Advanced Photoshop the Magazine for Adobe Photoshop Professionals 126 2014

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The

SECRETS OF ADVERTISING

RETOUCHING

TIPS FOR PROS

30

UR OWN

ERHERO

TEAM

MIC ART

BUILD YOUR OWN

PHOTOSHOP BRUSHES

Create custom tools to streamline your

workflow and stand out from the crowd

HOW TO PAINT

ANTASY WORLDS

te-painting techniques for creating

istic environments with photos

CREATE

THIS

IMAGE

O

Compose a dynamic layout



O

Design character archetypes

O

Master pencilling & inking

Killer commercial art every time

ISSUE 126

Tutorial files available at:

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To learn more visit www.pny.eu/quadro or

© 2014 PNY Technologies. The PNY Technologies logo is a registered trademark of PNY Technologies. © 2014 NVIDIA Corporation. NVIDIA, the NVIDIA logo, NVIDIA Quadro are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of NVIDIA Corporation. All rights reserved. All company and product names are trademarks or registered trademarks of the respective owners with which they are as sociated. Features, pricing, availability, and specifications are all subject to change without notice

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WELCOME

ISSUE 126

Welcome to the latest

issue of Advanced

Photoshop. With

comics-inspired movies going

from strength to strength

at the box office, we take

a look at the original

inspiration behind them.

IN THIS ISSUE: WEB DESIGN ADVERTISING PHOTOMANIPULATION DIGITAL PAINTING

APRIL MADDEN

Editor

This issue our cover features our very own superhero team, created from scratch by illustrator David Nakayama. Find out more on p52.

On p26 we delve into the world of advertising and branding, looking at how composition, colour and typography can tug on a viewer’s psychological strings to get a message across. Then we move into the sometimes-controversial area of retouching on p34, where a selection of professionals share their 30 tips for perfect images. John Ross from The Art of Retouching follows this up on p46 to craft an image using both standard and creative techniques.

On p62 you’ll learn how to use Photoshop to create icons and graphics for responsive web designs across phones, tablets and desktops alike with award-winning designer Rolf Anders Jensen. Then we jump into some serious matte painting techniques on p66 with Tony Andreas Rudolph Plus there’s a host of interviews, r

you to explore and enjoy.

FIND US ONLI

@advancedpshop

/AdvancedPhotoshop

.co.uk

003

ISSUE 126

CONTENTS

COVER IMAGE

Illustrator, concept artist and comic-book cover creator David Nakayama walks us through the process of designing a superhero team from thumbnails to fi nal artwork. Check it out in his tutorial on p52.

DAVID NAKAYAMA

dna-1.deviantart.com TYPOGRAPHY NEW MEDIA

WORKSHOP:

EPIC FANTASY

LANDSCAPE COMPOSITE

66

Combine photo elements and painting techniques to create photoreal concept art

46

WORKSHOP:

MASTER RETOUCHING

Use Photoshop to produce an image that combines standard retouching techniques with creative ones

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46

MASTER RETOUCHING

EYE ON DESIGN

What’s hot, who’s in and the

latest art & design happenings

CONTENTS

ISSUE 126

004

66

EPIC FANTASY LANDSCAPE CONCEPT

52

CREATE COMIC ART

FOR BACK ISSUES, BOOKS

AND MERCHANDISE VISIT:

THIS ISSUE’S PRO PANEL

Our contributors share Photoshop secrets

06

INDUSTRY NEWS

Introducing Corel Painter 2015

08

10

PORTFOLIO INTERVIEW

Advantages of working with CGI

16

PROJECT FOCUS

Creating a successful ad campaign

18

STUDIO INTERVIEW

True North

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TECHNIQUES

Professional artists reveal their high-end Photoshop skills in

our easy-to-follow workshops

Creative advertising

26

INDUSTRY FEATURE

REVIEWS

We put the latest creative kit

and apps to the test

80

FEATURE:

UGEE Rainbow III vs Wacom Intuos Manga

84

REVIEW:

Mischief

Free with issue 126 of

Advanced Photoshop

PREMIUM RESOURCES

PLUS:

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ON YOUR DISC

Create comic art

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WORKSHOP

Master retouching

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30 retouching tips for pros

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HOW I MADE

SEE PAGE 24 OR 51 FOR THE LATEST OFFERS

SUBSCRIBE TODAY!

66

Epic fantasy landscape concept

WORKSHOP

62

RESPONSIVE DESIGN

26

CREATIVE ADVERTISING

ISSUE 126

#/.4%.43

Retro fantasy

72

READER INTERVIEW

A’khami

78

HOW I MADE

62

Responsive design

WORKSHOP

Photography in a digital world

86

READER INTERVIEW

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EYE ON DESIGN

THIS ISSUE’S PRO PANEL

THIS ISSUE’S PRO PANEL

MEET THE EXPERTS BEHIND THIS ISSUE’S AMAZING ARTWORK AND DISCOVER

SOME OF THEIR TRADE SECRETS

EYE ON DESIGN

DAVID NAKAYAMA

http://dna-1.deviantart.com

Using Window>Arrange>New Window for…, I always keep a duplicate window of whatever I’m working on open on my secondary monitor. This lets me keep an eye on the overall image even as I’m focused on details, and unlike the Navigator, the image isn’t grainy or partially covered by a distracting border box.

■ Create incredible comic art from scratch with Marvel superhero David Nakayama on p52

JOHN ROSS

www.theartofretouching.com The best retouching is when no one knows you have done anything at all. Proper retouching begins in pre-production, not post-production. Know where you are going, and how you are going to get there. On the back end, keep your file structure clean and organised. No one will see it, but it will make changes easier later. ■ Master pro retouching with John Ross in his

expert tutorial on p46 © John

Ros s © D av id N ak ay am a

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007

ROLF ANDERS JENSEN

www.portfolio.works

Using Smart 34 x 34 Vector Objects to create icons in Illustrator and pasting them into your Photoshop designs is the best and most seamless way to create SVG or Retina-ready graphics for your developer, and they will love you for it. This is a great workaround instead of having the designer save out 2x graphics for every icon in your user interface.

■ Discover more about creating web assets in Photoshop in Jensen’s tutorial on p62

TONY ANDREAS RUDOLPH

www.zulusplitter.de

Photoshop has a lot of different, useful tools to select a part of a photo, like the Lasso tool, Color Range or Magic Wand tools. Very often I use photos as a kind of brush. To select the part I want, I can recommend the Quick Selection tool. This powerful tool works like a brush and creates automatically smoothed selections.

■ Journey to a fantasy world with Rudolph as he explains how to use matte painting techniques in imaginative scenes on p68

Proper retouching begins in pre-production, not post-production.

Know where you are going, and how you are going to get there

© T on y A nd re as R ud ol ph © Imagine Publishing Ltd 2014 ISSN 1748-7277

Magazine team

Editor April Madden april.madden@imagine-publishing.co.uk  01202 586218

Editor in ChiefDan Hutchinson

Production EditorAlicea Francis

Senior Designer Curtis Fermor-Dunman PhotographerJames Sheppard

Senior Art EditorDuncan Crook

Publishing DirectorAaron Asadi

Head of DesignRoss Andrews

Contributors

Julie Bassett, Rolf Anders Jensen, Larissa Mori, David Nakayama, Kirk Nelson, John Ross, Tony Andreas Rudolph, Anna-Lisa Saywell, Simon Skellon and Poz Watson Advertising

Digital or printed media packs are available on request. Head of Sales Hang Deretz

 01202 586442

hang.deretz@imagine-publishing.co.uk Advertising Manager Alex Carnegie

 01202 586430

alex.carnegie@imagine-publishing.co.uk Cover disc

Junior Web Designer Steve Dacombe apxtrahelp@imagine-publishing.co.uk International

Advanced Photoshop is available for licensing. Contact the International department to discuss partnership opportunities.

Head of International Licensing Cathy Blackman

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For all subscription enquiries: adphotoshop@servicehelpline.co.uk  UK: 0844 848 8402  Overseas: +44 (0) 1795 592 880 13-issue subscription (UK) – £62.30 13-issue subscription (Europe) – £70 13-issue subscription (ROW) – £80 Circulation

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Disclaimer

The publisher cannot accept responsibility for any unsolicited material lost or damaged in the post. All text and layout is the copyright of Imagine Publishing Ltd. Nothing in this magazine may be reproduced in whole or part without the written permission of the publisher. All copyrights are recognised and used specifically for the purpose of criticism and review. Although the magazine has endeavoured to ensure all information is correct at time of print, prices and availability may change. This magazine is fully independent and not affiliated in any way with the companies mentioned herein. Photoshop is either a registered trademark or trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the United States and/ or other countries and is used with express permission. All $ prices are US Dollars unless otherwise stated.

If you submit material to Imagine Publishing via post, email, social network or any other means, you automatically grant Imagine Publishing an irrevocable, perpetual, royalty-free license to use the images across its entire portfolio, in print, online and digital, and to deliver the images to existing and future clients, including but not limited to international licensees for reproduction in international, licensed editions of Imagine products. Any material you submit is sent at your risk and, although every care is taken, neither Imagine Publishing nor its employees, agents or subcontractors shall be liable for the loss or damage.

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Web: www.imagine-publishing.co.uk www.advancedphotoshop.co.uk www.greatdigitalmags.com

The magazine for Adobe® Photoshop® professionals

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© R ol f An de rs Je ns en

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008

EYE ON DESIGN

INDUSTRY NEWS

INTRODUCING

COREL PAINTER 2015

THE LATEST ITERATION OF COREL’S PREMIUM

DIGITAL PAINTING SOFTWARE IS MORE

PHOTOSHOPFRIENDLY THAN EVER

INDUSTRY NEWS

C

orel Painter 2015 hit the shelves in August, and it’s looking like the best version of Painter yet. Many digital artists bounce their work between Photoshop and Painter, using the strengths of each program to craft the ultimate in digital illustration.

Painter has always been Adobe file-friendly, but this release sees it stepping up to the level of its frequent partner, as it finally introduces 64-bit

NEW FEATURES

Many of the libraries within Painter have been updated, with new toys to play with in the Weaves, Patterns, Selections, Papers and Image Hose Nozzle libraries. Flow Map textures allow you to apply a texture to a piece of artwork that will emerge as you paint, and you can now transform your own images into Flow Maps too. The Brush Tracking utility has also been improved, allowing you to teach Painter your preferred painting style, such as the levels of pressure you typically use.

support for both Mac and PC. It’s also the fastest version of Painter to date. Corel claims that it runs, on average, 40 per cent faster than previous versions, with brushes typically benchmarking at six times faster than their predecessors. For digital artists used to the speed of Photoshop CC, this is a welcome performance boost.

Other new features include better stylus control and support, known as Real Time Stylus, default UI profiles for a range of different digital artists, such as photo artists and illustrators, and of course the obligatory new brush set that always wows long-term Painter fans. 2015 is no different: the Particle brushes it introduces are groundbreaking.

The Painter Advisory Council, a community of digital artists who have been using the program for a long time and know exactly what digital artists want from it, have driven many of the innovations in Painter 2015. Take a look at the new features they’ve inspired right here!

Forward Escape by Painter Master Android

Jones showcases the awesome possibilities of Painter’s latest iteration

Painter is associated with rich, painterly artwork, but in Dragon Hunter, Erik Holman shows off its clean, illustrative capabilities

© E rik H ol m an © A ndr oid Jones

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009

Painter’s Jitter controls allow for natural-looking

variance within your brushstrokes. You can now achieve handmade, naturalistic variance without constantly varying your settings. The Jitter controls cover variations in colour, angle and opacity for building up different hues, shapes and shades, allowing you to create a truly organic look with Painter’s extensive library of real-media-inspired brushes.

The innovation that will really excite long-term Painter fans and Photoshop users alike! Painter’s new Particle brushes are inspired not by traditional brushes but by physics itself. They come under three different umbrellas: Gravity, Flow and Springs. Each of these reacts to brushstrokes in different ways, producing marks never before seen in digital painting. They can be tightly controlled or allowed to run free to create abstract effects, and are perfect for glowing and fiery effects.

JITTER SMOOTHING

Much-loved digital painting tutor Don Seegmiller shows off the capabilities of the new Particle brushes in Dark Princess, also used as the box art for Painter 2015.

The new Particle brushes provide the ability to create fiery and glowing effects with the stroke of a stylus

Painter is a feature-packed piece of software and can sometimes feel overwhelming. If you want to use it for specific tasks, you can now set it to one of three built-in UI profiles optimised for different kinds of artwork. The Simple layout features commonly used tools, the Photo Art profile concentrates on image optimisation, cloning and paintover tools, and the Illustration profile is optimised for illustrators. When you open the program, you can choose one of these profiles for the project you’re working on directly from the Welcome screen. © D on S ee gm ill er © M ik e T ho m ps on

PARTICLE BRUSHES

CUSTOMISED UI PROFILES

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EYE ON DESIGN

PORTFOLIO INTERVIEW

CREATIVE RETOUCHER AND 3D EXPERT RADOSLAV ŽILINSKÝ

ON CREATING IMAGES FOR BIGNAME CLIENTS

PORTFOLIO INTERVIEW

ADVANTAGES OF

WORKING WITH CGI

www.radoxist.com

Radoxist_studio

C

GI photography is not an easy field to master, so when you throw 3D into the mix, things can get very complicated. By his own admission, Radoslav Žilinský believes that artists should specialise in one area rather than being just okay at everything – that way clients know what to look for.

However, with experience working for big-name clients including Saatchi & Saatchi and Magnum, Žilinský’s creative flair seems to have no bounds. “Now what really fascinates me about the industry is the variety of requests that come to me. It always surprises me, especially if you work with top art directors and advertising agencies. Emerge a submarine in the streets of Paris? No problem!”

TELL US A LITTLE MORE ABOUT YOUR HISTORY AS AN ARTIST?

I was always fond of drawing and cartoons, but what really made a difference was when I got a first release of 3D software – 3ds Max. I had a long summer in front of me, and an even longer software manual. Page after page it revealed the mysteries of 3D CGI. It was during that time that I became fascinated with anything visual. It was just a first step.

Back then, CGI was new to clients and they were a little bit

sceptical. Slowly, one project after another, they became more

confident and eventually understood the big advantages of CGI

010

WHAT WERE THE MOST IMPORTANT LESSONS THAT YOU LEARNT DURING YOUR EARLY YEARS OF IMAGEMAKING?

When I think about it, I’ve come to the conclusion that there are lessons to be learnt all the time. This is maybe the most important one too – the sole realisation that everything happens [in order to] teach us something. It is hard to give advice, because everyone needs to learn something different. Recently I have tried to meditate more – it gives me more detachment and clears my mind. This helps me to identify and learn the lessons.

YOU WORK A LOT IN CGI PHOTOGRAPHY AND CREATIVE RETOUCHING. HOW DID YOU SPECIALISE IN THAT?

I slowly realised that there are so many ways of applying my talent and it is sometimes a bit confusing. From making 3D models for games,

matte paintings for films, through to retouching for advertising agencies, it is easy to get lost. Therefore it is great to specialise and pick just what you are best at. Then, for clients, it is much easier to identify you from the crowd.

YOU SAY YOU’VE WORKED WITH SAATCHI & SAATCHI BEFORE. WHAT WAS YOUR BRIEF WITH THEM?

It is nice that you mentioned Saatchi & Saatchi, because it is actually the agency I started collaborating with back in 2010, and now we have completed 51 projects together! Back then, CGI was quite new to clients and they were a little bit sceptical. Slowly, one project after another, they became more confident and eventually understood the big advantages of CGI. But if I could pick a particular client of Saatchi & Saatchi, I would definitely go for CSOB Bank. They were happy from

Last Minute: This is a perfect example of what we love to do the most. A neat combination of 3D CGI, fashion retouching, matte painting, photomanipulation and colour grading accompanied with a nice idea

© R ad oxi st st ud io

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Flip Flop Visuals – Island: This was the first visual from a series. MUW Saatchi & Saatchi commissioned us to do the series of image visuals for their client, travel agency Ruefa Reisen.

Flip Flop Visuals – Pool: This is the second visual from the travel series. From time to time, there is a project that you instantly fall in love with. Finally I can showcase it here

Flip Flop Visuals – Inflatable: Finally, the third visual from the Ruefa Reisen travel series commissioned by MUW Saatchi & Saatchi

© R ad oxi st st ud io © R ad oxi st st ud io © R ad oxi st st ud io

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Football Visual: After receiving a brief of ‘the atmosphere of village football’, we knew that this was going to be a lot of fun during the production and photo shoot phase. It was a beautiful project!

© Ra do xis t s tu di o, Slova k fo ot ba ll as soci at io n

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the start about using CGI and 3D, and we have done many creative prints for them.

TELL US ABOUT MAGNUM’S 25TH BIRTHDAY IMAGE CAMPAIGN. WHAT PART DID YOU PLAY IN IT?

I was quite excited when LOLA Madrid came to me to produce a visual for Magnum’s 25th birthday: wrapping a Magnum in golden paper with a beautiful bow on top. I always wanted to do something similar to this, because the simple things are often the most difficult. It was the first time my visual was tested on people before launching on air, and thankfully it passed successfully! In the end it was used as a teasing visual on digital and social media for the new Silver Magnum.

WHAT IS THE MOST CHALLENGING PART OF CREATING A COMMERCIAL IMAGE?

To stay confident. There are so many people adding their input during the process. Meeting the visual taste of an art director and client, consistently watching over the quality of output of your co-workers and keeping up with deadlines can be difficult. So many things can go wrong, but you just need to stay focused and believe in yourself. In the end you often realise that everything went smoothly.

WHICH OF YOUR IMAGES ARE YOU MOST PROUD OF AND WHY?

It is quite hard for me to maintain pride, because I’m a person that loves to progress, and when you progress, the love for your older work slowly shrinks. I know that this is a little bit cruel, but it applies to everything in life.

But if I have to pick one project, it would be my series of flip flop visuals for Saatchi & Saatchi and client Ruefa Reisen travel agency. I had a chance to cooperate with one of the most talented art directors and co-owner of Saatchi & Saatchi, Rasto Ulicny. I learnt a lot from this project and it pushed my skills much further.

WHAT DO YOU FEEL SEPARATES YOUR ARTWORK FROM THE OTHERS?

It will sound surprising, but my personality. Even through my work, I believe that the most important part is to evolve as a human being, and when I develop my personality it will reflect in my work too. It’s a win-win situation. My work is not about my visual talent, it is more about adding tons of tiny details. Most importantly it’s about good communication with your client and people around you, having a helpful attitude, solving problems, staying organised and not overloading yourself. I try to do all of these things.

DO YOU PREFER WORKING IN 3D OR PHOTOSHOP SOFTWARE?

It slowly shifted from 3D in the past to Photoshop in

013

Travel Luggage: We used a

combination of 3D CGI and retouching for this project. The shoot was organised by Radoxist studio and a matte painting background was used to produce this visual

EYE ON DESIGN

PORTFOLIO INTERVIEW

Do The Right Mix – UFO: The second in the series of 3D work completed for ‘Do the Right Mix – European Mobility Week’ with friends Jekyll ‘n Hyde

© R ad ox ist s tu di o, J ek yl l ‘n H yd e © R ad oxi st st ud io

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■ THE BIG PICTURE

Do not get stuck on the details too early. They are essential, but your image needs to work as a whole first. Work on the rough image and when you think it fits, move on to a deeper level of detail. After a few steps, do not forget to zoom out and check if everything is alright.

■ NEW TECHNIQUES

It is good to master one technique, but try not to stay with your favourite one for too long. If you are stuck and not improving, try to learn a new tool. It will push the old one too. Look into fields like matte painting, concept art, photomanipulation, 3D, photography and retouching. ■ DO NOT BE AFRAID OF MURDER

Every project counts, because you have definitely learnt something new. However, it doesn’t mean that you have to showcase them all. Just pick the best ones, with the most public reaction and kill the old ones. People are busy, so they need to know quickly who you are.

PORTFOLIO TIPS

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PORTFOLIO INTERVIEW

the present. In the past I really enjoyed working with the details in 3D, observing materials and mimicking the real world. Now, I’m more into the emotion and overall feeling of an image and with Photoshop, I get quicker visual feedback. This allows me to do a better job regarding the final result. So even though Photoshop is more important to me, I always try not to forget the things that I learnt in early years about adding detail.

CAN YOU TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOUR DAYTODAY WORKING LIFE? ARE YOU OFTEN WORKING ON MORE THAN ONE PROJECT? My working life is dependent on the period I’m in. I try to focus my work on one particular project, because doing too many things at the same time leads to nothing. For example, recently I have focused more on advertising and redesigning my website. It started with a feeling that I needed to make another step as a studio. From now on, it will go back to being about work, so it just naturally shifts forward.

WHICH TECHNIQUE DO YOU FIND GETS YOU THE MOST COMMISSIONS? IS THERE A GENRE THAT IS MOST POPULAR WITH CLIENTS? It is hard to tell. My visuals are rarely done using just one technique, so I think what really attracts my clients is my visual style, a combination of realism and the illustrative look.

IS THERE AN ADVANTAGE TO WORKING FOR A STUDIO AS OPPOSED TO FREELANCE? I do not think that advantages are the most important. The most important thing for anyone to discover is whether your personality fits to freelance or working in a studio. The only way to find out is to try both. The more you try, the easier it is for you to find out what works. Listen to your intuition and do not mistake it for fear.

DO YOU HAVE ANY TIPS FOR ANY OTHER FREELANCERS OR GRAPHIC ARTISTS TRYING TO GET A FOOT IN THE DOOR?

I think that the most important thing is to realise that it is not solely about your talent. I have to admit that the biggest weakness of most artists is communication. For me, communication is one of the most important aspects of work or any relationship, because I think that everything can be solved just by talking.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU? WHAT ARE YOU WORKING ON?

Right now I’m finishing a series of three visuals for

014

The most important thing for anyone to discover is whether

your personality fits to freelance or working in a studio. The only

way to find out is to try both

TMP Worldwide London and their client Arup. It is the kind of project I love the most and presents another challenge for me. Hopefully I can share it with you in the next few weeks, so stay tuned on my website or social networks. Dinosaurs:ď#OSSETTEď)NCďREQUESTEDďAďSERIESďOFďVISUALSďFORď-ONTRƈALď 3CIENCEď#ENTREďPROMOTINGďTHEIRďUPCOMINGďDINOSAURďEXHIBITIONď4HEď BASICďIDEAďWASďTOďCOMBINEďAďPHOTOďOFďAďCHILDďSUPPORTEDďBYď$ďMODELSď OFďDINOSAURSďANDďTOďCOMPLETEďTHEďIMAGEďUSINGď#')ďRETOUCHING Magnum’s 25th Birthday:ď2ADOXISTď WEREďASKEDďTOď PRODUCEďTHISď EXCLUSIVEďARTWORKď FORď-AGNUM…SďTHď ANNIVERSARYď ‚#ONGRATULATIONS ď -AGNUMď)TďWASďAď PLEASUREďTOďWORKď WITHďYOUƒ qď2 AD OX IS TďS TU DI O ď5 NI LE VE R qď2 AD OX IS TďS TU DI O ď# OS SE TT Eď) NC 

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EYE ON DESIGN

PROJECT FOCUS

PROJECT FOCUS

W

hen Polish advertising agency byss.pl was first approached to work on the labels and key visuals for a client as important as Original Source, it was up to graphic designer Krzysztof Olak (www.behance. net/krisolak) to use Photoshop to create the artwork that would be perfect for the job.

“I had the pleasure of working on the Seasonal Edition designs,” he explains, telling us that he was given a lot of creative freedom to generate the ideas that would eventually go into the ads. “Our team had the idea to hint at the origin of the components and fruits used in the Seasonal Editions within the label design. In the 2013 Seasonal Editions there were two fragrances: ‘Raspberry & Cocoa’ and ‘Mandarin & Basil’. In the first one I made reference to Aztec culture for the cocoa and my home country, Poland, for the raspberry.”

The result of the team’s idea and Olak’s ingenious work was a big success. So much so, in fact, that byss.pl and Olak created another vibrant ad using the same idea for the ‘Carambola’ Seasonal Edition fragrance again in 2014. To find out more, Advanced Photoshop spoke to Olak to discover exactly how he did it.

WHEN WERE YOU FIRST INSPIRED TO LEARN PHOTOSHOP AND USE IT AS A TOOL FOR ADVANCING YOUR CAREER?

Well, since I was a little boy I have liked to draw, and everyone told me I was a gifted guy. I won a lot of drawing contests in primary school. I remember back in 2009 a friend that I have known since my childhood showed me some work by Peter Jaworowski. I was really amazed by the power of Photoshop to the point that I installed the CS2 version on my PC. From that moment my curiosity turned into a hobby, and after a year I had my first features and exposure on the web.

Two of my works have won a Featured Image award on the Advanced Photoshop website.

I was spending my whole spare time learning the tools and techniques in Photoshop back then, constantly learning something new. I was really determined to grow my skills in every field of design and every award that I’ve achieved pushed me to work more and more. Today I work full time as a graphic designer in one of the best advertising/ interactive agencies in Poland.

WHAT PHOTOSHOP TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES DID YOU MAINLY USE TO CREATE THE AD? DETAILS LIKE THE WATER ARE STUNNING! Thank you! Mainly I used creative photo retouching with photomanipulation and digital painting techniques. As for the water, I used the good old Warp tool with the Screen blending mode, and a lot of water splashes were digitally painted. The key visuals are based on stock photos. I also used a lot of clipping masks to paint the shadows and highlights or other image adjustments such as Brightness/Contrast, Levels or Selective Color.

WOULD YOU EVER CONSIDER USING SOFTWARE OTHER THAN PHOTOSHOP TO CREATE ADS SUCH AS THESE?

To be honest with you, no! I’ve been using Photoshop since I can remember. If someone took Photoshop away from me I would probably start using 3D software to try to make ads like these. Of course, 3D modelling takes a lot more time, and time is precious when you work in an ad agency. Photoshop gives me a range of opportunities to work on stock photos and retouch; this software is irreplaceable for me. HAVING SAID THAT, ARE THERE ANY TOOLS OR FEATURES THAT YOU’D LIKE TO SEE IN THE NEXT VERSION?

I work with the CS5 version at my agency and I really miss some features that are available in CS6, especially the layer search feature. I am the first to admit that I’m not a tidy person when it comes to naming each layer separately, that’s why I really love this feature.

It’s also possible to not only use layer groups as the basis of clipping masks, but also to apply layer effects to an entire group. Previously, they could only

ABOUT THE ARTIST

Krzysztof Olak is a multidisciplinary designer who lives and works in Stettin, Poland. A er fi ve years of experience in the industry, his work has been featured on Digital Art Served, Branding Served, Packaging Design Served and in numerous magazines. Olak works full time as a graphic designer at interactive agency byss.pl, where he works for numerous clients such as Original Source and Carlsberg. He is also a proud member of Goverdose Polish art collective.

KRZYSZTOF OLAK

www.behance.net/krisolak

ORIGINAL SOURCE

SEAS

NAME OF PROJECT

040

016

GRAPHIC DESIGNER KRZYSZTOF OLAK REVEALS HOW HE AND HIS

TEAM CREATED THE ADS FOR ORIGINAL SOURCE’S SEASONAL EDITIONS

CREATING A SUCCESSFUL

AD CAMPAIGN

2014 ‘Carambola’ ad Ingredients as inspiration

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I had to make a background that indicated the carambola fruit origin, so I decided that I would make a photomanipulation using stock photos from Java. The biggest challenge was to make the packshot more interesting. To do that, I decided to wrap the package around with a carambola tree, an idea which all started with a simple sketch.

The tree was made by combining about 20 bark stock photos. To blend the bark together as one I used masks and a lot of retouching techniques and digital painting to paint branches or leaves. Some of the bark stocks were resized and stretched by using the Warp tool. After everything was blended together, I had to adjust every piece I used to build the tree. There were a lot of clipping masks used with adjustments like Selective Color, Curves and Shadows/Highlights painted with a simple soft brush. The splashes are also stock photos

resized and distorted with the Warp tool. I mostly used the Screen blending mode, and sometimes Linear Dodge on the bright sides of the background to make the water more visible.

be applied to individual layers. The Eyedropper tool has also now been tweaked so that it can sample underlying layers as if intervening adjustment layers weren’t there, which makes patching and retouching much easier. I’m a lucky owner of Photoshop CS6 and it has all the features and functions I need to keep my workflow going strong.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A BEGINNER ON HOW THEY CAN QUICKLY IMPROVE THEIR PHOTOSHOP SKILLS? Only hard work can improve your skills quickly! Keep an eye out for good tutorials and learn from them, visit good design portals for inspiration, and join an art collective where you can get feedback from other designers and artists. Most importantly, love what you do.

WHAT RESOURCES WOULD YOU RECOMMEND TO OTHER BUDDING DIGITAL ARTISTS FOR INSPIRATION AND LEARNING NEW SKILLS? I’m a part of Goverdose art collective. You can get free PSD files to download from our ‘Goverdose Academy’ page on Facebook. I suggest keeping an eye out for some great free stuff and tutorials on there. I would also recommend visiting ‘Psdtuts+’ for some awesome tutorials. Al l im ag es © W ik to ria G ry ni ec Extra details Water effects

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STUDIO INTERVIEW

MEET THE MANCHESTER STUDIO THAT HELPS BUSINESSES BUILD

EFFECTIVE BRAND IDENTITIES AND CAMPAIGNS THROUGH A STRONG

TEAMWORK ETHOS AND AN UNDERSTANDING OF CLIENT NEEDS

TRUE NORTH

EYE ON DESIGN

STUDIO INTERVIEW

018

A

t True North, every member of the team is considered equally important, and it is by working together that the studio can deliver effective designs that help brands to drive business. Head of artwork Ed Dunsdon believes that this is what sets the studio apart from its peers. “In my experience, the True North studio stands apart from other studios because of the structure of the design teams and the egalitarian culture that permeates from the top down,” he says. “The teams, led by senior designers and guided by the design director and creative director, continually share and discuss ideas from the concept stage through to final artwork. There are no egos or dominant

personalities, which makes for a very calm, focused and enjoyable creative environment.”

The studio was started 12 years ago by co-founders Ady Bibby, Martin Carr and Craig Webste. “They shared a ‘frustration with mediocrity’ and believed that there was a place for a really great Manchester-based design agency,” says design director Karen Hughes. “The original details of True North were decided at a high-powered meeting in the Sainsbury’s cafe in Denton. Despite these humble beginnings, within six months of setting up they had been appointed to the rosters of Bank of Scotland, BMI, and worked on the launch of Imperial War Museum North. From day one the driving force behind True North has always been great ideas that ‘work’ for our clients and help drive business success. To achieve this is a matter of strategy, creativity and craft, and although there have been many changes at True North over the years, this has and always will remain the why and how we do what we do.”

The reason for the success of the studio is down to the collaborative efforts of the team members, each pulling on their own strengths to the requirements of the brief. “It’s about getting the right team and the right expertise on the right jobs,” says Hughes. “Our strategic and creative teams work closely together from day one and throughout the process to make sure we really understand the client and deliver on their brief.”

This collaboration very much centres around the client and their needs, with the studio team working closely with them at every stage to ensure that the final result is the very best that it can be. When asked if True North is able to add its own style and input into each brief, Hughes replies: “Rather than

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019

True North is an award-winning strategic

branding agency based in the heart of the Northern Quarter in Manchester. Its ethos is ‘brands that drive business’, and they believe in

simple ideas that make a big difference to brands and businesses.

TRUE NORTH

ABOUT THE STUDIO

www.thisistruenorth.co.uk @thisistruenorth

Karen Hughes

Design Director Sarah HardmanDesigner Ed Dunsdon Head of Artwork

From day one the driving force behind True

North has always been great ideas that ‘work’

for our clients and help drive business success

The studio works on a range of projects, predominately print-based, for well-known business clients

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4

020

EYE ON DESIGN

STUDIO INTERVIEW

influence our clients with our own personal taste, we help them to find their own style that helps them capture and communicate who they are and what they do. To make this happen, we start a long time before we start kerning the type and looking at CMYK breakdowns. It’s about really understanding the job in hand. This means when we get a brief, we pull it apart, get to grips with what the client actually wants to get out of it, then we put it back together again. We ask lots of questions, we involve all the stakeholders and really get under the skin of our client’s businesses and organisations.”

Because of this flexibility and ability to adapt to meet each client’s needs, True North has attracted some well-known businesses to its roster. A particular standout project for the team was a recent commission for a wayfinding job for Dunham Massey, a National Trust property on the outskirts of Greater Manchester. This job came off the back of another, creating a set of guidelines for them to use internally. Designer Sarah Hardman tells us more about the brief: “A visual language was created to help them push their proposition of ‘More than just a walk in the park’, unifying all areas of the estate and

drawing visitors into areas they might not have previously visited.” In February this year, Dunham opened an impressive new visitor reception building to facilitate its large number of visitors. True North’s job was to design the wayfinding and environmental graphics for the new build, helping people navigate while bringing the story of Dunham to life through material, interpretation spaces and the visual language. “For the navigational elements we created a modular system that could be applied consistently throughout the space for ease of use,” explains Hardman. “Once we had tackled the practical

A team of 11 legendary British footballers come together for the first time in Royal Mail’s Football Heroes stamps

England players illustrated through ash for our ‘New Era, Old Enemy’ campaign for the Ashes at Old Trafford in 2013

The studio enjoys “a very calm, focused and enjoyable creative environment”

The team know how to relax in-between working hard to meet client briefs and deadlines

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021

021

04

FINAL RETOUCH

Working from the marked-up proof, the retoucher has strengthened the lighting on the leading edge, rounded the back and tidied the model’s hair. The image has been cut out and layered so that it can be dropped into the artwork files.

03

FIRST RETOUCH

The retouch increases the highlights and overall lighting, enhancing the muscle definition to give the impression of the surface texture of the brain. At this stage the retouch is shown to the designer and the creative director. Amends are marked up on the proof and returned to the retoucher.

05

PRACTICAL USE

The retouched image is now incorporated into client stationary. The image is applied to the letterhead and the reverse of the business card.

02

STUDIO SHOT

This is the chosen image from the studio shoot. The designer oversaw the shoot and planned the lighting with the photographer to match as closely as possible to the visual concepts.

SPORT PSYCHOLOGY BRAND IDENTITY

ARTWORK MANAGER ED DUNSDON TALKS US THROUGH THIS RECENT BRANDING PROJECT

01

SPORT PSYCHOLOGIST CONCEPT

This shows the initial concept for the brand identity; a strong identity that helps communicate the mental and physical elements of sports psychology. It was built on the observation that muscle definition of the human body mirrors the brain.

The brief for this project was to “create an engaging brand identity based around the function of the company that is both professional and confident”

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040

022

EYE ON DESIGN

STUDIO INTERVIEW

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF SARAH HARDMAN

DESIGNER SARAH TAKES US THROUGH A TYPICAL DAY AT TRUE NORTH

components of the wayfinding system, we could then layer in ideas that had a bit more emotion, that told a story, that communicated the brand and engaged with its users. We had to consider the use of the visual language in the environment and how it could be used to talk to various audiences that Dunham welcomes. Communicating on these different levels brought us a lot of enjoyment, and it was great to see people engaging with the space while also being able to find where they need to go.”

True North isn’t afraid to tackle a challenging project head on, as exhibited through the Dunham project. Another recent example is a pilot project for Sport England and Bury Council to encourage women and girls to do more exercise. This type of project needs much more than just good design, as there are numerous other factors that need to be considered from the outset. “The main challenge was to get women to overcome their fears and barriers to exercise,” says Hardman. “Our solution was to take the intimidation out of exercise, showing women they are not on their own. Therefore we created the brand campaign ‘I Will If You Will’, which encouraged women to support each other and get moving together. The campaign involved creating a brand video, six sheet campaigns, and campaign collateral, which all showed real women of Bury, in real situations, telling real stories, deliberately avoiding the unrealistic, intimidating, size 8 model imagery usually used to promote women’s exercise. The response in Bury has been great, and so far the campaign has been a huge success, with women

09:00

BREW ROUND

With the ‘delayed trains’ excuses out of the way, it is time for the morning brew. We all do our best to avoid having to make it. If successful in escaping the round, then yesterday’s timesheet will always need completing.

10:30

MORNING BRIEF

Due to the nature of my work, there’s never really a typical day. A new project is briefed this morning and I will get time to think around the idea. More often than not a team of us will get our heads together to gain stronger answers.

13:00

LUNCHTIME RUN

Running club commences at 1pm, all abilities welcome. A slow, steady pace is run along the canal, Manchester City Stadium being our halfway marker. With a cold shower and a clear head, we’re now ready for the afternoon.

sharing their positive stories and benefits of getting more active.”

The team uses the Adobe suite of programs to achieve its creative visions, including Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign. “Photoshop is an intrinsic tool within the studio,” says Ed Dunsdon. “[It helps] to manifest creative ideas and concepts. We use it at all levels, from batch processing and contact sheets, to retouching and full creative compositions. The majority of our work is print-based, and imagery

plays an important part in bringing concepts to life, from postage stamps to billboards.”

A combination of effective imagery and a strong understanding of what a business needs from its branding materials is certainly a recipe for success, and will ensure a strong future for the operations of True North. For Karen Hughes, it is the members of the team that are the real secrets to its impressive achievements: “The people who work here are what make True North, and they will be what shapes True North over coming years. Our team here is a great mix of experiences; we’ve got people here from day one who’ve been through it all a hundred times over, mixed with enthusiastic young graduates who are looking to make their mark. It’s this mix of people and energy that makes the future of True North really exciting, and there really is a feeling that the best is yet to come.”

Our team here is a great mix of experiences; we’ve got people

here from day one who’ve been through it all a hundred times

over, mixed with enthusiastic young graduates

An updatable timeline of events and exhibitions during the Wellcome Collection’s redevelopment project

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023

023

TOP 5 PRODUCTION TIPS

Ed Dunsdon shares his top tips for ensuring a seamless workflow

14:00

PHOTO SHOOT

This afternoon I am out of the office at a photo shoot for Bury Council, art directing our photographer Stuart Hendry to capture how the real women of Bury are getting more active as part of our ‘I Will If You Will’ campaign.

16:00

BACK TO WORK

Back to the office to get cracking on with the brief. I will spend a couple of hours researching and scribbling down ideas before sharing with the rest of the team in the design crit. Not quite there yet, best keep thinking...

18:30

HOME TIME

With the timesheets done, it’s now time to put the Mac to sleep and call it a day (or sometimes a night). On a good day it’s a 6.30pm finish (if we’re lucky). Cue the race for the lift. Maximum weight is 400kg!

■ PHOTOSHOP LAYERS

Always order and name your layers clearly and logically. This is especially important when working on multi-layer comps that someone else may need to pick up to work on.

■ RENAME FILES

Batch Rename in Adobe Bridge is a quick and easy way to rename multiple image files.

■ NEVER DELETE

When a designer, or client, asks you to take something out of a comp, never delete it – always mask it. They are bound to ask for it to be put back in.

■ HOUSEKEEPING

Artwork is about good housekeeping. Create a centralised resources point for all images and logos, so that the creative team is always using the latest versions.

■ CAN DO

Artwork and production should be about ‘can do’ or ‘let’s see what we can do’ to assist the creatives to visualise their concepts. Be

proactive, not reactive. All a

rt icl e i m ag es © T ru e N or th 2 01 4

Photoshop is an intrinsic

tool within the studio,

helping to manifest creative

ideas and concepts

The team work together on briefs to come up with ideas

Repositioning campaign encouraging people to ‘take another look’ at the National Portrait Gallery

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026

© A m ol J ad ha v P ho to gr ap hy / C re at ive r et ou ch in g b y P ixe lP ain t

“We worked very closely with the photographer to get the desired lighting in the studio, with respect to the selected backplates in which the bike and the rider were going to get comped into,” explains creative production studio PixelPaint

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CREATIVE ADVERTISING

TECHNIQUES

WE TALK TO PROFESSIONALS WITH EXPERIENCE IN ALL OF THE KEY AREAS OF

GOOD ADVERTISING DESIGN, AS THEY SHARE THE TRICKS OF THE TRADE

C

reating effective advertising imagery is the mark of a good designer, but there is a lot more to it than simply making pretty pictures. Yes, the key artwork needs to be high-quality, attractive and engaging, but an advertising image needs to be so much more. It is the combination of the key artwork, text and necessary information, put together in the most effective composition; it is the right colours to speak to the right target audience; and it is the correct typeface to match the brand and the message being conveyed.

Advertising imagery is often the result of a large number of people from different disciplines working together as one, including the client, an ad agency, the art director, the designer/designers, CG artists, retouchers and copywriters. To be dominant in this field, you need to be flexible and resilient, as

numerous changes are likely to be made, but if the end result is successful, then it can lead to bigger and better things.

As a starting point, Emlyn Davies and Lewis Williams of Bomper studio suggest that you break your project down into stages so that you can tackle each one effectively: “A solid understanding of how design principles work in harmony can help you to deconstruct an overwhelming artwork into a series of elements, whose relationship to each other determines the next logical step you need to consider. Write a checklist, organise your workflow and take it one element at a time. And remember, composition is as much about whether it feels right as whether it technically looks right. If something just doesn’t feel right, change it.”

Being able to place all of these elements in the right place is one thing, but it is skill with Photoshop

that brings it all together. Often, even the key images themselves are complex composites, bringing together studio shots and location photography into a seamless whole. This is something that creative retouchers Chirag Doshi and Prasad Shetty of PixelPaint specialise in, working with their clients to create bespoke visuals that are high-quality and photorealistic, even though they bring together different photographic elements.

“For us at PixelPaint we think that for a really good advertising visual the image should be seamless, irrespective of any number of different images comped in to create one image. We believe in creating visual content [that is both] emotional and engaging for the audience, and where the essential elements (ideas, product or cause) are highlighted at once.”

CONTRIBUTORS

PIXELPAINT

WWW.PIXELPAINT.IN PixelPaint is a creative production studio based in India that specialises in creative retouching and CGI for still imagery. It combines the skills of Chirag Doshi and Prasad Shetty.

EMLYN DAVIES AND LEWIS WILLIAMS

BOMPERSTUDIO.COM Davies is the creative director (and founder) and Williams is the studio manager at Bomper studio, a boutique CGI and design studio specialising in photorealistic 3D visualisations. DMITRIY GLAZYRIN WWW.WESTERNJACK.COM Glazyrin is the production director at Western Jack, a CG production studio specialising in photography, 3D graphics and retouching. The small team produces big work for a range of clients.

JONATHON GARRATT WWW.BEHANCE.NET/JGARRATT Garratt is a graphic designer working for Marketing In Partnership (mipagency.

com). He does a lot of print

ads for magazines, as well as campaign imagery for sports events. SASHA VINOGRADOVA WWW.SASHAVINOGRADOVA.COM Sasha Vinogradova is a Russian artist and graphic designer. She is currently working in the entertainment industry in Los Angeles doing key visuals for movies and TV series. LAUREN HOM WWW.HOMSWEETHOM.COM Hom is a designer, illustrator and letterer based in Brooklyn, New York. She combines hand-drawn lettering with her digital work to create a unique, whimsical style.

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028

TECHNIQUES

CREATIVE ADVERTISING

Composition refers to the way that the different elements of your design are put together. In advertising, that may include a brand logo, a strong selling message and more descriptive and informative text. It’s a lot to balance all of this in one small space, and often an advertising image needs to work just as well when printed in a magazine as it does when it’s posted as a giant billboard.

Emlyn Davies and Lewis Williams know that advertising artworks have a specific purpose or focus, which is determined from the outset through the brief or brand guidelines: “We try to guide the viewer to firstly consume the image as our entry point (establishing an emotional connection), followed by the descriptive copy (communicating the value), and finally the product or brand (creating a lasting image) as our exit point. Composition has the power to control the viewer and can determine how much impact an artwork has, how coherent its message is, or even how long it holds the viewer’s attention. The importance of composition is huge; it truly is the foundation of successful ad design.”

OFTEN YOU WILL BE REQUIRED TO CREATE MULTIPLE

IMAGES FOR A SINGLE CAMPAIGN, WHICH NEED TO LOOK

AND FEEL SIMILAR TO MAINTAIN CONSISTENCY ACROSS

A BRAND, AS THIS EXAMPLE FROM PIXELPAINT SHOWS

CONSISTENT COMPOSITIONS

COMPOSITION

© O gi lv y, D el hi / C re at ive r et ou ch in g b y P ixe lP ain t © B om pe r s tu di o a nd H ur ric an e d es ig n s tu di o

“The client, Aciquick, wanted to portray the instantaneous effect of its product, which is an antacid tablet relieving acidity quickly. The copy for this campaign reads: ‘Aciquick – gets to work in six seconds’. For this project we worked closely with art director Khurram Haque and creative director Nitin Srivastava at Oglivy, Delhi.

“We started off with the use of stock imagery for the animals; the dynamite was crafted by us in order to achieve the real scraped look needed, and further shot by photographer Dushyant Bhatt individually and as a group together. The vests seen in the image are also shot individually, and finally all of these multi-part elements are comped in to make it work as a seamless image.”

Doughnut retouch: Retouch of photography and CGI

chocolate for Hurricane design studio

We think that for a really

good advertising visual the

image should be seamless,

irrespective of any number of

different images comped in to

create one image

PixelPaint,

www.pixelpaint.in

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029

EMLYN DAVIES AND LEWIS WILLIAMS OF BOMPER STUDIO

TALK US THROUGH THIS IMAGE FOR THE CADBURY

REBRAND AND NEW BAR SHAPE

KEEP COMPOSITION SIMPLE

“The hero of this campaign was the new branding and product shape. Trying to showcase this without cluttering an ad is always a challenge. We began the process by sketching several thumbnails, to work out the optimal flow that would accommodate each of the elements, and tried to scale back anything that was not required. We utilised CGI to create the product shots for the newly rebranded bars, along with the new format and shape for the smaller bars. Creating elements entirely in 3D gave us the most flexibility later when considering composition.

“Another benefit of CGI is the consistency of the visuals across multiple variants, as well as any potential future campaigns. Consistency is important in advertising, as we look to establish a lasting connection between brand and consumer. We combined the CGI elements and environment with dynamic typography, to better reflect the new size and weight of the product. With some final reflections and background highlights, we felt we had focused the design, and captured everything that we set out to capture within one great visual.”

NBS brochure: 3D poseable characters for

redtag design agency for the Nottingham Building society print and digital campaigns. Robin Hood and Maid Marian are out and about on the streets of Nottingham to launch the Nottingham’s Whole of Market mortgage campaign © B om pe r s tu di o a nd C ad bu ry D es ig n S tu di o © B om pe r s tu di o a nd r ed ta g

Composition has the power to control the viewer and can

determine how much impact an artwork has, how coherent

its message is, or even how long it holds the viewer’s attention

Emlyn Davies and Lewis Williams, www.bomperstudio.com

There are various ‘rules’ of composition that are relevant to any piece of design work, no matter its intended output. Things like the ‘rule of thirds’ or the ‘golden ratio’ are what students are taught as theory when studying the art of advertising design, but it is quite something else to apply it to real-life commissions. As well as thinking about what is aesthetically pleasing, it is also essential to consider the purpose of the advert: who is it trying

to target and what will encourage them to interact with the product or service?

“Composition that engages the viewer, establishes an emotional connection, holds their attention and guides them to the important details is important no matter what the audience,” says the team at Bomper studio. “Meanwhile, designers need to put themselves in the mind of the target viewers and try to imagine what would grab (and

hold) their attention. Where the target is a younger audience or the content a more energetic brand or product, it may be more effective to stick to a shorter eye path or a more dynamic flow between elements, for example. But we’ve found no quick and fast rules relating certain target groups to specific composition choices; ultimately it’s determined by the tone of the brand and the emotion that the concept aims to evoke.”

Putting this into practice requires a strong workflow process that address all of these concerns. For Emlyn Davies this starts with looking at the brief and determining the key points required within the advertisement. “We try to follow a hierarchy of what is most important – most often the message – and first tackle that visual or typographic element. The branding of the ad is very important too, and can range from just subtly using the brand’s colours to flooding the ad with logos.” From here, the team use sketched thumbnails to work out what the best flow of the required elements is. Next, assets can be collated and put within the decided structure.

Of course, when working with clients and on briefs, there are always going to be compositional changes throughout the design process to contend with. “Liaising with marketing teams usually throws up amends to copy or headlines within the middle of a job, so you always have to be ready to adjust what you’ve already done, and what you’ve planned to do next. Ultimately with ads it’s about what looks right, as it has to have its desired effect instantly – if we’re not successful in grabbing the eye and the attention of the viewer right away, most will either just pass the billboard by or turn the page.”

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TECHNIQUES

CREATIVE ADVERTISING

© W es te rn J ac k

COLOUR

Once a strong composition has been created, then the next thing to consider is the colours that you are going to use. This is both in terms of the colours themselves and the shades of those colours, but also colour correction in Photoshop of key photography and other elements – especially in complex compositions where multiple lighting setups may have been used.

Colours can play a strong role in whether an advert is successful in its goal of attracting an audience, and their effect can be immediate. “Printed advertisements are often seen for only a few seconds. This time should suffice for attracting attention and delivering the ad’s message,” says Dmitriy Glazyrin of Western Jack. “A proper combination of colours, shades and the overall composition help place the key highlights and focus on the main point [of the advertisement].”

This is true across the board when it comes to advertising imagery, explains graphic designer Jonathon Garratt: “I’ve always believed that regardless of which market you are in, more often than not aesthetics will be the deciding factor in what you spend your money on. Picking the right

Choosing the right

colours and knowing

what works best for your

market is key if you want the

attention of your customers

Jonathon Garratt, behance.net/jgarratt

DMITRIY GLAZYRIN OF WESTERN JACK SHARES HIS TOP TIPS AND ADVICE ON WHY

COLOUR IS SO IMPORTANT IN PRINT ADVERTISING

THE IMPORTANCE OF COLOUR

“Colours and shades often help convey emotions and mood; a drawing can be dull, lively, neutral or repulsive. Therefore, the colour scheme is picked to match the scenario of an ad print. There are many stereotypes and standards here that every designer must know and use. For instance, food images cannot be lacklustre and bleak, and serious social messages will look bizarre if rendered in bright, vivid colours.

BEFORE FINAL COLOUR PROCESSING AFTER FINAL COLOUR PROCESSING

“I pick the colour scheme at the beginning when I start creating a sketch. Later on, colours can be adjusted at each stage, but final colour correction of the ready print is a must in most situations. For instance, in this image (pictured), colours were corrected at the very end of the process. Although the work had been officially accepted, we continued looking for a colour that would help us achieve the necessary effect and make the print more expressive.”

© W es te rn J ac k

China Town: Colours don’t always have to be bright to be effective;

in this image, Western Jack creates an engaging atmosphere through powerful but dark colours and strong highlights

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References

Related subjects : Can Photoshop Elements Do That?