City University of Hong Kong

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City University of Hong Kong

Information on a Course

offered by Department of Applied Social Sciences with effect from Semester A in 2014 / 2015

Part I

Course Title: Introduction to Social Work

Course Code: SS2105

Course Duration: One Semester

No. of Credit Units: 3

Level: B2

Medium of Instruction: English

Medium of Assessment: English

Prerequisites: (Course Code and Title): Nil

Precursors: (Course Code and Title): Nil

Equivalent Courses: (Course Code and Title): Nil Exclusive Courses: (Course Code and Title): Nil

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Part II

1. Course Aims

As the first social work course to social work students, this course will introduce to students the generic and generalist components of social work as a profession, including its professional value, ethics, knowledge, process and cross-cultural considerations. Social work students hold a set of values and knowledge about social needs and problems before they start their professional training. In this course, students will evaluate and align their personal values with the professional base and from a macro system perspective. They will also achieve a theoretical orientation to see social needs and problems from the eco-systems perspectives. In the course, of shifting from personal to professional and macro, students will discover their new social responses to human problems and social issues and will take social work training and practice an inventive and creative process, rather than just an instructional process.

This course introduces students to:

1. The generic and generalist base of social work practice including its value, ethnics, goals and methods;

2. The eco-systems perspectives and how do these perspectives help to create and adopt new professional discourses and responses when analyzing and assessing the needs and problems of individuals, families, groups and communities;

3. The process model of social work helping and how this professional process could be created through blending personal competence with professional values and knowledge; and

4. The awareness and sensitivity of the cultural differences between the social origin of social work practice which is the western culture and its adoption to the eastern culture.

2. Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

No. CILOs Weighting

1. Describe the core social work values and the common base of social work and to blend it creatively with professional goals when applied to use;

15%

2. Create solutions to ethical dilemmas and to take into account of personal and professional values;

15% 3. Identify old perspectives and discover how to make possible

to innovate new eco-systems perspectives in analyzing and assessing the needs and problems of individuals, families, groups and communities; and

40%

4. Describe the process model and cultural dimensions of social work helping and to search for a creative blend of all levels of competence in social work practice.

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3. Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs)

(Indicative of likely activities and tasks designed to facilitate students’ achievement of the CILOs. Final details will be provided to students in their first week of attendance in this course)

CILO No.

TLA1 TLA2 TLA3 TLA4 TLA5 Hours/course

(if applicable) CILO 1 CILO 2 CILO 3 CILO 4 TLA1: Lectures

This is an introduction course to social work as a profession as well as a theoretical perspective to human problems and social services. Students have to understand the core components which contribute to make social work a professional as well as an academic subject. From individual values to the constructs of social problems, students need to reveal their own personal values and have to understand the macro theories which contribute perspectives to understand social problems. Lectures will be used as the major media to introduce these personal and social perspectives.

TLA2: Tutorials and small group discussions

Tutorials are designed to facilitate students to discuss in smaller groups and in a personal participatory way about social work values, ethics, ecological perspectives and cultural awareness. All topics are run in the way that students will learn these concepts from a personal stance to a societal level, finally making a connection which is similar to the social work perspective, that all individual and social problems are interrelated in an ecological and systematic way.

TLA3: Audio visual materials

To stimulate students’ interest to further understanding the link between person and environment in an ecological way, audio visual materials including television series and movie scripts are used in lectures to demonstrate some unique features of social work values, ethnics and other theoretical concepts.

TLA4: Case demonstrations

Case demonstrations and stories are also used to stimulate students’ interest in lectures. Professional requirements when responding to social needs will also be demonstrated in classes so as to show the students the professional expectations and norms in practices. TLA5: Field experience

Students will be divided into smaller groups and be arranged to try out the basic helping skills in an NGO for one 4 hours session. Students will make use of this field experience for writing one short paper.

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4. Assessment Tasks/Activities

(Indicative of likely activities and tasks designed to assess how well the students achieve the CILOs. Final details will be provided to students in their first week of attendance in this course)

CILO No. Type of Assessment

Tasks/Activities

Weighting (if applicable) State CILOS in percentages

Remarks

CILO 1,2,3,4 AT1: Quiz 30%

CILO 1,2,3 AT2: Short papers 70%

AT1: Quiz (30%)

A quiz is designed to test students’ knowledge and understanding of the core common base of social work including its professional values and ethics and major theoretical concepts which are essential for them to be able to work towards a registration to the profession. AT2: Short papers (70%)

Two short papers will be titled either on social work values, ecological orientation of social work or social work process model will be designed for students to deepen their understanding on those core elements through paper writing and to encourage them to develop interest to a wider spectrum of topics.

5. Grading of Student Achievement: Refer to Grading of Courses in the Academic Regulations.

Letter Grade

Grading criteria in relation to CILOs A+

A A-

Demonstrate in an excellent way that values, ethnics are the foundation of the social work as a profession and that alignment of personal values and ethics to the professional ones are the key to professional practice. Critically apply eco-system perspectives and social work process model to learn and write when preparing to be a generalist practitioner. Strong evidence of cultural thinking; good organization, capacity to analyse and synthesize; superior grasp of subject matter; evidence of extensive knowledge base when presenting ideas in paper writing.

B+ B B-

Reasonable understanding that values, ethnics are the foundation of the social work as a profession and that alignment of personal values and ethics to the professional ones are the key to professional practice. Showing reasonable ability to apply eco-system perspectives and social work process model to learn and write when preparing to be a generalist practitioner. Evidence of grasp of cultural learning, some evidence of critical capacity and analytic ability; reasonable understanding of issues; evidence of familiarity with literature.

C+ C C-

Ability to understand that values, ethnics are the foundation of the social work as a profession. Show a basic understanding when applying eco-system perspectives and social work process model to learn and write when preparing to be a generalist practitioner. Showing that one is profiting from the learning in this course that such subject matters are important and one is able to refer to some of the concepts to solve a problem in a simple way.

D Sufficient evident that one is familiar with social work values and ethics and to know the concepts of eco-system and social work process model. The levels of familiarity with the subject matter have enabled the student to progress without repeating the course.

F Little evidence of familiarity with the subject matter; weakness in critical and analytic skills; limited, or irrelevant use of literature. Could hardly name and refer to values and ethics and social work concepts to analyse and write.

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Part III

1. Keyword Syllabus

Values and ethnics; values and ethnics in dilemma; social system; ecological; ecosystem; person-in-environment practice and adaptation; generic and generalist bases of social work practice; social work process models; social work as a response to social problems; cultural dimensions of social work practice.

2. Recommended Reading

Text(s):

Essential Reference

Johnson, Louise C. (1992). Social work practice: A generalist approach (4th/6th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Johnson, L. C., & Yanca, S. (2004). Social work practice: A generalist approach (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson/Allyn and Bacon.

Miley, K. K., O’Melia, M., & DuBois, B. (1995-2004 Editions). Generalist social work practice: An empowering approach. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Module Reading List

Allen-Meares, P., & Lane, B. A. (1987). “Grounding social work practice in theory: Ecosystems”, in Social Casework.

Anderson, Joseph (1981). Social work methods and processes. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsworth Publishing Company.

Anderson, Joseph (1988). Foundations of social work practice. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

Anderson, Joseph (1982). “Generic and generalist practice and the BSW curriculum”, in Journal of Education for Social Work.

Anderson, Joseph (1984). “Towards generic practice: The interactional approach”, in Social Casework: The Journal of Contemporary Social Work.

Barry, Norman (1990). Concepts in the social sciences: Welfare. Milton Keynes: Open University Press.

Bartlett, Harriett M. (1970). The common base of social work practice. Washington: National Association of Social Workers.

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Bisman, Cynthia (1994). Social work practice: Cases and principles. Pacific Grove, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

Bond, M. H. (Ed.). (1986). The psychology of the Chinese people. Hong Kong: Oxford University Press.

Brammer, Lawrence M. (1993). The helping relationship: Process and skills (5th ed.) Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Brower, A. M. (1988). “Can the ecological model guide social work practice?” in Social Service Review, September, pp. 411-429.

Brown, John A. (1992). Diagnostic formulation or assessment process. In John A. Brown, Handbook of social work practice (pp.150-162). Springfield, Ill.: Charles, C. Thomas. Butrym, Z. T. (1992). The nature of social work. London: Macmillan.

Cheetham, J. (Ed.). (1982). Social work and ethnicity. London: George Allen and Unwin. Cheung, F. M. (1984). Preferences in help-seeking among Chinese students. Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, 8, 1-10.

Cheung, F. M. C. (1985). Modes of presentation and help-seeking for psychology problems among Chinese. In C. Chiao (Ed.), Proceedings of the conference on modernization and Chinese culture. Hong Kong: Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Chow, N. W. S. (1987). Western and Chinese ideas of social welfare. International Social Work, 30(1), 31-41.

Clifford, D. (1998). Assessing needs, risks and strengths. In D. Clifford, Social assessment theory and practice: A multi-disciplinary framework (pp.115-136). Aldershot, Hants; Brookfield, Vt.: Ashgate Publishing Limited.

Cohen, Neil A. (Ed.). (1992). Child welfare: A multicultural focus. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Compton, Beulah & Galaway, Burt (1979). Social work processes. Homewood, Ill.: The Dorsey Press.

Corey, G., Corey, M., & Callanan, P. (1993). Issues and ethics in the helping profession (4th ed.). Pacific Grove, Calif.: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.

Dailey, Wilda J. (1974). “Professionalism and the public dollar”, in Social Casework.

De Hoyos, G. (1989). “Person-in-environment: A tri-level practice model”, in Social Casework, March, pp.131-138.

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DePaulo, B. M., Nadler, A., & Fisher, J. d. (Eds.). (1983). New directions in helping (Vols. 1-3). New York: Academic Press.

DuBosi, B., & Miley, K. K. (1996). Social work: An empowering profession (2nd ed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.

Emanuel, Ezekiel J. (1991). The ends of human life: Medical ethics in a liberal polity. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Flanagan, Owen J. (1991). Varieties of moral personality: Ethics and psychological realism. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press.

Fizdale, Ruth (1974). “The voluntary agency-structure vs. accountability” in Social Casework.

Garvin, C., & Seabury, B. (1984). Interpersonal practice in social work: Processes and procedures. New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

Germain, Carel B., & Gitterman, Alex (1980). The life model of social work practice. New York: Columbia University Press.

Germain, Carel B. (1978), “General-systems theory and ego psychology: An ecological perspective” in Social Service Review.

Germain, Carel B. (1981). The ecological approach to people-environment transaction. Social Casework, 62(6), 323-331.

Gilbert, N., & Specht, H. (1986). Dimensions of social welfare policy. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall.

Green, J. W. (1982). Cultural awareness in the human services. Englewood Cliffs, N. J.: Prentice Hall.

Greene, Roberta R. (1999). General systems theory. In Roberta R. Greene, (Ed.), Human behaviour theory and social work practice (2nd ed.) (pp.215-249). New York: Aldine de Gruyter.

Hepworth, Dean H., & Larsen, Jo Ann (1986). Direct social work practice: Theory and skills. Belmont, Calif.: Wadsowth Publishing Company.

Heus, Michael, & Pincus, Allen (1986). The creative generalist: A guide to social work practice. Barneveld, Wis.: Micamar Publishing.

Hewitt, Martin (1992). Welfare, ideology and need: Developing perspectives on the welfare state. Savage, Md.: Barnes & Noble Books.

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Ho, David Y. F. (1985). Cultural values and professional issues in clinical psychology: Implications from the Hong Kong experience. Washington, D. C.: American Psychological Association.

Ho, David Y. F. (1979). “Therapeutic intervention for parents and children in Hong Kong: Problems, frustration, and reflections from a cross-cultural perspective” in Hong Kong Journal of Social Work.

Hodge, Peter (Ed.). (1980). Culture and social work: Education and practice in Southeast Asia. Hong Kong: Heinemann Asia.

Howe, D (1979). An introduction to social work theory: Making sense in practice. Hants, U. K.: Wilwood House.

Jordan, Bill (1990). Social work in an unjust society. New York: Harvester Wheatsheaf. Kemp, S. P., Whittaker, J. K., & Tracy, E. M. (1997). An introduction to person- environment practice. In S. P. Kemp, J. K. Whittaker, & E. M., Tracy, Person-environment practice: The social ecology of interpersonal helping (pp.1-19). New York: Aldine de Gruyter.

Kilpatrick, A. C., & Holland, T. P. (1995). Working with families: An integrative model by level of functioning. Boston: Allyn an Bacon.

Kirst-Ashman, K. K., & Hull, G. H. (1997). Introduction to generalist practice with organizations and communities. In K. K. Kirst-Ashman, & G. H. Hull, Generalist practice with organizations and communities (pp.1-42). Chicago: Nelson-Hall Publishers.

Lasan, D. B. (1975). Indigenization with a purpose. International Social Work, 18(10), 24-26.

Lewis, H. (1986). The intellectual base of social work practice: Tools for thought in a helping profession. New York: Haworth Press.

Livingston, Martha, & Lowinger, Paul (1983). The minds of the Chinese people: Mental health in new China. Englewood Cliff, N. J.: Prentice Hall.

Ma, J. (1987). The practice of family therapy in Hong Kong: A cultural dilemma. Hong Kong Journal of Mental Health, 16, 56-62.

Marsella, Anthony J., DeVos, G., & Hsu, Francis L. K. (1985). Culture and self: Asian and Western perspectives. New York: Tavistock Publication.

McMahon, M. O. (1996). The foundation for social work practice: A holistic view. In M. O. McMahon, The general method of social work practice: A generalist perspective (3rd ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

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Morales, Armando T., & Sheafor, Bradford W. (1992). Social work: A profession of many faces (6th ed.). Boston: Allyn and Bacon.

Midgley, J. (1981). Professional imperialism: Social work in the Third World. London: Heinemann.

McCready, William (Ed.). (1983). Culture, ethnicity, and identity: Current issues in research. New York: Academic Press.

Netting, F. Ellen, Kettner, Peter M., & McMurtry, Steven L. (1998). An introduction to macro practice in social work. In F. Ellen Netting, Peter M. Kettner, & Steven L. McMurtry, Social work macro practice (2nd ed.) (pp.3-34). New York: Longman.

Netting, F. Ellen, Kettner, Peter M., & McMurtry, Steven L. (1998). Understanding the problem and the target population. In F. Ellen Netting, Peter M. Kettner, & Steven L. McMurtry, Social work macro practice (2nd ed.) (pp.68-102). New York: Longman.

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