Recent History of Clinical Psychology. Influence of WWII 9/11/2009. As in WWI, psychologists were called upon to evaluate soldiers

10 

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

Recent History of Clinical Psychology

Influence of WWII

• As in WWI, psychologists were called upon to  evaluate soldiers • Intellectual, psychiatric, and personality  assessments were given to over 20 million  people –Army General Classification Test, Personal Inventory,  Rorschach, TAT • Also called upon to perform therapy and  consultation

Influence of WWII

• In addition to the war effort, many other  developments during this time • MMPI developed by Hathaway in ‘43, WISC by  Wechsler in ‘49 • Connecticut passes certification law in ‘45,  followed by many other states • ABEPP created in ‘46, develops EPPP

(2)

Post WWII

• Over 40K veterans were hospitalized in VAs for  psych reasons • Psychiatrists were overwhelmed, needed  more CPs for testing, therapy, consultation,  and research • VA teamed with major universities to develop  formal CP training programs in ‘46 –Over 200 students in 22 programs later that year

VA and CP

• VAs offered good salary, secure positions, and  many options for service

• By 1950s, single largest employer of CPsBy 1950s, single largest employer of CPs • Still a tension between “academic”  psychologists and those in applied fields

Training

• NIMH recognized need for MH practitioners,  developed grant programs to train CPs • David Shakow and the APA Committee on  Training in Clinical Psychology developed  formal training guidelines in 1947 –Four years of doctoral study –1 year clinical internship –Course content

(3)

Training

• In ‘48, APA began to evaluate training  programs using these guidelines, accrediting  those that met certain criteria • This accreditation was crucial, as federal  monies were given to support such programs • Led to a committee meeting in Boulder,  Colorado in 1949

The Boulder Conference

• Co‐sponsored by the VA and NIMH • Formally adopted the scientist‐practitioner  model of training model of training –Emphasized training in both conducting research  and performing clinical services • Decreed that a PhD from university‐based  training program + 1 year of clinical internship  were minimum preparation needed

The Boulder Conference

• Met for two weeks, 73 participants • S‐P model became accepted and predominant  training approach training approach • Rise from 22 to 42 APA‐accredited schools  between ‘48‐’49

(4)

Post‐Boulder

• Critiques abounded, particularly about  emphasis on conducting research

–Only 10% of CPs published research, so why spend  so much energy on it?

so much energy on it? • No resolution, although free‐standing PsyD programs now offer much less research‐ focused training

Rise of Alternative Therapies

• First half of 20thcentury was dominated by  Freudian therapy and it’s derivatives • As CPs became more involved in doingAs CPs became more involved in doing 

therapy, new approaches were developed • Rise of psychoactive medications also greatly  altered therapy

Behavioral Approach

• Applies theories of learning and condition to  treatment of problems • Rooted in basic science conducted by Pavlov,  Watson, Thorndike, Hull, Dollard, Miller, and  Skinner • BT began as a reaction to disappointment with  psychodynamic and medical results

(5)

Behavioral Approach

• BT appealed to research‐oriented clinicians

–Operationalized easily –Measurement was possible –Statistical analysis

• Joseph Wolpe in South Africa, Eysenck & Shapiro  in UK, Lindsley and Lovass in US

• Embraced by those following the Boulder model  of training

Behavioral Approach

• Various approaches, but all have  commonalities –Problematic behavior is learned and can be  altered via learning principles –Treatment is based on scientifically‐derived  principles –Collaborative relationship with client • Association for Advancement of Behavior  Therapy was founded in 1967

Cognitive‐Behavioral Approach

• Limits of a strict focus on overt behavior led to  focus on impact on thinking and attitudes on  behavior in 1970s –Ellis’ REBT –Ellis  REBT –Beck’s cognitive therapy for depression –Mahoney’s cognitive restructuring –Meichenbaum’s stress inoculation –Bandura’s social learning

(6)

Cognitive‐Behavioral Approach

• Focused on integrating behavioral and cognitive  approaches –Changing thoughts, feelings, and expectations became  as important as overt behavior • Commonalities include –Learning and behavior are mediated by cognitive  processes –Therapist helps alter maladaptive cognitions • Led to AABT becoming the Association for  Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies in 2005

Humanistic Approach

• Also arose in frustration at PD and BT  approach, delivered a more optimistic view of  humans and their potential for growth/change • Strongly influenced by the philosophy of  existentialism (Kerkegaard, Nietzsche, Sarte) –There is a basic human need to seek and define  meaning in life

Humanistic Approach

• Leading figures were Carl Rogers, Maslow,  Perls, and Frankl

• Commonalities includedCommonalities included

–Commitment to phenomological model,  emphasizing self‐determination and freedom –Humans strive for growth

(7)

Family Systems Approach

• Focused on treatment of the entire family  rather than an individual

–It’s the whole system that needs to be changed,  not one individual

not one individual • Began as a study on communication by  Bateson (anthropologist), Haley (comm.  Expert), Weakland (engineer), and Jackson  (psychiatrist) in the ‘50s

Family Systems Approach

• Major figures were Haley, Minuchin, Bowen,  Ackerman

• All different FS approaches focused onAll different FS approaches focused on  communication and relationships within the  family, as well as the role of system in  maintaining problems

Psychotropic Medication

• Accidental discovery of medications for severe  psychological problems in the ’50s –Cade giving lithium chloride to guinea pigs Deniker & Delay’s Thorazine to schizophrenics –Deniker & Delay s Thorazine to schizophrenics –Benzodiazepines in the ‘60s for anxiety reduction

• Very positive reaction from lay community,  even after side effects and limitations were  realized

(8)

Psychotropic Medication

• Meds allowed number of inpatients to be  reduced from 500,000 to 50,000 between  1950 and 2000 • Gave a new role to psychiatrists, emphasized  brain/body connection • Today, between 20‐30% of all meds prescribed  are psychotropics

Community Mental Health

• With the end of “warehousing” and  deinstitutionalization, many patients needed  affordable outpatient services • Huge government support for CMH clinics at  first, but by the mid‐1980s lots of support was  removed

Integrative Approaches

• During ’70s and ’80s, many psychologists  began emphasizing the common factors  between different clinical approaches • Wachtel, Frank, and others tried to  incorporate different aspects of therapies into  one approach

(9)

Biopsychosocial Approach

• Research demonstrating that biological,  sociological, and psychological factors were all  at play in most illness, including mental, led to  an emphasis on the BSP approach

an emphasis on the BSP approach • Became foundation for health psychology, and  very influential on all areas of clinical psych

A New Training Model

• In 1973 a conference was in Vail, Colorado  that defined a new, different model of training • The scholar‐practitioner model was endorsedThe scholar practitioner model was endorsed  as an alternative to the scientist‐practitioner –Emphasizes delivery of services, minimizing  research training –Also endorsed free‐standing schools as an  alternative to university programs and the PsyD degree

A New Training Model

• Vail model has become hugely popular,  outnumbers Boulder model 4:1 • Vail conference also endorsed terminalVail conference also endorsed terminal 

master’s recipients as professional  psychologists

–APA did not endorse this, stated a doctorate was  required – still law in most states

(10)

Today

• Numerous challenges and difficulties for  modern clinical psychology

–Increasing diversity of the US Lack of diversity among CPs –Lack of diversity among CPs

–Influx of professional school trained CPs –Reductions in federal funding

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :