Rf-5710-x95 Series. Manual de Operacion y Mantenimiento

165 

Full text

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HARRIS

MANUAl

ASSEMBLYNUMBER:

1044710020101

Rev

I

B

RF COMMUNICATIONS

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RF COMMUNICATIONS

MANUAL ASSEMBLY NUMBER: 10447-0020-101

MARCH 1998 Rev. B

RF-571 O-X95

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HARRIS CORPORATION (RF COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION)

FROM HARRIS TO YOU - This warranty is extended to the original buyer and applies to all Harris Corporation, RF

Communications Division equipment purchased and employed for the service normally intended, except those products

specifically excluded.

WHAT WE WILL DO - If your Harris Corporation, RF Communications Division equipment purchased from us for use outside the

United States fails in normal use because of a defect in workmanship or materials within one year from the date of shipment, we

will repair or replace (at our option) the equipment or part without charge to you, at our factory. If the product was purchased for use in the United States, we will repair or replace (at our option) the equipment or part without charge to you at our Authorized Repair Center or factory.

WHAT YOU MUST DO - You must notify us promptly of a defect within one year from date of shipment. Assuming that Harris

concurs that the complaint is valid, and is unable to correct the problem without having the equipment shipped to Harris:

0 Customers with equipment purchased for use outside the United States will be supplied with information for the return

of the defective equipment or part to our factory in Rochester, NY, U.S.A., for repair or replacement. You must prepay

all transportation, insurance, duty and customs charges. We will pay for return to you of the repaired/replaced equipment

or part, C.I.F. destination; you must pay any duty, taxes or customs charges.

0 Customers with equipment purchased for use in the United States must obtain a Return Authorization Number, properly

pack, insure, prepay the shipping charges and ship the defective equipment or part to our factory or to the Authorized Warranty Repair Center indicated by us.

Harris will repair or replace the defective to a cause covered by this warranty.

Harris Corporation RF Communications Division Customer Service 1680 University Avenue Rochester, NY 14610, U.S.A. Telephone: (716)244-5830 Cable: RFCOM

equipment or part and pay for its return to you, provided the repair or replacement is due

WHAT IS NOT COVERED - We regret that we cannot be responsible for:

0 0

Defects or failures caused by buyer or user abuse or misuse.

Defects or failures caused by unauthorized attempts to repair or alter the equipment in any way.

0 Consequential damages incurred by a buyer or user from any cause whatsoever, including, but not limited to

transportation, non-Harris repair or service costs, downtime costs, costs for substituting equipment or loss of anticipated

profits or revenue.

The performance of the equipment when used in combination with equipment not purchased from Harris.

0 HARRIS MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTIES BEYOND THE EXPRESS WARRANTY AS CONTAINED HEREIN. ALL

EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR MERCHANTABILITY ARE

EXCLUDED.

SERVICE WARRANTY - Any repair service performed by Harris under this limited warranty is warranted to be free from defects

in material or workmanship for sixty days from date of repair. All terms and exclusions of this limited warranty apply to the service

warranty.

IMPORTANT - Customers who purchased equipment for use in the United States must obtain a Return Authorization Number

before shipping the defective equipment to us. Failure to obtain a Return Authorization Number before shipment may result in a

delay in the repair/replacement and return of your equipment.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS - Concerning this warranty or equipment sales or services, please contact our Customer Service

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HAF3RlS

RF-571 O-X95 SERIES RF COMMUNICATIONS

RF-5710-X95 SERIES

OPERATION & MAINTENANCE MANUAL

MANUAL ASSEMBLY NUMBER: 10447-0020-101 PUBLICATION NUMBER: 10447-0020-121

CONSISTS OF:

0 Installation/Maintenance Section

Section 1: Introduction Section 2: Installation

Section 3: Theory of Operation Section 4: Maintenance

PUBLICATION NUMBER: 10447-0020-111 CONSISTS OF:

0 Operation/Remote Control Section

Section 5: Operation Section 6: Remote Control

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MARCH 1998 Rev. B

‘RF-5710-X95

SERIES

- Copyright 0 1998 By Harris Corporation All Rights Reserved

HARRIS CORPORATION RF COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES a

HARRIS

RF COMMUNICATIONS

When an Adult Stops Breathing

WARNING

DO NOT attempt to perform the rescue breathing techniques provided

on this page, unless certified. Performance of these techniques by

uncertified personnel could result in further injury or death to the victim.

I

Does the Person

Respond?

l Tap or gently shake

victim.

l Shout, “Are you OK?”

3

Roll Person

Onto Back

l Roll victim toward you

by pulling slowly.

4

Open Airway

l Tilt head back and lift

chin.

6

Give 2 Full

Breaths

l Keep head tilted back.

l Pinch nose shut.

l Seal your lips tight

around victim’s mouth.

l Give 2 full breaths for

1 to l-1/2 seconds each.

7

Check for Pulse

at Side of Neck

l Feel for pulse for

5 to 10 seconds.

9

Begin Rescue

Breathing

l Keep head tilted back.

l Lift chin.

l Pinch nose shut.

l Give 1 full breath

every 5 seconds.

l Look, listen, and feel for

breathing between breaths.

2

Shout, ‘He/pi”

l Call people who can

phone for help.

5

Check for

Breathing

l Look, listen, and feel

for breathing for 3 to 5 seconds.

8

Phone for Help

l Send someone to call

an ambulance.

IO

Recheck Pulse

Every Minute

l Keep head tilted back.

l Feel for pulse for

5 to 10 seconds.

l If victim has pulse but is

not breathing, continue rescue breathing. If no pulse, begin CPR.

For more information about these and other life-saving techniques, contact your Red Cross chapter for training. “When Breathing Stops” reproduced with permission from an American Red Cross Poster.

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation A, AMP ac, AC ACE ND ADC ADDR ADP ADT ADU AF AFC AFSK A-G, A/G AGC AIC ALC ALE AMD AME ANTIVOX API

ARQ

AS1 ASK ASSY ATE AUD AUX AVS

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms Term

Ampere(s)

Alternating Current Advanced Crypt0 Engine Analog-to-Digital Converter Analog-to-Digital Converter Address

Automated Data Processing

Administrative Delay Time, Automated Data Terminal Automatic Dialing Unit

Audio Frequency

Automatic Frequency Control Audio Frequency Shift Keying Air-to-Ground

Automatic Gain Control Analog Interface Chip Automatic Level Control Automatic Link Establishment Automatic Message Display Amplitude Modulation Equivalent Antenna

Voice-Operated Transmitter Key Inhibitor Analog Phase Interpolation

Automatic Repeat on Request Analog Signal Interface Amplitude Shift Keying Assembly

Automatic Test Equipment Audio

Auxiliary

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RF-5710-X95 SERIES

ab

HARRDS

RF COMMUNICATIONS 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ( ( l ( l l Abbreviation 4WG B/A BC BCD BD BER BFO BIT BITE BP1 bps BPSK Btu BW CARC CB ccw CDR CDRL CFE CH, CHAN CI CKT cm CMOS CNTL CPU CRC CRT CSM CTRL CTS cw D/A iv

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

American Wire Gauge Buffer Amplifier

Broadcast, Binary Counter Binary-Coded Decimal Baud, Binary Decoder Bit Error Rate

Beat-Frequency Oscillator Built-In Test

Built-In Test Equipment Bits Per Inch

Bits Per Second

Binary Phase Shift Keying British Thermal Unit Bandwidth

Chemical Agent Resistive Coating Circuit Breaker

Counterclockwise Critical Design Review

Contract Data Requirements List Contractor-Furnished Equipment Channel Configuration Item Circuit Centimeter Complimentary-Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Control

Central Processing Unit Cyclic Redundancy Check Cathode Ray Tube

Crypt0 Synch Message Control

Clear to Send

Continuous Wave, Clockwise Digital-to-Analog Converter

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS s Abbreviation DAC DAM dB dBm dc, DC DCD DE DEMOD Diff Dip, DIP DMM DP DPDT DPRAM DPST DSP DSR DTE DTL DTM DV DTMF DTR DUART DUSART DVM DVOM EAM EAROM ECM

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

Digital-to-Analog Converter Direct Access Memory Decibel(s)

Decibels referenced to 1 milliwatt Direct Current

Data Carrier Detect Data Encryption Demodulation Differential

Dual In-Line Package Digital Multimeter Double Pole

Double Pole, Double Throw Dual-Port RAM Access Memory Double Pole, Single Throw Digital Signal Processor Data Set Ready

Data Terminal Equipment Diode Transistor Logic Data Text Message Digitized Voice

Dual Tone Multi-Frequency Data Terminal Ready

Dual Universal Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter

Dual Universal Synchronous/Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter Digital Voltmeter

Digital Volt-Ohm Meter Embedded Adaptive Module

Electronically Alterable Read Only Memory Electronic Counter Measure

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RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation ECCM EEPROM, E2PROM EM1 ENCRYPTION EOM EPROM FCC FD FEC FET F/F FFT FH FSK FSKNS FSKWS FSK-A FSK-V F/W, FW G-A, G/A GF GFE Gnd, GND GPIB HD HDCP HF HSS HSSB HWCI Hz

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

Electronic Counter-Counter Measure

Electrically Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory

Electromagnetic Interference .

Digital Data Ciphering and Deciphering End of Message

Erasable Programmable Read-Only Memory Federal Communications Commission Full Duplex

Forward Error Correction Field-Effect Transistor Flip-Flop

Fast Fourier Transform Frequency Hopping Frequency Shift Keying

Frequency Shift Keying - Narrow Shift Frequency Shift Keying - Wide Shift Frequency Shift Keying - Narrow Shift 2 Frequency Shift Keying - Variable Firmware

Ground-to-Air

Government (or customer) Furnished Government-Furnished Equipment Ground

General Purpose Interface Bus Half Duplex

Harris Data Communications Protocol High Frequency

High-Speed Synchronizer High-Speed Serial Bus Hardware Configuration Item Hertz

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation IC ID IDF IF INT INTLK INTR I/O ISB

J

k kbyte kHZ km kV kVA KVD KVDU kW LBT LC LCD LD LED LF LLSB LOS LP LPC LPF

LQA

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

Integrated Circuit Identification

Intermediate Distribution Frame Intermediate Frequency Interrupt Interlock Interrupt Input/Output Independent Sideband Joules Kilo (thousand) Kilobyte Kilohertz Kilometer(s) Kilovolt(s) Kilovolt Ampere(s) Keyboard Visual Display Keyboard Visual Display Unit Kilowatt(s)

Listen Before Transmit Inductive Capacitive Liquid Crystal Display Lock Detect

Light-Emitting Diode Low Frequency

Lower Lower Sideband Line of Sight

Low Pass

Linear Predictive Coding Low Pass Filter

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RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation LRU LSB LSD M m Mbyte MDM MHz MIC MIL-STD mm Mod Mod/Demod Modem MOS MOSFET ms, msec MTBCF MTBF MTBM MTBR MUF MUX mVac mVdc n NATO NB NC, N.C. N/C

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

Line Replaceable Unit Lower Sideband Least Significant Digit Meter, Mega (one million) Milli, one-one thousandth Milliampere(s) Megabyte MODEM Megahertz Microphone Military Standard Millimeter(s) Modification, Modulated Modulator/Demodulator Modulator/Demodulator Metal Oxide Semiconductor

Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor Millisecond

Mean Time Between Critical Failure Mean Time Between Failure

Mean Time Between Maintenance Mean Time Between Replacement Maximum Usable Frequency Multiplex, Multiplexer

Millivolts Alternating Current Millivolts Direct Current Nano (1 x 10mg)

North Atlantic Treaty Organization Narrowband

Normally Closed Not Connected

. . .

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation NMOS NO, N.O. No. NPN nsec NVG Q O&M O&R O.C. OEM OP Amp ocxo P PA PABX PCB PCM PEP PF PIV PLL PNP P-P PPm PROM PS Pt Pt, Pt-Pt PWB QPSK

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

N-channel Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Normally Open

Number

N-type, P-type, N-type (transistor) Nanoseconds

Night Vision Goggles

Ohms, a unit of resistance measurement Operation and Maintenance

Operation and Repair

Open Circuit or Open Collector Original Equipment Manufacturer Operational Amplifier

Oven Controlled Crystal Oscillator Pica

Power Amplifier

Private Automatic Branch Exchange Printed Circuit Board

Pulse Code Modulation Peak Envelope Power Picofarad (1 x lo-l2 Farads) Peak Inverse Voltage

Phase-Locked Loop

P-type, N-type, P-type (transistor) Peak-to-Peak

Parts Per Million

Programmable Read Only Memory Power Supply

Point-to-Point Push-to-Talk

Printed Wiring Board

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES aID

HARRIS

RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation QTY R, RG RAD RC RCU RCV/RX RCVR RD RDY REC RETX RF RF1 RLPA RLSD RMS ROM RST RTC RTN RTS RTTY RTU S, SG SA SB SCR SHLD

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

Quantity

Receiver Circuit: Receive, Receive Ground (from teletype) Random Access Data

Random Access Memory Resistive Capacitive Remote Control Unit Receive Receiver Read Ready Receptacle Retransmit Radio Frequency Radio-Frequency Interference Rotatable Log Periodic Antenna Receive Level Sense Detect Root Mean Squared Read-Only Memory Reset

Real Time Clock Return

Request to Send Radio Teletype Remote Terminal Unit Reception

Send Circuit, Send Ground (to teletype) Spectrum Analyzer

Sideband

Silicon Controlled Rectifier Shield

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation SINAD Sip, SIP SMD SNR SOM SP SPDT SSB ST STD SWR SYNC TB TCXO TDQPSK TGC T/R IT ITL -ITvm TTY TX U UART uF UHF USART USB usec UUSB

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

A ratio of (signal + noise + distortion) to (noise + distortion) used to measure the signal quality of a communication channel. SINAD is commonly used to evaluate the ability of a channel to pass voice traffic.

Single In-Line Package Surface-Mount Device Signal-to-Noise Ratio Start of Message Single Pole Single-Pole, Double-Throw Single Sideband Single Throw Standard

Standing Wave Ratio Synchronous

Terminal Board

Temperature Controlled Crystal Oscillator Time Differential Quaternary Phase Shift Keying Transmitter Gain Control

Transmit/Receive Teletype

Transistor-Transistor Logic Teletype Voice Frequency Tone Teletype

Transmit

Micro (1 x 10m6)

Universal Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter

Microfarad (1 x 10m6 Farads)

Ultra High Frequency

Universal Synchronous/Asynchronous Receiver-Transmitter Upper Sideband

Microseconds

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES ZEi

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RF COMMUNICATIONS Abbreviation UUT UW V VA Vat VCA vco VDC, Vdc VDU VECT VF VFO VFR VHF VLF VMOS VOM VOX VPP VSWR W WRL XCVR XFMR XMT XMTR

List of Abbreviations and Acronyms - Continued Term

Unit Under Test Microwave Volt

Volt-Ampere

Volts, Alternating Current Voltage Controlled Attenuator Voltage Controlled Oscillator Volts, Direct Current

Video Display Unit Vector

Voice Frequency

Variable Frequency Oscillator Voice Frequency Repeater Very High Frequency Very Low Frequency

V-groove Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Volt-Ohm-Meter

Voice Operated Transmitter Volts peak-to-peak

Voltage Standing Wave Ratio Watt(s)

Wire Run List Transceiver Transformer Transmit Transmitter

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HARRIS

RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS SAFETY SUMMARY

SAFETY SUMMARY

1. INTRODUCTION

All operators and maintenance personnel must observe the following safety precautions during operation and maintenance of this equipment. Specific warnings and cautions are provided in the manual and at the end of this Safety Summary. Warnings, Cautions, and Notes appear before various steps in the manual and will be used as follows:

0 WARNING - Used when injury or death to personnel and damage to equipment is possible

0 CAUTION - Used when there is a possibility of damage to equipment

0 NOTE - Used to alert personnel to a condition that requires emphasis

2. PERSONNEL AND EQUIPMENT SAFETY

Basic safety precautions consider factors involved in protecting personnel from injury or death. Electrical, mechanical, ElectroMagnetic Radiation (EMR), material, or chemical hazards are the most common types of hazards found in electronic equipment. The following are types of hazards that may exist:

- ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL - THERMAL - CHEMICAL - EMR

Hazardous voltage and current levels may exist throughout the equipment. Contact with these hazards could cause electrocution, electrical shock, burns, or injury due to involuntary reflexes of the body.

Mechanical hazards are created when heavy assemblies and components must be removed and replaced. Moving parts (such as fan blades) and hot surfaces are potential mechanical hazards.

Burn hazards may exist in the equipment that could cause personal injuries and/or serious equipment damage. Internal surfaces of the equipment may be in excess of 65°C the point at which personnel could be burned. Extreme caution should be used when working with any hot assemblies (for example, power supply or power amplifier assemblies). Physical injury or damage may result to personnel and/or equipment as a result of a reflex action to a burn.

Chemicals or materials used for servicing the equipment may present potential hazards. Many chemical agents, such as cleaners and solvents, may be toxic, volatile, or flammable. If used incorrectly, these agents can cause injury or death.

Overexposure to electromagnetic radiation results from amplified radio frequencies which may produce a health hazard.

3. OPERATIONAL AND MAINTENANCE SAFETY GUIDELINES

Good safety discipline is critical to prevent injury to personnel. All other safety measures are useless if personnel do not observe the safety precautions and do not follow safety disciplines. Once aware of a hazard, personnel should ensure that all other personnel are aware of the hazard. The following basic safety disciplines are stressed:

a. Read a procedure entirely before performing it. Personnel must always perform each assigned task in a

safe manner.

b. Prior to applying equipment power after maintenance, personnel must ensure that all unsecured hand

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RF-5710-X95 SERIES ai3

HARRIS

SAFETY SUMMARY RF COMMUNICATIONS

C. Power to the equipment must be removed before a piece of equipment is removed.

d. Extreme care must be used when adjusting or working on operating equipment. Voltages in excess of

70 V or current sources in excess of 25 A are covered with barriers. Barriers include warning information about the hazard encountered upon barrier removal.

e. Personnel must react when someone is being electrically shocked. Perform the following steps:

1. Shut off power.

2. Call for help.

3. Administer first aid if qualified.

Under no circumstances should a person come directly in contact with the body unless the power has been removed. When immediate removal of the power is not possible, personnel must use a

non-conductive material to try to jolt or pry the body away from the point of shock.

f. Personnel should work with one hand whenever possible to prevent electrical current from passing

through vital organs of the body. In addition, personnel must never work alone. Someone must be available in the immediate area to render emergency first aid, if necessary.

Lifting can cause injury. Items weighing more than 37 pounds must be lifted by two or more people.

h. Some electrolytic capacitors contain aluminum oxide or tantalum. If connected incorrectly, the capacitor

will explode when power is applied. Extreme care must be used when replacing and connecting these capacitors. The capacitor terminals must always be connected using the correct polarity: positive to positive and negative to negative.

The next section contains general safety precautions not directly related to specific procedures or equipment. These precautions are oriented toward the maintenance technician. However, all personnel must understand and apply these precautions during the many phases of operation and maintenance of the equipment. The following precautions must be observed:

DO NOT SERVICE EQUIPMENTALONE

Never work on electrical equipment unless another person familiar with the operation and hazards of the equipment is near. When the maintenance technician is aided by operators, ensure that operators are aware of the hazards.

GROUNDING

Always ensure that all equipment and assemblies are properly grounded when operating or servicing.

TURN OFF POWER AND GROUND CAPACITORS

Whenever possible, power to equipment should be turned off before beginning work on the equipment. Be sure to ground all capacitors that are potentially dangerous.

KEEP AWAY FROM LIVE CIRCUITS

Operators and maintainers must observe all safety regulations at all times. Do not change components or make adjustments inside equipment with a high voltage supply on unless required by the procedure. Under certain conditions, dangerous potentials may exist in circuits with power controls off, due to charges retained by capacitors.

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS SAFETY SUMMARY

-

DO NOT BYPASS INTERLOCKS

Do not bypass any interlocks unnecessarily. If it is necessary to employ an interlock bypass for equipment servicing, use extreme care not to come in contact with hazardous voltages.

USE CARE HANDLING HEAVY EQUIPMENT

Never attempt to lift large assemblies or equipment without knowing their weight. Use enough personnel or a mechanical lifting device to properly handle the item without causing personal injury.

HEED WARNINGS AND CAUTIONS

Specific warnings and cautions are provided to ensure the safety and protection of personnel and equipment. Be familiar with and strictly follow all warnings and cautions on the equipment and in technical manuals.

PROTECTIVE EYEWEAR

All personnel must wear protective eyewear when servicing or maintaining equipment. Protective eyewear must be worn at all times when using tools.

4. PROTECTION OF STATIC-SENSITIVE DEVICES

- Diode input-protection is provided on all Complementary-Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) devices.

This protection is designed to guard against adverse electrical conditions such as electrostatic discharge. Although most static-sensitive devices contain protective circuitry, several precautionary steps should be taken to avoid the application of potentially damaging voltages to the inputs of the device.

To protect static-sensitive devices from damage, the following precautions should be observed. a. b. C. d. e. f.

Keep all static-sensitive devices in their protective packaging until needed. This packaging is conductive and should provide adequate protection for the device. Storing or transporting these devices in conventional plastic containers could be destructive to the device.

Disconnect power prior to insertion or extraction of these devices. This also applies to Printed Wiring Boards (PWBs) containing such devices.

Double check test equipment voltages and polarities prior to conducting any tests.

Avoid contact with the leads of the device. The component should always be handled carefully by the ends or side opposite the leads.

Avoid contact between PWB circuits or component leads and synthetic clothing.

Use only soldering irons and tools that are properly grounded. Ungrounded soldering tips or tools can destroy these devices. SOLDERING GUNS MUST NEVER BE USED.

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES aIt4

HARRIS

SAFETY SUMMARY RF COMMUNICATIONS

5. EXPLANATION OF HAZARD SYMBOLS

The symbol of drops of a liquid onto a hand shows that the material will cause burns or irritation of human skin or tissue.

The symbol of a person wearing goggles shows that the material will injure your eyes.

Irl

I

The symbol of a flame shows that a material can ignite and burn you.

IJLI

The symbol of a skull and crossbones shows that a material is poisonous or a danger to life.

4B

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0

The symbol of a human figure in a cloud shows that vapors of a material present danger to your life or health.

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RF COMMUNICATIONS EC DECLARATION

EC Declaration

of

Conformity

We, RF Communications Division of Harris Corporation , 1680 University Avenue, Rochester, NY 146 lo- 1839, declare under our sole responsibility that the product

RF-5710-X95 Series

HF Modem

is in compliance with the Following EEC Directive and Standards:

Directive 73/23 EEC (Low Voltape Directive):

EN 60950: Safety of Information Technology Equipment Including Office Equipment

Date: 22 -mu -98

Name: Al Simon

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H A R R I S

RF COMMUNICATIONS PUBLICATION NUMBER: 10447-0020-121 MARCH 1998 Rev.

-INSTALLATION/MAINTENANCE

SECTION

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H A R R I S

RF-5710-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS

Paragraph Page 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.5.1 1.5.2 1.5.3 1.5.4 1.5.5 1.5.6 1.6 1.7 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.5.1 2.5.2 2.5.3 2.5.4 2.6 2.7 2.7.1 2.7.2 2.7.3 2.7.4 2.8 2.9 2.10 2.11 2.11.1 2.11.2 2.11.3 2.12 2.13 TABLE OF CONTENTS Specifications.. . . . SECTION 1 - INTRODUCTION SAFETY PRECAUTIONS . . . . PURPOSE OF MANUAL . . . . GENERAL DESCRIPTION . . . .

RADIO INTERFACE CRITERIA . . . .

DATA TERMINAL EQUIPMENT (DTE) INTERFACE CRITERIA . . . .

Serial Tone Waveform Considerations . . . .

Serial Tone Waveform Synchronous Operation . . . .

Serial Tone Waveform Asynchronous Operation . . . .

Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) General Considerations . . . .

FSK Synchronous Operation . . . .

FSK Asynchronous Operation . . . .

REMOTE CONTROL . . . .

FIRMWARE UPGRADE CAPABILITY . . . .

SECTION 2 - INSTALLATION

INTRODUCTION . . . .

UNPACKING AND INSPECTION . . . .

TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT . . . .

ITEMS SUPPLIED . . . .

RACK MOUNT INSTALLATION . . . .

Equipment Rack Preparation . . . .

Installing One Modem In One Rack Space . . . .

Installing Two Modems In One Rack Space . . . .

Installing One RF-5710 Modem and One RF-5710-X95 Series Modem in One Rack Space . . . .

POWERREQUIREMENTS . . . .

MODEM REAR PANEL CONNECTORS . . . .

AC Power Connector A3J4 . . . .

Radio Connector J1 . . . .

DTE Connector J2 . . . .

Remote Connector J3 . . . .

TESTING THE MODEM . . . .

CONNECTING THE MODEM TO THE RADIO . . . .

CONNECTING MODEM TO THE DTE . . . .

SETTING THE MODEM INTERFACE CRITERIA . . . .

Programming the Modem Waveform Parameters . . . .

Asynchronous DTE . . . .

Synchronous DTE . . . .

SENDING DATA . . . .

PROGRAMMABLE TX AUDIO DELAY . . . .

V 1-1 1-1 1-2 1-7 1-8 1-8 1-8 1 - 8 1 - 8 1 - 8 1 - 9 1 - 9 1 - 9 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-1 2-6 2-6 2-6 2-7 2-8 2-8 2-9 2-10 2-10 2-11 2-11 2-12 2-12 2-15 2-15 2-15 2-16 2-16 2-16

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TABLE OF CONTENTS RF COMMUNICATIONS

Paragraph 3.2 3.2.1 3.2.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.5.1 3.5.2 3.5.3 3.5.4 3.5.5 4.1 4.1.1 4.2 4.3 4.3.1 4.3.2 4.3.3 4.4 4.4.1 4.4.2 4.4.3 4.4.4 4.4.5 4.5 4.6 Figure Page 1-1 1-2 2-1 2-2 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-6 2-7 2-8

TABLE OF CONTENTS - Continued

SECTION 3 - THEORY OF OPERATION

3.1 INTRODUCTION . . . .

FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION . . . .

Transmit Processing.. . . .

Receive Processing . . . .

POWER SUPPLY . . . .

FRONT PANEL ASSEMBLY . . . .

HF MODEM CIRCUIT BOARD ASSEMBLY . . . .

MCP Circuit . . . .

DSP Circuit . . . .

HF Radio lnterface . . . .

Data Terminal Interface . . . .

Remote Control Interface . . . .

SECTION 4 - MAINTENANCE

INTRODUCTION . . . .

Protection of Static-Sensitive Devices . . . .

BIT/BITE DESCRIPTION AND USE . . . .

FAULT ISOLATION GUIDELINES . . . .

Safety . . . .

Front Panel Display. . . .

Modem Self-Test Failure . . . .

MODULE AND FUSE REPLACEMENT PROCEDURES . . . .

External Fuse Removal and Replacement . . . .

Internal Fuse Removal and Replacement . . . .

A1 Power Supply Assembly Removal and Replacement . . . .

A2 HF Modem Circuit Board Assembly Removal and Replacement . . . .

A5A1 Front Panel LCD Assembly Removal and Replacement . . . .

PARTS LISTS . . . .

COMPONENT LOCATION AND SCHEMATIC DIAGRAMS . . . .

LIST OF FIGURES

RF-5710-X95 HF Modem . . . .

RF-571 0 HF Modem, Typical Applications . . . .

Modem Dimensions . . . .

Modem Rack Mount Installation - One Modem . . . .

Modem Rack Mount Installation - Two Modems . . . .

Modem Rack Mount Installation - One RF-5710 Modem and One

RF-571 O-X95 Series Modem . . . .

Modem Rear Panel Layout . . . .

Connection of Power Cables . . . .

Radio Interface Cable (Balanced Audio) . . . .

Radio Interface Cable (Unbalanced Audio) . . . .

Page 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-1 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-3 3-4 3-4 4-1 4-1 4-1 4-1 4-1 4-2 4-2 4-2 4-3 4-3 4-4 4-4 4-5 4-8 4-19 1-3 1-5 2-2 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-8 2-9 2-13 2-14 ii

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RF COMMUNICATIONS TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF FIGURES - Continued Figure 2-9 2-10 3-1 4-1 4-2 4-3 4-4 4-5 4-6

Typical RS-232 DTE Cable . . . .

Keyline Delay Timing Diagram . . . .

Modem Functional Block Diagram . . . .

Modem Main Assembly Component Locations . . . .

Modem Interconnect Schematic Diagram (10447-1 001) . . . .

Interconnect Flex Schematic Diagram (10447-1 301) . . . .

Modem PWB Assembly Component Location Diagram (Top)

(10447-2000) . . . .

Modem PWB Assembly Component Location Diagram (Bottom)

(10447-2000) . . . .

Modem PWB Assembly Schematic Diagram (10447-2001) . . . .

LIST OF TABLES Table Page 1-1 2-1 2-2 2-3 2-4 2-5 2-6 2-7 2-8 3-1 4-1 4-2 4-3 4-4 4-5 4-6 4-7

Radio Equipment Requirements . . . .

HF Data Modem Rear Panel Connectors . . . .

Radio Connector J1 Pin Numbers and Signals . . . .

DTE Connector J2 Pin Numbers and Signals . . . .

Remote Connector J3 Pin Numbers and Signals . . . .

Default Parameters . . . .

Non-FSK Waveform Minimum Keyline - TX Audio Delay Measurements (tKA *) 0 Delay Setting . . . .

FSK Waveform Minimum Keyline - TX Audio Delay Measurements (tKA *) 0 Delay Setting. . . .

Minimum Timing Diagram Values . . . .

Modem Subassemblies . . . .

Modem Subassemblies Parts List . . . .

Modem Ancillary Kit Parts List (10447-0021-001 Rev. B) . . . .

A2 HF Modem Circuit Board Assembly Parts List (10447-2000-101) . . . .

A3 AC Input Filter Assembly Parts List (10447-1013-001) . . . .

A5 Front Panel Assembly Parts List (10447-1 120-1 0X)* . . . .

A5A1 Front Panel LCD Assembly Parts List (10447-1110-1 01) . . . .

A5A2 Front Panel Flex Interconnect Assembly Parts List

(10447-1 300-001)

. . . .

Page 2-14 2-18 3-2 4-7 4-21 4-23 4-25 4-27 4-29 1-7 2-8 2-10 2-10 2-11 2-15 2-17 2-17 2-18 3-1 4-8 4-8 4-9 4-18 4-18 4-18 4-19

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RF-5710-X95 SERIES RF COMMUNICATIONS SPECIFICATIONS - SPECIFICATIONS - MECHANICAL Size: Weight: Shock: Vibration: ENVIRONMENTAL Storage Temperature: Operating Temperature: Humidity: ELECTRICAL Power Consumption: Power Requirements: Receive Audio: nansmit Audio: YIYansmit Keyline:

Secondary nansmit Keyline:

Data Terminal Interface:

1.75 H x 8.38 W x 12.0 D inches 4.45 H x 21.27 W x 30.48 cm 4 lbs. maximum

MIL-STD-810D, Method 516.3, Procedure I, Functional (40 G, 11 msec duration)

MIL-STD-810D, Method 514.3, Category 9, Shipboard

MIL-STD-810D, Category 1, Basic Transport

-40 “C to +80 “C 0 “C to +50 “C

0% to 95%, non-condensing

12.5 watts, typical, 15 watts, maximum 85 - 250 Vat, 50 Hz/60 Hz

600 ohms transformer coupled, +5 to -30 dBm 600 ohms transformer coupled, +6 to -20 dBm, adjustable

Open collector transistor driver, 50 mA sink capability,

up to +45 Vdc open circuit voltage. Closure to signal ground to key, open to unkey.

Contact closure, 200 mA bidirectional current capability, up to 45 V open circuit voltage magnitude. Contact closed to key, open to unkey. MIL-STD-188-114A, unbalanced

Compatible with EIA RS-232D specifications Selectable MIL-STD-188/RS-232 polarity *See Operation/Remote Control section for waveform modes specifications.

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INTRODUCTION -

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

All safety precautions necessary for the protection of personnel and equipment are cross-referenced in the following list. The WARNING or CAUTION is referenced to the paragraph number where it is used in the manual, and a brief subject phrase indicating the content is provided. Read these items in their entirety before uerforming the referenced procedure.

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

WARNING - Paragraph 2.6 - Improperly grounded equipment may expose personnel to dangerous voltage.

WARNING - Paragraph 4.3.1 - Voltages hazardous to human life are present if power is not removed from the unit.

WARNING - Paragraph 4.4.1 - Voltages hazardous to human life are present if power is not removed from the unit.

WARNING - Paragraph 4.4.2 - Voltages hazardous to human life are present if power is not removed from the unit.

WARNING - Paragraph 4.4.3 - Voltages hazardous to human life are present if power is not removed from the unit.

WARNING - Paragraph 4.4.4 - Voltages hazardous to human life are present if power is not removed from the unit.

WARNING - Paragraph 4.4.5 - Voltages hazardous to human life are present if power is not removed from the unit.

CAUTION - Paragraph 4.4.5 - Do not pull on the flex circuit.

RF COMMUNICATIONS INTRODUCTION

SECTION 1

INTRODUCTION

1 .l SAFETY PRECAUTIONS

1.2 PURPOSE OF MANUAL

This manual contains information necessary to install, program, operate, maintain, and repair the RF-5710-X95 High Frequency (HF) Modems. The RF-5710-X95 Series of HF Modems are available in three colors:

0 RF-5710-095, Navy Gray

0 RF-5710-195, PACER (Light) Gray

0 RF-5710-295, Black

The modems are functionally and electrically identical. The function of the main assembly is described through the use of a functional block diagram and text. In addition, maintenance procedures supply all information required to locate and replace faulty modules.

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RF-5710 X95 SERIES 89

INTRODUCTION RF COMMUNICATIONS

1.3 GENERAL DESCRIPTION

The Harris RF-5710-X95 HF Modem, shown in Figure l-l, has the ability to generate five HF waveforms (see Operation section for available waveforms) using the same hardware. Each waveform is selectable from front panel controls and the current mode of operation is shown on the Liquid Crystal Display (LCD). The modem allows both half-duplex operation and full-duplex operation in most modes of operation, except data rates of 4800 bits per second (bps) when only half-duplex operation is supported. A flexible, programmable interface ensures compatibility with a wide range of data and radio equipment.

The versatility and speed of the modem make it suitable for a variety of applications, including: Narrowband Secure Voice

High-Speed Burst Data Digital Facsimile Slow-Scan Television HF, Microwave, Land-Line Narrowband Satellite

Figure l-2 shows possible applications of the modem in an integrated communications system, including

transmission of high-speed data, digital facsimile, or narrowband secure voice. It can support either synchronous or asynchronous data terminal equipment.

The architecture of the modem is based on the TMS320C51 and DSP56156 families of Digital Signal Processors (DSPs) and the 8OC186 microprocessor. The unit is a general purpose signal processor with input/output

capabilities, and provides for future waveform/option expansion by software reprogramming. Software can be downloaded into the modem through an auxiliary serial port which is part of rear panel connector 53. Extensive Built-In Test (BIT) functions are also included.

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RF-5710-X95 SERIES RF COMMUNICATIONS INTRODUCTION

I

RF-6710 HF MODEM

n

POWER ON OFF

Ic::I::I::I:7J

/ b flELD -- A v L SCROLL A 0 ENTER FRONT VIEW

Jl RADIO J2 DATA J3 REMOTE

o(@]o o(gEqo o[G]o

85-25OV: 1 50/60HZ

:OvERED BY U.S. PAT: 4,36.5,551

5710-1018

Figure I-1. RF-571 O-X95 HF Modem

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INTRODUCTION - RF-590A RECEIVER MIL-S * DIGITAL FACSIMILE TERMINAL TELEPHONE COMPUTER RF-11 30-01 TRANSMITTER 5710-0118

Figure 1-2. RF-571 0 Modem, Typical Applications

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RF COMMUNICATIONS INTRODUCTION

1.4 RADIO INTERFACE CRITERIA

The modem is compatible with most High Frequency-Single SideBand (HF-SSB) radio equipment. However, consider the following criteria when selecting HF-SSB equipment to interface with the modem:

0 Envelope Delay Distortion

0 Amplitude Distortion

l Intermodulation Distortion

0 Synthesizer Phase Noise

0 Synthesizer Frequency Deviation

l Transient Response Time (Automatic Gain Control [AGC] and Automatic Level Control [ALC])

0 Mechanical Interface Compatibility (for example, connector types)

Acceptable limits for these criteria are listed in Table l-l.

Table l-l. Radio Equipment Requirements Consideration Limitation or Deviation

Envelope Delay Distortion Less than 1 millisecond total for transmitter and receiver between 675 Hz

and 2812 Hz

Amplitude Distortion Amplitude ripple between 300 Hz and 3000 Hz should not exceed 2 dB.

Intermodulation Distortion Third-order intermodulation distortion products should be at least 35 dB

below Peak Envelope Power (PEP).

Synthesizer Phase Noise Root Mean Square (RMS) phase jitter should not exceed 2.5 degrees when

averaged over 22 millisecond periods.

Synthesizer Frequency Deviation 2 1 part in lo6

Receiver AGC Decay time should be about 0.5 seconds.

Audio Interface 600 ohms balanced

Key line Open collector to ground, up to 50 mA from current limited source with

maximum open-circuit output of 45 volts. Keyline is shorted to signal ground to key the transmitter.

Secondary Keyline Contact closure, up to 200 mA bidirectional current with maximum

open-circuit voltage magnitude 45 V. Contact is closed to key, open to unkey.

Transmitter Ready Radio must be ready for transmit audio within a finite amount of time. Refer

to Section 2, Paragraph 2.13 for information on programming the modem transmit audio delay settings.

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INTRODUCTION RF COMMUNICATIONS

1.5 DATA TERMINAL EQUIPMENT (DTE) INTERFACE CRITERIA

The modem is designed to interoperate with both MIL-STD-188-114 unbalanced interface and EIA standard RS-232D interface. The modem can be configured for synchronous or asynchronous operation. The following operation criteria should be considered when selecting Data Terminal Equipment (DTE) to interface with the modem.

1.5.1 Serial Tone Waveform Considerations

The modem requires the DTE to supply a Request to Send (RTS) to initiate transmission. If the DTE does not support RTS signaling, an external means of generating an RTS must be provided.

The modem returns a Clear to Send (CTS) signal to the DTE when it is ready to receive data. Any data sent by the DTE prior to CTS being asserted is ignored.

The DTE should drop the RTS signal between messages to ensure that a preamble is sent at the beginning of a new message.

The Carrier Detect (CD) signal is active when the demodulator of the receiving modem is synchronized with the sending modem.

IS.2 Serial Tone Waveform Synchronous Operation

Receive (RX) clock signals are generated by the modem. The source of the transmit clock signal can be set by the user: the modem can either provide the clock to the data terminal or accept it from the data terminal. CTS remains active until the RTS is dropped. The DTE rate must be the same as the transmission data rate.

1.5.3 Serial Tone Waveform Asynchronous Operation

The modem and DTE use their own internal Transmit (TX) and RX data clocks. Sending and receiving DTE need not be set at the same bit rate; however, character length, parity, and number of stop bits must be identical

between the DTE and the modem.

Flow control can be set by the user to either the CTS signal or the XON/XOFF characters (if character length is 7 or 8 bits.) CTS is reissued when the modem is ready to accept more data from the sending DTE.

The CTS signal is deactivated in response to the RTS signal being deactivated.

The CTS and/or XON/XOFF flow control features will normally occur only if the DTE rate exceeds the

over-the-air data rate. If the data terminal rate is less than the selected over-the-air rate, the modem automatically reduces the over-the-air rate to match the data terminal rate.

1.5.4 Frequency Shift Keying (FSK) General Considerations

An RTS signal from the DTE causes the modem to issue a keyline to the transmitter. Data rates of 75, 600 bps are allowed; when using an asynchronous DTE interface, 50 bps is also available.

150,300, or

The modem returns a CTS signal to the DTE when it is ready to receive data. Any data sent by the D’ CTS being asserted will be ignored.

TE prior to

The CD signal is active when the demodulator of the receiving modem is receiving a valid signal from the transmitting modem.

1.5.5 FSK Synchronous Operation

RX clock signals will be generated by the modem, and TX clock signals can be programmed as either an input from the DTE or as an output from the transmitting modem. CTS will remain active until RTS is removed. Note that 50 bps is not allowed in this mode.

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RF COMMUNICATIONS INTRODUCTION

1.56 FSK Asynchronous Operation

The modem and DTE use their own internal Transmit (TX) and RX data clocks. Sending and receiving DTE need not be set at the same bit rate; however, character length, parity, and number of stop bits must be identical

between the DTE and the modem.

Flow control can be set by the user to either the CTS signal or the XON/XOFF characters (if character length is 7 or 8 bits.) CTS is reissued when the modem is ready to accept more data from the sending DTE.

The CTS signal is deactivated in response to the RTS signal being deactivated.

The CTS and/or XON/XOFF flow control features will normally occur only if the DTE rate exceeds the

over-the-air data rate. If the data terminal rate is less than the selected over-the-air rate, the modem automatically reduces the over-the-air rate to match the data terminal rate.

1.6 REMOTE CONTROL

The modem can be controlled from any remote American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) terminal connected to the modem remote control port. Any modem operating parameters that can be manipulated from the front panel can be changed by the remote controller, except remote control interface parameters. The transmit keyline can also be initiated and terminated from the remote location. The modem is capable of reporting current operational and front panel status in response to polls from the remote control unit. The remote control interface is designed to EIA standard RS-232 and uses a simple ASCII interface.

1.7 FIRMWARE UPGRADE CAPABILITY

Auxiliary serial port (part of 53) provides the ability to reprogram the modem. New firmware can be downloaded serially from a Personal Computer (PC) to the modem when future enhancements become available.

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RF COMMUNICATIONS INSTALLATION

SECTION 2 INSTALLATION

2.1 INTRODUCTION

This section contains specific installation information needed to install the modem. The modem is intended to be installed by trained installation or service personnel.

There are no special installation considerations required for the following:

0 Ventilation

0 Lubrication

2.2 UNPACKING AND INSPECTION

Carefully remove the unit from the shipping container and retain the carton for repacking if necessary. Inspect the equipment for damage and check the packing list to account for all equipment on the list. Immediately notify carrier if the unit is damaged or items are missing.

2.3 TOOLS AND EQUIPMENT

The following tools and test equipment are recommended to install and set up the modem:

0 A High Frequency (HF) radio with a 0 dBm, 600 ohm transmit audio port and a 600 ohm receive audio

port that provides output audio levels in the +5 to -30 dBm range

0 A data source (Data Terminal Equipment [DTE]) that meets the interface criteria described in Section 1,

Paragraph 1.5 (Data Terminal Equipment Interface Criteria)

0 RS-232 interface breakout box such as the Blackbox #SAM32-55 for troubleshooting interface lines

0 Voltmeter capable of measuring true Root Mean Square (RMS) such as the Fluke #8060A or

Hewlett-Packard HP3400A

0 A modem to data DTE cable

0 A modem to radio cable

0 Standard electronic technician tools

2.4 ITEMS SUPPLIED

The modem is supplied with a rack mount kit that is intended for use in a standard 19 inch equipment mounting rack. A power cord, strain relief, and mating connectors are supplied in the ancillary kit. Self sticking bumper feet are also provided which can be placed on the bottom of the modem for desktop applications.

2.5 RACK MOUNT INSTALLATION

The RF-5710-X95 rack mount brackets utilize a universal rack mount pattern (see Figure 2-l). The rack mount brackets can be used to mount the RF-5710-X95 in a 19 inch EIA or IEC-297 rack. See Figure 2-l for dimensions of the modem. The modem can be mounted by itself (see Figure 2-2), or two modems may be mounted

side-by-side in a 19 inch EIA or IEC-297 rack (see Figure 2-3). Instructions are also given for mounting any earlier RF-5710 modem model (ie. RF-5710-X75, RF-5710-X85) and RF-5710-X95 modem side-by-side in a 19 inch rack (see Figure 2-4).The following paragraphs describe the installation procedure.

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

INSTALLATION RF COMMUNICATIONS a

HAF3RJS

1.75 IN “.4f cm) IEC-297 RACK M SL TING 1.125 IN (2.88 cm) + 19.0 IN (48.26 cm)

Figure 2-1. Modem Dimensions

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES RF COMMUNICATIONS INSTALLATION SUPPORT STANDOFFS #lo-32 X .375 INCH SOCKET HEAD CAP SCF=W RAIL SUPPORT (2 PLACES) -- . . -d”L.. 1032 X 3/8 INCH

FLATHEAD SCREW FIATWASHER

w SHORT PANEL BRACKET I l/4 INCH (4 PLACES) k’ SPLIT LOCKWASHER (4 PLACES) 1 O-32 X 5/8 INCH SEMS SCREW (2 PLACES) 5710-008C

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INSTALLATION tiB HARRIS

RF COMMUNICATIONS #lo SPLIT LOCKWASHER (2 PLACES) #lo-32 X ,375 INC SOCKET HEAD CAP SCREW (2 PLACES) :H SUPPORT RAILS (2 PLACES) SUPPORT STANDOFFS / (4 PLACES) r’

SHORT PANEL BRACKET (2 PLACES)

#l O-32 X 5/8 INC SEMS SCREW

2 (PLACES)

Figure 2-3. Modem Rack Mount Installation - Two Modems

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RF COMMUNICATIONS RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

INSTALLATION - #lo-32 X .375 INCH SUPPORT STANDOFFS SHORT PANEL BRACKET (WITH MOUNTING STUD) AND

#lo-32 X 3/S INCH FLATHEAD SCREW MODEM RACK MOUNT KIT) SEMS SCREW RF-571 O-X95 5710-007D

Figure 2-4. Modem Rack Mount Installation - One RF-5710 Modem and One RF-571 O-X95 Series Modem

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

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INSTALLATION RF COMMUNICATIONS

2.5.1 Equipment Rack Preparation

Install the two support rails into the 19 inch rack assembly, onl= on the left side and one on the right side, using the following hardware:

0 Two each Supporting Rails

0 Four each l/4 Inch-20 X 3/4 Inch Pan Head Screws

l Four each l/4 Inch-20 J-Clip Nuts

0 Four each l/4 Inch Split Lockwashers

0 Four each l/4 Inch Flatwashers

Secure all mounting hardware.

NOTE

Both support rails are fully reversible.

2.5.2 Installing One Modem In One Rack Space

See Figure 2-2 and perform the following procedure to install one modem in one rack space:

h. i. 5 k. 1. 2.5.3

Decide whether the modem should be on the left or right side of the single rack space.

NOTE

Both brackets are fully reversible.

Install the long panel bracket on the appropriate side of the modem using the two (2) #lo-32 X 0.375 inch socket head cap screws and #lO lockwashers provided.

Install the short panel bracket on the opposite side of the modem using the #lo-32 X 3/8 inch flathead screw provided.

Install four (4) nylon support standoffs in the threaded holes located at the rear of the modem and rear of the long panel bracket. Offset the support standoffs top and bottom as shown in Figure 2-2.

Install the single modem assembly into the rack by guiding the nylon standoffs into the “U” channels of the support rails mounted in the rack.

Slide the assembly carefully into the rack and secure the front panel to the rack with the #lo-32 X 5/8 inch SEMS screws provided.

Installing Two Modems In One Rack Space

See Figure 2-3 and perform the following procedure to install two modems in one rack space:

a. Set the two modems side by side on a bench or other suitable work surface. Remove the top chassis cover

of the modem that is located on the right hand side.

b. Inside the right hand modem chassis, locate the two (2) clearance holes on the left side of the chassis.

C. Use two (2) #lo-32 X 0.375 inch socket head cap screws with #lO lockwashers and insert the screws

completely through the holes in the left side of the chassis. The screws must be inserted from inside the chassis.

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES RF COMMUNICATIONS INSTALLATION - d. e. f. li5 h. i.

J. Install the double modem assembly into the rack by guiding the nylon standoffs into the “U” channels of

the support rails mounted in the rack.

k. Slide the assembly carefully into the rack and secure the front panel to the rack with the #lo-32 X 5/8

inch SEMS screws provided.

2.5.4 Installing One RF-5710 Modem and One RF-5710-X95 Series Modem in One Rack Space

On the remaining covered modem on the left hand side of the bench, locate the two (2) corresponding threaded holes on the outside of the right side chassis.

Line up the threaded holes in the left hand modem with the protruding screws from the right hand modem.

Tighten both screws.

Replace the modem top cover. Install the 13 screws used to secure the top chassis cover.

Install two (2) short panel brackets, one on each side of the double modem assembly with one (1) HO-32 X 3/8 inch flathead screw. (One (1) short panel bracket and one (1) #lo-32 X 3/8 inch flathead screw is supplied with each modem.)

Install four (4) nylon support standoffs. Install two (2) standoffs on each side of the double modem assembly in the threaded holes located at the rear sides of the chassis. Offset the support standoffs top and bottom as shown in Figure 2-3.

cl

See Figure 2-4 and perform the following procedure to install one RF-5710 and one RF-5710-X95 Series modem in one rack space:

a. b. C. d. e. f. g - h. i.

Set the two modems side-by-side on a bench or other suitable work surface. Locate the RF-5710 modem on the left side and locate the RF-5710-X95 Series modem on the right side. Remove the top chassis cover of the RF-5710-X95 Series modem.

Inside the RF-5710-X95 Series modem chassis, locate the two clearance holes on the left side of the chassis.

Use two (2) #lo-32 X 0.375 inch socket head cap screws with #lO lo&washers and insert the screws completely through the holes in the left side of the panel. The screws must be inserted from inside the chassis.

On the RF-5710 modem on the left side of the bench, locate the two (2) corresponding threaded holes on the outside of the right side chassis.

Line up the threaded holes in the left RF-5710 modem with the protruding screws from the right RF-5710-X95 Series modem.

Tighten both screws.

Replace the RF-5710-X95 Series modem top cover. Install the 13 screws used to secure the top chassis cover.

Install two (2) short panel brackets, one on each side of the double modem assembly with the flathead screws provided. One (1) short panel bracket and two (2) #lo-32 X 3/8 inch flathead screws are supplied with each RF-5710 modem. One (1) short panel bracket (with mounting stud) and one (1) #lo-32 X 3/8 inch flathead screw supplied with each RF-5710-X95 Series modem.

Install four (4) nylon support standoffs. Install two (2) standoffs on each side of the double modem assembly in the threaded holes located at the rear side of the chassis. For the RF-5710-X95 Series modem, offset the support standoffs top and bottom shown in Figure 2-3.

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INSTALLATION RF COMMUNICATIONS

i Install the double modem assembly into the rack by guiding the nylon standoffs into the “U” channels of

the support rails mounted in the rack.

k. Slide the assembly carefully into the rack and secure the front panel to the rack with the NO-32 X 5/8

inch SEMS screws provided.

2.6 POWER REQUIREMENTS

The modem uses a maximum of 15 watts of power (12.5 watts, typical). The modem does not require any reconfiguration to operate over the range of different input supply voltages, and will automatically accept any primary power voltage and frequency in the specified ranges:

0 85 - 250 Vat

l 50/60 Hz

Improperly grounded equipment may expose personnel to dangerous voltage. Do not energize the equipment unless the chassis and all exposed parts are properly grounded. Failure to do so could result in serious injury or death to personnel. 2.7 MODEM REAR PANEL CONNECTORS

Connectors A3J4 and Jl through 53 are located on the rear panel of the modem. Table 2-l identifies the connectors, and Figure 2-5 shows the locations of these connectors.

Table 2-1. HF Data Modem Rear Panel Connectors Connector Function

A3/J4 Alternating Current (AC) Power

Jl Radio

52 DTE

53 Remote

Type

Standard, IEC 320 3-prong, grounded

9 Pin D, Male 25 Pin D, Female 9 Pin D, Female

5710-2048

Figure 2-5. Modem Rear Panel Layout

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2.7.1 AC Power Connector A3J4

AC power input connector A3J4 is used to supply the modem with its primary power as described in Paragraph 2.6. The AC power cable is a standard IEC-320 three-prong detachable power supply cord, and is included in the ancillary kit. A cable clamp is also included in the ancillary kit, and should be placed around the AC power cord, approximately four inches from the plug connector. This clamp should be secured to the grounding lug on the rear panel of the modem chassis in order to provide strain relief. See Figure 2-6 when connecting the power cable and grounding strap.

NOTE

For maximum shielding effectiveness, connect an appropriately grounded system grounding strap (in addition to the AC power cord cable clamp) to the ground lug on the rear panel of the modem chassis. The strap must be placed between the modem chassis and the cable clamp.

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

Table 2-2. Radio Connector Jl Pin Numbers and Signals

I

Jl Pin Signal Description

1 Receive Audio + 2 Receive Audio - 3 Secondary Keyline A (contact closure) 4 Transmit Audio + 5 Transmit Audio - 6 Secondary Keyline B (contact closure) 7 Reserved

8 Keyline (Open collector

to ground)

9 Keyline Return/Ground

INSTALLATION RF COMMUNICATIONS

2.7.2 Radio Connector Jl

Table 2-2 describes the signals associated with the pins on radio connector Jl. The radio connector is used to interconnect the modem and the radio equipment. Receive and transmit audio are 600 ohm transformer coupled connections. KEYLINE is an open collector driver which provides a closure to ground to key the radio

transmitter. The secondary keyline provides a contact closure to key the radio transmitter. The connector is located on the rear panel of the modem chassis. A matching connector is provided in the ancillary kit for use in fabricating an interface cable. The use of shielded cable is strongly recommended to minimize Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) from external sources.

2.7.3 DTE Connector 52

Table 2-3 describes the signals associated with the pins on DTE connector 52. The DTE connector is used to interconnect the modem and data terminal. The data interface is interoperable with both MIL-STD-188114 Unbalanced mode and EIA RS-232 specifications. The DTE connector is located on the rear panel of the modem chassis. A matching connector is provided in the ancillary kit for use in fabricating an interface cable. The use of shielded cable is strongly recommended to minimize RF1 from external sources.

Table 2-3. DTE Connector 52 Pin Numbers and Signals 52 Pin Signal Description

1 Chassis Ground

2 Transmit Data (TXD)

3 Receive Data (RXD)

4 Request to Send (RTS)

5 Clear to Send (CTS)

6 Data Set Ready (DSR)

7 Signal Ground

8 Carrier Detect (CD)

9 . N/C

10 Slow DTE Edge Rate Enable

11 Signal Ground

12-14 N/C

15 TX Clock

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Table 2-3. DTE Connector 52 Pin Numbers and Signals - Continued J2 Pin 16 17 18 19-23 24 25 2.7.4 Remote Connector 53 Signal Description N/C RX Clock Reserved N/C

External Transmit Clock (EXT TX CLOCK) N/C

Table 2-4 describes the signals associated with the pins on remote connector 53. The remote connector is used to interconnect the modem and a simple terminal to issue ASCII text commands. In addition, the remote connector includes an auxiliary serial port which provides the capability to reprogram the modem. New firmware can be serially downloaded from a PC when future enhancements become available. The remote connector is located on the rear panel of the modem chassis. A matching connector is included in the ancillary kit for use in fabricating an interface cable. The use of shielded cable is strongly recommended to minimize RF1 from external sources.

Table 2-4. Remote Connector 53 Pin Numbers and Signals J3 Pin Signal Description Function

Auxiliary Serial Port Receive Data (ARXD) Receive Data (RXD)

Transmit Data (TXD) BootVpp

Signal Ground

Auxiliary Serial Port Transmit Data (ATXD) RTS

CTS Reserved

Provides external firmware upgrade capability Interconnection to ASCII remote terminal Interconnection to ASCII remote terminal Provides external firmware upgrade capability Provides ground connection

Provides external firmware upgrade capability Interconnection to ASCII remote terminal Interconnection to ASCII remote terminal Provides +12 Vdc to optional Modem Inter- face Unit (MIU)

2.8 TESTING THE MODEM

With power applied to the modem, turn the modem power switch to the ON position. The modem display will turn on and display the following messages:

0 * INITIALIZING JI=

BITE IN PROGRESS

0 * INITIALIZING *

BOOTING CODE

The modem will then display the waveform operating parameters that were in use before the modem was turned off. Refer to the Operation section of this manual for a detailed explanation of modem operation and testing. If the display does not turn on, check the power cab.‘ing and power source. When the initialization and boot-up process is done, waveform information will be displayed. If a fault code appears, or no display is shown, turn the power switch to the OFF position. Verify that only the power cable is attached and turn the modem on again. Refer to the Maintenance section of this manual for explanation of various fault codes and messages. Notify the depot or Harris Corporation if the fault persists.

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RF-5710-X95 SERIES aI

HARFUS

INSTALLATION RF COMMUNICATIONS

2.9 CONNECTING THE MODEM TO THE RADIO d

Harris provides a 9-pin D matching connector to assist users in making a modem-to-radio cable. Refer to Paragraph 2.7.2. The modem has a standard 600 ohm transformer coupled audio interface with both open collector to ground and contact closure keyline circuits. Any radio used with the modem should match the following specifications:

0 600 ohm, +6 dBm to -20 dBm transmit audio

0 600 ohm, receiver output audio, fixed level, +5 dBm to -30 dBm

a A keyline activated by open collector to ground or contact closure

0 A transmit and receive filter bandwidth of 300 Hz - 3000 Hz (2 3 dBm)

NOTE

Radios with specifications different than those listed may require a special radio interface cable. Most HF radios, however, have these listed features, thereby making direct connection to the modem possible. Radios with bandwidth less than that specified will cause degraded modem performance.

Use the 9-pin D connector provided with the modem to make the modem-to-radio interface cable. Refer to Paragraph 2.7.2. Figure 2-7 shows an example of a balanced audio configuration; Figure 2-8 shows an unbalanced configuration. Most radios accept a 0 dBm transmit signal (2.2 volts peak-to-peak into 600 ohms). If the system radio requires a lower transmit signal, refer to the Operation section of this manual to set the nominal transmit level between +6 dBm and -20 dBm (600 ohms) in 2 dBm increments.

Some radios may require a delay between the assertion of the keyline signal and the start of the transmit audio from the modem. This delay may be required to allow a transmit circuit to power up or an antenna coupler to tune. Refer to Paragraph 2.13 for additional information.

2.10 CONNECTING MODEM TO THE DTE

Harris provides a 25-pin D connector with the modem that matches with the 52 connector and is used to make a modem-to-DTE cable (refer to Paragraph 2.7.3).

Figure 2-9 shows a typical modem-to-RS-232D DTE cable. 52 is the modem side of the cable. The other side shows the signal pinouts and descriptions as defined in the RS-232D specification.

Some types of DTE require an indication that the modem is ready for operation. The RF-5710 provides a Data Set Ready (DSR) signal on pin 6 of 52. That signal is asserted true during the modem powerup initialization and remains true while the modem is powered on. If the DTE requires it, the signal should be connected as shown in Figure 2-9.

Some types of MIL-STD-188-114A DTE require slower signal rise/fall times. The modem can be configured for slow rise/fall times by connecting pins 10, 11 on 52, the data interface connector. Alternatively, the position of JMPll on Jll can be changed inside the modem to position l-2. For standard rise/fall times, the internal jumper, JMPll, is to be in the 2-3 position and 52 pins 10,ll are not connected. The default factory setting is for standard rise/fall times.

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RF-571 O-X95 SERIES

RF COMMUNICATIONS INSTALLATION

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In synchronous mode, the modem can either provide a transmit clock or accept an external transmit clock. 52 pin 15 provides a transmit clock signal output to external equipment when necessary, and 52 pin 24 is used for the input of an external transmit clock.

NOTE

If the modem is programmed for External Transmit Clock, the DTE must provide the clock signal on pin 24 of the modem rear panel DATA connector 52. Failure to do this will result in a modem fault after the RTS is activated. Receive clock is always provided by the modem.

RF-571 0 CONNECTOR

Jl

RADIO CONNECTOR (See Radio Manual for Pinouts)

- RX AUDIO + RX AUDIO - TX AUDIO + TX AUDIO - KEYLINE GND/KEYLINE RETURN -- 1 2 4 5 a 9 5710-201-dcr RX AUDIO + RX AUDIO - TX AUDIO + TX AUDIO - KEYLINE GND/KEYLINE RETURN

Figure

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References

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