Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous & Explosive Chemicals. Contractor Management & Emergency Planning & Response

Full text

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Process Safety Management

of Highly Hazardous &

Explosive Chemicals

Process Safety Management

of Highly Hazardous &

Explosive Chemicals

Contractor Management & Emergency

Planning & Response

Contractor Management & Emergency

Planning & Response

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Now That We’ve Developed

Now That We’ve Developed

 Process Safety Information

 Process Material Toxicity Information  Process Hazard Analysis (PHA’s)

 Mechanical Integrity Certificates  Management of Change

 Inspection/Testing/Maintenance  Operating Procedures

 Safe Work Procedures  Training Programs

Now…

 Process Safety Information

 Process Material Toxicity Information  Process Hazard Analysis (PHA’s)

 Mechanical Integrity Certificates  Management of Change

 Inspection/Testing/Maintenance  Operating Procedures

 Safe Work Procedures  Training Programs

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Contractor Management

Contractor Management

1910.119(h)

The employer, when selecting a contractor, shall obtain and evaluate information regarding the contract

employer's safety performance and programs.

1910.119(h)

The employer, when selecting a contractor, shall obtain and evaluate information regarding the contract

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Contractor Management

Contractor Management

The employer shall

inform contract

employers of the

known potential fire,

explosion, or toxic

release hazards

related to the

contractor's work and

the process.

The employer shall

inform contract

employers of the

known potential fire,

explosion, or toxic

release hazards

related to the

contractor's work and

the process.

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Contractor Pre-Qualification &

Authorization

Contractor Pre-Qualification &

Authorization

 The Standard Requires You to:

 Explain contractor qualification requirements

 List what is required for contractor pre-bid awareness - pre-qualification

 List what is required for contractor post-bid awareness - training & orientation

 Specify contractor responsibilities

 Describe contractor 300 Log Requirements  Evaluate Contractor Performance

 List documentation requirements for contractors to complete

 Explain the use of a work authorization system

 The Standard Requires You to:

 Explain contractor qualification requirements

 List what is required for contractor pre-bid awareness

- pre-qualification

 List what is required for contractor post-bid

awareness - training & orientation

 Specify contractor responsibilities

 Describe contractor 300 Log Requirements  Evaluate Contractor Performance

 List documentation requirements for contractors to

complete

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Typical Pre-Qualification Elements:

Years Experience in Work Process

Experience Modification Rate (EMR)

OSHA Total Recordable Incident Rate and

Lost Work day Case Rate Information, DART

Safety Programs

Training Documentation

Typical Pre-Qualification Elements:

Years Experience in Work Process

Experience Modification Rate (EMR)

OSHA Total Recordable Incident Rate and

Lost Work day Case Rate Information, DART

Safety Programs

Training Documentation

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Contractor Management

EMR’s & Loss Ratios - What do They Mean?

Contractor Management

EMR’s & Loss Ratios - What do They Mean?

MOD Rate or EMR:

Experience Modifier RateModifier for WC: based on

loss frequency and severity formula.Developed by NCCI Examples:Unity Rate: 1.0Debit Mod: 1.2Credit Mod: .65 Loss Ratios

Ratio between losses

and premiumUsed by Underwriters Used by Others Example: $50,000 losses $100,000 premium

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Contractor Management

Incident Rates & DART Rates

Contractor Management

Incident Rates & DART Rates

 The incidence rate is a trending number based on your Injury & Illness rates if you had worked 200,000 hours. Why does OSHA use the 200,000 hour benchmark? Quite simply, 200,000 hours are the hours worked by 100 employees, averaging 40 hours per week over a 50 week span (two weeks taken away for holidays).

 The DART rate stands for "Days Away, Restrictions and Transfers". This number is also based on trending over 200,000 hours but its not based on total injuries. Its

based only on those injuries and illnesses severe enough to warrant "Days Away, Restrictions and Transfers".

 The incidence rate is a trending number based on your Injury & Illness rates if you had worked 200,000 hours. Why does OSHA use the 200,000 hour benchmark? Quite simply, 200,000 hours are the hours worked by 100 employees, averaging 40 hours per week over a 50 week span (two weeks taken away for holidays).

 The DART rate stands for "Days Away, Restrictions and Transfers". This number is also based on trending over 200,000 hours but its not based on total injuries. Its

based only on those injuries and illnesses severe enough to warrant "Days Away, Restrictions and Transfers".

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Contractor Management

Contractor Management

Let’s Review the Standard Contractor

Pre-Qualification Form in Your Class

Notebooks.

Let’s Review the Standard Contractor

Pre-Qualification Form in Your Class

Notebooks.

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Contractor Management

Contractor Management

Establish Your Own Company’s PQF

Requirements and Standards

Apply them Uniformly

Remember, This Requirement is to Ensure

that Only Qualified, Trained and Safe

Operating Contractors are Allowed to

Perform Work on a Covered Process

Establish Your Own Company’s PQF

Requirements and Standards

Apply them Uniformly

Remember, This Requirement is to Ensure

that Only Qualified, Trained and Safe

Operating Contractors are Allowed to

Perform Work on a Covered Process

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Contractor Management

Contractor Responsibilities

Contractor Management

Contractor Responsibilities

 The contract employer shall assure that each contract employee is trained in the work practices necessary to safely perform his/her job.

 The contract employer shall assure that each contract employee is instructed in the known potential fire,

explosion, or toxic release hazards related to his/her job and the process, and the applicable provisions of the emergency action plan.

 The contract employer shall document that each contract employee has received and understood the training

required by this paragraph. The contract employer shall prepare a record which contains the identity of the

contract employee, the date of training, and the means used to verify that the employee understood the training.

 The contract employer shall assure that each contract employee is trained in the work practices necessary to safely perform his/her job.

 The contract employer shall assure that each contract employee is instructed in the known potential fire,

explosion, or toxic release hazards related to his/her job and the process, and the applicable provisions of the emergency action plan.

 The contract employer shall document that each contract employee has received and understood the training

required by this paragraph. The contract employer shall prepare a record which contains the identity of the

contract employee, the date of training, and the means used to verify that the employee understood the training.

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

1910.119(f)(1)(i)(D)

The employer shall establish and implement an

emergency action plan for the entire plant in accordance with the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.38. In addition, the

emergency action plan shall include procedures for handling small releases. Employers covered under this standard may also be subject to the hazardous waste and

emergency response provisions contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (a), (p) and (q).

1910.119(f)(1)(i)(D)

The employer shall establish and implement an

emergency action plan for the entire plant in accordance with the provisions of 29 CFR 1910.38. In addition, the

emergency action plan shall include procedures for handling small releases. Employers covered under this standard may also be subject to the hazardous waste and

emergency response provisions contained in 29 CFR 1910.120 (a), (p) and (q).

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

Compliance Directive

Has an emergency action plan been

established and implemented for the entire

plant in accordance with the requirements of

1910.38? Does the plan address the

following: [Criteria Reference .119(n) or

.38(a)(2)]

Compliance Directive

Has an emergency action plan been

established and implemented for the entire

plant in accordance with the requirements of

1910.38? Does the plan address the

following: [Criteria Reference .119(n) or

.38(a)(2)]

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

Compliance Directive - Does it Cover?

 Escape procedures and routes?

 Procedures for post-evacuation employee accounting?

 Preferred means to report emergencies?  Duties and procedures of employees who:  Remain to operate critical equipment?

 Perform rescue and medical duties?

 The names for persons or locations to contact for more action plan information?

 Employee alarm systems?

There is Much More- Review in Your Class Notebooks.

Compliance Directive - Does it Cover?

 Escape procedures and routes?

 Procedures for post-evacuation employee

accounting?

 Preferred means to report emergencies?  Duties and procedures of employees who:  Remain to operate critical equipment?

 Perform rescue and medical duties?

 The names for persons or locations to contact for more

action plan information?

 Employee alarm systems?

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

 Our Written Plan Must:

 Define an emergency action plan

 Define an emergency response plan

 Describe a Minimum emergency response plan  Describe procedures for handling small releases  List the three levels of emergency response

 List procedures for emergency evacuation  List requirements of alarm systems

 List training requirements

 Our Written Plan Must:

 Define an emergency action plan

 Define an emergency response plan

 Describe a Minimum emergency response plan  Describe procedures for handling small releases  List the three levels of emergency response

 List procedures for emergency evacuation  List requirements of alarm systems

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

Level I (Disaster)

Example -

community-wide emergency that

seriously impairs or halts the operation of the area. Outside emergency services would be needed. Major policy considerations and decisions would always be required. Examples:

 Mass casualties.

 Natural disaster such as earthquake or tornado.  Large-scale hazardous material spill.

Level I (Disaster)

Example -

community-wide emergency that

seriously impairs or halts the operation of the area. Outside emergency services would be needed. Major policy considerations and decisions would always be required. Examples:

 Mass casualties.

 Natural disaster such as earthquake or tornado.  Large-scale hazardous material spill.

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

Level II (Major Emergency)

 A serious emergency that completely disrupts one or more operations of the facility and /or town and may affect mission-critical functions or life safety. Outside emergency services, as well as major efforts from emergency services, would be required. Major policy considerations and decisions would usually be

required. Examples:  Hostage situation  Major fire

 Civil disturbance  Bomb Threat

Level II (Major Emergency)

 A serious emergency that completely disrupts one or

more operations of the facility and /or town and may affect mission-critical functions or life safety. Outside emergency services, as well as major efforts from emergency services, would be required. Major policy considerations and decisions would usually be

required. Examples:

 Hostage situation  Major fire

 Civil disturbance  Bomb Threat

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

Level III (Minor)

 A localized, contained incident that is quickly resolved with internal resources or limited help and does not affect the overall functioning capacity of of the Plant or City. Example:

 Small fire.

 Small hazardous material incident.  Limited power outage.

Level III (Minor)

 A localized, contained incident that is quickly resolved

with internal resources or limited help and does not affect the overall functioning capacity of of the Plant or City. Example:

 Small fire.

 Small hazardous material incident.  Limited power outage.

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

The Standard Requires You to:

Develop a Early Warning Method for

Releases (Sensors/Alarms)

Train on the Meaning of the Alarms (May

be Multiple Alarms)

The Standard Requires You to:

Develop a Early Warning Method for

Releases (Sensors/Alarms)

Train on the Meaning of the Alarms (May

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

Warning Systems

must:

 Clearly Notify Employees of the Hazardous Release  Employees & Contractors must be Trained in the Meaning of the Alarm(s) 

Warning Systems

must:

 Clearly Notify Employees of the Hazardous Release  Employees & Contractors must be Trained in the Meaning of the Alarm(s)

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 Develop Emergency

Evacuation Written Plans, Evacuation Maps &

Assembly Points based on Release

Characteristics

 Develop Emergency

Evacuation Written Plans, Evacuation Maps &

Assembly Points based on Release

Characteristics

Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

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Alternate Assembly Point Alternate Assembly Points Depending on Prevailing Weather Affecting Release

Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

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Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

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PPE Requirements

Hazardous Chemicals

May Require

Emergency PPE to be

Worn

 FRP  Escape Respirators  Eye Protection 

PPE Requirements

Hazardous Chemicals

May Require

Emergency PPE to be

Worn

 FRP  Escape Respirators  Eye Protection

Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

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Drills

At Least Annual

Emergency

Preparedness Drills

This is not Just an

Emergency

Evacuation…

but Could Include

HAZWOPR

Response

Must Document

Results

Drills

At Least Annual

Emergency

Preparedness Drills

This is not Just an

Emergency

Evacuation…

but Could Include

HAZWOPR

Response

Must Document

Results

Emergency Planning & Response

Emergency Planning & Response

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NASA High Pressure Gas

Plant

NASA High Pressure Gas

Plant

Contractor Management &

Emergency Response

Case Study

Team Exercise

Contractor Management &

Emergency Response

Case Study

Team Exercise

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Team Exercise

Team Exercise

With the Information to Follow in The

NASA Case Study Video, Presentation &

Notebook,

With Your Team Members, Perform the

Following Tasks & Answer the Following

Questions.

With the Information to Follow in The

NASA Case Study Video, Presentation &

Notebook,

With Your Team Members, Perform the

Following Tasks & Answer the Following

Questions.

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Case Study Exploration

Case Study Exploration

1. What are the Responsibilities of the Employer with respect to

Contractor Management?

2. What are the Responsibilities of the Contractor?

3. Can an Unqualified Contractors Perform Work on a Covered

Process?

4. What are the three Levels of Emergency Response? 5. How Often Must a Drill be Performed?

6. Team Exercise - Choose One of the Team’s Companies and

Complete the Standard Contractor Prequalification form.

7. What Did Your Team Learn from the Completion of the

Prequalification Form?

We will Discuss Findings & Presentations of Each Team in Class

1. What are the Responsibilities of the Employer with respect to Contractor Management?

2. What are the Responsibilities of the Contractor?

3. Can an Unqualified Contractors Perform Work on a Covered Process?

4. What are the three Levels of Emergency Response? 5. How Often Must a Drill be Performed?

6. Team Exercise - Choose One of the Team’s Companies and Complete the Standard Contractor Prequalification form.

7. What Did Your Team Learn from the Completion of the Prequalification Form?

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What’s Next

What’s Next

Compliance Audits

Incident Reports &

Trade Secrets

Compliance Audits

Incident Reports &

Trade Secrets

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References

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