Effect of Floating Zone Refining under Reduced Hydrogen Pressure on Copper Purification

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(1)Materials Transactions, Vol. 43, No. 11 (2002) pp. 2802 to 2807 c 2002 The Japan Institute of Metals. Effect of Floating Zone Refining under Reduced Hydrogen Pressure on Copper Purification Yongfu Zhu1 , Kouji Mimura1 , Yukio Ishikawa2 and Minoru Isshiki1 1 2. Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577, Japan Sumitomo Electric Industries, LTD., Itami 664-0016, Japan. Floating zone refining of copper under a reduced hydrogen pressure of 0.7 Pa has been carried out. Commercial 99.9999% pure 8-mmdiameter Cu rod was used as a starting material. The purification effect has been examined by the bulk residual resistivity ratio (RRRB ) and glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). The RRRB of the starting material is 3200, and that of refined copper is 22000. Almost all impurities were effectively reduced to near or below their detection limits of GDMS. The removal of S and Se is attributable to the reaction with hydrogen. The marked decrease of Al and Si is ascribed to a convective transportation of alumina and silica inclusions to the surface of the molten zone, and these inclusions are concluded to come from the starting material. This result suggests that trace amounts of Al and Si present as solid solution in starting material can be removed in the same manner by zone melting in a slight oxidizing atmosphere for the first few passes. (Received March 25, 2002; Accepted September 2, 2002) Keywords: copper, floating zone refining, purification, impurities, residual resistivity ratio, glow discharge mass spectrometry. The purity is very important for fundamental research of Cu, because the trace impurity elements influence physical and chemical properties of Cu, such as electrical resistivity,1) thermal conductivity,2) ductility3) and oxidation kinetics.4) Floating zone refining (hereafter FZR) has been widely used as a purification method of high purity materials.5) An advantage of FZR with induction heating is that stirring provided by the eddy currents in the molten zone can enhance segregation of impurities.5) Compared with some other materials, such as silicon and iron, FZR of copper had been much difficult due to its large thermal conductivity and the small surface tension of molten zone. To solve this problem, Brüning et al.6) developed a conical coil that stabilizes the molten zone, and they purified the 9.5-mm-diameter copper rod under atmospheric inert He gas. The residual resistivity ratios (RRR) of the starting material and the refined single crystal copper were 10000 and 22500, respectively, and the enhancement in the purification effect was concluded to be due to the segregation of some impurities. Since atmospheric inert He gas was used, however, enhancement of purification by vaporization is not expected. In addition, prior to the RRR measurement, vacuum annealing of the zone-refined samples was carried out, and there is a possibility of internal oxidation effect on the RRR values. Recently, Ishikawa et al.7) reported that the commercial 5mm-diameter copper rod was successfully purified with FZR method under a reduced hydrogen pressure of 0.7 Pa. The RRRB value increased from 3200 of the starting material to 36000 of the refined copper. Since the specimens were annealed under dry hydrogen atmosphere before RRR measurement, the effect of internal oxidation on the RRRB values would be exactly avoided. However, purification effect of copper with the pass number and the removal of various impurities during the refinement have not been well discussed. To clarify the purification effect, FZR of copper was carried out under a reduced hydrogen pressure of 0.7 Pa. The purity. was evaluated not only by RRRB but also by glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS). For removal of impurities under such a low hydrogen pressure, it is expected that, besides segregation of some impurities, the purification effect would also be enhanced by vaporization of volatile impurities and a reaction of some impurities with hydrogen. In addition, Pfann suggested that removal of insoluble inclusions was important in zone refining.5) Attention will also be paid to it in this work. 2. Experimental Procedure Starting material in this work is a commercial 8-mmdiameter copper rod, the purity of which is 99.9999%, the same as that of the 5-mm-diameter rod used by Ishikawa.7) Prior to FZR, the starting rods were electrically polished with a phosphoric acid-ethanol solution. To obtain a stable molten zone, induction heating with 400 kHz and 20 kW power supplied and a three-turn conical coil were used. Figure 1 shows the schematic diagram of the coil, which is simpler than that developed by Brüning et al.,6) and we chose 30◦ as the halfangle at the apex of the cone to stabilize the molten zone. The turbo-molecular pump was used as a main pump and the base pressure before preheating of sample was typically 10−4 Pa. Hydrogen pressure was kept at 0.7 Pa under the hydrogen flow rate of 45 µmol/s (60 sccm). More details of the floating zone melting apparatus and the procedure have been described in the previous paper.7). 8mm 40mm. 1. Introduction. 30. 16mm. Fig. 1 Schematic diagram of the coil for FZR of copper..

(2) Effect of Floating Zone Refining under Reduced Hydrogen Pressure on Copper Purification. 3. Results and Discussion 3.1 Purification effect with the number of pass Figure 2 shows the RRRB profiles of the refined copper rods for 3, 5 and 7 passes. The RRRB value is plotted against the normalized position of the rod, x/L, where L is the whole zone refined length and x the distance from the starting point of zone melting. Purification effect by segregation of impurities is clearly seen in Fig. 2. Table 1 shows the reported equilibrium distribution coefficient k0 of various elements in copper,10) where almost all the metallic impurities have k0 values less than unity, and only a few metallic impurities such as Ni and Fe have the k0 higher than unity. It is reasonable that, therefore, the RRRB values of the head side of each refined copper are higher than those of the end side, and correspondingly, the maximum RRRB values of each refined sample locates at the head side, as shown in Fig. 2. As compared with the maximum RRRB , 22000, obtained after 5 passes, the relatively high maximum value, 16000 close to 22000, was observed even after 3 passes, indicating that the purification effect for the first 3 passes was considerably remarkable. The RRRB value of the head side increases from 10000 after 3 passes to 13000 after 5 passes, and then that of the almost head side significantly increase to nearly 20000 after 7 passes. This result is also reasonably thought to be due to segregation of impurities. Although the maximum value decreases from 22000 after 5 passes to 20000 after 7 passes, the high RRRB value region at the head side becomes much wider for the case after 7 passes. Further increase in the RRRB at x/L = 0.2 to 0.5 would be expected for more pass number, according to. 3 passes 5 passes 7 passes. 20000. 15000. RRRB. The total zone-refined length was 110 mm. The length of the molten zone was almost the same as the rod diameter. To keep the molten zone stable for 8-mm-diameter Cu rod, the rate of the zone pass was set to be 1 mm/min, which was smaller than the value of 2 mm/min for 5-mm-diameter Cu rod.7) The copper rods were zone refined for 3, 5 and 7 passes. By the way, we tried to measure the temperature of the molten zone by a radiation thermometer, but it was impossible to get the precise temperature distribution of the molten zone, because of the three-turn coil obstructing the light from the molten zone. From some studies on zone melting of copper,6, 8) the temperature of the molten zone for FZR is supposed to be about 100 K higher than the melting point of copper (1356 K) in this work. Specimens for the RRR measurement were in shape of wires with 0.5 mm in diameter and 100 mm in length, prepared by cold drawing. The specimens were electrically polished, and then they were annealed under 0.1 MPa H2 atmosphere at 973 K for 24 hours.7) Resistance of the refined copper both at 4.2 K and at room temperature was measured by the DC type four-point probe method. After the size effect correction for the RRR values of wire specimens,9) the corresponding residual resistivity ratio of a bulk sample would be determined. In addition, GDMS was used for analysis of impurities. GDMS sample with 2 mm in diameter was prepared as the same way as sample for RRR measurement.. 2803. 10000. 5000 Starting material 0.2. 0.4. 0.6. 0.8. 1. Location, x/L Fig. 2 RRRB profiles of the zone-refined Cu rods after 3, 5 and 7 passes.. Table 1. Equilibrium distribution coefficients of various elements in Cu.10). Elements. k0. Elements. k0. Al Ag As Au Bi Cd Co Cr Fe Ga Ge In. 0.98 0.65 0.17 0.36 very small 0.13 1.1 0.25 1.3 0.58 0.35 0.43. Mn Ni O P Pb S Sb Se Si Sn Te Zn. 0.52 4.2 8 × 10−3 0.025 very small very small 0.11 very small 0.52 0.12 very small 0.71. the further movement of impurities with k0 < 1, such as Ag, Au, As and Cr, to the end side and the further movement of impurities with k0 > 1, such as Fe and Ni, to the head side. The maximum RRRB value, 22000, obtained in this work is lower than the maximum value 36000 reported by Ishikawa, who used the starting 5-mm-diameter rod.7) When increasing the diameter from 5 mm to 8 mm, a more precise control for the power of the high-frequency generator is required to obtain a stable molten zone, due to the large thermal conductivity and the small surface tension of molten zone. So, it would be more difficult to keep the molten zone at a constant length. The difficulties in operating the floating zone melting of a copper rod with a larger diameter would have a wrong influence on the purification effect. In this work, the diameter of the starting material is 8 mm, so the obtained lower maximum RRRB value is thought to be a reasonable result. In addition, Johnson11) has studied the stability of the molten zone for FZR. He found that high temperature gradient of the metal rod was beneficial for stabilizing the molten zone, and increasing the diameter of the metal rod would decrease the stability. In addition, if the purification effect of copper were mainly enhanced by segregation of impurities, the RRRB values of the end side of the zone-refined sample would be expected to.

(3) 2804. Y. Zhu, K. Mimura, Y. Ishikawa and M. Isshiki. Table 2 GDMS results for the starting material and the zone-refined copper after 5 passes (mass ppm). Starting Zone-refined Cu Zone-refined Cu Zone-refined Cu Element material (x/L = 0.1) (x/L = 0.4) (x/L = 0.95) Al Si S Cr Ni As Se Ag O∗ RRRB. 0.4 0.3 0.06 0.01 0.004 0.01 0.3 0.008 0.2 3200. 0.002 N.D. 0.002 N.D. N.D. 0.003 N.D. N.D. — 15000. N.D. 0.004 0.003 N.D. N.D. 0.003 N.D. N.D. — 22000. 0.08 0.007 N.D. N.D. N.D. 0.002 N.D. N.D. — 8100. N.D.: not detected. B, F, Na, Mg, P, K, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ge, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Pt, Mo, Pb, Bi, In, Ru, Co, Ni, Zn, Zr, W, Nb and Hf were also not detected for all samples. ∗ Determined by inert gas fusion method without flux by LECO TC-436.7). be lower than that of the starting material. In fact, the RRRB values of the end side of each refined sample are observed higher, similar as the result of Ishikawa et al.,7) and they increase gradually on the increment of the number of pass, as can be seen in Fig. 2. This infers that some impurities must be effectively removed from the molten zone during the purification procedure under the reduced hydrogen pressure. It is obvious that, therefore, besides segregation of impurities, vaporization of some volatile impurities, reaction of some impurities with hydrogen and/or transportation of inclusions to the surface of the molten zone should be also possible for copper purification. To make it clear, change in the impurity concentrations along the zone-refined sample was determined by GDMS analysis. 3.2 Removal mechanism of impurities Table 2 shows the GDMS results of the starting material and the refined copper after 5 passes. The detected impurities in the starting material are Al (0.4 mass ppm), Si (0.3 mass ppm), Se (0.3 mass ppm), and S (0.06 mass ppm). After 5 passes, the concentrations of Al, Si, Se and S are extremely low even at the end side, and all of the other impurities were also reduced to near or below the detection limits. Here, we would discuss more concretely about the reduction of S, Se, Al and Si. It is expected that the reduction of S and Se at the head side could be achieved by segregation, because of their very small k0 values according to Table 1. However, although the marked reduction of S and Se was exactly observed at the head side, the accumulation of S and Se at the end side by segregation was not observed, as seen in Table 2. So, the other way responsible for the remarkable reduction of S and Se should be considered. There are two provable ways for the removal of S during FZR of copper in hydrogen atmosphere, one is a degassing reaction, and the other is a reaction with hydrogen as represented by eqs. (1) and (2), respectively: [S] = 1/2S2 ,. (1). and [S] + H2 = H2 S,. (2). where [S] indicates the dissolution of S in liquid copper. According to Oishi,12) however, when the concentration of S is below 10 mass ppm, the vaporization of S by eq. (1) would become thermodynamically difficult. Thus, the remarkable reduction of S caused by a reaction of S with hydrogen according to eq. (2) should be possible. Thermodynamically examination given in Appendix A demonstrates that the removal of S by the reaction with hydrogen is feasible. In an analogous way with S, removal of Se is also due to the reaction with hydrogen. In addition, it is probable that the inductive stirring in the molten zone plays an important role in the marked removal of S and Se, because the stirring can eliminate the cross-sectional impurity variation in the molten zone.5) According to Table 1, the removal of Al and Si due to segregation would be difficult because of their k0 close to the unity. Also, their removal by vaporization would be impossible due to their low vapor pressures. So, formation of Al2 O3 and SiO2 inclusions in the molten zone and then transportation of them to the surface of the molten zone is expected. In this work, the formation of a thin slag-like film was indeed observed during the refining. For the first two passes, the amount of slag is relatively large, covering the molten zone and moving with it. At the fourth pass, the amount of slag becomes very small, and it can only be observed floating at the lower part of the molten zone. The slag is left at the surface of the end side of the zone-refined copper rod after each pass, and thus, the slag will be accumulated at the end side of the zone-refined copper as the number of pass increases. Figure 3 shows a zone-refined copper rod after 5 passes, where the slag-like film with whitey-brown in color at the end side can be clearly observed. Characterization of the slag-like film was performed with SEM and SIMS. SEM image in Fig. 4 indicates that the slag-like film is very loose, consisting of very small particles smaller than 1 µm. SIMS depth profile of Cu, Al, Si Se, S and O was illustrated in Fig. 5, where the slag-like film was mainly composed of Cu, Al, Si and O, and the contents of Se and S were very low. It is confirmed that, therefore, Al and Si concentrations were reduced through the transportation of alumina and silica inclusions to the surface of the molten zone. In fact, Brüning et al.6) also observed a slag-like film always covering the molten zone during the first pass of the zone refining under atmospheric inert He gas. However, characterization of the slag film was not performed in their work. With reference to the present work, the film they observed might also consist of some insoluble inclusions. Then, the purification of copper achieved in their work should be to some extent attributed to transportation of these inclusions to the surface of the molten zone. Uhlmann13) have reported that, during the normal freezing, insoluble inclusions can be repelled by the advancing solid/liquid interface, and therefore, these inclusions will accumulate inside the molten zone and travel with it. As an example, for the ice-water system, if the rate of the advancing ice/water interface is lower than 20 µm/sec, solid particles.

(4) Effect of Floating Zone Refining under Reduced Hydrogen Pressure on Copper Purification. 2805. 101. Iimpurity /ICu. 100. Cu. -1. 10. 10-2. Se. 10-3 10-4. Si. Al. O. S. 10-5 0. 20. 40. 60. SputteringTime, t /min Fig. 5 SIMS depth profiles of the slag-like film. For Al, Si and Cu analysis, the sample was sputtered with negative O ion; For O, Se and S, the sample was sputtered with positive Cs ion.. Fig. 3. Floating zone-refined copper (after 5 passes).. Fig. 4 SEM observation of the slag-like film.. of radius 2 µm can be successfully removed. Unlike the case for normal freezing, however, the inclusions are removed by transportation of them to the surface of the molten zone in this work. Considered that stirring is available in the molten zone for FZR,5) the transportation of inclusions to the surface of the molten zone could be attributed to the forced convection. We here would like to examine the origination of Al2 O3 and SiO2 inclusion in the molten zone. Appendix B shows that, if Al and Si were present as solid solution in the starting material, to reduce them below 0.005 mass ppm, the oxygen partial pressure in the chamber should be higher than 4.6 × 10−13 Pa and 1.6 × 10−11 Pa at 1473 K, respectively. However, the oxygen partial pressure in the hydrogen atmo-. sphere is only 1.3 × 10−20 Pa, as can be seen in Appendix C. It appears that the alumina and silica inclusions are not due to the reaction of Al and Si with trace oxygen in liquid copper during the refining in hydrogen atmosphere. These inclusions should come from the starting material. Furthermore, Appendix B suggests that, even if small amounts of Al and Si were present as the solid solution in the copper starting material, floating zone melting under a slight oxidizing atmosphere for the first several passes could be available for converting them to insoluble oxides by internal oxidation. Thus, these oxides would be removed as a slag layer on the surface of the molten zone, as observed in this work. After that, the remaining impurities such as oxygen and some metallic elements could be reduced to very low levels by FZR under a reduced hydrogen pressure. The oxygen concentration of the starting material is determined to be 0.2 mass ppm,7) as indicated in Table 2, by inert gas fusion method without flux. On the other hand, when Al and Si present as Al2 O3 and SiO2 in the starting material, the concentration of oxygen from both oxides is calculated to be 0.7 mass ppm. This disagreement must be caused by the difficulty in analysis of oxygen for specimens containing small amount of inclusions such as Al2 O3 and SiO2 , because of the high affinities of Al and Si for O. So, the actual oxygen concentration of the starting material is probably higher than 0.2 mass ppm. Above we have discussed the removal mechanism of S, Se, Al and Si. As for many other metallic impurities such as Cr, Ni, As and Ag with very low concentrations in the starting material, the removal of them to even lower levels in the zonerefined copper might be due to the way of segregation and vaporization. One of the characteristics of FZR under reduced hydrogen atmosphere is removal of S and Ag, which are not easy to be removed by conventional electrorefining. According to Gregory et al.,14) the effect of some impurities such as S, Se, Si and P on the increase in the resistivity of copper is relatively high. When these impurities could be decreased to the very low levels, a marked increase in the RRRB of copper would be expected. It is understandable that, therefore, the remarkable purification effect for the first 3 passes.

(5) 2806. Y. Zhu, K. Mimura, Y. Ishikawa and M. Isshiki. discussed in Section 3.1 should be largely attributable to the effective removal of S, Se and Si from the molten zone. Moreover, the result that, after FZR, the RRRB values of the refined copper after various passes were raised to the considerably higher values than that of the starting material, as indicated in Fig. 2, should also be related to the removal of these impurities. Since there is no re-distribution problem in molten zone for removal of impurities by reaction with hydrogen and by convective transportation of inclusions, the increase in the RRRB values observed even at the end side is reasonable. We would like to point out here that possibility of removal of some impurities by reaction with hydrogen and due to the forced convection is strongly dependent on sort of main residual impurities in starting material. Preparation and characterization of starting material is a key factor to achieve the purification of copper with FZR under reduced hydrogen pressure of 0.7 Pa in this study. 4. Conclusions Floating zone refining of copper was carried out under a reduced hydrogen pressure using commercial available pure copper as a starting material, and the following results were obtained. (1) The maximum RRRB , 22000, were obtained at x/L = 0.4 of the zone refined copper after 5 passes. Segregation of some trace impurities was found available for enhancing the purification effect of copper. (2) Almost all impurities were reduced to near or below their detection limits of GDMS. (3) The concentrations of S and Se were reduced to the very low levels, and their reduction could be attributable to their reaction with hydrogen. (4) The remarkable decrease of Al and Si is supposed to be due to the convective transportation of alumina and silica inclusions to the surface of the molten zone. These Alumina and silica inclusions are concluded to come from the starting material. (5) It is suggestible that if small amounts of Al and Si were present as solid solution in the starting material, floating zone melting under a slight oxidizing atmosphere for the first few passes can convert them into the alumina and silica inclusions by an internal oxidation. Al and Si will then be reduced through the possible convective transportation of alumina and silica inclusions to the surface of the molten zone. Acknowledgements We would like to express our thanks to Dr. Osako of Sumimoto Mining Metal Co. LTD for GDMS analysis. Thanks are also for Nikko-kinzoku Co. Ltd. for supplying starting material Cu. Al(l) + 3/4O2 (g) = 1/2Al2 O3 (s); 3/4O2 (g) = 3/2[O](mass% in liquid Cu); [Al] = Al(l)(mass% in liquid Cu);. REFERENCES 1) M. Kato: J. Min. Met. & Mater. Soc. 48–12 (1995) 44–46. 2) A. Kurosaka, N. Tanabe, O. Kohno and H. Osanai: Ultra high purity Base Metals, UHPM-94 446–451. 3) S. Fujiwara and K. Abiko: J. De Physique IV, Colleque C7 au, Supplement Journal de Physique III 5 (1995) 295–300. 4) Y. Zhu, K. Mimura, Y. Ishikawa and M. Isshiki: Journal of the JCBRA. 40 (2001) 96–100. 5) W. G. Pfann: Zone melting, 2nd ed., John Wiley, & Sons, Inc., (1966). 6) H. Brüning, J. L. Hericy and K. Lucke: Ann. Chem. Fr. 10 (1985) 521– 533. 7) Y. Ishikawa, K. Mimura and M. Isshiki: Mater. Trans., JIM 40 (1999) 87–91. 8) A. Mori, T. Ono, N. Uchiyama and M. Nakane: J. High Temp. Society 13 (1987) 18–29. 9) K. Mimura, Y. Ishikawa, M. Isshiki and M. Kato: Mater. Trans., JIM 38 (1997) 714–718. 10) J. Gerlach, F. Pawlek and D. Rogalla: Metallurgia 18 (1964) 1158. 11) R. Johnson: J. Appl. Phys. 34 (1963) 352–355. 12) T. Oishi, T. Nishi, Y. Kondo and K. Ono: J. Japan Inst. Metals 53 (1989) 593–600. 13) D. Uhlmann, B. Chalmers and K. Jackson: J. Appl. Phys. 35 (1964) 2986–2993. 14) P. Gregory, A. Bangay and T. Bird: Metallurgia 71 (1965) 207–214. 15) S. Hirakoso, T. Tanaka and K. Watanabe: Mem. Fac. Engi. Hokkaido Iam. Uni. 9 (1952) 125–132. 16) O. Kubaschewski and C. B. Alcock: Metallurgical Thermochemistry, 5th ed., 238–384, Oxford: Pergamon (1979). 17) K. Oberg, L. Freidman, W. Boorstein and R. Rapp: Metall. Trans. 4 (1973) 61–67. 18) T. Azamaki and A. Yazawa: Can. Metall. Quar. 15 (1976) 111–123.. Appendix A: Removal of S According to Hirakoso et al.,15) the equilibrium concentration of S in liquid copper in hydrogen atmosphere shown in eq. (A.1) is given as a function of temperature by the relationship log K = log pH2 S − log pH2 − log cs (mass%) = −0.899 − 2056/T, Thus, at 1473 K, to reduce S to below 0.005 mass ppm pH2 S / pH2 = 2.5 × 10−9. (A.1). During the refining, the chamber is kept vacuuming, and the flow rate of the purified hydrogen is 45 µmol/s (60 sccm), so the condition due to eq. (A.1) can be met. Appendix B: Removal of Al and Si If Al or Si is present as solid solution in the starting material, it is possible to remove them by internal oxidation during FZR of copper in a slight oxidizing atmosphere. For Al, an estimate of the extent to which such removal would be feasible is provided by the criteria. ∆G o (J/mol) = −848850 − 7.85T log T + 192.9T 16). (B.1). ∆G o (J/mol) = −135555 + 33.3T 17). (B.2). ∆G o (J/mol) = 117914 (at 1473 K). (B.3).

(6) Effect of Floating Zone Refining under Reduced Hydrogen Pressure on Copper Purification. 2807. o The ∆G o value of eq. (B.3) is calculated from the eq. (B.4) using γAl = 0.002818) at 1473 K. o ∆G o (J/mol) = −RT ln[γAl MCu /(100MAl )]. (B.4). For eqs. (B.1), (B.2) and (B.3), [O] and [Al] denote the concentration of O and Al (mass%) dissolved in liquid copper, respectively. Upon summation of eqs. (B.1), (B.2) and (B.3), at 1473 K, for [Al] + 3/2[O] = 1/2Al2 O3 (s);. ∆G o (J/mol) = −396924. (B.5). At equilibrium 1/2. 3/2. ∆G o (J/mol) = −RT ln K = −RT ln[(aAl2 O3 )/(aAl · aO )]. (B.6). and ai = f i (%) · C i where f i (%) and C i denote the activity coefficient according to Henry’s law (the standard state for a solute element is 1 mass% solution in liquid copper) and the concentration of the solute element (mass%) in liquid copper, respectively. The value of aAl2 O3 should be unity. Thus, the following relation would be obtained from eq. (B.6). 3/2. aAl aO = f Al (%)C Al · [ f O (%)C O ]3/2 = exp(∆G o /RT ). (B.7). Since the concentration of Al and O are quite dilute, the values of f Al (%) and f O (%) are close to unity. Then, from eqs. (B.5) and (B.7) at 1473 K, C Al C O = 8.5 × 10−15 . 3/2. (B.8). Namely, to reduce the concentration of Al to 0.005 mass ppm, i.e. C Al = 5.0 × 10−7 , the oxygen concentration should be C O = 6.6 × 10−6 . According to eq. (B.2), we have log pO2 = 2 log[ f O (%) · C O ] + 2.32 − 9443/T,. (B.9). where the value of f O (%) is almost unity. So, the oxygen partial pressure in the chamber should be at least 4.6 × 10−13 Pa. As for removal of Si, the partial oxygen pressure can be estimated by the criteria Si(l) + O2 (g) = SiO2 (s); O2 (g) = 2[O] (mass% in liquid Cu); [Si] = Si(l) (mass% in liquid Cu); The ∆G o value of eq. (B.12) is calculated according to eq. (B.4) using γSiO = 0.00618) at 1473 K. Upon summation of eqs. (B.10), (B.11) and (B.12), at 1473 K, for [Si] + 2[O] = SiO2 ;. ∆G o (J/mol) = −427235. (B.13). At equilibrium ∆G o (J/mol) = −RT ln K = −RT ln[aSiO2 /(aSi · aO2 )], (B.14). −∆G o (J/mol) = −952700 + 203.8T 16). (B.10). ∆G o (J/mol) = −180740 + 44.4T 17). (B.11). ∆G o (J/mol) = 109073. (B.12). (at 1473 K). are insufficient in the literatures. However, since the concentrations of impurities are quite dilute as this work, the effect can be ignored. Similar treatment has been reported by Kubaschewski et al.16) Appendix C: Partial Oxygen Pressure in Hydrogen Atmosphere The oxygen partial pressure in the hydrogen atmosphere can be evaluated by16). and. H2 (g) + 1/2O2 (g) = H2 O(g) ai = f i (%) · C i .. with. Following the same way as the case for aluminum, we get C Si C O2 = 7.1 × 10−16 .. ∆G o (J/mol) = −246437.6 + 54.8T. (B.15). This means that, to reduce the concentration of Al to 0.005 mass ppm, i.e. C Si = 5.0 × 10−7 , the oxygen concentration should be C O = 3.8 × 10−5 . According to eq. (B.9), the oxygen partial pressure in the chamber should be at least 1.1 × 10−11 Pa. It should be mentioned here that, for the above discussion, we have tried to consider the interaction coefficients of impurities in liquid copper. We failed because the related data. 1/2. = −19.15T log( pH2 O /( pH2 · pO2 )).. (C.1). At 1473 K, 1/2. pH2 O / pO2 = 7.5 × 105 pH2. (C.2). In the inlet purified hydrogen gas, assuming that the remnant O2 is 0.5 atomic ppm, and the remnant H2 O is 0.5 atomic ppm. According to eq. (C.2), the oxygen partial pressure is 1.3 × 10−20 Pa in hydrogen atmosphere at 1473 K..

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Figure

Fig. 1Schematic diagram of the coil for FZR of copper.

Fig 1.

Schematic diagram of the coil for FZR of copper . View in document p.1
Fig. 2RRRB profiles of the zone-refined Cu rods after 3, 5 and 7 passes.

Fig 2RRR.

B pro les of the zone re ned Cu rods after 3 5 and 7 passes . View in document p.2
Table 1Equilibrium distribution coefficients of various elements in Cu.10)

Table 1.

Equilibrium distribution coef cients of various elements in Cu 10 . View in document p.2
Table 2GDMS results for the starting material and the zone-refined copperafter 5 passes (mass ppm).and

Table 2GDM.

S results for the starting material and the zone re ned copperafter 5 passes mass ppm and. View in document p.3
Fig. 4SEM observation of the slag-like film.

Fig 4SE.

M observation of the slag like lm . View in document p.4
Fig. 5SIMS depth profiles of the slag-like film. For Al, Si and Cu analysis,the sample was sputtered with negative O ion; For O, Se and S, the samplewas sputtered with positive Cs ion.

Fig 5SIM.

S depth pro les of the slag like lm For Al Si and Cu analysis the sample was sputtered with negative O ion For O Se and S the samplewas sputtered with positive Cs ion . View in document p.4
Fig. 3Floating zone-refined copper (after 5 passes).

Fig 3.

Floating zone re ned copper after 5 passes . View in document p.4

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