: Master of Science in Computer Science

Full text

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Graduate Program Prioritization Criteria and Questions/Elements

Department

: Computer Science

Program

: Master of Science in Computer Science

1. History, Development and Expectations of the Program

a)

(457/550 wds + 1 image + 1 table)

The MSc in Computer Science @ Southern started with its first course

offerings in the Fall of 2001. The program was structured around 3 core

courses and three concentrations each providing a selection of 6 courses. The

concentrations were: 1.) Visualization and Intelligent Systems, 2.)

Distributed Computing and 3.) Computer Systems.

To complete the program, a

graduate student would need to

complete 36 credits of course

work and thesis development.

The program required students

to complete 9 credits of core

courses + 12 credits of

concentration courses + 6 credits

from another concentration + 3

credits from yet another

concentration. In addition to the

courses, a graduate student

needed to complete 6 credits of

Thesis development.

The program was tailored for

students trying to enrich their already existing careers (Conc 2 and 3), or

preparing to enter strong academic doctoral programs (Conc 1).

All classes have been strategically scheduled after 5pm (5-7:30 and

7:35-10:05pm intervals). Below is a table showing the number of course offerings

per semester.

Fa01 Sp02 Su02 Fa02 Sp03 Su03 Fa03 Sp04 Su04 Fa04 Sp05 Su05 Fa05 Sp06

4 5 2 5 5 5 5 4 4 3 3 4 3 3

Fa06 Sp07 Fa07 Sp08 Fa08 Sp09 Fa09 Sp10 Su10 Fa10 Sp11 Su11 Fa11 Sp12

2 3 3 3 3 3 4 5 1 3 4 1 4 4

Fa12 Sp13 Fa13 Sp14

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Typically the program will offer 3 or 4 courses per semester, with enrollment

of approximately 12-15 students each. The student population is very diverse

in terms of background, experience and ethnicity. However, our typical

student holds a daytime job and takes classes part time.

Given the significant changes in the technology areas of knowledge, the

department decided to update the program with new courses and

concentrations. The new program was proposed and approved with its first

course offerings starting in Spring 2014.

The new program requires students to take core courses, and to select one of

the two available concentrations: 1) Software Development and 2)

CyberSecurity. Students must complete 4 core courses + 4 concentration

courses + 2 courses outside the concentration. In addition, students are

expected to complete 6 credits of thesis work. The total of the new program is

also 36 credits.

Students that approach our new program are diverse: significant number of

prospective students are holding Bachelors or Masters in some other

discipline, and are working full time. Recently we also noticed an increase of

the student interest coming from the Veterans Office.

Students having degrees in other discipline are required to take a pre

-requisite course (typically during Summers) in order to get ready for the

program.

Recruiting efforts include contacting employers of current students (graduate

and undergraduate), utilizing Graduate School marketing efforts, and placing

Google advertisements. A Google search for “Master in Computer Science

Connecticut” would typically return Computer Science @ Southern link as its

first search result.

The features that students look for are: the streamlined duration of the

program, the total cost, and the location.

We do receive some interest from international and out-of-state students, but

the prohibitive out-of-state cost makes Southern very unattractive.

(3)

b)

( 124/150wds)

There is a clear correlation between the market and the interest in our

program: typically when the market is slow, the interest in our program

increases.

There is a related correlation visible at the exit point: a significant number of

students do not finish their capstone thesis work due to achieving better

employment before the completion of the program.

The department reached out to an international recruiting agency (who had

worked with other state institutions) proposing to deliver a cohort of

graduate students from China. They did not ask for a reduced tuition rate.

Unfortunately, the talks with administration yielded to a proposal rejection.

Our undergraduate program’s national accreditation body (ABET) helped us

establish stronger IT support for both our undergraduate and graduate

programs.

(4)

2. External Demand for the Program

a)

(482/450 wds)

i)

Academic

Year

Program

Applications Accepted Acceptance %

2008-2009

MS-CSC

15

11

73%

2009-2010

MS-CSC

16

13

81%

2010-2011

MS-CSC

17

12

71%

2011-2012

MS-CSC

21

9

43%

2012-2013

MS-CSC

23

10

43%

The first offering of our program was in Fall 2001. At that time, the dot-com

bubble had clearly deflated, and the interest for graduate education and

career changes increased significantly. The program did not have any

problems offering (and filling) 5 courses per semester.

Shortly after the strong start, the number of admissions applications

followed a downward turn. This was due to a couple of reasons, namely 1)

the IT market recovery from the dot-com bust began generating more jobs

thus reducing the need for graduate training, and 2) the low interest in

undergraduate computer science programs due to the (incorrect) perception of

no-job prospects lead to a so-called “shrinking pipeline”, and 3) companies

cutting back on tuition reimbursement programs.

To address the lower number of applications, the department initiated a

marketing campaign that included contacting employers, recruiting at

graduate college fairs and placing Google ads.

The department also changed the program curriculum with completely new

concentrations making the program more up-to-date and more attractive to

prospective students without undergraduate degrees in computer science.

We are excited to report that interest in our new program is increasing,

which is reflected in the most recent number of applications.

The average acceptance rate has been between 50%(last ASC report) -60%

(the provided table). Students are not accepted if their academic history does

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not provide rigorous background for the program, if they do not meet their

conditional acceptance requirements, or if they leave Southern for another

institution during the admission process. Some of the regional schools with

Masters degrees in Computer Science that provide competition for SCSU

include: University of New Haven, Sacred Hart University, Quinnipiac

University and the University of Connecticut.

The department is finding ways to attract more students seeking higher

application numbers. The department is satisfied with the quality of students,

and would keep the same acceptance criteria in place.

(6)

ii)

Enrollments

Fall

'08

Spr

'09

Fall

'09

Spr

'10

Fall

'10

Spr

'11

Fall

'11

Spr

'12

Fall

'12

Spr

'13

Fall

Avg

Spr

Avg

Female

1

1

3

1

2

3

4

2

1

3

2

2

Male

13

14

18

19

16

20

21

18

15

12

17

17

Total

14

15

21

20

18

23

25

20

16

15

19

19

Full-Time

5

2

7

6

8

9

9

5

3

4

6

5

Part-Time

9

13

14

14

10

14

16

15

13

11

12

13

The department has resources (expertise and experience) to deliver at least 3

graduate courses per semester. This is an absolute minimum of course

offerings per semester in order to support our full time (9-credit minimum)

student population. It also serves our part-time population with a quicker

way to complete their degree.

The most effective course registration limit is 15 students per course since all

of our courses have hands-on requirements in our dedicate laboratories that

are limited in space to 15 students.

For the 3 courses per semester, the approximate number of CSC registered

students would be around 20 per semester ( 5 full time x 3 courses + 12-15

part time taking max 2 courses = 5x3+15x2= 45 yielding average of 15

students per class) .

The majority of our student population is clearly part-time students. Our

students typically have full-time jobs and are arriving on campus after 5pm.

The number of female students reflects the underrepresentation of female

(graduate and undergraduate) students in areas of Computer Science across

the US.

b)

( 122/150 wds)

The majority of our graduate students are already employed and taking

classes part-time. Some of the companies that employ our students are

offering tuition reimbursement and are encouraging employees to continue

their training and education. The remaining students are paying from their

own pockets. In either case, their education empowers them to take more

significant roles at their place of work. Some companies that employ our

students are: PepsiCo, Pfizer, and Avon. Other students are employed by

smaller companies, either start-ups, or long established ones.

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There is a significant interest coming from our military veterans.

The State of Connecticut benefits from our graduates by having stronger

leaders, more qualified and a highly trained work force, and also providing

opportunities for our veterans.

c)

(99/100 wds)

The competition (both regional and national) in the areas of our

concentrations is strong. The type of students that we attract are in-state

residents, already working in the industry looking to improve their careers.

They are commuters and taking classes part time in the evenings.

Prospective international candidates, and candidates on Visas working in CT

repeatedly shy away from Southern due to the significant out-of-state cost,

despite the fact that many of them are, and have been, paying CT taxes for

many years. Offering incentives (especially in-state tuition for those paying

CT taxes) would undoubtedly increase our application pool.

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3. Internal Demand for the Program

a)

Other Programs (85/100 wds)

Credits Generated

AY 08/09

AY 09/10

AY 10/11

AY 11/12

AY 12/13

Total Academic Credits

180

273

219

246

183

Major Credits

147

219

198

225

144

Total Students

60

91

73

82

61

Non Major Credits %

18.33333

19.78022

9.589041

8.536585

21.31148

Below is the list of CSC prerequisites for other departments (source Grad

Catalog)

SCE 573 has CSC 501 as one of the possible prerequisites.

MSc in Applied Physics: CSC541 as a required course.

In the past, the department used to offer: CSC 515 and CSC 516, Computer

Programming I & II for Behavioral Sciences.

None of the above listed courses are required in our program (no overlap).

CSC 541 (a program elective), typically enrolls 12-15 students per session.

The last offering was in Spring 2014.

b)

Undergraduate Program (97/100wds)

The interest from our undergraduate population is twofold:

Our high-achieving undergraduate students are able to take a graduate

course in favor of an undergraduate requirement.

Upon graduation, some of our undergraduates continue their graduate

education with us. Typically, new graduates will seek employment first

(usually due to financial stress), and after some time in industry, they

return to SCSU for their graduate work.

The department is currently establishing a pathway for our undergraduates

to a Master’s Degree with an accelerated 5-year program. The proposal is in

its development phase and will go forward this semester (Spring 2014).

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c)

Reliance (41/100 wds)

There is no overlap in our programs. The above mentioned courses are not

required by our program. The department occasionally reaches out to other

departments for possible academic collaboration.

Based on this reasoning, the department feels that the reliance is minimal.

d)

Campus services ( 44/100 wds)

The department does not have a formal engagement with other on-campus

entities. Having said that, within our courses and, during the thesis

development phase, various projects with on-campus clients were sought (e.g

Office of Assessment has benefited from some of our graduate student

projects).

e)

Other ( 68/100 wds)

We have had some interest from graduate students in other disciplines

looking to take a number of CSC courses (in lieu of a graduate minor). Also a

few students expressed their interest in having a ‘double’ graduate major,

which is currently not allowed by the School of Graduate Studies.

Our graduate program accepts non-major applications: there is some interest

from students coming from other undergraduate programs (Physics,

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4. Quality of Program Inputs and Processes

a) Faculty ( 213/450 wds)

There are 11 full time faculty in our department. We have a faculty search, but also we have a faculty retiring. (The number of faculty will stay the same.)

Out of 11 faculty, 9 of them are actively involved with the program: new program proposal, new courses proposals, teaching graduate courses, mentoring graduate thesis. On very rare occasions we would utilize services from highly qualified

adjunct instructors for a specific course instruction. The adjunct pool would typically consist of our retried faculty. The use of adjuncts is not crucial to our program delivery.

Our 9 graduate faculty all have terminal degrees and do have areas of expertise that benefit our program. They expertise closely matches our course offerings, and our graduate students interests in selection of Thesis topics.

Our graduate faculty pool can easily provide services to our current student population. The department typically offers 3 graduate courses per semester; in addition the faculty is engaged in mentoring Thesis work. We believe that our full time faculty resources have a potential to deliver 4-5 courses per semester and mentor more students with the current pool. Increase in the number of graduate courses would create a shortage of instructors for our undergraduate courses, but this void could be easily covered with an adjunct pool.

b) Curriculum (174 /250 wds)

The areas of knowledge in Computer Science field are ever-changing and expanding daily. The rapid change in relevancy of material, methods and policies used in the industry creates challenges in the academic environment.

In order to address those changes, the department proceeded with a completely new program proposal. This proposal was approved, and the first courses from the new program are offered in Spring 2014.

We believe that the new program is more relevant, updated, but still rigorous. With this new program we expect Southern to be more attractive for in-state students. The curriculum is structured in such a way to enable students to gain depth and breadth in the Computer Science areas. Students are expected to take 4 core courses (foundations) + 4 concentration courses (depth) + 2 courses from outside the

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At this point we offer two concentrations (considered to be ‘hot’ in the industry): 1.) Software Development and 2.) Cybersecurity. More concentrations could be added depending on the students; interests.

c) Dynamic (287/300 wds)

Given the speed of changes in the Computer Science areas of knowledge, it is crucial to have a dynamic and up-to-date curriculum. During the tenure of our original program (started in Fall 2001), the department had been constantly adapting existing courses to new materials. New additional courses had been proposed

numerous times, but the amount of changes reached the point where a new program was deemed inevitable. New program was approved and its first offerings were scheduled for Spring 2014.

Faculty driven: Our faculty loves exploring new technologies and methodologies. This is evident in frequent syllabus changes that include new materials, lab exercises, and methods of delivery. Again, the new program was a result of the curricular changes that needed a completely new program framework.

Student driven: Our classes are structured to enable students to research the Computer Science field with their own indecent eyes. Majority of our classes include student projects, where students propose projects according to their interests.

Completed projects are presented in the classroom, hence enabling students to learn from each other, become experts in the presented area, and brush upon their

communication skills. Students’ suggested topics serve as a guideline for the next offering of the same course, or a suggestion for a new one.

Assessment cycle observed: Goals and objective are clearly posted on each course’s syllabus. During the last presentation session, students and the instructor discuss the achievements of such objectives. Also faculty frequently engages in the

discussion of quality of the achievements, and possible changes are suggested and implemented. Alumni are easily tracked by means of personal contacts, and are surveyed. Alumni get-together meetings are organized for the networking and data-gathering purposes. Facebook alumni webpage is the process of updating.

d) Other (135 /200wds.)

The quality of incoming students is reasonably strong. (E.g. average GPA for Sp 12 was 3.38, Fa 12 3.36). Our typical student has a daytime job taking classes part-time. This yields to a level of maturity ad clear expectations. Some quality students do not complete their graduate work due to their early career achievements: they

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would obtain a better job position before they completed their thesis work and would never return back to Southern.

Or new program is carefully designed to fill the gap that exists in the state. For example: University of New Haven had a long standing Computer Forensics

program, but our new concentration in CyberSecurity would not overlap with UNH. We believe that our program could benefit from a slight increase in the number of applicants given the resources we already have.

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5. Quality of Program Outcomes

a) Assessment Data/ Outcomes (892/900 wds) ( 2 graduate school provided tables not counted)

Given that we do have a very new program we present two lists of program outcomes: for the ‘old’ and the ‘new’ programs:

[‘Old’ Program]

Upon successful completion of the MS in CS program, graduates will be:

LO #1 Able to demonstrate knowledge of theoretical foundations and formal methods in computer science. LO #2 Able to communicate effectively.(written and oral)

LO #3 Able to analyze and evaluate existing computing solutions and create innovative solutions to research problems utilizing current/emerging computing technologies.

LO #4 Prepared for employment in a computing-related industry or for further post-graduate study. [‘New’ Program]

Upon successful completion of the MS in CS program, graduates will be:

LO #1 able to demonstrate sophisticated knowledge of software design and

development cycle

LO #2 able to engage and apply secure practices in any computing environments

LO #3 able to communicate effectively in both a written and oral manner. LO #4 able to analyze and evaluate existing computing solutions and create innovative solutions to research problems utilizing current or

emerging computing technologies,

LO #5 prepared for employment in a computer-related industry or for further post-graduate study The new program first course offerings are scheduled for Spring 2014. At this point there is neither data collection nor analysis phase.

To discuss assessment methods for data collection we used in the ‘old’ program we provide the following table:

Learning

Outcome What and Where How

LO #1 3 core courses

Focus primarily on the theoretical foundations and formal methods of computer science.

Individual student homework

assignments, examinations and final projects;

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CSC 521: Algorithms: Students are required to analyze and develop both the theoretical and empirical complexity of a variety of

algorithms.

CSC 523: Formal Languages: Students are required to design and implement automats. Students are also required to conduct

independent research in areas of theoretical computation.

CSC 525: Advanced Operating Systems: Students are required to implement at least one project where a theoretical result is used to guide the design of a computer system.

Graduate Alumni Survey

LO #2 Effective communication, both written and oral, is required in almost every course.

Numerous oral

presentations and formal written documents (e.g., project proposals, article critiques, literature

reviews) culminating in the final capstone requirement (oral defense and written thesis);

Graduate Alumni Survey LO #3 The application of theoretical

foundations and the use of various technologies to solve relevant problems are addressed in almost every course in the curriculum.

Final course projects are required. Additionally, the final thesis project often addresses every aspect of LO #3;

Graduate Alumni Survey LO #4 To prepare students for

employment or post-graduate study, students are required to conduct research in most of their graduate courses. In addition, in several courses, students are required to complete a software development cycle through the constructs of a team and in particular, to develop the skills to establish

Evaluation of research projects;

Evaluation of various components of group work; Graduate Alumni Survey

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communication channels and a means of assigning and managing individual responsibilities.

The next table provides a description of resources used by the department for external validation of curricular components and measurement.

Resource Resource Detail

Technical Advisory Committee

The Technical Advisory Committee is composed of local employers in the area (some of which are employers of graduates of our graduate program). It meets every third year to review our curriculum and to advise the department on our program outcomes and curricular issues. Student In-Class

Survey

The in-class survey is given to our current graduate students and is designed to gather information about the strengths and weaknesses of our program. A summary of the survey results are distributed to all members of the Computer Science faculty. The in-class survey is conducted every third year..

Alumni Survey The alumni survey is designed to gather information including job placement, graduate school information, and the strengths and weaknesses of our program. A summary of the survey results is distributed to all members of the Computer Science faculty. The alumni survey is conducted every third year.

During the last assessment cycle (Spring 2010) these were the recognized Strengths and Weaknesses (based on the different surveys’ data.)

Strengths:

 Faculty

 Students

 Curriculum Weaknesses

 Low Enrollment

 Alumni tracking

 Graduate Students Governance

 Frequent Changes to Planned Program of Studies due to Course Availability The program has invested resources to address the weaknesses: creating a new program to attract more students, creating a Facebook page, having a carefully designed course schedule cycle.

The tables provided by the graduate school follow:

Fall

'08

Spr

'09

Fall

'09

Spr

'10

Fall

'10

Spr

'11

Fall

'11

Spr

'12

Fall

'12

Spr

'13

Fall

Avg

Spr

Avg

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Overall

GPA

3.77

3.73

2.99

3.1

3.54

2.89

3.48

3.38

3.36

2.44

3.43

3.11

Majority of students that decide not to come back for the thesis completion do start their thesis development, and would keep an ‘F’ in their CSC 590 (Thesis Development course). This certainly would push to lower GPA-s.

Course Information Survey

AY

08/09

AY

09/10

AY

10/11

AY

11/12

AY

12/13

Statement

SA/A

SA/A

SA/A

SA/A

SA/A

Methods of instruction have helped me

understand the subject matter.

95%

91%

84%

86%

50%

Reading the assigned material has helped me

understand this subject.

78%

82%

90%

84%

50%

Exams and out-of-class assignments have

helped me understand the subject matter.

92%

95%

88%

88%

83%

Number of exams & other graded assignments

has been sufficient to evaluate my progress.

79%

77%

My experiences in this class make me want to

learn more about this subject.

76%

95%

I would rate the quality of instruction in this

course as high.

88%

90%

I would rate the overall quality of this course as

high.

88%

86%

This course helped me meet the learning goals.

88%

86%

67%

This course evaluated how well I met those

learning goals.

91%

86%

67%

My experience in this course helped me

appreciate this subject.

91%

91%

83%

The instructor provided regular feedback on my

performance in this course.

78%

77%

50%

The instructor had high standards for student

achievement.

81%

93%

83%

The instructor encouraged me to take

responsibility for my own learning.

94%

98%

100%

All the percentages show a strong perception of the program quality, except for the AY 12/13 in certain areas (50%). If one is to analyze the first 3 rows in the last column (AY 12/13), one could conclude that only the given exams helped students (83%), but not the readings (50%) nor instruction methods (50%) The department is trying to understand the reasons for the students 50% response, but will still continue to assign reading materials. We believe that this is an outlier due to low number of students taking the

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survey, plus the students’ constant exposure to multitude of surveys could have desensitized them in asking for honest answers.

b) Other (92 /300 wds)

Limited number of our students decides to continue their academic pursuit at the PhD. Level (E.g. A.P. and R.S.) The students reported that they felt well prepared for such an endeavor.

All of our students and their careers benefit from the program. For example S.K was asked, after his degree completion, to become a director of IT & Surveillance at an international resort.

A number of our students attempted and successfully completed industry certification. They reported that the skills and knowledge obtained at Southern certainly made it easier to achieve this goal.

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6)

Size, scope and productivity of the program

a)

Credits Generated

AY

08/09

AY

09/10

AY

10/11

AY

11/12

AY

12/13

Total Academic

Credits

180 273 219 246 183

Major Credits

147 219 198 225 144

Total Students

60 91 73 82 61

Non Major Credits %

18.33333 19.78022 9.589041 8.536585 21.31148

b) Master of Science in Computer Science c)

Degrees Conferred

AY

08/09

AY

09/10

AY

10/11

AY

11/12

AY

12/13

MS-Computer Science

2 6 4 1 3

d) Faculty Research/Creative Act( 129 / 200wds)

Publications

Type of Publication 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

Book, Scholarly-New 1 0 0 0

Conference Proceeding 0 1 0 1

Journal Article, Academic Journal 1 0 0 0

Other 2 1 0 0

Professional Presentations

Presentation Type

2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

Oral Presentation 3 6 0 3

Paper 0 0 1 0

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Professional Conference Participation

Role 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

Attendee 5 2 3 2

Contracts, Grants and Sponsored Research

Type 2009-2010 2010-2011 2011-2012 2012-2013

Grant 1 2 1 0

The provided tables do not capture all of the activities.

For example: The following peer-reviewed article in a nationally recognized journal is not captured:

[2012] J. Skorin-Kapov, D. Skorin-Kapov, H. Podnar, "Core Node Location Problem: Heuristic Solvability via Tabu Search," International Journal of Operations and Quantitative Management Vol. 18(1), 71-86.

Our last Graduate Program Review report (2010) stated the following performance over the assessment cycle (5 years):

“the faculty as a whole has contributed by attending 93 workshops and

conferences, publishing 3 books, 12 journal articles, 120 other publications/scholarly work and 45 grants totaling almost $160,000 in grant money.”

This category within P&T process also includes completed software products. Almost all of our graduate thesis include strong software component, and one of the expected

deliverables is a software product.

e) Student/Faculty Research (77 /100 wds)

The Student-Faculty research collaboration is done typically through our thesis development phase. Some of the thesis would generate a professional conference presentation.

Examples:

“A Performance Model of Gossip-Based Update Propagation” Student: Dhar R. Faculty: Antonios I. Venue: 2010 9th IEEE International Symposium on Network Computing and Applications.

“Analyzing PHP frameworks for use in a project-based software engineering course” Student: Katha S. Faculty: Lancor L. Venue: 2013 Proceeding of the 44th ACM technical symposium on Computer science education.

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f) Impact (180 /200 wds)

We believe that the thesis development is the driving force behind our student based research. Unfortunately the thesis option typically requires more time, and as such, prolongs the students’ graduation. But the benefits of the thesis work are clear: the students are immersed in the research process and are proud of their research contributions.

Impact on Size: The completed research projects (including thesis) certainly generate interest from stringer prospective candidates. On the other hand the graduation period takes more time. We could conclude that the impact on size is minimal.

Impact on Scope: The thesis work is typically done with most recent technologies and methods, and as such would not be able to be delivered within a structured graduate course. The thesis topics are diverse, and technically very challenging. We would conclude that the impact on scope is significant.

Impact on Productivity: The students taking the thesis option take more time to graduate. On the other hand, the department faculty clearly benefit by having additional research projects and publication possibilities. We would conclude that the impact on productivity is significant.

g) Other ( 59 /100 wds)

The department purchases:

 Super-Computer purchase ($30K) devoted to our graduate classes and thesis,

 Hardware modules purchases for our graduate students’ thesis

For our courses, and thesis, we usually converge to open source solutions, but do provide our students with the latest solutions given their thesis projects (OpNet, Zigbee boards..)

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7)

Revenue and other resources generated by the program

a)

7a

7a

7a

Display

Orgn

Code

Prioritization

Pgm for

Reports

Fiscal

Year

Student

Tuition

and Fees

Other

Revenue

Sources

Grand

Total

Revenue

24020

MS-CSC

2010 169,045

32,721

201,766

24020

MS-CSC

2011 151,765

56,134

207,898

24020

MS-CSC

2012 187,367

48,016

235,383

b) ( 6 / 50 wds)

No Lab nor Special User fees. c) ( 6/ 50 wds)

No Service Revenue (external / internal). d) ( 77 /100 wds)

Research oriented classes and some thesis work do require special hardware and/or software. Ownership of such resources can certainly help in delivering specialized courses and provide more opportunities for student thesis. For example, parallel computer, virtual reality, servers, forensic software/hardware and such would be beneficial to the program.

A number of prospective students are inquiring about possibility of Assistantships. Given the fast changing areas of Computer Science,, faculty training and

certifications would prove beneficial to the program. e) ( 22 / 100 wds)A

During the last assessment cycle (2010) the program reported “45 grants totaling almost $160,000 in grant money” (over the 5 year period).

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8)

Costs and other expenses

a)

8a

8a

8a

8a

8a

Displa

y

Orgn

Code

Pgm

Fiscal

Year

Employee

Compen-

sation

Operating

Expenses

Allocated

Overhead

and

Indirect

Costs

Grand

Total

Costs

Net

Income

/ (Loss)

Per

BCH

24020

MS-CSC

2010

(156,419)

(1,628)

(89,237)

(247,284)

(132.06)

24020

CSC

MS-

2011

(134,410)

(4,802)

(82,695)

(221,907)

(39.38)

24020

MS-CSC

2012

(121,530)

(2,920)

(80,948)

(205,397)

73.38

b)

8b

Display

Orgn

Code

Prioritization

Pgm for

Reports

Fiscal

Year

Ratio of

Costs to

Revenue

24020

MS-CSC

2010 1.24 : 1.00

24020

MS-CSC

2011 1.07 : 1.00

24020

MS-CSC

2012 0.88 : 1.00

c) New Resources ( 96 / 200 wds)

We believe that with the current level of students the department has enough faculty resources to support the program. We also believe that the new program, with the first course offerings in Spring 2014, is very attractive, and could result in an increase in the student population. A significant increase in the population would create a need for more lab space (almost all of our grad courses are taught in our labs) and possibly a faculty.

To keep current with the new methods and technologies the department would benefit from a continuing support for new hardware/software.

(23)

d) ( 81 /100 wds)

During Summers, the program offers pre-requisite courses. Occasionally a course or two would be offered during Summers, based on the students interest.

The program rarely offers graduate cross-listed courses.

Delivery of courses in a lab environment; speeding up the learning process by engaging students to work in teams and to proceed with presentations to teach each other. Teaching Concepts rather than Steps.

All classes offered in the evenings (5 or 7:30pm) (to cater to our student body: working part time students).

(24)

9)

Impact, justification, and overall essentiality of the program

a) (100/100 wds)

Given our program Learning Objectives, we believe that our graduates would gain “knowledge, skills and perspectives for active participation in rapidly changing global society.” Our classes are structured to enable students to grasp the latest technologies and methodologies. Given this focus on students as an integral part of the program, the students embrace the program as their own, taking ownership of their work within the program and long after the graduation (“life-long learning”).

Majority of our students work in Connecticut, hence creating opportunities to the students and the companies in the state.

Our graduates do experience advancements in their careers. b) (85 / 100 wds)

Majority of our students work in Connecticut, and do experience a career advancements after the graduation.

We also have a noticeable interest coming from our Veterans office.

We also believe that our students are not just becoming experts in the latest technologies and methodologies, but also are embracing ethical and fair practices in order to protect any wrong doing in the digital space.

We also take students that do not have Computer Science undergraduate major. This would provide opportunities for retraining on the graduate level.

c) ( 56 / 100wds)

During the development of the newly offered program, the department proceeded with a needs assessment, and thoroughly researched the other programs in the region. After the careful consideration, the department decided to focus its efforts on two areas of concentration, in order to cover a gap, and at the same time create a demand for Southern.

d) ( 38 / 100 wds )

Our alumni report that the gained knowledge helped them in their careers. They also report that they liked small class sizes, constant hands-on labs and frequent presentations. In additions they value diversity, networking opportunities, and lifelong learning prospects.

(25)

10)

Opportunity analysis of the program

a) External (155 /300 wds)

The department feels that an increase in the number of application would be rather beneficial to the program.

The department does invite (every 3 years) a panel of advisors from local

companies (TAC) and inquires about the recent practices, and possible curricular changes based on the companies’ needs.

More exposure and publicity to regional companies would be beneficial. Approach to our Veterans with a possibility of training on the graduate level might improve the number of prospective students.

Our Alumni are perceived as an invaluable resource to the department. Majority of them turn to the department with their questions, internships or just a social call. They are often invited to present during our seminar series, or within a class.

There had been some interest from international placement firms to bring a cohort of graduate students. Those efforts failed due to the unfavorable cost structure for such students.

The department is considering offerings of online courses. b) Internal (88 / 300 wds)

The department believes that can easily create a graduate level course for other departments. One example is a Physics: students in the Applied Physics program are required to take a graduate imagining course. Providing additional courses could only benefit the program, and the students in the program.

The department is also willing to provide their expertise in Web services, Databases, Computer Networking, Security and other related disciplines to our campus community. Such efforts would create opportunities for our graduate students to actively participate in projects across the campus.

Figure

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References

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