Office of Enrollment Management Annual Report

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Office of Enrollment Management

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Welcome!

We’re pleased to share the 2012-2013 Enrollment Management Annual Report with you and thank you for taking the time to review it. This year our report focuses on the five-year anniversary of the implementation of Banner and related student systems. The way Enrollment Management staff and many others on campus do their work has changed dramatically in the past five years. With major change there are always challenges, but because of modern technology and the willingness of many to embrace its capabilities, there have been many more opportunities for improvements in service and efficiency.

Just five years ago Purdue student systems were in silos, required nightly interfaces, paper-intensive for students and extensive data entry for staff. Students conducted their business with the University in-person during business hours or though snail mail. During peak times, lines of students snaked through Hovde and Schleman Halls. As we planned and implemented not only new technologies, but also new business processes, real-time integration and providing online service to students 24-7 were the highest priorities. Additional guiding principles include capturing data once and at the source, ensuring that every step in a process is value-added, automating many routine tasks and eliminating steps that do not add value. We remain committed to rarely modifying our baseline enterprise software, but at the same time programming around the edges for continuous improvement. People are our most valuable resource and we want to save their time for handling complex issues and direct constituent service and communication. As a result, many Enrollment Management positions have shifted from routine data entry and passing of paper to higher skilled, results-oriented responsibilities. And those lines of students at the beginning of each term? They’re non-existent!

The successes and met challenges of the past five years could not have been possible without strong partnerships across campus, especially with our colleagues at the Student Systems Competency Center, but also with faculty governance, the academic advising community, International Students and Scholars, Student Success at Purdue and many others.

Five years ago at go-live, we knew it was only the beginning. Continuous improvement is never done, and we are constantly seeking innovation that adds value for students, faculty and staff. To that end, Enrollment Management has also invested in training staff with Six Sigma tools to identify and streamline processes. In addition, the recent implementations of electronic workflow, myPurdue Plan and other applications show great promise in further transforming service and supporting student success.

This report, along with additional publications, presentations, student data, higher education links and much more can be found on the Enrollment Management website: http://purdue.edu/enrollmentmanagement.

Pamela T. Horne

Associate Vice Provost for Enrollment Management Dean of Admissions

Of

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f Enroll

ment M

anagem

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Undergraduate Students

EN

ROLL

MEN

T MAN

AGEMENT

DASHBOARD

57.2%

42.8%

29,440

16,751

RESIDENT

7,749

NON-RESIDENT

DOMESTIC

4,490

INTERNATIONAL

S

T

U

D

EN

T

S

3/4

STUDENTS RECEIVED

FINANCIAL AID

Strategic enrollment management has allowed Purdue’s undergraduate population to stabilize in Fall 2013 at just under 30,000 students. Undergraduate enrollment, which is 468 fewer than last year, also reflects Purdue's goal to shift its total student population to 29,000-30,000 undergraduates and more than 9,000 graduate students by 2014 to continue serving students with high-quality instruction, while matching the size of the student body with its physical and instructional resources.

The 2013-2014 undergraduate population is enrolled across the University in similar patterns to last year. Just over 57% of the students are male and Engineering remains the largest academic college for undergraduate students.

25%

ENGINEERING

11%

SCIENCE

4%

EXPLORATORY STUDIES

14%

HEALTH&HUMAN SCIENCES

11%

TECHNOLOGY

9%

AGRICULTURE

11%

LIBERAL ARTS

9%

MANAGEMENT

2%

PHARMACY

2%

EDUCATION

1%

NON-DEGREE

1%

VETERINARY TECHNOLOGY

FEM

ALE

MALE

PELL

FEDERAL

6,600

RECIPIENTS

GRA

NT

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For the seventh consecutive year, the academic profile of Purdue’s first-year class has increased – a trend that contributes to better retention and graduation rates as well as overall student success. At 30,955, applications also reached an all-time high, and yield rates (admitted students who choose Purdue) rose for both in- and out-of-state students.

The 6,283 first-year students include 3,453 Indiana residents, 1,852 U.S. non-residents and 978 international students. The first-year class academic profile represents all-time highs in test scores and GPAs, and the largest jump in SAT scores in eight years. The average SAT scores increased by 24 points to a combined 1773 on the critical reading, math and writing sections; the average ACT score increased to 27.2 from 26.9. The average high school GPA is 3.70, up from 3.66 in 2012.

EN

ROLLM

EN

T M

ANA

GEMENT D

ASHBOA

RD

New Students

163,791

18,684

30,955

80,504

6,283

PROSPECT

APPLICANT

INQUIRY

ENROLL

ADMIT

SA

T

1773

CRITICAL READING

MATH & WRITING

27.2

ACT

COMPOSITE

3.70

GRADE POINT

AVERAGE

SELECTIVITY RATE -

60.4%

YIELD RATE -

33.6%

6,283

S

T

U

D

EN

T

S

&

22.2%

FIRST-GENERATION

*

PELL- ELIGIBLE

* of U.S. students

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Servicing

EN

ROLLM

EN

T M

ANA

GEMENT D

ASHBOA

RD

2

ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

ORIENTATIONS

2

FORUMS

ENROLLMENT MANAGEMENT

Students

DIRECT

STUDEN

T

E

MAIL

S

350

Campus

3,708

FINAL

EXAMS

DIPLOMAS

7400

8

COMMENCEMENT

CEREMONIES

PARTICPATION

77%

DATA

REQUESTS

1,219

SIX SIGMA

GREEN BELTS

24

COURSES SCHEDULED

SECTIONS

37,908

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Students depend on online access to their application – to see what steps are necessary to complete it, whether we’ve received the material they sent, and to check the status of their admission decision.

This 24/7 access to information has contributed to a 24-percent decrease in Admissions’ incoming phone calls, from 77,958 in 2008-2009 to 58,937 in 2012-2013.

Undergraduate

Admi

ssi

ons

NEARLY PAPERLESS SYSTEM

In 2008, six-foot-high cabinets lined the walls of Admissions offices. From transcripts to portfolios, they housed every piece of paper associated with 30,000 student applications. To “check-out” a student application, staff completed a paper form and inserted it in place of the file so other staff would know where to go if in need of the same application.

Today, those cabinets are gone, replaced by redesigned work spaces built for a nearly paperless application processing system. Banner has transformed how Admissions does business.

Beyond cost savings realized through greater efficiencies, Banner has helped Admissions reduce printing and postage costs as well.

Since most students use an online status check to view their admission decision, sending paper letters to denied students is unnecessary. Email prompts them to check the decisions online and a PDF of the decision letter is available through the application portal.

An improved online application has eliminated the need for paper applications. In 2009, Admissions was mailing thousands of paper applications to high school seniors. Today, all applications are submitted online.

COST REDUCTION

E

INFORMATION

24.0%

DECREASE

FI VE -YEAR

INC

OMI

NG P

HONE

CALL

S

Electronic information, and access to the most current information, is essential for nearly every aspect of Admissions’ work.

10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

77,958

58,937

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Messages are developed using fresh data, based on student action or inaction. Have they applied? Is their application complete? Have they accepted their offer of admission? Data determine which messages students receive.

0.00% 10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00% 60.00% 70.00% 80.00%

Purdue Pre-applicants Purdue Applicants Purdue Admits

0.00% 10.00% 20.00% 30.00% 40.00% 50.00% 60.00% 70.00% 80.00%

Purdue Pre-applicants Purdue Applicants Purdue Admits

Undergraduate

Admi

ssi

ons

COMMUNICATION

Over the course of a year, Admissions’ sends out over 1.7 million outbound emails. A daily data transfer between Banner and Admissions’ constituent relationship management (CRM) system ensures communication with high school students and transfer students is timely and differentiated.

CALCULATED

The effectiveness of timely, relevant communication is reflected in the tables below – Purdue Admissions email open and click-through rates as compared to the education industry average.

COLLABORATIVE

Academic colleges and schools also use the CRM for communication campaigns to promote opportunities to students with aligned interests and welcome those who are admitted to their programs.

CURRENT

21.5%

55.8%

72.4%

11.4%

2.4%

30.6%

INDUSTRY AVERAGE 26.2% 5.8%

OPEN R

AT

E

CLI

CK

-T

HRO

UGH RA

TE

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Division of Financial

Aid

In the five years since the implementation of Banner, the Division of Financial Aid (DFA) imaged and indexed the majority of student documentation, virtually eliminating paper. This lead to benefits such as increased office organization and efficiency, enhanced communication capabilities and streamlined processes.

Family sent or submitted documentation to financial aid counselor.

Financial aid counselor placed the file in a folder. The folder was placed in a large filing cabinet that was accessible to all financial aid staff members. This left

opportunity for files being misplaced.

After a specified period of time, the file was packed in a box and sent to the basement for long-term storage.

THEN. . .

NOW. . .

Family sends or submits documentation to financial aid counselor. The documentation is imaged (scanned) and indexed (filed) appropriately.

Once scanned, the paper documentation is kept for a specified period of time and then disposed of appropriately.

The documentation is permanently available to all staff members with access to Banner .

DAY IN THE LIFE OF A DOCUMENT

The paperless system allows staff to organize documentation in a more user-friendly fashion that can be shared among the entire department simultaneously.

Student documentation is logged in Banner using specific codes for the document processing status. Additionally, staff leave notes in Banner to alert other staff members to key elements such as the physical location of a document. This has led to greater efficiency, rather than rooting through a paper file scattered across a staff member’s desk or piles of folders locked in a sea of file cabinets.

Staff flag student records with award eligibility for major institutional awards such as the Trustee & Presidential Scholarship before the student has been packaged for financial aid. These indicators aid in identifying targeted populations for preliminary communications and reports.

Upgrading from paper to electronic reports provided many benefits such as increased efficiency, better use of physical storage space and improved accessibility to inform operations and strategy.

UPGRADED REPORTS

ENHANCED RECORDS

INCREASED ORGANIZATION

DOCUMENTATION

The removal of a large number of filing cabinets that held student files created about 150 square feet of free space for DFA to reconfigure the front desk area and construct a new student counseling area, to be unveiled later this year.

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5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Division of Financial

Aid

DFA uses a proactive approach to communications and attributes the reduction in in-person and phone communication to strategic electronic communications and advances made with Banner.

COMMUNICATION

2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

13,548

16,182

19.4%

INCREASE

FI VE -YEAR

Sending student emails was previously a cumbersome process that could last two business days. Today emails are sent using a quick and easy process that can be done within one business day.

The ability to send specific messages for students through Banner has created customized, proactive communication efforts.

Emails now have better graphics and formatting, which is an improvement over the text-only emails that the department used before the implementation of Banner.

AESTHETICS

PROCESS IMPROVEMENT

SEGMENTED MESSAGING

Emails received through FA Contact increased from 13,548 in 2008 to 16,182 in 2012, a 19.4% increase, showing that students and families utilize electronic communications more and more. Targeted, proactive electronic communications and increased presence on the web have contributed to the reduction in calls and walk-in traffic in DFA.

20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

54,574

147,753

39.2%

DECREASE

FI VE -YEAR

63.1%

DECREASE

FI VE -YEAR

11,511

18,935

PHONE

CALL

S

INC

OMI

NG EMAIL

S

W

ALK I

N TR

AFFIC

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Registrar

ELIMINATING PAPER

In the last five years, the Office of the Registrar steadily decreased paper and printing through electronic processes and digital technologies. Remaining paper processes are expected to be eliminated in next two years with implementation of electronic work flow.

The Registrar began using the Xtender imaging system to scan and store electronic historical student files that date back to 1968. This application provides easy access to retrieve archived records for inquires from students, advisors, faculty and campus staff within minutes. The application has also eliminated the paper process and storage.

PRE-BANNER

FIVE-YEARS LATER

One of the most significant developments is an e-transcript system that allows current and former students to order electronic transcripts. Electronic transcripts eliminate printing and postage costs, as well as reduce delivery time to 15 minutes or less. Printed transcript orders have decreased by 1000-2000 per month. Transcripts remain free of charge, unlike most peer universities.

E-TRANSCRIPTS

E-DOCUMENTING

E-TICKETING

The implementation of the Graduation Tab on the student portal provides an excel format download of student commencement ticket requests. The excel file easily flows into Purdue’s ticketing vendor, Ticketmaster. Ticketmaster generates the electronic tickets and the student receives an e-mail with a unique username and password to their electronic tickets. This system allows 24/7 secure service to students prior to the event.

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Enrol

lment

Ma

na

gement

Ana

lysis &

Repo

rting

Data driven decision making has become easier for all departments on campus. A major factor for this success is that Enrollment Management has made reporting widely available through the Enterprise Reporting Tool (Cognos), through pdf files on the Enrollment Management

website, and sharing of reports through SharePoint.

DATA DRIVEN DECISION MAKING

REPORTING

ACCESS

TRAINING

Over 100 student data reports are available in the Cognos Public folder. These validated and authoritative reports are authored by report authors in the Enrollment Management offices as well exports in other areas. The Cognos Validated reports are accessible for Purdue employees with a Cognos license. For those who do not have a Cognos license, summary reports on enrollment and degrees are available on the EM website and Admissions Summary reports are available on a SharePoint site.

At the university, there is no shortage of data. Combine this with the demand for data to drive key decisions, it becomes imperative that there exist one source of truth. The Cognos environment is built on the authoritative Student Information System (Banner) data warehouse. This data warehouse has been customized to meet daily operational needs as well as strategic and longitudinal historical reporting needs. Access to the right data and the many publicly available reports has given personnel in the academic departments the ability to answer key questions to facilitate decision making.

It’s essential to release authoritative data and also provide the tools to access the data. However, without the proper data training, using can become overwhelming. Enrollment

Management provides training sessions for specific groups such as the academic advising community, one-on-one training for Cognos users, and customized training for specific departmental needs.

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Bursar

ELECTRONIC BILLING AND PAYMENT

$50,000 $100,000 $150,000 $200,000 $250,000 $300,000 $350,000 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13

$286,329

$216,156

$55,251

BANNER

IMPLEMENTATION

JULY 2008 JULY 2009

EBILLING

IMPLEMENTATION

1098T ELECTRONIC

DELIVERY

JANUARY 2010 Since the initial implementation of Banner, the Bursar has implemented electronic billing and payment.

The Bursar implemented electronic invoices in July 2009 and delivered the 1098T tax form electronically starting in January 2010. The chart below represents the savings in providing this service to our student electronically. Since 2008, the Bursar has reduced postage and paper expenses by approximately 80%.

Electronic payment is the preferred payment method. The success of this project has led to reduced costs and processing, as well as improving accuracy and customer service. In September 2010, the Bursar closed their lock-box relationship to further reduce costs and now process all forms of payment in-house.

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Office of Enrollment Management

Schleman Hall of Student Services

475 Stadium Mall Drive

West Lafayette, IN 47907-2050

EA/EOU

enrollmentmanagement@purdue.edu

www.purdue.edu/enrollmentmanagement

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