City University of Hong Kong

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City University of Hong Kong

Information on a General Education Course

offered by Department of Biology and Chemistry

with effect from Semester A in 2008 / 2009

Part I

Course Title:

Forensics & Modern Society

Course Code:

GE2302

Course Duration:

1 Semester

Proposed Area:

 Arts and Humanities

2

Study of Societies, Social and Business Organisations

1

Science and Technology

No. of Credit Units:

3CUs

Level:

2

Medium of Instruction: English

Medium of Assessment: English__________________________________________

Prerequisites:

(Course Code and Title)

Nil

Precursors:

(Course Code and Title)

Nil

Equivalent Courses:

(Course Code and Title)

None

Exclusive Courses:

(Course Code and Title)

None

Part II

1. Abstract

The course is collaboratively taught by four instructors from four departments of the College of Science and Engineering:

Department Discipline covered

Biology & Chemistry Crime scene investigation techniques, Criminalistics, Controlled drugs, explosives & bombs

Computer Science Digital forensics

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All the instructors involved are experienced in their own disciplines of Forensic Sciences.

Teaching is mainly done via formal lectures (2 hr every week). This is supplemented by invited guest lectures (e.g. on computer forensics) and interactive tutorials (e.g. on crime scene walkthrough & investigation and blood alcohol & breathalyzer test). These tutorials are arranged to allow students to learn, and discover by themselves, specific skills in forensics caseworks, and to put them in practical uses. For example, in the crime scene walkthrough tutorials, mock break-in, burglary and/or vandalism crime scenes are set up so that students can learn about all the important tactics and skills in CSIs.

2. Course Aims

This course aims to introduce students to the various aspects in which Forensic Science are applied in sophisticated societies such as Hong Kong. The course will highlight (i) the importance of accuracy, (ii) how existing knowledge can be applied to new challenges and (iii) how honesty and ethical behaviour are necessary in each part of the process.

Not only will the course deal with traditional aspects of forensics such as crime scene investigation (CSI) and effective presentation of evidence in Court, it will broaden students' perception by encouraging them to consider such diverse matters as counter terrorism, computer forensics, the detection of counterfeit items and accident investigation using forensic engineering techniques.

3.

Course Intended Learning Outcomes (CILOs)

Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

No. CILOs Approx. Weighting

1. Evaluate basic crime scene techniques. Explain the importance of logical thinking and ability to apply this to different forensic scenarios. Apply forensics and crime scene techniques in crime scene investigations.

45%

2. Describe how the use and misuse of computers has led to the need for more professionals who can detect and combat computer crime.

24%

3. Explain the importance of timely and accurate forensic engineering investigation on incidents such as the collapse of tower cranes.

12%

4. Describe the role of the forensic engineer in engineering litigation involving financial loss or criminal prosecutions.

11%

5. Describe the role of forensic expert witness in Court 8%

Alignment of CILOs to the GE Programme Intended Learning Outcomes (PILOs) is explained in Part A of the Annex to this Form.

4.

Teaching and Learning Activities (TLAs)

(designed to facilitate students’ achievement of the CILOs - Some TLAs may address more than one CILO.)

TLA CILO No. Hours/week (if applicable)

Formal lectures (including guest lectures from experts in specific fields of forensic investigations)

1-5 26

Mock crime scene investigation and CSI report writing

1 6

Tutorials on drug and alcoholic abuse 1 1

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Multimedia teaching and learning (using materials from TV programmes, newspaper and the internet) of relevant topics in criminalistics, digital forensics and forensic engineering.

1-4 2

Multimedia teaching and learning (using materials from TV programmes, newspaper and the internet) of roles of forensic expert witness and cross-examination skills and tactics in Court

5 2

5.

Assessment Tasks/Activities

(designed to assess how well the students achieve the CILOs –Some assessment tasks/activities may address more than one CILO.)

Type of Assessment Tasks/Activities CILO No. Weighting

(if applicable)

Remarks

Crime scene investigation report 1 38% Nil

Essay writing on topics about drug abuse 1 8% Nil

Application of pharmacokinetic model to estimate alcohol contents in blood and breathe

1 8% Nil

Short quiz and report writing on digital forensics topics

2 23% Nil

Essay and report writing on forensic engineering topics and cases

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6.

Grading of Student Achievement:

Grade Case Studies Mini-projects Short Quiz

A Able to provide a comprehensive analysis of real-life cases in Hong Kong or elsewhere, with clear explanations, logical and advanced justifications.

Able to show evidence in arguments or applications of the use of a range of sources of information outside taught material, properly referenced, with effective oral and written communication.

Able to complete all assessment tasks and activities and can demonstrate excellent understanding of critical forensic thought.

Able to demonstrate excellent understanding of critical forensic thought as this applies to traditional forensics such as basic crime scene techniques, and also modern problem areas including misuse of computer, terrorism, the spread of substandard or counterfeit goods and the prevalence of fatal accidents due to shoddy work and inferior materials in construction projects.

B Able to provide detail and critical analysis of real-life cases in Hong Kong or elsewhere, with accurate and clear explanations.

Able to show an ability to integrate concepts, analytical techniques and applications via clear oral and written communication.

Able to complete all assessment tasks and activities and can describe and explain the various principles of forensic science.

Able to describe and explain forensic principles as this applies to

traditional forensics such as basic crime scene techniques, and also modern problem areas including misuse of computer, terrorism, the spread of substandard or counterfeit goods and the prevalence of fatal accidents due to shoddy work and inferior materials in construction projects.

C Able to provide some simple analysis of real-life cases in Hong Kong or elsewhere.

Able to show evidence of the clear use of oral and written

communication.

Able to complete all assessment tasks and activities and can describe and explain some key forensic concepts.

Able to describe and explain some key forensic principles, applications, processes and methodologies related to traditional forensics as well as less conventional areas.

D Only able to demonstrates limited ability in analysis and justification of real-life applications in Hong Kong or elsewhere, with a lack of an integrated understanding of applications in forensic procedures as a whole.

Able to communicate simple ideas accurately in writing and orally.

Able to complete all assessment tasks and activities but can only briefly describe isolated forensic principles.

Able to briefly describe isolated principles, applications, methodologies, problems and limitations related to various aspects of forensics.

F Cannot provide appropriate analysis and satisfactory justifications to real-life criminal or civil cases in Hong Kong or elsewhere where forensic procedures were used. May show evidence of plagiarism or inability to communicate ideas, or a bare minimum of effort.

Fail to complete all assessment tasks and activities and/or cannot accurately describe and explain relevant forensic principles

Fail to accurately describe and explain relevant principles, applications, processes, methodologies, problems and limitations related to various aspects of traditional forensics.

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Part III

Keyword Syllabus:

Forensic(s); Crime scene; CSI, Chain-of-custody; Contamination; Pollution; Environment; Explosives; Counterterrorism; Intellectual Property; Counterfeit; Narcotics; Drugs; Fraud; Currency; Documents; Accuracy; Globalisation; Court; Engineering; Ethics; Honesty; Dishonesty; Computers: Pornography; Prosecution; Defence; Law; Lawyers; Criminal; Civil; Identification; Identity; Analysis; DNA; Odontology; Presumptive tests, Matching; Certainty.

Recommended Reading:

Text(s):

Forensic Science: Andrew R.W. Jackson and Julie M. Jackson, (2007 – 2nd edition) Prentice Hall;

Forensic Science – An Introduction to Scientific and Investigative Techniques: Stuart H. James and Jon

J. Norby (2005 – 2nd edition), Taylor and Francis;

Computer Forensics: An Essential Guide for Accountants, Lawyers and Managers: Michael Sheetz,

John Wiley.

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