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The information in this document is subject to change without notice. MPAY Inc. shall not be liable for any technical or editorial errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages resulting from the performance, furnishing, or use of this publication.

The software described in this document is furnished under license and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of that license.

No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including (but not limited to) photocopying, recording, scanning, or retrieval system, for any reason other than the purchaser’s personal use without the express written permission of MPAY Inc. The company data contained in the examples within this text is fictitious and any resemblance to real people, places, or companies is purely coincidental.

MPAY, Millennium, and payentry.com are trademarks of MPAY Inc. Windows, Windows 2000, Windows XP, Windows Vista, and Windows 7 are registered trademarks of Microsoft, Inc. All other brand and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners.

Corporate Headquarters:

9920 West Kincey Avenue Suite 120

Huntersville, NC 28078 Phone: 781-810-9009 http://www.mpay.com Copyright © 2011 by MPAY, Inc.

Version: June, 2011

Document Number: M3-RPTWRT-GD-SB-462-01

All rights reserved

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• • • •

TOC

Table of Contents

Chapter 1: How to Use the Report Writer . . . .5

Step 1: Create a New Report . . . .6

Step 2: Define the Report . . . .7

Step 2A: Set Up the Title & Report Type . . . .9

Step 2B: Add Fields for the Report . . . 11

Special Payroll Formulas . . . 15

Special Fields In the Employee List . . . 15

Step 2C: Sort & Group the Report Output . . . 16

Step 2D: Filter the Report Input . . . 18

Example 1: Filters About Companies . . . 21

Example 2: Filters About Employees . . . 21

Example 3: An Advanced Filter for a Deduction Report . . . 22

Step 2E: Preview and Finish . . . 22

What Report Writer Can Not Do . . . 23

Running Reports Across Multiple Companies . . . 23

Calculating Employer Taxes in Report Writer . . . 25

Chapter 2: Advanced Report Writer Scripting . . . 27

Current Date & Length of Service . . . 28

Using the Basic Formula . . . 28

Using a VB Script . . . 28

Specifying Results as Integers or Decimals . . . 29

Calculating Age Based on the Report End Date . . . 30

Accessing the Employee Annual Salary . . . 30

Formatting Date Strings . . . 30

Formatting Numeric Fields . . . 31

Using “If” Statements for Replacements . . . 31

Single Replacements . . . 31

Multiple Replacements . . . 32

Using the Date Range of the Report . . . 32

Using the Dates of the Most Recently Processed Payroll . . . 32

Using Formatting Options and MRW Output Formats . . . 33

How to Select an Output Format . . . 33

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Alternative Fill Option . . . 34

Advanced Calculations Using Rates . . . 35

Simulating Wildcard Characters in Filters . . . 35

Reporting From Custom Views . . . 37

Displaying Employee Pay Grade Information . . . 38

Displaying Names or Descriptions Instead of Codes . . . 38

Employee Department Name Instead of Department Code . . . 39

Employee Termination Description Instead of Termination Code . . . 39

Handling Blank Dates in Filters . . . 39

Determining Employee Age . . . 40

Company Contact E-mail . . . 40

Displaying the Employee’s Cell Phone . . . 41

Displaying the Employee’s Name & SSN . . . 41

Notes and Known Issues . . . 41

Chapter 3: Copying Report Writer Reports . . . 43

From One Company to Another (Same Database) . . . 43

The Beginning . . . 43

Copy to One or More Companies . . . 46

Copy to a Company Set . . . 49

Copy to All Active Companies . . . 52

Copy to Your Scratch Pad . . . 55

Copy to System Reports . . . 57

What Information is NOT Copied? . . . 59

Copying Multiple Reports . . . 59

From One Database to Another . . . 60

Original Report Writer Copy Utility . . . 60

Limitations . . . 60

Installing the Utility . . . 60

Extracting a Report . . . 61

Importing a Report . . . 62

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• • • •

Chapter 1

How to Use the Report Writer

This chapter explains how to use the Report Writer feature in Millennium.

Reporting data is an important element in satisfying your customers’ needs. You may find that you need a report that is slightly different from—or not included in—the existing reports in Millennium. When it comes to creating your own reports, you have two options: • Option 1: Create a report using Crystal Reports (or some other reporting utility).

For information about using Crystal Reports, seek other documentation. • Option 2: Create a report using the Report Writer feature in Millennium.

The Report Writer feature allows you to produce a report quickly without getting into all the details and complexity of Crystal Reports.

You can use Report Writer for most of your reporting needs because it has access to almost all data in Millennium. You can:

• Create employee and personnel listings

• Access current, month-to-date (MTD), quarter-to-date (QTD), and year-to-date (YTD) values for any earning, deduction, or tax code

• Create most types of output files

The basic steps for using Report Writer are outlined below. Each step is explained in detail in subsequent sections:

• Step 1: Create a New Report • Step 2: Define the Report

• Step 2A: Set Up the Title & Report Type • Step 2B: Add Fields for the Report • Step 2C: Sort & Group the Report Output • Step 2D: Filter the Report Input

• Step 2E: Preview and Finish

• Running Reports Across Multiple Companies • Calculating Employer Taxes in Report Writer

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Step 1: Create a New Report

To create a report using Report Writer, perform the following steps: 1. Select one of the following:

All Companies > [company] > Reporting

All Companies > [company] > Company Maintenance > ReportingSystem > Reports

Note

When you use Report Writer to create a system-level report, you cannot access some company-level information.

From any of these choices, the system displays a report page:

Figure 1: The company Reporting page and My Reports sub-page

1. Right-click in the open area in either the items list (top portion) or My Reports pane (bottom portion) of the screen.

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Figure 2: Creating a new report

The system adds the new report, using New Report as both its ID and Name. The

system waits for you to rename it:

Figure 3: New report waiting for an ID

3. Give the report a unique ID and press [Enter].

Use something short for the ID and save the more descriptive name for the title of the report (the Name field).

Step 2: Define the Report

Now you must define the data and format that you want to include in this report: 1. Right-click on the report ID.

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Figure 4: Select Edit Report

Note

If the Edit Report option is grayed out, you did not right-click on a Millennium Report Writer report.

After you select Edit Report, the system displays the Report Writer dialog: Figure 5: Report Writer dialog for a new report

The system uses this dialog for editing both new and existing reports. It includes a tree view in the Available Fields area and four tabbed pages:

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Setup — Basic Information that includes the Report Title, Sub Title, and Report Type. • Fields — Specifies the fields and headings that appear in the report. This defines the

content of the report.

Sorts — [Optional] Specifies how the report is sorted.

Filters — [Optional] Specifies any filtering done in the report. Each page is explained in each of the main steps.

The three buttons at the bottom of the dialog are available no matter which tabbed page you have displayed.

The explanations of the buttons are as follows:

Add Adds the highlighted field in the tree view to the page in use. Remove Removes the highlighted field from the tab in use.

Preview Allows you to see a print preview of the report.

Step 2A: Set Up the Title & Report Type

When you click on the Setup tab, the system displays the Setup page: Figure 6: Setup tab

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Report Title The heading of the report. The text you enter in this field becomes the name that appears in the Reporting section.

Sub Title [Optional] The subheading of the report.

Report Type Informs the system what to display for detail items on the report. For example:

• If you select Employee List in this drop-down field, Millennium

displays one line per employee.

• If you select Employee Paychecks, the system displays one line per

check.

In addition, the report type controls the report data to which you have access. The two database tables that are standard for every report are the co (company information) and ee (employee information) tables.

You’ll be allowed to use all data for the items you select and all items above it.

Each report type will select the database tables relevant to that report type:

Figure 7: The report type selects the relevant tables

For example, if you select Employee DirectDeposits as the report

type, you will have access to the EDirDep table in addition to the standard tables.

Some of the types that you may use frequently include: • Company List

Displays basic company setup information. • Employee List

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• Employee Paychecks

Displays check register-style information (gross, retirement, and so on). Use code groups to handle the kind of information you want. • Employee Rates

Displays information about employee rates of pay. The default report type is Employee List.

Reset Field Selection Tree

If you decide to change the value of the Report Type field, you must press the Reset Field Selection Tree button. Click this button to refresh the tree view, which will now include the fields that are associated with the newly select report type.

Employee listing is the default and is available to be used on any of the Employee report types. If you decide to use a company level report type, the employee listing is not available.

Note

You are restricted to using only one report type at a time. You cannot create your report beginning in one type, then change the report type and add information from that new type.

Step 2B: Add Fields for the Report

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Figure 8: Fields tab showing the left-most columns

The Fields page allows you to decide what information goes into the report. It contains many columns; to see the other columns, use the scroll bar at the bottom of the tabbed page:

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Use this page to enter all of the items you want displayed on your report. Each field you select become a column in your report.

You can enter four different types of data into the fields column:

A. Data fields from the database, which are displayed in the Available Fields list

You can customize the reports provided by Millennium by using additional formulas. For more information, see the task sheet about each report.

B. Static or “fixed” entries, which you type in directly C. Simple formulas

D. Special payroll formulas

For more information, see “Special Payroll Formulas” on page 15.

The information that you can include in the report is determined by the Report Type field on the Setup tab.

To select the fields that will be used to generate the report, perform the following: 1. In the Available Fields tree, double-click a field you want to include in the report.

The system adds that field to the list under the Fields tab.

You can also just highlight the desired field and click the Add>> button.

2. If you no longer wish to include a field that’s already listed, highlight that field under the Fields tab and click the <<Remove button.

3. If you want to include a “fixed” value (a particular value you want to appear) instead of a database value (see step 1), type the value you want to appear, enclosed in quotes; for example:

"100" or "ML71" or "Dog"

You can used this feature to enter, say, a plan ID or record identifier in a 401(k) output file.

4. If you want to see how the report will appear, click the Preview button.

5. Repeat the preceding steps until all the fields you wish to use in the report are listed under the Fields tab.

If you have begun using one report type, then decide you want to change the data in the report, you do not need to delete the report and start over. Instead, you can simply click on the Setup tab, change the value of the Report Type field, then click the Reset Field Selection Tree button.

The default setting for any report’s orientation is Portrait. If you are going to include many columns on the report, it is highly recommended that you change the report’s orientation to Landscape.

The order of the fields on this page corresponds to the order of the columns in your report. The order from top-to-bottom in the field list matches the left-to-right order of the report columns.

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You can change the order in which the columns appear on the report. Use the up-arrow and down-arrow buttons on the right-most side of the Fields page to move the fields up and down.

A report will not work across companies if the fields you select do not match, have different company levels, and so on. For example, use the same deduction codes in all companies; if you have different deduction codes defined in each company, a report that spans more than one company will not produce the information you need.

The fields (columns) on the Fields page are as follows:

Field The name of the field. A column on the report will list values of this field. Heading The column title that will appear above the field on the report.

The rest of the fields in each row concern how the column is formatted on the report: Len The maximum number of characters that will be display in this column.

The default value is the length defined in the database.

If you set this field to 0 (zero), the column for this field will not be

included on the report.

Dec The number of decimal places that will be displayed for the values of this field. The default value is 2.

L/R Indicates whether this column will be left- or right-justified.

Fill Indicates the character to be used if the column is to be filled with a character rather than spaces.

For example, some organizations wish to fill a monetary amount with pound signs (#) before the actual number.

Most commonly used to zero-fill fields on output files. For more fill options, see “Alternative Fill Option” on page 34.

Show 0 Put a check in this check box to make the system show zeroes instead of leaving the field blank (if it is a numeric field and the value is zero or null). Total Put a check in this check box to include a total for this column on the

report.

No Punct Put a check in this check box to suppress all punctuation marks from values in this column.

No . (Periods) Put a check in this check box to suppress all decimals from number fields. No , (Commas) Put a check in this check box to suppress commas from number fields.

OverPunch Put a check in this check box to display numbers using the overpunch format. The last digit of the number will be changed to a letter to differentiate between positive and negative numbers.

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UPPERCASE Put a check in this check box to change all letters for these field values to uppercase characters.

For more information on formatting and output options, see Chapter 2, “Advanced Report Writer Scripting.”

Special Payroll Formulas

You can enter a formula in place of a database field or static entry. You typically use formulas to provide special text formatting or add values together.

For example, the following formula displays an employee name in the “last, first” format: ee.lastName + “, “ + ee.firstName

The following formula adds the current regular and overtime earnings together: ee.Current("E","Reg").amount + ee.Current("E","OT").amount

Special payroll formulas can use most Visual Basic (VB) functions: • Text formatting functions

Display the first letter of the middle name only: Left (ee.middlename,1)

Display check box values as “Y” or “N”:

replace (replace(ee.owner, "1", "Y"), "0", "N") • Date formatting functions

Change the date format from 01/03/2006 to January 3, 2006:

Monthname (Month(ee.hiredate), False) + " " + Cstr(Day(ee.hiredate)) + ", " + Cstr(Year(ee.hiredate))

• Math functions

Divide a rate by a specific number (10): EDed.rate / 10

Special Fields In the Employee List

When you select Employee List for the Report Type field under the Setup tab, the bottom of the list of Employee fields in the Available Fields tree includes several special sections:

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Figure 10: Special fields in the Employee list

The explanations of the fields are as follows:

Deductions The employee deduction setup information. Rates The employee rate information.

CYTD Current year-to-date values for all codes and code groups. CQTD Current quarter-to-date values for all codes and code groups. CMTD Current month-to-date values for all codes and code groups. Current Current payroll values for all codes and code groups.

These special sections use the year, month, quarter, and time frame of the report.

Step 2C: Sort & Group the Report Output

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Figure 11: Sorts tab

The format of the Sort page is similar to the Fields page.

Report Writer allows you to sort information to control the order in which the data is displayed on the report. In addition, you can have the system generate totals at each sort break by checking the Subtotal field.

Double-click on one or more fields in the Available Fields tree to add fields to the list on the Sort page.

These subtotals are in addition to any field-level total defined in the Fields tab. Subtotals are generated for each field that can be mathematically summarized.

The explanations of the fields are as follows:

Field The name of the field upon which you are going to group or sort the output.

Description The default description of this field in the database.

Subtotal Put a check in this check box to create a subtotal of this column on the report.

Break After Put a check in this check box to insert a page break after this field is listed.

Works in conjunction with the Subtotal check box. If you do not use the Subtotal check box, the system will not use this break.

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Works in conjunction with the Subtotal check box. If you do not use the Subtotal check box, the system will not use this break.

Use the Break After and Break Before check boxes to fit your results on standard sheets of paper.

Step 2D: Filter the Report Input

When you click on the Filters tab, the system displays the Filters page: Figure 12: Filters tab

Filters allow you to narrow down the data to a smaller subset. You can either include or exclude that data from the report.

Fields that you use as filtering elements will not necessarily appear on the report. In other words, you can use a filter based on information that is not included in the report itself. Each report allows you to create two standard filters:

• The Company Filter sub-tab corresponds with fields listed in the co table under

Available Fields.

• Likewise, the Employee Filter sub-tab corresponds with fields listed in the ee table

under Available Fields.

Some reports add a third table of available fields and corresponding sub-tab, which is determined by the type of report you select (the Report Type field on the Setup tab). Be sure you have that sub-tab selected before you add fields from its corresponding table:

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Figure 13: Using the correct table/sub-tab combination

Note

For data that is related to employee listings, enter filter statements on the Employee Filter sub-tab. In similar fashion, use the Company Filter sub-tab to filter company-based reports.

The explanations of the sub-tab fields are as follows:

Field The name of the field from the database upon which you are basing the filter.

As with the other pages, you can double-click on a field in the Available Fields tree to enter the name.

Comp Use this drop-down list to select the comparison you are making between the Field and the Value. Valid entries are:

= — Is Equal to

< — Is Less Than

> — Is Greater Than

<= — Is Less Than or Equal to

>= — is Greater Than or Equal to

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Value The text or number to which you are comparing the value of the Field. If you are entering text, enclose it in double quotes.

And/Or Use this drop-down list to select an operator if you are creating more than one comparison in your filter. Valid entries are AND and OR:

• If you use AND, all of the filter conditions must be met for the data to

display.

• If you use OR, any one of the filter conditions must be met for the data

to display.

Note

A hierarchy exists for these operators. The AND operator is executed first, but as soon as the system reads an OR operator, every subsequent operator is considered an OR

statement.

If you need to create a compound statement, where several statements are grouped together, use parentheses to define the groupings. For an example of how to use the parentheses properly, see “Example 3: An Advanced Filter for a Deduction Report.”

Advanced Use this button to enter SQL statements rather than comparison fields described above. When you click this button, the Field, Comp, Value, and And/Or columns are replaced by a text area.

If you use this method of creating a filter, be aware that proper SQL syntax is very important.

Tip

You can use code groups instead of formulas. If you already have code groups defined for the company, you can use them from the employee list of available fields. For more information, see “Special Fields In the Employee List” on page 15.

Note

If you click the Advanced button and enter statements in the text area, then decide you want to return to the normal filtering method, you must delete the statements in the text area first.

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Example 1: Filters About Companies

You can show all companies except one (in this case, company ABC):

Figure 14: Show all companies except ABC

You can show all companies in particular states (in this case, Massachusetts & California):

Figure 15: Show companies located in MA or CA only

Example 2: Filters About Employees

You can show all active and full-time employees:

Figure 16: Show all active and full-time employees

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Figure 17: Show employees in cost centers 100 or 200

You can show all active employees who work in cost centers 100 or 200:

Figure 18: Show active employees in cost centers 100 or 200

Example 3: An Advanced Filter for a Deduction Report

The following code is an example of how to use SQL statements after clicking the Advanced button.

You can use the AND operator to specify that the filter must meet the conditions you define:

EDed.dcode = "U" AND EDed.rate >= "5.00" AND EDed.rate <= "9.00"

You can use the OR operator to specify that the filter must meet one of the conditions. In

addition, you can create compound statements by grouping AND filters within parentheses:

(EDed.dcode = "U" AND EDed.rate >= "5.00" AND EDed.rate <= "9.00") OR (EDed.dcode = "V" AND EDed.rate >= "5.00" AND EDed.rate <= "9.00")

If you use the Deduction table as your tree, your deduction filter tab has to be defined first with the deduction code; afterwards, you define the rate you are trying to compile.

Step 2E: Preview and Finish

Now that you have created the content and configured any filters, you can:

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While you are creating your reports, it is important to constantly check how the report looks. The ability to preview the report helps verify you are retrieving the correct data and presenting it in a format that is easy to understand.

• Click the OK button at any time to save your changes. Tips

Use code groups instead of lengthy formulas.

Use taxable wage values to calculate employer tax amounts.

When adding text fields, always enter a Len value (because the default is zero).

Column headers comply to the Len value. They will truncate if longer than the Len value. You can remove the column headers as necessary.

Preview the report as you build it. Adjust your layout as necessary.

What Report Writer Can Not Do

The Millennium Report Writer can not do the following:

• Create “fancy” formatting, such as boxes, shading, other fonts, color, and so on • Report on system setup information

• Report on individual pay detail items (EPayHistDetail) • Report on labor distribution information

• Change the margins

• Use data from two related tables on the same report

Running Reports Across Multiple Companies

You can run Report Writer across multiple companies or a company set. You accomplish this task by using filters.

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Figure 19: A filter across multiple companies

For example, you are writing a report using the pay history sections of the ee available

fields:

A. First, you set up your report from within one of the companies that will be included in the report.

The reason is that the Deductions, CYTD, CQTD, CMTD, Current, and Rates sub-sections reference the location from which the report is created; therefor, you must start from one of the included companies:

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Figure 20: The sub-sections that reference the starting location

B. While you create the report, be sure to test it using the Preview button.

C. After you are satisfied it works properly with the first company, click the OK button. D. From the location where you just saved the new report, right-click on the report and

select Copy from the pop-up menu. E. Select System > Reports.

F. Paste in the new report.

Calculating Employer Taxes in Report Writer

Use the SQL statement format below to print employer taxes on a report. Employer taxes are not available in Report Writer; they are calculated at the company level and updated in the ELaborDistribution table.

You can use the following format (the taxes listed are for instructional purposes only): (ee.Current("T","SS-R").cappedTaxable * .062) + (ee.Current("T","FUTA").cappedTaxable * .008) + (ee.Current("T","MED-R").cappedTaxable * .0145) + (ee.Current("T","TXSUI").cappedTaxable * .027) + (ee.Current("T","MOSUI").cappedTaxable * 0.0351) + (ee.Current("T","KSSUI").cappedTaxable * .0297)

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• • • •

Chapter 2

Advanced Report Writer Scripting

One of the nice things that the Report Writer has to offer is a vast array of things you can do with it. For example, you can utilize VBScript to either manipulate data or retrieve data from non-Millennium sources.

To get more info on VBScript, please refer to Microsoft’s VBScript documentation at the following URL:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/t0aew7h6.aspx

Note

You can use VBScript functions in Report Writer—not Visual Basic programming.

In this chapter you will find some examples of what you can do inside the report writer: • Current Date & Length of Service

• Accessing the Employee Annual Salary • Formatting Date Strings

• Formatting Numeric Fields

• Using “If” Statements for Replacements • Using the Date Range of the Report

• Using the Dates of the Most Recently Processed Payroll • Using Formatting Options and MRW Output Formats • Advanced Calculations Using Rates

• Simulating Wildcard Characters in Filters • Reporting From Custom Views

• Displaying Employee Pay Grade Information • Displaying Names or Descriptions Instead of Codes • Handling Blank Dates in Filters

• Determining Employee Age • Company Contact E-mail

• Displaying the Employee’s Cell Phone • Displaying the Employee’s Name & SSN

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Current Date & Length of Service

Length of service (LOS), or the number of days the employee has been employed, is calculated by Millennium—but not stored. The formula provided in this article explains how to take the current date and subtract the hire date to get the length of service.

Note

The LOS figure returned on the report may not be accurate for employees that have an adjusted seniority or rehire date.

Millennium, when calculating LOS, considers if the Adjusted Seniority and Rehire date fields have values. The order of date fields at which it looks is: adjusted seniority, rehire, hire. Therefore, the figure on the report may vary from the LOS calculation in the software.

Using the Basic Formula

The formula to use is:

(Current Date) - (Hire Date) = LOS

To derive the current date within the system, use Now().

To derive the employee’s hire date within the system, use ee.hiredate.

Therefore, to calculate the length of service based on the hire date (calculate the amount of days between the hire date and the current date), use the following in a report:

Now()-ee.hiredate

To determine the LOS in years rather than days, simply divide by 365: (Now()-ee.hiredate)/365

Using a VB Script

The examples above use basic math to return the length of service. Other ways to determine it include using the VB script function DateDiff, which has the option of returning a variety of different intervals.

The syntax for the DateDiff function is as follows: DateDiff(interval, date1, date2)

The available arguments according to the Windows Scripting help files is as follows: • interval — String expression that is the interval you want to use to calculate the

differences between date1 and date2.

Available intervals that can be returned and the parameter required for them: • yyyy — Year

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q — Quarter • m — Month • y — Day of year • d — Day • w — Weekday • ww — Week of year • h — Hour • n — Minute • s — Second

date1, date2 — Date expressions. Two dates you want to use in the calculation.

Note

When you use DateDiff in Report Writer, you must use quotes around the interval. If you use a field name for date values, you do not need to use quotes.

Here is an example of using DateDiff to return the LOS (in months): DateDiff("m", ee.Hiredate, Now())

The syntax in the example above returns the number of months the employee has been employed. Like the calculations in “Using the Basic Formula” on page 28, it ignores the rehire dates and adjusted length of service dates.

Specifying Results as Integers or Decimals

The methods of calculating LOS in “Using the Basic Formula” and “Using a VB Script” round the LOS to the nearest integer. If you do not have any decimal places configured for the field in Report Writer, you need an integer for an answer. If you want decimals, you must ensure your formula will produce decimal places.

In order to prevent rounding and see the closest, lowest integer—for instance, if someone has worked 18 months, the following will return 1 year because the employee has only worked one full year—use the INT function. Two examples using the employee’s hire date

follow:

INT((Now()-ee.hiredate)/365)

INT((DateDiff("d",ee.hireDate,NOW()) / 365))

Here is an example of using DateDiff to return the age of an employee (using the employee’s birth date in years in the nn.dd format):

DateDiff("d", ee.birthdate, Now())/365)

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For example, if the employee will turn 71 in December and you are running the report in October, the report displays the employee’s age as 70.8.

Calculating Age Based on the Report End Date

To get the age as of the endDate of the report.

ROUND((((CDate(CStr(mid(co.currentreportingend,5,2) + "/" + > mid(co.currentreportingend,7,2) +"/"+

left(co.currentreportingend, > 4)))-ee.birthdate)/365)-.499999999999),0) Example: Enter in a date value

Tip

To enter in specific dates in filters, use the pound sign on either side of the date. For example, to show May 31, 2011, you would enter: #05/31/2011#

Accessing the Employee Annual Salary

To calculate the annual salary for an employee, enter the expression below in a field box: ee.AnnualSalary(co.safecheckdate)

Formatting Date Strings

You can use VBScript Report Writer field box to reformat and display dates from the default format of dd/mm/yyyy.

The examples that follow use the ee.hiredate of 01/03/2002:

• To display the Jan 3, 2002 format:

Monthname (Month(ee.hiredate), True) + " " + Cstr(Day(ee.hiredate)) + ", " +

Cstr(Year(ee.hiredate))

• To display the January 3, 2002 format:

Monthname (Month(ee.hiredate), False) + " " + Cstr(Day(ee.hiredate)) + ", " +

Cstr(Year(ee.hiredate))

• To display the 01/03/02 format:

Right("00" + CStr(Month(ee.hiredate)),2) + "/" + Right("00" + CStr(Day(ee.hireDate)),2) + "/" + Right(Cstr(Year(ee.hireDate)),2)

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To display the 132002 format: CStr(Month(ee.hireDate)) +

CStr(Day(ee.hireDate)) + CStr(Year(ee.hireDate) To display the 01032002 format:

Right("00" + CStr(Month(ee.hireDate)),2) + Right("00" + CStr(Day(ee.hireDate)),2) + CStr(Year(ee.hireDate))

Formatting Numeric Fields

The following examples show how you can dictate the number of characters for a numeric field:

A. Define a number field for 10 characters with two implied decimal places: Right(" " & EPaycheck.netCheck * 100, 10)

B. Define a number field for 8 positions, two implied decimal places, and make it zero filled:

Right("00000000" & EPaycheck.netCheck * 100, 8)

Be sure the number of digits or spaces between the quotes matches the last number in the format command. For example, the command above has eight zeros between the quotes and value of the variable before the close parenthesis is an eight. If you typed eight zeros but made the value of the last variable a seven or a nine, the system would get confused.

Using “If” Statements for Replacements

In Report Writer, there is no way to write an “If” statement or use an “If” function similar to the one in Microsoft Excel®.

However, if you need to use If-Then logic to change the value of a field, you can use the VBScript “Replace” statement.

Single Replacements

To replace a single value, the basic syntax is: Replace(FieldName, ”Value”, ”NewValue”)

For example, you want to tell Report Writer, “If an employee’s last name is Smith, change it to XXX to hide their name.” In this case, you would use the following statement:

Replace(ee.Lastname,"Smith", "XXX")

When the system runs the above statement, it will replace the last name Smith for any employees that have that last name.

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Multiple Replacements

You can use nested “Replace” statements for scenarios like: if the value = 1, then show A; if the value = 2, then show B.

To replace a value based on multiple possibilities, the basic syntax is: Replace(ReplaceStatement, “SearchText”, “NewText”)

For example, you to tell Report Writer to hide the last name Smith with one value and hide the last name Jones with another value. In this case, you would use the following statement:

Replace(Replace(ee.lastName,"Smith","YYY"),"Jones","XXX")

When the system runs the above statement, it will replace every last name of Smith with YYY and every last name of Jones with XXX.

Using the Date Range of the Report

Each time you run a report in Millennium, you are specifying a date range for the report to run. However, many reports do not use a date range. You can use the following variables to derive the appropriate dates:

• co.currentreportingstart — The start date • co.currentreportingend — The end date

When using these variables, it will return a number that looks like the process number. To properly use the variable, you may need to use some string manipulation using common VBScript string modifiers.

To get the date in MM/DD/YYYY format the following syntax can be used. CDate(CStr(mid(co.currentreportingstart,5,2) + "/" +

mid(co.currentreportingstart,7,2) +"/" + left(co.currentreportingstart, 4))) These variables can be used in any of the fields, or can be filtered off of.

Using the Dates of the Most Recently Processed Payroll

If you are running a report and need to use the dates of the most recently processed payroll. It is probably easier to use the following syntax than use the reporting dates. This way you can set the report to run for the last payroll processed and not have to worry about the date ranges being passed in.

• co.mostrecentcheckdate.process — The process number for the date • co.mostrecentcheckdate.periodbegin — The period begin date • co.mostrecentcheckdate.periodend — The period end date • co.mostrecentcheckdate.checkdate — The check date

The different variables return different formats of dates; for example, the process number is in the format YYYYMMDD##.

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You can use these variables in any of the Report Writer fields or filters.

For example, you have a Report Writer report that looks at a specific deduction, using multiple entries for each deduction code controlled by start and end dates. You want to see the current deduction rate value only. Therefore, you edit the EDed filter as shown below:

EDed.dcode = "XXXX" AND (EDed.startDate <= CDate(CStr(mid(co.currentreportingend,5,2) + "/" + mid(co.currentreportingend,7,2) +"/" + left(co.currentreportingend,4))) AND EDed.endDate >= CDate(CStr(mid(co.currentreportingend,5,2) + "/" + mid(co.currentreportingend,7,2) +"/" + left(co.currentreportingend, 4))))

The statement above allows you to use the most current rate effective alone for a specific deduction.

This logic will work with any table where there are multiple entries with begin and end dates. Simply replace EDed.startDate with the appropriate table name.

Using Formatting Options and MRW Output Formats

This section explains the formatting options pertaining to each output format in the Millennium Report Writer (MRW).

How to Select an Output Format

Once a report has been created, right-click the report’s name and select Properties from the pop-up menu. Select the Output tab. Select an output format from the drop-down list.

The Formatting Options & Output Format Combinations

Not all formatting options are available for the output destinations. For example, it would not make sense to use overpunch if the output is a PDF.

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* In measurement, not characters ** Subtotals as well

Alternative Fill Option

As explained in on page 14, you can fill in the blank spaces of a field with a character other than the blank. However, if you are creating a PDF report, the Fill field will not work. In such cases, you can use the following formula instead:

Right("FillValues" & YourField, FillValueNumber) Here is an example:

Figure 21: Alternate fill

The explanations of the formula variables are:

FillValues — The value you wish to use as the filler.

If your field is eight characters long (as denoted by the value of the Len field), type that character eight times and enclose it in double quotes. See the example above.

YourField — The field you want to fill.

In the example above, the field ee.Current("E","Reg").hours is being filled. • FillValueNumber — How many characters to fill.

Must match the number of characters you typed for the FillValues variable and the value of the Len field.

Table 1: Field formatting availability in various output formats

Fo rm at Field Headi n g Length Deci m al L or R Fill Sho w Z ero es To ta l No Punc t No P erio d s No Comm as Overpunch Uppercase CSV Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y PDF Y Y Y* Y Y N Y Y** Y Y Y N Y PNF Y Y Y* Y Y N Y Y** Y Y Y N Y TSV Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y TXT Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y

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Advanced Calculations Using Rates

Report Writer is designed to pull “current” rates based on the report run dates—which works fine until you want to perform calculations using any Visual Basic (VB) functions (Round, CDbl, CLng, and so on). Inclusion of VB functions in the calculation logic prevents Report Writer from using the “current” rates.

For example, the following formula calculates annual salary and uses the current base rate: ee.Rates("Base").salary * 12

Using this same calculation with a VB function will not work. A VB function cannot access the current base rate if an employee has multiple base rates defined in their Rates/Reviews tab.

However, you can create a workaround. The formula below is an example of what the syntax would look like:

ROUND(ee.Rates.itembykeydate("Base",rw_dtEndCheckDate).salary, 0) * 12

This parameter uses the end check date for which the report is being run and selects the rates accordingly.

Simulating Wildcard Characters in Filters

If you want to include only certain records—ones that contain certain characters or text— you would usually use a wildcard character (for example, using % in SQL statements).

You cannot use a wildcard character in Report Writer filters; however, you can be creative and use almost any VBScript function. Even though there is no LIKE operator in VBScript, there are ways to simulate it.

How you can create a script that acts like the SQL LIKE operator is best explained through an example. In this example, you want to:

• Create an employee report that lists only the tax information for SUI taxes.

• Include some basic employee demographics and the tax code (tcode) from the Etax section.

Therefore, when you create a new Report Writer report, you select Employee Taxes in

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Figure 22: Report for all employee tax codes

After you run the report, you notice that the report includes every tax associated with every employee. You decide to filter the information to see only the SUI taxes assigned to each employee.

Normally in SQL, you would use the wildcard character % in the ETax.tcode entry; for example, %SUI% would return only tax codes with “SUI” in the name. In Visual Basic (VB),

you have to be creative and use string functions. In this example, you decide to use the INSTR() function to get the desired results.

A common VB and VBScript function, INSTR() has the following parameters.

INSTR([start, ]string1, string2[, compare])

Explanations of the INSTR() function arguments that you use in this example are:

start — A numeric expression that sets the starting position for each search. Should

usually be 1, as that is the start of a string.

string1 — The string expression being searched.

In this example, it is the field name ETax.tcode.

string2 — The string expression for which you are searching.

In this example, the string for which you are searching is SUI.

You want the system to look for “SUI” from the beginning of the tax code value. If the system finds the string, the function returns a number greater than 0.

In Report Writer, you click on the Filters tab and then the ETax Filter tab. You click on the Advanced button because you decide it is easier to type it in directly:

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This is the result of the steps described above:

Figure 23: Report for all employee tax codes

This report will now return any tax assigned to the employees with “SUI” in the name and ignores any tax that does not.

For more information about VBScript, see the Help file in Microsoft VBScript or search the Microsoft web site.

Reporting From Custom Views

To report off of a custom view, you must ensure you have properly created your User Properties. For more information on setting up the custom views, please refer to knowledge base article 599.

Once you have your custom views defined and you are entering data for the employees, you can create a report that uses the Employee Listing report type to run off of the custom

views. The key to doing this is to reference the proper field name. On the Report Writer report, you would use the following syntax.

ee.XProperty("FieldName").xValue

For example, you created a property called DriversLicenseNum. To make that field to

appear, you would use:

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For any employee that has a value for that field, that value will appear in the report (provided you have set up the field properly).

Note

Report Writer will sometimes show a length of negative one. Check the length of your fields.

Displaying Employee Pay Grade Information

Each employee can have a pay grade assigned to them via their base rate. Presently, there is no easy way to obtain the salary rank information in Report Writer because it is stored at the company level. The only information accessible on the employee is their pay grade. In order to return the various components of the pay grade for each employee that has a pay grade, you can use the examples below. If an employee does not have a pay grade assigned, they will have a blank value or a zero, depending on your Report Writer. This will give you the maximum of the pay grade:

co.paygrades.itembykey(ee.paygrade(co.safecheckdate)).Maximum This will give you the midpoint of the pay grade:

co.paygrades.itembykey(ee.paygrade(co.safecheckdate)).midpoint This will give you the minimum of the pay grade:

co.paygrades.itembykey(ee.paygrade(co.safecheckdate)).Minimum

The examples above use the company’s current check date to obtain the pay grade from the employee. You can replace co.safecheckdate with a different date value or variable.

Note

If you are using a hard-coded value, you must enclose it in double quotes.

To obtain the %Mid and %Max values from the employee’s Rates/Reviews tab, you must compute the annual salary and divide by the value.

Displaying Names or Descriptions Instead of Codes

You can change the output of a field from the actual value of the field to, for example, the description of that field.

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Employee Department Name Instead of Department Code

In a Report Writer report, you want to see the name of the employee’s department—not the department number. Therefore, under the Fields tab of the report’s Report Writer properties, you would type a formula in the Field column to display each department’s name rather than the actual field name.

This will print the name value of the department rather than the department code:

Employee Termination Description Instead of Termination Code

To get the description rather than the code, you would use the following field values:

Handling Blank Dates in Filters

Dates such as Hire Date and Birth Date are stored in Millennium with NULL values. Filters, however, are not able to process fields with NULL values.

In such cases, use a date less than #01/01/1900# as the value of a filter.

For example, you want to run a report that shows all employees that do not have a birth date in their file. In this scenario, you enter the following formula in the Employee Filter sub-tab:

ee.BirthDate < #01/01/1900# Here is how it would look:

Figure 24: Filtering a NULL date

Table 2: Employee department names

Actual Dept Field Value You Would Type in the Field Column ee.cc1co.l1 co.l1departments.itembykey(ee.cc1).name ee.cc2co.l2 co.l2departments.itembykey(ee.cc2).name ee.cc3co.l3 co.l3departments.itembykey(ee.cc3).name ee.cc4co.l4 co.l4departments.itembykey(ee.cc4).name ee.cc5co.l5 co.l5departments.itembykey(ee.cc5).name

Table 3: Employee termination description

Value You Would Type in the Field Column Heading Title co.TermReasons.itembykey(ee.TermReason).Description Reason for Termination

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Determining Employee Age

To determine an employee’s age, use the birth date of the employee and the current date to get the difference in days and divide by 365.25 and the scripting functions Round and Fix to display the number to the left of the decimal point:

CStr(fix(Round((DateDiff("d", ee.birthdate, now()) / 365.25),2))) The result is the employee’s age as an integer, not a decimal number.

Note

Employees born on February 29th (leap year) will be considered one year older on February 28th on non-leap years.

Company Contact E-mail

The Available Fields list in Report Writer includes the contact e-mail address as: • co.emailContact

The selection is shown in Figure 25:

Figure 25: Available company e-mail contact field

This value is not valid. Instead, you can replace it with the following values: • co.Contact1email

co.Contact2email

co.Contact3email

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Figure 26: Replacement company e-mail contact field

Displaying the Employee’s Cell Phone

The field for displaying the cell phone number is:

ee.cellphone

Displaying the Employee’s Name & SSN

To display an employee’s first initial, last name, and the last four digits of their Social Security number (SSN), use the following:

Left(ee.firstname, 1) + ee.lastname + Right(ee.ssn,4)

Notes and Known Issues

At present, there are a few known issues concerning Report Writer in Millennium. Development is in the process of resolving some of these issues, but the less important issues are also worth noting:

• You can only report off of one Report Type at a time and cannot combine data from multiple report types. The exception occurs on most of the employee reports: you can include company demographic information.

• Presently, system-level reports ignore the use of company sets you selected on the Data Selection tab in the Report Properties dialog. The current workaround is to add filters for all the companies you wish to include in the report.

• If any fields are missing, you may want to try re-importing the Millennium online help file and see if this fixes the issue. If this does not fix the issue, please contact MPAY Customer Support.

• If there are any pieces of information you are not seeing available in Report Writer, such as a specific tab is not found in the report types, please let MPAY know through the Support channels and we can forward the requests to development.

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• • • •

Chapter 3

Copying Report Writer Reports

This chapter explains how you can copy a report you create in Report Writer for one company to another company in Millennium.

From One Company to Another (Same Database)

You can copy a Report Writer report from one company to one or more companies within the same database.

You can copy from the following locations:

All Companies > [company] > Reporting (the “ad hoc” reporting section) • My Reports (your “scratch pad”)

All Companies > [company] > Company Maintenance > Reporting payroll folders (Every Payroll, Next Payroll, and so on)

System > Reports You can copy:

• A report between all of the above locations • To one or more companies

• An entire company set at the same time, if you choose any of the options that are company-specific.

The Beginning

To copy a report within a database, perform the following steps:

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Figure 27: Selecting Copy

The system displays the MRW Report Copy pop-up dialog:

Figure 28: Welcome screen for the Copy Wizard

Notice that the Welcome screen lists some basic information: the name of the report and the location from which you are copying.

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Note

If you are copying from custom folders which you have created, the workflow will tell you the location is the ad hoc reporting folder under the company or the system. You can copy from these custom locations, but not paste to them at this time.

2. Click on the Next button. The system displays the Select Destination screen:

Figure 29: Select Destination screen

The explanations of the fields are as follows: Copy to One or More

Companies

Select this radio button if you want to choose the specific company (or companies) to which you’ll copy the report.

Copy to All Co’s in a Company Set

Select this radio button and use the associated drop-down list to copy the report to each company in a company set.

Other Copy Options Select this radio button and use the associated drop-down list to copy the report to the following choices:

All Companies (Active only)

My Reports (Scratch Pad)

System > Reports

3. Make your destination selection using the radio buttons (and drop-down lists, as necessary).

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4. Click the Next button. What the system displays depends on the choice(s) you made for the destination:

• Copy to One or More Companies • Copy to a Company Set

• Copy to All Active Companies • Copy to Your Scratch Pad • Copy to System Reports

Copy to One or More Companies

From the Select Destination screen, you selected the Copy to One or More Companies radio button:

Figure 30: Select Destination screen

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Figure 31: Select Companies screen

2. Put a check in Incl (Include) column next to each company to which you want to copy the report; then click the Next button. The system displays the Select Location screen:

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3. Use the Select Location drop-down list to indicate the location within each company to which the report will be copied. Valid entries are:

Every Payroll Folder

First Payroll of Month Folder

Last Payroll of Month Folder

Last Payroll of Quarter Folder

Next Payroll Folder

First Payroll of Year

Last Payroll of Year

Adhoc Reporting Folder

4. Click the Next button. The system displays the Copying Reports screen, indicating it is ready to begin the copy process:

Figure 33: Copying Reports screen

5. Click the Copy button. The system copies the report to the one or more companies you selected. When it is finished, it displays the Report Copy Results screen:

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Figure 34: Copying Reports screen

6. Click the Done button.

Copy to a Company Set

From the Select Destination screen, you selected the Copy to All Co’s in a Company Set radio button and selected the appropriate company set from the drop-down list:

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Figure 35: Select Destination screen

1. Click the Next button. The system displays the Select Location screen:

Figure 36: Select Location screen

2. Use the Select Location drop-down list to indicate the location within each company to which the report will be copied. Valid entries are:

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Every Payroll Folder

First Payroll of Month Folder

Last Payroll of Month Folder

Last Payroll of Quarter Folder

Next Payroll Folder

First Payroll of Year

Last Payroll of Year

Adhoc Reporting Folder

3. Click the Next button. The system displays the Copying Reports screen, indicating it is ready to begin the copy process:

Figure 37: Copying Reports screen

4. Click the Copy button. The system copies the report to the companies within the company set you selected. When it is finished, it displays the Report Copy Results screen:

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Figure 38: Copying Reports screen

5. Click the Done button.

Copy to All Active Companies

From the Select Destination screen, you selected the Other Copy Options radio button and selected Copy to All Companies from the drop-down list:

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Figure 39: Select Destination screen

1. Click the Next button. The system displays the Select Location screen:

Figure 40: Select Location screen

2. Use the Select Location drop-down list to indicate the location within each company to which the report will be copied. Valid entries are:

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Every Payroll Folder

First Payroll of Month Folder

Last Payroll of Month Folder

Last Payroll of Quarter Folder

Next Payroll Folder

First Payroll of Year

Last Payroll of Year

Adhoc Reporting Folder

3. Click the Next button. The system displays the Copying Reports screen, indicating it is ready to begin the copy process:

Figure 41: Copying Reports screen

4. Click the Copy button. The system copies the report to all the active companies within your database. When it is finished, it displays the Report Copy Results screen:

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Figure 42: Copying Reports screen

5. Click the Done button.

Copy to Your Scratch Pad

From the Select Destination screen, you selected the Other Copy Options radio button and selected Copy to My Reports (Scratch Pad) from the drop-down list:

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Figure 43: Select Destination screen

1. Click the Next button. The system displays the Copying Reports screen, indicating it is ready to begin the copy process:

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2. Click the Copy button. The system copies the report to your scratch pad. When it is finished, it displays the Report Copy Results screen:

Figure 45: Copying Reports screen

3. Click the Done button.

Copy to System Reports

From the Select Destination screen, you selected the Other Copy Options radio button and selected CopytoSystem>Reports from the drop-down list:

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Figure 46: Select Destination screen

1. Click the Next button. The system displays the Copying Reports screen, indicating it is ready to begin the copy process:

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2. Click the Copy button. The system copies the report to the Reports node under System. When it is finished, it displays the Report Copy Results screen:

Figure 48: Copying Reports screen

3. Click the Done button.

What Information is NOT Copied?

The information that is copied to another location is the report’s entire setup: the fields, sorts, and filters.

The settings of the report’s properties are not copied—with the exception of the fields on the Date Selection tab and the Copies field on the Print Options tab.

Output format and similar destination settings are not copied to prevent the overwriting of export files. Those settings default to the same properties as if you created a new report.

Copying Multiple Reports

If you wish to copy more than one report from one company to one or more companies, you can run the utility described in “Report Setup Copy Utility” on page 63.

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From One Database to Another

Often are times when you need to copy a report from one company to another, in one database to another or from service bureau to client. This article provides a couple of utilities to facilitate that process. In both cases, you run the utility at the service bureau and then the extracted script against the database to import into, usually the client.

• Original Report Writer Copy Utility • Report Setup Copy Utility

Original Report Writer Copy Utility

The Report Writer Copy Utility is a utility for Millennium 3 that can copy a Report Writer report across different databases.

IMPORTANT

DO NOT use this utility to copy reports to more than one company in the same database. To accomplish that, see “From One Company to Another (Same Database)” on page 43. The tool is used in two steps. First, a program is used to extract the report from a database. The report is saved as a VB Script file that can then be copied or e-mailed to any location. Second, running the VB Script will import the report to any database.

Limitations

The settings of the report’s properties will not be copied over.

Installing the Utility

To set up this utility, perform the following steps:

1. Go to https://www.mpaysoftware.com/support/kb/view.asp?id=625 to download the following two files:

RWCopy.exe — Main program file

MSVBVM60.dll — Visual Basic runtime file

Note

The only place where you need to set up these files is the database from which the report will be extracted. The database where the report will be imported does not need this utility.

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\Program Files\Millennium 3\

3. Place MSVBVM60.dll in the Windows system directory; normally, the directory is

located in one of these locations: C:\Windows\System32

C:\WINNT\System32

If you cannot locate the Windows system directory, place MSVBVM60.dll in the same

directory as RWCopy.exe. If you already have a copy of MSVBVM60.dll on your

computer, you do not need to update it.

Extracting a Report

To extract a report from the original database, perform the following steps: 1. Run the RWCopy.exe program. The utility prompts you log in:

Figure 49: Log in to Millennium first

2. Log in using your Millennium user name and the database from which you want to copy a report.

The utility displays the Millennium Report Writer Export dialog:

Figure 50: Millennium Report Writer Export dialog

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4. Change the default name and location of the output file in the Filename field, if desired. The output file must be a .vbs (VBScript) file; do not change the file extension.

5. Click the Export button to create the file.

The utility creates the .vbs file in the location specified in the Filename field; if the file

already exists, it will be overwritten.

Importing a Report

To import a report to a different database, perform the following: 1. Run the .vbs file you created in “Extracting a Report.”

The .vbs file is a script that creates the report exactly as it existed in the source

database. The script prompts you to log in to a database:

Figure 51: Log in to Millennium first

2. Log in using your Millennium user name and the database into which you want to copy the report. Be sure it is a different database from the report’s original database. The utility displays the Select Company Code dialog:

Figure 52: Millennium Report Writer Export dialog

3. Type in the company ID and click the OK button. The utility automatically creates the report after you log in.

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Note

The utility uses the security level of the logged in user when it imports the report. Be aware that your security settings may prevent some data from being added or modified.

Report Setup Copy Utility

The ReportSetupCopy.exe utility copies the report definitions from all reporting

folders—including the First Payroll of Year and Last Payroll of Year folders—from one company to another. It was designed to allow a service bureau to set up reports on company A, then copy the entire reporting package to company B.

Use this utility to copy the properties you set up on various reports to another company. You copy the properties of Report Writer reports and/or Crystal & hard-coded reports.

Note

This utility does not copy the physical report files. It copies only the setup information and properties that are stored in the database.

This utility copies all reports selected by type within the given company. You can choose the location from which you copy, rather than being limited to copying from the Reporting node.

Important

In order for the report properties to be copied, the reports you want to copy must already exist in the standard reports list. If you want to copy any custom report that is not already set up, you must define its properties prior to running the utility.

Like the original utility (see “Original Report Writer Copy Utility” on page 60), you must run the utility to export a VBScript file, then run the script file to import the reports. To run the utility, perform the following:

1. Go to https://www.mpaysoftware.com/support/kb/view.asp?id=625 to download the utility (ReportSetupCopy.zip).

2. Unzip the file, ReportSetupCopy.exe, to a convenient location.

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Figure 53: Log in to Millennium first

4. Log in as an administrative user for best results. The utility displays the M3 Report Copy Utility screen:

Figure 54: M3 Report Copy Utility

The title bar of the window indicates the database into which you have logged in. You can click the Exit button if you meant to log into a different database.

5. Select the source company from the Select a Company to Copy Reports From drop-down list.

6. Use the Select Locations to Copy Reports From check boxes to choose the location from which you copy the reports.

7. Use the Report Types to Copy check boxes to choose which report types to include in your export.

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Note

You must have at least one location and one report type checked. The settings shown in the example above are the default settings; you still need to choose a location before copying the reports.

8. Enter the path and name of the export file in the last field of the window.

By default, the setting is C:\[company code]_reports.vbs; change the path and name accordingly. The file extension must be .vbs in order to run the import process

later on.

9. Once you have the proper settings, click the Begin Copying button. The utility creates the export file and informs you when it has finished.

10. To import the data, launch the VBScript created in the previous steps. 11. Log into the Millennium database into which you want to import the reports. 12. Indicate the company into which you want to copy the reports and click the OK

button.

If you receive an error, you probably entered an incorrect company code. Verify the proper company code and then run the script again.

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Figure

Figure 7:  The report type selects the relevant tables
Figure 8:  Fields tab showing the left-most columns
Figure 10:  Special fields in the Employee list
Figure 11:  Sorts tab
+7

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