwide audience.

The programme was also listed on the EACEA website. This was an incredibly useful tool at the beginning because it enabled students who already knew about Erasmus Mundus to find out about the existence of the EMM-NANO programme and to be directed to its website for further information.

10 years after, the EMM-NANO programme has recorded a significant increase in the number of applications it receives. Most importantly, although there are now fewer scholarships offered by the EC, the quality of applications has improved hugely and the programme receives applications from top students from all over the world.

Marketing approach

The website is now the main tool that EMM-NANO uses to attract new applicants. Student feedback regularly shows that students found the programme by searching online where EMM-NANO is listed first on Google results. For this reason, EMM-NANO very much focuses its marketing work on the website by maintaining it up to date and providing very comprehensive information which

ranges from application procedures and the academic programme to success stories and alumni testimonials.

Word of mouth is another marketing channel that EMM-NANO has found incredibly useful. The high quality of the programme means that many students and alumni go back to their home universities and share their positive experiences with other students, researchers and staff. Prof. Guido Groeseneken thinks that this works best because the quality of the programme sells itself. EMM-NANO adopts a laissez-faire approach when it comes to social media. Initially, it was the programme coordinator that encouraged its students and alumni to create a Facebook page. Now alumni keep in touch through this page but they also offer information to prospective students. According to Prof. Guido Groeseneken from the coordinating university, this is a slightly risky approach because sometimes the information is not fully accurate; however it is one way of providing student friendly information to other students.

The international offices at the partner universities also play a critical role in sharing information with their own networks, and promoting the benefits of the Erasmus Mundus programmes. For instance, the coordinating university’s International Office for EMM-NANO recently commissioned a film which featured student testimonials from different Erasmus Mundus programmes.

Good practice

EMM-NANO have recognized that the subject of their programme is a very specialized one which requires marketing to be targeted at audiences that already have an interest in nanotechnology and nanophysics. To address this, the programme board pays a fee towards advertising space of ¼ page in journals of nanotechnology and nanophysics. This technique has proven very successful because it has increased the number of applications from European students, which was one of the main challenges the programme faced.

The future

EMM-NANO is very proud of its quality and it firmly believes that this is what now makes the programme attractive to the top students it receives applications from. Prof. Guido Groeseneken thinks that one can always do more to improve, but sharing experiences with other universities and marketing professionals is one way that can help further the sustainability and growth of Erasmus Mundus programmes such as EMM-NANO.

“Erasmus Mundus programmes have changed the education culture in Europe.

This is a slow process but sharing of experiences and expertise from marketing

professionals can help”

With the support of the Erasmus Mundus programme of the European Union www.em-ace.eu

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