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Special Education Minimum Degree Requirements and Satisfactory Progress Chart March, 2014.

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Master’s Degrees:

M.S. Special Education (General Master’s Track) M.S. Special Education (Teacher Certification Track)

Doctoral Degrees: Ph.D. Special Education

Minimum Graduate Degree Credit Requirement M.S. – 30 credits

*note that the Teacher Certification track requires a professional program with an average number of credits taken by students which exceeds 30 credits

Minimum Graduate Degree Credit Requirement Current PhD Program – 52 credits

Revised PhD Program beginning with students admitted fall 2015 and later – 56 credits

Minimum Graduate Residence Credit Requirement M.S. –16 credits (300 level or above, no audits or pass/fail) taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison.

Minimum Graduate Residence Credit Requirement

PhD – 32 credits (300 level or above, no audits or pass/fail) taken as a graduate student at UW–Madison.

Minimum Graduate Coursework (50%) Requirement M.S. Special Education (General Master’s Track) 15 credits must meet the graduate level course work requirement. RPSE courses that meet this designation include:

RPSE 630, 660 Topic: Issues in Severe Disabilities, RPSE 690, RPSE 699, RPSE 700, RPSE 710, RPSE 719, RPSE 741, RPSE 788, RPSE 789. Courses identified by other departments as meeting the graduate level course work requirement may also count toward this requirement.

M.S. Special Education (Teacher Certification Track) 36 credits must meet the graduate level course work requirement. Required RPSE courses that meet this designation include:

RPSE 330, RPSE 464, RPSE 465, RPSE 472, RPSE 473, RPSE 477, RPSE 478, RPSE 690, RPSE 700, RPSE 710

Minimum Graduate Coursework (50%) Requirement Current PhD program – 52 credits required

26 credits must meet the graduate level course work requirement. RPSE courses that meet this designation include:

RPSE 660 Topic: Critical Issues in Severe Disabilities, RPSE 700, RPSE 710, RPSE 719, RPSE 729, RPSE 735, RPSE 736, RPSE 737, RPSE 741, RPSE 788, RPSE 789, RPSE 801, RPSE 802, RPSE 803, RPSE 835, RPSE 871, RPSE 872, RPSE 873, RPSE 903, RPSE 904, RPSE 920, 921, RPSE 930, RPSE 941, RPSE 977, RPSE 985, RPSE 990, RPSE 999. Courses identified by other

departments as meeting the graduate level course work requirement may also count toward this requirement.

Revised PhD program beginning fall 2015 – 56 credits required 28 credits must meet the graduate level course work requirement. RPSE courses that meet this designation include:

RPSE 660 Topic: Critical Issues in Severe Disabilities, RPSE 700, RPSE 710, RPSE 719, RPSE 729, RPSE 735, RPSE 736, RPSE 737, RPSE 741, RPSE 788, RPSE 789, RPSE 801, RPSE 802, RPSE 803, RPSE 835, RPSE 871, RPSE 872, RPSE 873, RPSE 903, RPSE 904, RPSE 920, 921, RPSE 930, RPSE 941, RPSE 977, RPSE 985, RPSE 990, RPSE 999. Courses identified by other

departments as meeting the graduate level course work requirement may also count toward this requirement.

Prior Coursework Requirements: Graduate Work from Other Institutions

Students are allowed to count graduate course work from other institutions. Course work earned five or more years prior to admission to a master’s degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW-Madison Undergraduate

With program approval, students are allowed to count 7 credits of course work numbered 300 level or above from a UW-Madison undergraduate degree toward the graduate degree. Course work earned five or more years prior to admission to a master’s degree is not allowed to satisfy

Prior Coursework Requirements: Graduate Work from Other Institutions

Students are allowed to count course work from other institutions. Course work earned ten years or more prior to admission to a doctoral degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Prior Coursework Requirements: UW-Madison Undergraduate No courses taken as an undergraduate are allowed to count toward the degree.

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requirements.

Prior Coursework Requirement: UW-Madison University Special

With program approval and payment of the difference in tuition (between special and graduate tuition), students are allowed to count no more than 15 credits of course work numbered 300 or above taken as a UW-Madison University Special students. Course work earned five or more years prior to admission to a master’s degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Prior Coursework Requirement: UW-Madison University Special With program approval and payment of the difference in tuition (between special and graduate tuition), students are allowed to count no more than 15 credits of course work numbered 300 or above taken as a UW-Madison University Special student toward the Minimum Graduate Degree Credit requirement. Students are allowed to count no more than 15 credits numbered 700 level or above taken as a UW-Madison University Special student toward the Minimum Graduate Course work (50%) requirement. Course work earned ten or more years prior to admission to a doctoral degree is not allowed to satisfy requirements.

Credits per Term Allowed M.S. – 15 credits

Credits per Term Allowed Ph.D. – 15 credits Program-Specific Courses Required

M.S. Special Education General Masters Track 30 graduate degree credits to include:

• RPSE 700

• Additional course work to be determined in consultation with faculty advisor

• Master’s comprehensive Exam

• Project and/or Thesis (to be determined in consultation with faculty advisor) M.S. Special Education Teacher Certification 30 graduate credits to include:

• Completion of the four-semester full time, sequenced Special Education teacher certification program (see attached).

• RPSE 700

• Completion of additional program related course work before student teaching (may be met through prior course work): RPSE 300, Ed Psych 331, or 320 and 321, Ed Psych 301, Ed Pol 300, 412, or 500 • Master’s Comprehensive Exam (usually taken as

RPSE 690)

• Project and/or Thesis (to be determined in consultation with faculty advisor)

Program-Specific Courses Required Current PhD program

54 post-master’s graduate degree credits to include:

• 13 credits seminars (RPSE 801, 802, 803 and additional seminars identified in consultation with faculty advisor

• 9 credits Internships (RPSE 921, 930, 940) • Minor: 12 credits

• 12 credits Research Design and Statistics (Ed Psych 760 and Ed Psych 761 and additional research/statistics courses identified in consultation with faculty advisor.

• Dissertation (990)

Revised PhD program beginning fall 2015 56 credits to include:

• 20 credits of seminar to include: RPSE 871, 872, 873, 710 and additional credits to reach 20 with courses identified in consultation with faculty advisor. (Choice courses are listed as RPSE-660s, or special topics, and Include Issues in Teacher Education and diversity---focused and adolescence---focused courses).

• 6 credits Internships to include RPSE 930 and 941

• 9 credits academic minor to be chosen in consultation with faculty advisor.

• 15 credits of research design and statistics to include: Ed Psych 760, 761, Curric 719, and other research/statistics courses chosen in consultation with faculty advisor

• 6 cr. RPSE 990 (Dissertation)

• Exams (not directly linked to course work to include Qualifying, Preliminary and Dissertation

Doctoral Minor/Breadth Requirements

All doctoral students are required to complete a minor.

Overall Graduate GPA Requirement 3.00 GPA required.

Overall Graduate GPA Requirement 3.00 GPA required

Other Grade Requirements

The Graduate School requires an average grade of B or better in all course work (300 or above, not including research credits) taken as a graduate student unless conditions for probationary status require higher grades.

Other Grade Requirements

The Graduate School requires an average grade of B or better in all course work (300 or above, not including research credits) taken as a graduate student unless conditions for probationary status require higher grades. Grades of Incomplete are considered to be unsatisfactory if they are not

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Grades of Incomplete are considered to be unsatisfactory if

they are notremoved during the next enrolled semester. removed during the next enrolled semester. Probation Policy

A semester GPA below 3.0 will result in the student being placed on academic probation. If a semester GPA of 3.0 is not attained during the subsequent semester of full time enrollment (or 12 credits of enrollment if enrolled part-time) the student may be dismissed from the program or allowed to continue for 1 additional semester based on advisor appeal to the Graduate School.

Probation Policy Current PhD Program:

A semester GPA below 3.0 will result in the student being placed on academic probation. If a semester GPA of 3.0 is not attained during the subsequent semester of full time enrollment (or 12 credits of enrollment if enrolled part-time) the student may be dismissed from the program or allowed to continue for 1 additional semester based on advisor appeal to the Graduate School.

Revised PhD Program beginning fall 2015 Same as above.

Advisor / Committee

Students are assigned a faculty advisor upon admission to the program.

Advisor / Committee Current PhD Program:

When a student is first admitted to the Doctoral program a faculty member in the Special Education Area will assume Major Advisor responsibilities on a temporary basis. In many instances, the Doctoral Student-Major Advisor relationship established at the time of admission will extend throughout the Doctoral program. However, both the student and the Major Advisor have the prerogative to change the relationship should personal, academic, or other considerations make it necessary. If a change is desired, the matter should be discussed first by the Major Advisor and the student. If the student and/or the Major Advisor can arrange for another faculty member to assume Major Advisor

responsibilities, the name of the new Major Advisor should be submitted in writing to the SEGSC. If the student and/or the Major Advisor cannot arrange for a new Major Advisor, a written request for one should be submitted to the SEGSC. The SEGSC will take reasonable actions designed to assist the student to arrange for a new Major Advisor.

Revised PhD program beginning fall 2015 Same as above.

Assessments and Examinations -Masters Comprehensive Exam -Project and/or Thesis

Assessments and Examinations -Qualifying Examination

-Preliminary Examination - Doctoral students are required to take a comprehensive preliminary examination after they have cleared their record of all Incomplete and Progress grades (other than research and thesis).

-Dissertation Final Oral Committee Examination Time Constraints

Master's degree students who are absent for five or more years will not be given credit for prior work.

Time Constraints

Doctoral students have five years from the date of passing the preliminary examination to take the final oral examination and deposit the

dissertation. In some departments, if the professor(s) in charge is satisfied with the preparation, the preliminary examination may be construed as the final examination.

A candidate for a doctoral degree who fails to take the final oral

examination within five years after passing the preliminary examination is required to take another preliminary examination and be admitted to candidacy a second time.

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HLC Compliance Plan: Special Education Masters with Certification

The following courses constitute more than 50% of the total number of credits completed by master’s students in the

teacher certification program:

RPSE 690 (2-3 cr.) – Graduate level course RPSE 700 (3 cr.) – Graduate level course

RPSE 330 (3 cr.) – Additional requirements for graduate students outlined on syllabus RPSE 464 (4 cr.) – Additional requirements for graduate students outlined on syllabus RPSE 465 (4 cr.) – Additional requirements for graduate students outlined on syllabus RPSE 472 (3 cr.) – Additional requirements for graduate students on syllabus RPSE 473 (3 cr.) – Additional requirements for graduate students outlined on syllabus RPSE 477 (7 cr.) - Additional requirements for graduate students outlined on syllabus RPSE 478 (7 cr) – Additional requirements for graduate students outlined on syllabus TOTAL: 36-37 credits

---Professional Sequence

Semester 1- Fall 14 Credits RPSE 330 - Behavior Analysis, 3 cr.

RPSE 466 - Diversity in Special Education, 3 cr. (or 710 Multicultural Issues in Special Education – 710 preferred for graduate students)

RPSE 464 - Diagnosis, Assess. & Instruct. Planning for Students w/Dis., 4 cr. RPSE 402 - Methods in Teaching Functional Skills, 1 cr.

C & I 506 - Strategies for Inclusive Schooling, 3 cr. Semester 2- Spring 17 Credits

RPSE 465 - Lang. & Reading Instruct. Planning for Students w/Dis., 4 cr. C & I 365 - Teaching Mathematics in Inclusive Settings, 4 cr.

C & I 374 - General Educ Practicum & Instructional Planning for Diverse Learners, 5 cr. RPSE 473 - Classroom Manag. For Students w/ Learning and Behav. Dis., 3 cr.

RPSE 401 - Aug. and Alt. Comm & Assist. Tech., 1 cr. Semester 3- Fall 10 Credits

RPSE 477 - Student Teaching: Learning and Behav. Dis. K-9, 7 cr. RPSE 467 - Student Teaching Seminar I, 2 Cr.

RPSE 403 - Promoting Adolescent Lit. for Students w/Dis., 1 cr. Semester 4- Spring 13 Credits

RPSE 478 - Student Teaching: Learning & Behav. Dis. 6-12, 7 cr. RPSE 468 - Student Teaching Seminar II, 2 cr.

RPSE 472 - Methods in Trans. & Voca. Edu., 3 cr.

RPSE 404 - Methods in Teaching Sci. & Soc. Studies for Students w/Dis., 1 cr.

Other courses that may be required depending on student academic background and individual needs – 17-18 credits RPSE 300 – Individuals with Disabilities, 3 cr.

RPSE 700 – Seminar, Rehabilitation Psychology Research, 3 cr.

Ed Psych 331 or Ed Psych 320 & 321, Developmental psychology course, 3 cr. Ed Psych 301, Human Abilities and Learning, 3 cr.

Ed Pol 300 or Ed Pol 412 or Ed Pol 500, Foundations of the profession course 3 cr.

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Examples of Syllabi: Master’s Level Differentiated Assignments and Assessments

---

DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITATION PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION

University of Wisconsin - Madison

SYLLABUS

_____________________________________________________________________________

Course: 194-477, Elementary Student Teaching

Semester: Fall 2014

Location: School Classroom Time: M-F 7:30 – 3:30

MERIT Room 336 Mondays 4:00-6:30

Instructor: Sara Bringman

Instructor Contact Info: sjbringman@wisc.edu

Course Objective

The Elementary Student Teaching placement is designed to allow teacher candidates to observe firsthand and practice professional skills that are vital to success as a special educator. Seminar bridges students’ experience in the classroom with research, problem solving and application of skills within the elementary setting.

Graduate students will attend an extended Seminar from 6:00-6:30 weekly to identify and discuss/problem solve around problems of practice. These can be unique to your experience and/or problems identified during Group Share.

Expected Outcomes

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a) Reflect on their actions and attitudes in the classroom in order to improve their own practice; b) Demonstrate ability to plan, implement and assess learning activities that meet the needs of students;

c) Demonstrate professional communication skills across a variety of formats in contacts with parents, related service providers, and other members of the relevant education community;

Teacher Education Standards

UW Madison Teacher Education Standards:

The content of this course (194-477) is aimed at developing teacher competencies specific to supporting students in elementary and middle school. This field experience and seminar combination is designed to address all UW Teacher Education

Standards. (These standards are appended.

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Initial Educator Standards: The following standards will be addressed in this course. For a full description,

see https://www.cec.sped.org/Content/NavigationMenu/ProfessionalDevelopment/ProfessionalStandards/Professional_Standa.htm Standard 1: Foundations

Standard 2: Development and Characteristics of Learners Standard 3: Individual Learning Differences

Standard 4: Instructional Strategies

Standard 5: Learning Environments and Social Interactions Standard 6: Language

Standard 7: Instructional Planning Standard 8: Assessment

Standard 9: Professional and Ethical Practice Standard 10: Collaboration

Course Materials Special Education Student Teaching Handbook

Relevant district and school handbooks that correspond with your placement TPA Assessment Handbook: Special Education

Readings as listed in the course sequence

Accommodations: Accommodations will be made for students with disabilities. To request academic accommodations due to a disability, please contact the McBurney Disability Resource Center (263-2741). Please present a letter of confirmation from this Center no later than the third week of the semester. Additional information is available through the UW Madison McBurney Disability Resource Center at http://www.mcburney.wisc.edu/

Religious observances: Students who miss course activities while electing to participate in religious activities will be allowed to make up missed work, provided that they inform the instructor of such obligations (via email) during the first two weeks of the

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semester.

Course Website:

1. Go to http://www.wisc.edu

2. Find a quick link to Learn@UW in the My UW-Madison section in the right-hand side of the page, under Campus Quick Links. Alternately, you can access Learn@UW directly at https://learnuw.wisc.edu/

3. Once in Learn@UW, enter your net ID and password. This ID and password are the same as those you use to access your My UW account (my.wisc.edu).

4. After logging in, please read the instructions on the top of the center column and

choose “Elementary Student Teaching Seminar” from “My Madison Courses.” This will bring you to the course home page. This home page is where we will post messages to the class as necessary.

In the upper left-hand tool bar on the course home page, you will find: “Content” which gives you access to course documents

“Grades” which shows you your progress in the class.

Grading & Course Assignments

Please note that all student-related materials must be written and presented in a confidential manner – making sure to protect the identity and privacy of the individual about whom it is written.

Notebook/Assignment Requirements

Assignment/Materials Points Date

Completed Due September 22nd

Special Education Student Handbook 5

Guest Site School Handbook 5

School District Calendar 5

Professional Goals 10

Class/Caseload Study Student Info Sheet or Files (Standards 1, 5) 20

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Lesson Plan Book 5

Reflective Journals 1-3 5

Personal Calendar/Daily Schedule 5

Artifact/Entry Slip 5

Due October 6th

Lesson Plan & Reflection #1 (Standards 1, 2) 40

Goal Check In #1 10

Class/Caseload Student Observation #1 (Standard 1) 5

Class/Caseload Student Observation #2 (Standard 1) 5

Class/Caseload Student Observation #3 (Standard 1) 5

Student Schedules 5

Copy of District’s IEP and Related Forms 5

Context of Learning 5

Reflective Journals 4-7 5

Due October 20th

Class/Caseload Student Observation #4 (Standard 1) 5

Class/Caseload Student Observation #5 (Standard 1) 5

1 Original Material you adapted with entry slip #1 5

Assessment administration and entry slip #1 (criterion, norm-references, or standardized test) (Standard 5)

5

Resource File 5

Reflective Journals 8-10 5

3-5 TPA Learning Segment/Instructional Unit Lessons (Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 50

Planning Commentary 20

Due November 3rd

Lesson Plan & Reflection #2 (Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 40

FBA/BIP Description/Proposal (Standards 1, 4, 5) 20

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Reflective Journals 11-14 5 Due November 17th

Assessment observation and entry slip (Standard 4) 5

Assessment administration and entry slip #1 (criterion, norm-references, or

standardized test) (Standard 4) 5

Assessment administration and entry slip #1 (curriculum-based) (Standard 4)

5

1 original material you adapted with entry slip #2 5

TPA Video Clip 20

Instructional Commentary 20

Reflective Journals 15-18 5

Due December 1st

Lesson Plan & Reflection #3 (Standards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5) 40

Goal Check In #2 5

FBA/BIP Summary of Results & Reflection (Standards 1, 4, 5) 30 Assessment administration and entry slip #2 (curriculum-based)

(Standard 8)

5

Attend IEP evaluation and summary (Standards 1, 4, 5) 5

Attend IEP Programming and summary (Standards 1, 4, 5) 5

Reflective Journals 19-20 5

1 original material you developed with Entry slip #2 5

Due December 8th

Lesson Plan and Reflection #4 40

TPA Assessment Materials 20

Assessment Commentary 20

8 Portfolio Standards and entry slips 40

Graduate Students: Present Learning Segment (Video & Instruction Commentary) for review

90 Notebook Total 700 points

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Total = 610

Grade Percentage Cut-Off Point Spread

A 92% 644-700 A/B 88% 616-643 B 82% 574-615 B/C 77% 539-573 C 72% 504-538 D 60% 420-503

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Course Sequence

Class Topic/Agenda

Session 1 Course Overview/Professional Development & Goal-

Setting; Professional expectations during elementary student teaching experience

Readings:

Washington, D. (January, 2007). Where it Starts. In January Guideposts.

Special Education Student Teaching Handbook

Relevant district and school handbooks that correspond with your placement

In-class activity:

• Becoming Familiar with the Student Teaching Handbook assignments and expectations. Assignment: Professional Goal Setting.

If you work as an educator in WI, you will at some point have to complete a PDP or Professional Development Plan. This assignment/activity is intended to help you begin to think about your PDP. For this assignment, I would like you to develop three professional development goals as they relate to your learning in your Elementary Student Teaching Placement. You do not have to complete the full PDP form, just use this opportunity to begin thinking about how you will address your ongoing professional development by completing parts B and C for your class goals.

Session 2 Becoming a Reflective Practitioner

Reflecting on one’s practice is an essential skill for today’s educator. We will discuss the benefits of reflecting on our practice as well as ways to develop this skill. We will operationalize our discussion by linking it to the UW Madison ePortfolio.

Recommendation for certification in any area requires that you can document your understanding of the 15 UW Teaching Standards. Your ePortfolio will summarize your development within each of these standards. Providing artifacts and reflecting on those artifacts will be the basis of your documentation. These artifacts will not be developed specifically for your portfolio. Rather, they will be actual evidence of the work you have done in your classes at the University or in your field placements.

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Reading:

UW Teaching Standards – Matching the edTPA

In-class activities:

• What is an artifact? Connecting your knowledge with the 15 UW Teaching Standards • Entry Slips – Context, Reflection, Justification

Assignment: Select an artifact from your student teaching experience to present in Seminar next week. Use the Entry Slip format to outline a brief presentation.

Session 3 Overview of Performance-Based Assessments

In this session we will discuss ways that teachers are evaluated. Specifically we will focus on performance-based assessments that are used at the university, district, and local school level.

Reading:

edTPA Assessment Handbook: Introduction to edTPA Special Education (pp. 1-4)

In-class activities:

• A look at Educator Effectiveness – the Wisconsin Educator Evaluation system. • Review the Teacher Performance Assessment: what it is and what is required.

Session 4 Planning Instruction for Elementary Students

We will discuss how to approach instructional planning so that it is appropriate for the students and the content you are teaching. You will demonstrate your ability to organize curriculum, instruction, and assessment to help diverse students meet the standards for the curriculum content and to develop academic language related to that content. You will provide evidence of your ability to select, adapt, or design learning tasks and materials that offer your students equitable access to curriculum content.

Reading:

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Assignment: Complete Context for Learning Activity

Using your current teaching placement, complete the requested context information for the class selected for this assessment. This format is designed to be completed electronically. Use as much space as needed to respond. Due: Next Seminar

In-class activity:

• edTPA Lesson Plan Format

Session 5 Planning for Individual Students at the Elementary Level

In this session we will discuss the importance of considering individual students’ needs when planning instruction. Part of our discussion will focus on developing individualized education programs (IEPs) and working with general education teachers to provide individualized instruction for elementary students with disabilities.

Reading:

edTPA Assessment Handbook: Task 1 Planning (pp. 6-7; 10-21)

In-class: Videotaping for the edTPA

Assignment: Develop a Learning Segment/Unit of 3-5 lesson plans to present in your classroom (general education or special education environment). Due Session 7.

Session 6 Academic Language in the Elementary Setting

Language is essential to just about everything we do and is particularly important in school. Yet, while instruction in the classroom focuses on the vocabulary around content, we often overlook the language we use to instruct or assess learning.

Reading:

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Assignments: Sort the language requirements of your Learning Segment/Unit using the Language Demand Organizer. Due: Session 7

Planning Commentary - Write a rough draft of your Planning Commentary. Due: Session 7.

In-class activity: Academic Language

Session 7 Engaging Elementary Students

We will discuss the importance of student engagement to achievement. We will discuss ways to motivate and engage elementary students. You will provide evidence of your ability to engage students in meaningful tasks, monitor their understanding, and use your responses to students to guide their learning.

Reading:

edTPA Assessment Handbook: Task 2: Instructing and Engaging the Focus Learners (pp. 22-29)

Session 8 The Caring Classroom

Traditionally, our role as educators has been to impart knowledge to our students. This has meant a passive education, where children sit at desks while a teacher pours facts into heads which are attached to bodies that can’t wait to get out of there. Today, however, programs such as Expeditionary Learning, Project Adventure, TRIBES, and service learning are making their mark. Their common themes involve community, integrated/thematic instruction, reflection, authentic learning, and empowerment. They are based on the foundation that people are whole beings connected to a larger environment and to each other. The benevolent dictator approach to teaching is giving way to participatory democracy. A sense of community is replacing isolationism.

Cooperative learning is eroding the notion that we need competition in order to motivate our students. In order to accomplish this ideal, we must begin with the idea of classroom as community.

Reading:

Frank, Laurie S. (2004). Journey Toward the Caring Classroom, 1-4.

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Session 9 Crisis Management, Child Abuse & Reporting

A special education teacher is often in “Crisis Intervention Mode.” Issues come up almost daily regarding behavior and reporting. By law, teachers are required to report suspected child abuse. You will be expected to complete Incident Reports and Accident Reports as well as participate in interviews with other agencies regarding the same. Often the school’s social worker will assist you in completing necessary reports, but you will need to know what’s required.

Presentation: Guest Speaker - MMSD Social Worker.

Session 10 Supporting Elementary Student Learning

In this session we will work in small groups to discuss your classroom experiences and work collaboratively to develop action plans that will support student learning.

Class Activity: Work time on 2 assignments

2 Assignments:

1. Instruction Commentary. Due Session 11

2. Bring in a video tape of one or all of your lessons. Due Session 12

Session 11 Bullying in our Schools

Reports from the Department of Justice, US Department of Health and Human Services, and Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction all recognize bullying as a widespread problem. Bullying can be physical, verbal, electronic, or indirect in nature. Implicit in any form of bullying is an imbalance in real or perceived power between the bully and victim.

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In this session we will discuss the benefits of self-evaluation of practice. You will watch a videotape of your instructional practice and evaluate your strengths and weaknesses.

Class Activity: In pairs, select 2 sections from your video

Session 13 ePortfolio Session

We will use this time to upload your Learning Segment into your edTPA and artifacts you’re your ePortfolio. Bring all your documentation on a flash drive to facilitate this process.

Assignment: Assessment Commentary – Due Session 14

Session 14 Graduate Student Presentation Session

Graduate students will present their Learning Segment for review and scoring by students within Seminar. Students will respond using edTPA rubrics.

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UW-Madison Teacher Education Standards

Future teachers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison are dedicated to teaching all children, seeking social justice through equitable educational outcomes. License candidates leaving their teacher education programs are highly skilled professionals who are prepared to lead efforts to improve educational opportunities in the communities in which they work. As such, these candidates have demonstrated their knowledge and skills in five broad standard areas: (1) learner and learning environment, (2) planning, (3) engaging/instructing, (4) assessing, and (5) behaving in professional and ethical ways.

1: Learner and Learning Environment Teachers know:

1. learning is different at different stages in life

2. learning and developmental patterns vary among individuals.

3. learners bring cognitive, linguistic, social, emotional, cultural, and physical differences to the learning process. 4. ways of knowing vary among individuals

5. learners need supportive, inclusive, and safe learning environments to thrive.

6. learning environments and activities must attend to the whole child, including mental and physical health.

7. ways to recognize and challenge their own assumptions about learners from diverse cultures, language, and backgrounds, and of differing ability levels.

8. learning environments change as technologies and information resources change Effective teachers:

• have high expectations for every learner, encourage learners to develop deep understanding of content areas and their connections and to apply understanding in meaningful ways.

• implement developmentally appropriate and challenging learning experiences.

• create supportive, inclusive, linguistically responsive, and safe learning environments that help all learners meet high standards and reach their full potential.

• reflect on and meaningfully justify decisions relating to the learner and the learning environment. 2: Plan

Teachers know:

1. how to bring together knowledge of content areas, tools of inquiry, curriculum, cross-disciplinary skills, instructional strategies, technologies and other informational resources, and knowledge of learners and the community context in order to define rigorous short- and long-range learning goals and standards.

2. how to use formative and summative assessment data, understanding of learners’ prior knowledge and experiences, learner interests, cultural and linguistic diversity, and strengths and needs to plan instruction that meets rigorous short- and long-range learning goals.

Effective teachers individually and collaboratively:

plan how to achieve each learner’s learning goals by selecting and creating experiences that (1) are appropriate for curriculum goals and content standards and (2) make the discipline accessible and relevant to learners.

choose and sequence appropriate instructional strategies, accommodations, technologies and other informational resources, and materials to differentiate instruction providing multiple ways for learners to access instruction and demonstrate knowledge, skill, and mastery of content standards.

choose or, as needed, create appropriate and equitable formative and summative assessments to measure learners’ learning in relation to instructional goals

evaluate plans in relation to short- and long-range goals and systematically adjust plans to meet each learner’s learning strengths and needs.

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3. Engage and Instruct Teachers know:

• research-based and other recommended instructional strategies relevant to the discipline.

• the disciplinary content, tools of inquiry and structures (how knowledge is organized and pursued).

how knowledge of the learner and knowledge of learner development inform selection of learning tasks, contemporary tools and resources, and strategies.

how to connect concepts and use differing perspective to engage learners in critical thinking, creativity, and collaborative problem solving related to authentic local and global issues.

Effective teachers:

engage learners in meaningful learning activities that lead to critical thinking, creativity, innovation, self-evaluation, and self-directed learning.

use a variety of teaching strategies, technologies and information resources to assist learners in meeting learning objectives and content standards.

adapt teaching to meet learner needs and strengths, with consideration of learners from different linguistic and cultural backgrounds.

use effective scaffolds and supports.

provide clear behavioral and learning expectations/standards.

provide consistent feedback and opportunities for learners to revise their work.

provide a positive, challenging, and inclusive learning environment that promotes mutual respect and opportunities to promote various perspectives.

encourage learners to develop different perspectives of authentic (real-world) issues.

manage the learning environment and resources to promote learning and minimize loss of instructional time. continuously monitor learners’ learning

reflect on and meaningfully justify decisions relating to engagement and instruction. 4. Assess

Teachers know:

how to design and use multiple forms of formative and summative assessments for different purposes.

how to design assessments to accommodate various learners, including learners with disabilities or learners with differing linguistic strengths and needs.

how to use assessment to inform instruction.

how to respond to the linguistic and cultural biases associated with tests and their administration. how to work with families as valuable partners in assessment.

Effective teachers:

monitor, verify, and document learner progress towards mastery of learning objective(s) and standards. use multiple methods of assessment.

when appropriate, work with families to ensure comprehensive and appropriate assessment.

select or modify assessment tools and processes to accommodate learner language and learning differences use assessment data to plan, modify, and justify future instruction to support each learner’s learning. provide meaningful feedback to learners that guides future learning.

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accurately communicate assessment results to parents and other professionals. reflect on and meaningfully justify decisions relating to assessment.

5. Professionalism and ethics Teachers know:

cultural and linguistic considerations related to communication and family engagement. relationship between reflection and instructional changes.

learning is a reciprocal activity that connects and affects both learner and teacher. there are multiple ways of knowing that may be differ among students and their teachers.

what resources are available in the school or the district and how to maximize the use of available resources in planning, assessing, instructing/engaging, and communicating.

professional ethics including their interactions with and communications about students, colleagues, parents and communities, and their performances as teachers.

state and federal law requirements, state and district policies and regulations.

institutional contexts, policies and practices influence inclusion of all learners and exclusion of some learners. Effective teachers:

use evidence to continually evaluate their practice, particularly the effects of their choices and actions on learner learning and adapt practice to meet the needs of each learner.

ethically leverage technological resources to improve learning and communication

make informed decisions about current technologies and their applications related to improving learning. use and model safe, legal, and ethical use of technologies and information resources

maintain accurate instructional and non-instructional records.

have ethical and professional relationships with learners, colleagues, and families from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

follow school and district, state, and federal policies and regulations.

communicate and collaborate with learners, families, colleagues, other school professionals, and community members to ensure learner growth, and to advance the profession.

engage in ongoing professional learning. demonstrate leadership.

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DEPARTMENT OF REHABILITIATION PSYCHOLOGY AND SPECIAL EDUCATION

RPSE 465—Language & Reading Instruction: Learning and Behavioral Disabilities (4 credits)

Syllabus

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Meeting Times: Tuesdays 4:00-5:00pm Location: Education L196 Wednesdays 2:25-5:25pm Location: 1270 Grainger Hall

Instructors

Melinda Leko Heather Dahl

1000 Bascom Hall Room 440 1000 Bascom Hall, Office 452 (608) 263-5751

leko@wisc.edu hsdahl@wisc.edu

Office Hours: By appointment. Email Office Hours: By appointment. Email

leko@wisc.edu hsdahl@wisc.edu

________________________________________________________________________________________________________

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This 4-credit course is designed to prepare future special educators to plan and provide language and reading instruction to a broad range of students with difficulties. The course will focus on interventions designed to improve the reading skills of students with disabilities in the following areas: oral language and communication, phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and comprehension. This course will address all aspects of diversity as it pertains to language and reading instruction. The course content will include perspectives and best practices relative to dominant cultural groups and address groups of students who speak English as a second language or those who speak dialects of American English. At the end of this course, it is expected that students will be able to:

 Articulate an understanding of typical and atypical language development and the ways in which exceptional conditions can interact with a student’s experience with and use of language

 Articulate an understanding of difficulties that a student with a disability might display in the areas of oral language, phonological awareness, phonics fluency, vocabulary, reading comprehension, and written expression.

 Select and carry out appropriate research-based instructional strategies to improve the reading skills of K-12 students, based on knowledge of a wide range of tools, pedagogies, and assessments.

Part B of the General Education Communication Requirement: This course satisfies part B of the General Education Communication Requirement. To meet the objectives for part B, students in this course will develop skills in

a) critical reading, logical thinking, and use of evidence,

b) use of appropriate style and conventions in writing and speaking c) productive use of core library resources.

Because this is a Comm B course, there will be an emphasis on writing instruction and instruction in oral communication. You can expect that a large portion of the course include intensive writing instruction and practice.

Course Structure: This four-credit course is divided into two parts, a weekly 1-hour discussion and a weekly 3-hour class. The weekly discussion will emphasize instruction in writing and oral communication. The discussion section will include mini-assignments that cover topics relevant to the course content, your major presentations, and writing and oral communication skills. The weekly class will cover the content related to reading and language instruction for students with disabilities.

Teacher Education Standards: The following standards will be addressed in this course. For a full description, see http://www.education.wisc.edu/pi34/

Standard 3: Demonstrates sophisticated curricular knowledge Standard 4: Demonstrates pedagogical knowledge in specific domains Standard 5: Explains and justifies educational choices

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Standard 8: Employs varied assessment processes Standard 10: Employs varied instructional strategies

Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) Initial Educator Standards: The following standards will be addressed in this course. For a full description,

see http://www.cec.sped.org/~/media/Files/Standards/ProfessionalStandards/Initial_Advanced_Preparation_Standards.pdf

Standard 1: Learner Development and Individual Learning Differences Standard 3: Curricular Content Knowledge

Standard 4: Assessment

Standard 5: Instructional Planning and Strategies

DPI Statutory Requirements: The following standard will be addressed in this course: Phonics Instruction

Plagiarism and Academic Integrity: While we do not foresee encountering academic dishonesty in this class, we will address the issue in case it arises. It is expected that students will complete their own original work and will demonstrate academic and personal integrity. The Code of Student Conduct which includes the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s Student Conduct Policies can be found at: http://www.wisc.edu/students/sajs/misconduct/misconduct.html. It is expected that all sources will be properly cited and credit given to the appropriate author. The following resource may provide assistance on how to cite accurately or determine whether or not something needs citing: www.wisc.edu/writing/Handbook/QuotingSources.html. Please see the instructors if you have specific questions regarding academic integrity and plagiarism. While most incidents are unintentional, they can result in severe penalty and being pro-active if you are unsure of a situation can help prevent these issues from occurring.

Cell Phones, Text Messaging, & In-Class Computer Use: All communication devices need to be turned off completely—not just silenced or set to vibrate—during class. If your situation requires the need to receive critical messages during class please communicate with the instructor at the start of class. Computer use is limited to note-taking only. If this is abused computer use may be prohibited. The instructors maintain the right to deduct class participation points for inappropriate distractions by cell phones, computers, and other handheld devices during class.

Students With Disabilities: Reasonable accommodations to curriculum, instruction, or assessment are provided to students with special needs who seek assistance through the McBurney Disability Resource Center (263-2741). If you choose to access these services, you will need to present a letter of confirmation, known as the VISA, from the McBurney Center no later than the third week of the semester. The McBurney Disability Resource Center is located at 702 West Johnson Street #2104. Their website provides additional information: http://www.mcburney.wisc.edu.

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Attendance: Attendance to class is mandatory. You may miss one class session without penalty. Missing class on the day exams are administered or presentations are given will result in a zero unless the student has official documentation of absence or has made prior arrangements with the instructor. Please note that missing 3 or more class sessions may result in a failing grade for the course. However, students who need to miss course activities due to religious activities will be allowed to make-up missed work. In this case, the instructor must be informed (via email) during the first two weeks of the semester, otherwise there is no obligation to allow the student to make-up the missed work.

Writing Center: Students who need assistance with their writing should contact the Writing Center at http://www.writing.wisc.edu/. The Writing Center can provide online and in-person assistance.

Course Website: There is a Learn@UW course website that accompanies this course: http://usmadcourses.wisconsin.edu/. Supplemental readings, the course syllabus, assignments, rubrics and other important course information can be found on this website. The course website is accessed using your NetID and password. Assistance with this can be found through the help center at http://www.doit.wisc.edu/students/ or 265-7469. In order to participate in the course students need to be able to access the course website, email, the Internet, Adobe PDF Reader, and Microsoft Office software.

Late Work: Late assignments are subject to a 10% deduction in possible points each day they are late (i.e., if you turn in an assignment one day late and get 100% on it, 10% will be deducted resulting in a grade of 90%). After the third day past the due date, if the assignment has not been turned it, the instructor is not obligated to accept the assignment. However, we realize that sometimes there are instances when life gets in the way of completing an assignment in a timely fashion. In this case, please contact the instructor prior to class and arrangements can be made if appropriate. Because quizzes are open for an entire week, they cannot be made-up or turned in late and if not completed, will result in a score of zero. Please note that if the syllabus specifically states that an assignment needs to be uploaded to the drop box prior to class, turning in the hard copy in class will result in a late work penalty.

Course Concerns: If you have questions or concerns about the class please feel free to visit the instructor during office hours or make an appointment. Grades and course information will be frequently added and updated on the Learn@UW course website.

Course Texts

Bursuck, W. D., & Damer, M. (2011). Teaching reading to students who are at risk or have disabilities. Pearson Education Inc.: NY.

Kaderavek, J. D. (2011).Language Disorders in Children: Fundamental Concepts of Assessment and Intervention. Pearson Education Inc.: NY.

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Recommended Strongly: The 6th edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychology Association (APA)

Course Requirements

Class Attendance & Participation

Weekly classes will be interactive and will involve group discussions on the weekly topics as well as small group activities. These lectures and discussions will extend ideas from the weekly readings. Because of this, class attendance, both during face-to-face and online sessions, is imperative. Students are required to attend class each week and stay for its entirety. Participation points will be awarded for 29 out of the 30 class sessions. Therefore, students can miss 1 class session without being penalized. Please note that missing 3 or more class sessions may result in a failing grade for the course. Points will be awarded as follows:

• 4.25 Points-Student is on time, participates, and stays for the entirety of class. • 2.25 Points-Student attends class and participates but is either late or leaves early. • 0 Points-Student does not attend class.

29 classes each worth 4.25 points 123 points total (25% of grade)

Exams

Exams will assess your understanding of concepts and skills presented in the course textbooks and class lectures. Exam 1= 35 points

Exam 2= 35 points

Exam 3 (Cumulative)= 51 points 121 points total (25% of grade)

Reading Case Study

Administer a series of assessments (at least one for each of the five areas of reading) with a child. In a 3-4 page paper describe the student’s strengths, weaknesses, and then provide recommendations for future reading instruction based on the assessment data.

 Assess a student in each of the five areas of reading (phonemic awareness, phonics/word study, fluency, comprehension, and vocabulary)

 Develop an instructional plan with recommendations including 3 lesson plans that target skills identified from the assessment data

Additional information about expectations and formatting will be provided in class.

Due to the Learn@UW Dropbox Wednesday April 16th by 2:00pm

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Reading Case Study Presentation

At the end of the semester each student will present findings from his or her reading case study in class in a 4-6 minute oral presentation. Further guidelines and a grading rubric will be distributed in class.

Presentations will take place in class on Wednesday April 16th 24 points (5% of grade)

Research Paper/Research Proposal

Undergraduate Students: Over the course of the semester, each student will review research related to one of the 5 main areas of reading: Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, or Comprehension. Students will disseminate their research findings in a 6-7 page research paper. Prior to submitting the final paper students will be required to (a) participate in peer conferences, (b) attend individual writing conferences with the instructor, and (c) submit a rough draft for formative feedback. Further guidelines and a grading rubric will be distributed in class.

Graduate Students: Over the course of the semester, each student will review research related to one of the 5 main areas of reading: Phonemic Awareness, Phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, or Comprehension. Students will complete an annotated bibliography of their research findings and then use the findings to inform a research study proposal. The research study proposals are to be 12-15 pages including the following sections: (a) introduction, (b) brief literature review, (c) rationale/purpose, (d) research questions, and (e) research design/methods. Prior to submitting the final paper students will be required to (a) participate in peer conferences, (b) attend individual writing conferences with the instructor, and (c) submit a rough draft for formative feedback. Further guidelines and a grading rubric will be distributed in class.

Rough drafts due to the Learn@UW Dropbox Tuesday April 8th by 2:00pm Final drafts due to the Learn@UW Dropbox Wednesday April 30th by 2:00pm 97 points (20% of grade)

Research Presentation

At the end of the semester each student will present findings from his or her research paper/proposal in class in an 8-10 minute oral presentation. Further guidelines and a grading rubric will be distributed in class.

Research presentations will take place in class on Wednesday May 7th

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Grading

The total number of points for this course is 486. Grades will be assigned based on the following distribution.

A 93-100% 449-486 points AB 88-92% 425-448 points B 83-87% 401-424 points BC 78-82% 376-400 points C 70-77% 338-375 points D 60-69% 289-337 points F 0-59% 0-288 points Topical Schedule

Date Meeting Topic Reading & Assignments

T 1/21 Meet face-to-face Education L196

Course Introduction & Expectations

Review Course assignments

W 1/22

Meet face-to-face Language Theory and Language Development

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1270 Grainger Hall

T 1/28 Online An Intro to APA

W 1/29

Meet face-to-face Children with Specific Language Impairment

Children with Intellectual Disability

Kaderavek Chapter 5 & 7

T 2/4

Online Identifying a Writing Topic

W 2/5

Meet face-to-face Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder Kaderavek Chapter 8

T 2/11 Online Selecting a Research Topic W

2/12

Meet face-to-face Memorial Library

Room 126

Library Session: Introduction to searching electronic databases

T 2/18 Online Prewriting and Outlining

Exam I Review

W 2/19

Meet face-to-face Explicit, Systematic Reading Instruction Bursuck Chapter 1

T 2/25 Meet face-to-face Education L196

EXAM I

W 2/26

Meet face-to-face Phonemic Awareness Bursuck Chapter 2; Kaderavek pp. 323-328

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T 3/4

Online Organizing Your Writing

W 3/5

Meet face-to-face Beginning Reading Bursuck Chapter 3; Kaderavek pp. 331-336

T 3/11 Online Giving Feedback: GLOCS vs. LOCS

Exam II Review

W 3/12

Meet face-to-face Advanced Word Reading Bursuck Chapter 4

T 3/18 Spring Break

Work on research papers and case studies W

3/19

Spring Break

Work on research papers and case studies

T 3/25 Meet face-to-face Education L196 Exam II W 3/26

Meet face-to-face Fluency

Research paper and case study individual conferences

Bursuck Chapter 5

T 4/1

Online Research paper peer conferences

W 4/2

Meet face-to-face Vocabulary Bursuck Chapter 6

T 4/8

Online Effective Presentations ROUGH DRAFTS OF RESEARCH PAPERS DUE FOR FORMATIVE FEEDBACK

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4/9 336-339

T 4/15 Online Small Group Practice Case Study Presentations

W 4/16

Meet face-to-face CASE STUDY PRESENTATIONS CASE STUDIES DUE

T 4/22 Online Final editing checklist and APA refresher

W 4/23

Meet face-to-face Writing Instruction

T 4/29 Online Small Group Practice Research Presentations

Exam III Review

W 4/30

Meet face-to-face Putting it all together

Reading Curricula RESEARCH PAPERS DUE T 5/6 Meet face-to-face Education L196

THIRD EXAM:CUMULATIVE

W 5/7

Meet face-to-face RESEARCH PRESENTATIONS Course Culmination Course evaluations

References

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