Jig Standard 1530 Manual

169 

Full text

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Quality assurance requirements for the

Quality assurance requirements for the

manufacture

manufacture, storage and

, storage and distribution of aviation

distribution of aviation

fuels to airports

fuels to airports

EI/JIG STANDARD 1530

EI/JIG STANDARD 1530

First edition First edition XXX 2013 XXX 2013 Published by Published by

ENERGY INSTITUTE, LONDON ENERGY INSTITUTE, LONDON The Energy Institute is

The Energy Institute is a professional membership body incorporated by Royal Charter a professional membership body incorporated by Royal Charter 20032003 Registered charity number 1097899

Registered charity number 1097899 and the

and the

JOINT INSPECTION GROUP JOINT INSPECTION GROUP

Joint Inspection Group Limited is a company limited by guarantee not having a share capital Joint Inspection Group Limited is a company limited by guarantee not having a share capital

Company Number 4617452 registered in England and Wales Company Number 4617452 registered in England and Wales

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DRAFT

DRAFT EI/JIG EI/JIG 1530 1530 FOR FOR STAKEHOLDER STAKEHOLDER REVIEW. REVIEW. Copyright Copyright © © EI EI & & JIG JIG 2012 2012 EI12/059EI12/059 Please submit any comments to

Please submit any comments to mh@energyinst.orgmh@energyinst.org by by 4 January 20134 January 2013

The Energy Institute (EI) is the leading chartered professional membership body supporting individuals and The Energy Institute (EI) is the leading chartered professional membership body supporting individuals and organisations across the energy industry. With a combined membership of over 13,500 individuals and 300 organisations across the energy industry. With a combined membership of over 13,500 individuals and 300 companies in 100 countries, it provides an independent focal point for the energy community and a powerful companies in 100 countries, it provides an independent focal point for the energy community and a powerful voice to engage business and industry, government, academia and the

voice to engage business and industry, government, academia and the public internationally.public internationally.  As

 As a a Royal Royal Charter Charter organisation, organisation, the the EI EI offers offers professional professional recognition recognition and and sustains sustains personal personal careercareer development through the accreditation and delivery of training courses, conferences and publications and development through the accreditation and delivery of training courses, conferences and publications and networking opportunities. It also runs a

networking opportunities. It also runs a highly valued technical work programme, comprising original independenthighly valued technical work programme, comprising original independent research and investigations, and the provision of EI technical publications to provide the international industry research and investigations, and the provision of EI technical publications to provide the international industry with information and guidance on

with information and guidance on key current and future issues.key current and future issues.

The EI promotes the safe, environmentally responsible and efficient supply and use of energy in all its The EI promotes the safe, environmentally responsible and efficient supply and use of energy in all its forms and applications. In fulfilling this purpose the

forms and applications. In fulfilling this purpose the EI addresses the depth and breadth of energy and EI addresses the depth and breadth of energy and the energythe energy system, from upstream and downstream hydrocarbons and other primary fuels and renewables, to power system, from upstream and downstream hydrocarbons and other primary fuels and renewables, to power generation, transmission and distribution to sustainable development, demand side management and energy generation, transmission and distribution to sustainable development, demand side management and energy efficiency. Offering learning and networking opportunities to support career development, the EI provides a home efficiency. Offering learning and networking opportunities to support career development, the EI provides a home to all those

to all those working in energy, and a scientific and working in energy, and a scientific and technical reservoir of knowledge for industry.technical reservoir of knowledge for industry.

This publication has been produced as a result of work carried out within the Technical Team of the This publication has been produced as a result of work carried out within the Technical Team of the Energy Institute (EI), funded by the EI’s Technical Partners. The EI’s Technical Work Programme provides Energy Institute (EI), funded by the EI’s Technical Partners. The EI’s Technical Work Programme provides industry with cost-effective, value-adding knowledge on key current and

industry with cost-effective, value-adding knowledge on key current and future issues affecting those operating future issues affecting those operating inin the energy sector, both in the UK and internationally.

the energy sector, both in the UK and internationally. For further information,

For further information, please visit http://www.energyinst.org.ukplease visit http://www.energyinst.org.uk

The EI gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions towards the scientific and technical The EI gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions towards the scientific and technical programme from the following companies:

programme from the following companies:

The Joint Inspection Group (JIG) is the leading internationally recognised forum where experts in all aspects of The Joint Inspection Group (JIG) is the leading internationally recognised forum where experts in all aspects of the aviation fuel supply industry can come together to establish and enhance standards for the safe handling and the aviation fuel supply industry can come together to establish and enhance standards for the safe handling and quality control of aviation fuels globally. The JIG Standards are recognised and endorsed by all parties with a quality control of aviation fuels globally. The JIG Standards are recognised and endorsed by all parties with a stake in the industry.

stake in the industry.

The primary purpose of JIG is to ensure that the standards for aviation fuel handling and quality control and The primary purpose of JIG is to ensure that the standards for aviation fuel handling and quality control and aircraft fuelling operations ensure safe and reliable operations, are continuously updated taking into account aircraft fuelling operations ensure safe and reliable operations, are continuously updated taking into account developments in technology and lessons learned, and that they are rigorously followed at JIG operations around developments in technology and lessons learned, and that they are rigorously followed at JIG operations around the world.

the world.

Currently the JIG standards are applied at about 180 of the world’s major airports where there are shared fuel Currently the JIG standards are applied at about 180 of the world’s major airports where there are shared fuel storage and handling facilities, including Heathrow, Frankfurt, Paris, Sydney, Singapore, Johannesburg, storage and handling facilities, including Heathrow, Frankfurt, Paris, Sydney, Singapore, Johannesburg,  Amsterdam, Istanbul, Dubai, and Hong Kong. JIG Standards are also applied at many of the member companies  Amsterdam, Istanbul, Dubai, and Hong Kong. JIG Standards are also applied at many of the member companies own operations, typically the smaller regional airports where the facilities are not shared, and used as a reference own operations, typically the smaller regional airports where the facilities are not shared, and used as a reference by many other airport operators. As a result some 2500 locations around the world work to the JIG Standards by many other airport operators. As a result some 2500 locations around the world work to the JIG Standards with approximately 40 % of the

with approximately 40 % of the world’s aviation fuel supplied through facilities that world’s aviation fuel supplied through facilities that follow JIG Standards.follow JIG Standards. JIG Ltd gratefully acknowledges the financial and

JIG Ltd gratefully acknowledges the financial and technical support from its Member Companies:technical support from its Member Companies:

Copyright © 2013 by the Energy Institute, London and the Joint Inspection Group Limited: Copyright © 2013 by the Energy Institute, London and the Joint Inspection Group Limited: The Energy Institute is a professional membership body incorporated by Royal Charter 2003. The Energy Institute is a professional membership body incorporated by Royal Charter 2003. Registered charity number 1097899, England

Registered charity number 1097899, England  All rights reserved

 All rights reserved

Joint Inspection Group Limited is a company limited by guarantee not having a share capital Joint Inspection Group Limited is a company limited by guarantee not having a share capital Company Number 4617452 registered in England and Wales

Company Number 4617452 registered in England and Wales

No part of this book may be reproduced by any means, or transmitted or translated into No part of this book may be reproduced by any means, or transmitted or translated into a machine language without the written permission of the publishers.

a machine language without the written permission of the publishers. ISBN 978 0 85293 637 5

ISBN 978 0 85293 637 5

Further copies can be obtained from: Further copies can be obtained from:

Portland Customer Services, Commerce Way, Whitehall Industrial Estate, Colchester CO2 8HP, UK. Portland Customer Services, Commerce Way, Whitehall Industrial Estate, Colchester CO2 8HP, UK. t: +44 (0)1206 796 351 e:

t: +44 (0)1206 796 351 e:  sales@portland-services.com  sales@portland-services.com

SAI Global - ILI Publishing, Index House, Ascot, Berks, SL5 7EU, UK SAI Global - ILI Publishing, Index House, Ascot, Berks, SL5 7EU, UK Tel: +44 (0)1344 636300, Fax: +44 (0)1344 291194,

Tel: +44 (0)1344 636300, Fax: +44 (0)1344 291194, www.ili.co.ukwww.ili.co.uk & & www.i2isolutions.netwww.i2isolutions.net e: standards@saiglobal.com e: standards@saiglobal.com Electronic access to EI

Electronic access to EI publications is available via our publications is available via our website, www.energyinstpubs.org.uk.website, www.energyinstpubs.org.uk.

Documents can be purchased online as downloadable pdfs or on an annual subscription for single users and companies. Documents can be purchased online as downloadable pdfs or on an annual subscription for single users and companies. For more information, contact the EI Publications Team (pubs@energyinst.org.uk)

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The Energy Institute (EI) is the leading chartered professional membership body supporting individuals and The Energy Institute (EI) is the leading chartered professional membership body supporting individuals and organisations across the energy industry. With a combined membership of over 13,500 individuals and 300 organisations across the energy industry. With a combined membership of over 13,500 individuals and 300 companies in 100 countries, it provides an independent focal point for the energy community and a powerful companies in 100 countries, it provides an independent focal point for the energy community and a powerful voice to engage business and industry, government, academia and the

voice to engage business and industry, government, academia and the public internationally.public internationally.  As

 As a a Royal Royal Charter Charter organisation, organisation, the the EI EI offers offers professional professional recognition recognition and and sustains sustains personal personal careercareer development through the accreditation and delivery of training courses, conferences and publications and development through the accreditation and delivery of training courses, conferences and publications and networking opportunities. It also runs a

networking opportunities. It also runs a highly valued technical work programme, comprising original independenthighly valued technical work programme, comprising original independent research and investigations, and the provision of EI technical publications to provide the international industry research and investigations, and the provision of EI technical publications to provide the international industry with information and guidance on

with information and guidance on key current and future issues.key current and future issues.

The EI promotes the safe, environmentally responsible and efficient supply and use of energy in all its The EI promotes the safe, environmentally responsible and efficient supply and use of energy in all its forms and applications. In fulfilling this purpose the

forms and applications. In fulfilling this purpose the EI addresses the depth and breadth of energy and EI addresses the depth and breadth of energy and the energythe energy system, from upstream and downstream hydrocarbons and other primary fuels and renewables, to power system, from upstream and downstream hydrocarbons and other primary fuels and renewables, to power generation, transmission and distribution to sustainable development, demand side management and energy generation, transmission and distribution to sustainable development, demand side management and energy efficiency. Offering learning and networking opportunities to support career development, the EI provides a home efficiency. Offering learning and networking opportunities to support career development, the EI provides a home to all those

to all those working in energy, and a scientific and working in energy, and a scientific and technical reservoir of knowledge for industry.technical reservoir of knowledge for industry.

This publication has been produced as a result of work carried out within the Technical Team of the This publication has been produced as a result of work carried out within the Technical Team of the Energy Institute (EI), funded by the EI’s Technical Partners. The EI’s Technical Work Programme provides Energy Institute (EI), funded by the EI’s Technical Partners. The EI’s Technical Work Programme provides industry with cost-effective, value-adding knowledge on key current and

industry with cost-effective, value-adding knowledge on key current and future issues affecting those operating future issues affecting those operating inin the energy sector, both in the UK and internationally.

the energy sector, both in the UK and internationally. For further information,

For further information, please visit http://www.energyinst.org.ukplease visit http://www.energyinst.org.uk

The EI gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions towards the scientific and technical The EI gratefully acknowledges the financial contributions towards the scientific and technical programme from the following companies:

programme from the following companies:

The Joint Inspection Group (JIG) is the leading internationally recognised forum where experts in all aspects of The Joint Inspection Group (JIG) is the leading internationally recognised forum where experts in all aspects of the aviation fuel supply industry can come together to establish and enhance standards for the safe handling and the aviation fuel supply industry can come together to establish and enhance standards for the safe handling and quality control of aviation fuels globally. The JIG Standards are recognised and endorsed by all parties with a quality control of aviation fuels globally. The JIG Standards are recognised and endorsed by all parties with a stake in the industry.

stake in the industry.

The primary purpose of JIG is to ensure that the standards for aviation fuel handling and quality control and The primary purpose of JIG is to ensure that the standards for aviation fuel handling and quality control and aircraft fuelling operations ensure safe and reliable operations, are continuously updated taking into account aircraft fuelling operations ensure safe and reliable operations, are continuously updated taking into account developments in technology and lessons learned, and that they are rigorously followed at JIG operations around developments in technology and lessons learned, and that they are rigorously followed at JIG operations around the world.

the world.

Currently the JIG standards are applied at about 180 of the world’s major airports where there are shared fuel Currently the JIG standards are applied at about 180 of the world’s major airports where there are shared fuel storage and handling facilities, including Heathrow, Frankfurt, Paris, Sydney, Singapore, Johannesburg, storage and handling facilities, including Heathrow, Frankfurt, Paris, Sydney, Singapore, Johannesburg,  Amsterdam, Istanbul, Dubai, and Hong Kong. JIG Standards are also applied at many of the member companies  Amsterdam, Istanbul, Dubai, and Hong Kong. JIG Standards are also applied at many of the member companies own operations, typically the smaller regional airports where the facilities are not shared, and used as a reference own operations, typically the smaller regional airports where the facilities are not shared, and used as a reference by many other airport operators. As a result some 2500 locations around the world work to the JIG Standards by many other airport operators. As a result some 2500 locations around the world work to the JIG Standards with approximately 40 % of the

with approximately 40 % of the world’s aviation fuel supplied through facilities that world’s aviation fuel supplied through facilities that follow JIG Standards.follow JIG Standards. JIG Ltd gratefully acknowledges the financial and

JIG Ltd gratefully acknowledges the financial and technical support from its Member Companies:technical support from its Member Companies:

Copyright © 2013 by the Energy Institute, London and the Joint Inspection Group Limited: Copyright © 2013 by the Energy Institute, London and the Joint Inspection Group Limited: The Energy Institute is a professional membership body incorporated by Royal Charter 2003. The Energy Institute is a professional membership body incorporated by Royal Charter 2003. Registered charity number 1097899, England

Registered charity number 1097899, England  All rights reserved

 All rights reserved

Joint Inspection Group Limited is a company limited by guarantee not having a share capital Joint Inspection Group Limited is a company limited by guarantee not having a share capital Company Number 4617452 registered in England and Wales

Company Number 4617452 registered in England and Wales

No part of this book may be reproduced by any means, or transmitted or translated into No part of this book may be reproduced by any means, or transmitted or translated into a machine language without the written permission of the publishers.

a machine language without the written permission of the publishers. ISBN 978 0 85293 637 5

ISBN 978 0 85293 637 5

Further copies can be obtained from: Further copies can be obtained from:

Portland Customer Services, Commerce Way, Whitehall Industrial Estate, Colchester CO2 8HP, UK. Portland Customer Services, Commerce Way, Whitehall Industrial Estate, Colchester CO2 8HP, UK. t: +44 (0)1206 796 351 e:

t: +44 (0)1206 796 351 e:  sales@portland-services.com  sales@portland-services.com

SAI Global - ILI Publishing, Index House, Ascot, Berks, SL5 7EU, UK SAI Global - ILI Publishing, Index House, Ascot, Berks, SL5 7EU, UK Tel: +44 (0)1344 636300, Fax: +44 (0)1344 291194,

Tel: +44 (0)1344 636300, Fax: +44 (0)1344 291194, www.ili.co.ukwww.ili.co.uk & & www.i2isolutions.netwww.i2isolutions.net e: standards@saiglobal.com e: standards@saiglobal.com Electronic access to EI

Electronic access to EI publications is available via our publications is available via our website, www.energyinstpubs.org.uk.website, www.energyinstpubs.org.uk.

Documents can be purchased online as downloadable pdfs or on an annual subscription for single users and companies. Documents can be purchased online as downloadable pdfs or on an annual subscription for single users and companies. For more information, contact the EI Publications Team (pubs@energyinst.org.uk)

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DRAFT

DRAFT EI/JIG EI/JIG 1530 1530 FOR FOR STAKEHOLDER STAKEHOLDER REVIEW. REVIEW. Copyright Copyright © © EI EI & & JIG JIG 2012 2012 EI12/059EI12/059 Please submit any comments to

Please submit any comments to mh@energyinst.orgmh@energyinst.org by by 4 January 20134 January 2013

CONTENTS

CONTENTS

Page Page Legal notices and disclaimers

Legal notices and disclaimers  ... ...

Foreword

Foreword ... ...

 Ac

 Ac knkn owow ledled gemgementent ss  ...  ...

1 Introduction, scope, application and important definitions

1 Introduction, scope, application and important definitions ... 1.1 Introduction ... 1.1 Introduction ... 1.2 Scope ... 1.2 Scope ... 1.3 Application ... 1.3 Application ... 1.4 Important definitions 1.4 Important definitions ... ... ... ...

2 Aviation fuel quality

2 Aviation fuel quality assurance aassurance and trnd tr aceaceabilityability ... ... ... 2.1 Introduction ... 2.1 Introduction ... 2.2 Quality assurance system

2.2 Quality assurance system ... ... ... ... 2.3 Traceability ... 2.3 Traceability ... 2.4 Quality assurance organisation

2.4 Quality assurance organisation ... ... ... ... 2.5 Document retention requirements

2.5 Document retention requirements ... ... ... ...

3 Management of change/new processes

3 Management of change/new processes   ...  ... 3.1 Introduction ... 3.1 Introduction ... 3.2 Principles ... 3.2 Principles ... 3.3 Management of change process

3.3 Management of change process ... ... ... ... 3.4 MoC process implementation ... 3.4 MoC process implementation ... 3.5 Specific changes ... 3.5 Specific changes ... 3.6 Example review process ... 3.6 Example review process ...

4 S

4 Sampling and testing ampling and testing of aviation fuof aviation fu elel  ...  ... 4.1 General sampling principles

4.1 General sampling principles ... ... ... ... 4.2 Normative documents ... 4.2 Normative documents ... 4.3 Sampling and samples – terminology

4.3 Sampling and samples – terminology ... ... ... 4.4 Sampling tanks

4.4 Sampling tanks for batching, certification or for batching, certification or recertification recertification ... ... 4.5 Sampling tanks in any

4.5 Sampling tanks in any marine vessel marine vessel ... ... ... .... 4.6 Sample testing ... 4.6 Sample testing ...

5 Laboratories

5 Laboratories   ...  ... 5.1 Laboratory quality assurance requirements

5.1 Laboratory quality assurance requirements ... ... ... 5.2 RCQ testing ... 5.2 RCQ testing ... 5.3 Authorised signatories ... 5.3 Authorised signatories ... 5.4 Test method validation ... 5.4 Test method validation ... 5.5 Software and computer syste

5.5 Software and computer system validation m validation ... ... ... 5.6 Equipment calibration ... 5.6 Equipment calibration ... 5.7 Document control (standards and specifications)

5.7 Document control (standards and specifications) ... ... ... 5.8 Training ... 5.8 Training ... 5.9 Retention samples ... 5.9 Retention samples ... 5.10 Sample handling and sample containers at laboratories

5.10 Sample handling and sample containers at laboratories ... ... 5.11 Data integrity management

5.11 Data integrity management ... ... ... ... 5.12 Documentatio

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6 Refineries: Manufacture  ... 6.1 Scope and application ... 6.2 Aviation fuel standards and specifications ... 6.3 Fuel components used in aviation fuel manufacture ... 6.4 Monitoring of refinery processes ... 6.5 Slops processing or recycling of off-grade material ... 6.6 Additives used in aviation fuels ... 6.7 Documentation ...

7 Additives used in aviation fuels

7.1 Scope ... 7.2 Introduction ... 7.3 Types of additive ... 7.4 Receipt procedures for additives ... 7.5 Storage procedures ... 7.6 Inspection and cleaning ... 7.7 Additive shelf life ... 7.8 Periodic testing ... 7.9 Additive dosing ... 7.10 Fuel containing additive(s) ... 7.11 Records ...

8 Receipt, batchin g, certifi cation and release

8.1 General ... 8.2 Refinery import or receipt ... 8.3 Receipt procedures ... 8.4 Quality control and release procedures ... 8.5 Procedure for SDA re-doping ... 8.6 Off-specification product ... 8.7 Documentation ... 9 Finished Product : Stor age Design Features and Handling Procedures

9.1 General principles ... 9.2 Delivery mode definitions ... 9.3 Tankage and pipework design ... 9.4 Filtration and fuel cleanliness ... 9.5 Storage procedures ... 9.6 Documentation ...

10 Transportation: Facilit ies and procedures ... 10.1 Ocean tankers, coastal and inland waterway vessels/barges ... ... 10.2 Pipeline transportation ... 10.3 Road tankers and rail tank cars ... 10.4 Drum and intermediate bulk container filling and ISO tank container loading ...

11 Synthetic Jet Fuel  ... 11.1 Introduction ... 11.2 Approval of synthetic components ... 11.3 Manufacture of synthetic fuel blends ... 11.4 Handling of synthetic fuel blends ...

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DRAFT EI/JIG 1530 FOR STAKEHOLDER REVIEW. Copyright © EI & JIG 2012 EI12/059 Please submit any comments to mh@energyinst.org by 4 January 2013

 An nex A – Gloss ary of terms & ab brevi ati ons ...  An nex B – Auth oris ed s ignat ories   ...  An nex C – Equ ipment/i ns tal lat io n p re-condi ti onin g p rior to use wi th aviati on fu el  ...  An nex D – Recerti fi cat ion t est cer ti fi cates  ...  An nex E – Data i ntegrit y management f low c harts ...  An nex F – Salt dryers an d b ulk water remov al ...  An nex G – Clay tr eaters ...  An nex H – Jet fu el c onduct iv it y ...  An nex I – Long ter m s to rage and retur n t o u se ...  An nex J – Referenc ed p ublicat ions  ...  An nex K – Abbr evi ati ons/u ni ts   ...

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LEGAL NOTICES AND DISCLAIMERS

This publication has been prepared by the Energy Institute (EI) Aviation Committee and the Joint Inspection Group (JIG).

The information contained in this publication is provided as guidance only, and although every effort has been made by EI and JIG to assure the accuracy and reliability of its contents, EI AND JIG MAKE NO GUARANTEE THAT THE INFORMATION HEREIN IS COMPLETE OR ERROR-FREE.  ANY PERSON OR ENTITY MAKING ANY USE OF THE INFORMATION HEREIN DOES SO AT HIS/HER/ITS OWN RISK. TO THE MAXIMUM EXTENT PERMITTED BY APPLICABLE LAW, THE INFORMATION HEREIN IS PROVIDED WITHOUT, AND EI AND JIG HEREBY EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS, ANY REPRESENTATION OR WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, WHETHER EXPRESS, IMPLIED OR STATUTORY, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE, TITLE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL EI OR JIG BE LIABLE TO ANY PERSON, OR ENTITY USING OR RECEIVING THE INFORMATION HEREIN FOR ANY CONSEQUENTIAL, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, INDIRECT OR SPECIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS), REGARDLESS OF THE BASIS OF SUCH LIABILITY, AND REGARDLESS OF WHETHER OR NOT EI OR JIG HAS BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES OR IF SUCH DAMAGES COULD HAVE BEEN FORESEEN.

The contents of this publication are not intended or designed to define or create legal rights or obligations, or set a legal standard of care.

EI and JIG are not undertaking to meet the duties of manufacturers, purchasers, users and/or employers to warn and equip their employees and others concerning safety risks and precautions, nor is EI or JIG undertaking any of the duties of manufacturers, purchasers, users and/or employers under local and regional laws and regulations. This information should not be used without first securing competent advice with respect to its suitability for any general or specific application, and all entities have an independent obligation to ascertain that their actions and practices are appropriate and suitable for each particular situation and to consult all applicable federal, state and local laws. EI AND JIG HEREBY EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ANY LIABILITY OR RESPONSIBILITY FOR LOSS OR DAMAGE RESULTING FROM THE VIOLATION OF ANY LOCAL OR REGIONAL LAWS OR REGULATIONS WITH WHICH THIS PUBLICATION MAY CONFLICT.

Nothing contained in any EI or JIG publication is to be construed as granting any right, by implication or otherwise, for the manufacture, sale, or use of any method, apparatus, or product covered by letters patent. Neither should anything contained in the publication be construed as insuring anyone against liability for infringement of letters patent.

No reference made in this publication to any specific product or service constitutes or implies an endorsement, recommendation, or warranty thereof by EI and JIG.

EI, JIG AND THEIR AFFILIATES, REPRESENTATIVES, CONSULTANTS, AND CONTRACTORS  AND THEIR RESPECTIVE PARENTS, SUBSIDIA RIES, AFFILIA TES, CONSULTANTS, OFFICERS, DIRECTORS, EMPLOYEES, REPRESENTATIVES, AND MEMBERS SHALL HAVE NO LIABILITY WHATSOEVER FOR, AND SHALL BE HELD HARMLESS AGAINST, ANY LIABILITY FOR ANY INJURIES, LOSSES OR DAMAGES OF ANY KIND, INCLUDING DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR PUNITIVE DAMAGES, TO PERSONS, INCLUDING PERSONAL INJURY OR DEATH, OR PROPERTY RESULTING IN WHOLE OR IN PART, DIRECTLY OR INDIRECTLY, FROM ACCEPTANCE, USE OR COMPLIANCE WITH THIS STANDARD.

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DRAFT

DRAFT EI/JIG EI/JIG 1530 1530 FOR FOR STAKEHOLDER STAKEHOLDER REVIEW. REVIEW. Copyright Copyright © © EI EI & & JIG JIG 2012 2012 EI12/059EI12/059 Please submit any comments to

Please submit any comments to mh@energyinst.orgmh@energyinst.org by by 4 January 20134 January 2013

FOREWORD

FOREWORD

This publication has been prepared by an EI/JIG Working Group, under the direction of the This publication has been prepared by an EI/JIG Working Group, under the direction of the EI Aviation Committee and the JIG

EI Aviation Committee and the JIG Operations Committee.Operations Committee.

EI/JIG 1530 is intended to provide a standard to assist in the maintenance of aviation fuel EI/JIG 1530 is intended to provide a standard to assist in the maintenance of aviation fuel quality, from its point of manufacture to delivery to airports. It provides mandatory provisions quality, from its point of manufacture to delivery to airports. It provides mandatory provisions and good practice recommendations for the design/functional requirements of facilities, and and good practice recommendations for the design/functional requirements of facilities, and operational procedures.

operational procedures.

This publication is intended for adoption worldwide, by any company or

This publication is intended for adoption worldwide, by any company or organisation involorganisation involvedved in the refining or handling of aviation fuel upstream of airports. This includes those in the refining or handling of aviation fuel upstream of airports. This includes those companies/organisations responsible for the design, construction, operation, inspection or companies/organisations responsible for the design, construction, operation, inspection or maintenance of refineries, pipelines, marine vessels, coastal/inland waterway barges, road maintenance of refineries, pipelines, marine vessels, coastal/inland waterway barges, road tankers, rail tank cars or storage installations, aviation fuel testing laboratories and tankers, rail tank cars or storage installations, aviation fuel testing laboratories and inspection companies.

inspection companies.

This publication uses the word ‘shall’

This publication uses the word ‘shall’ to denote mandatory provisions, compliance with whichto denote mandatory provisions, compliance with which is considered essential for the

is considered essential for the maintenance of aviation fuel quality. The maintenance of aviation fuel quality. The word ‘should’ is usedword ‘should’ is used to denote provisions considered to represent good practice. Note: If companies/ to denote provisions considered to represent good practice. Note: If companies/ organisations choose to follow this publication, it is recommended that all of its provisions organisations choose to follow this publication, it is recommended that all of its provisions (mandatory and good practice) are

(mandatory and good practice) are adopted.adopted.

Whilst written in the context of the legislative and regulatory framework generally applicable Whilst written in the context of the legislative and regulatory framework generally applicable in the European Communities, the provisions set out in this publication can similarly be in the European Communities, the provisions set out in this publication can similarly be applied in other countries providing national and local statutory requirements are complied applied in other countries providing national and local statutory requirements are complied with. Where the requirements differ, the

with. Where the requirements differ, the more stringent should be adopted.more stringent should be adopted.

The EI and JIG are not undertaking to meet the duties of employers to warn and equip their The EI and JIG are not undertaking to meet the duties of employers to warn and equip their employees, and others exposed, concerning health and safety risks and precautions, nor employees, and others exposed, concerning health and safety risks and precautions, nor undertaking their obligations under local and regional laws and regulations.

undertaking their obligations under local and regional laws and regulations.

Nothing contained in any EI/JIG publication is to be construed as granting any right, by Nothing contained in any EI/JIG publication is to be construed as granting any right, by implication or otherwise, for the manufacture, sale, or use of any method, apparatus, or implication or otherwise, for the manufacture, sale, or use of any method, apparatus, or product covered by letters patent. Neither shall anything contained in the publication be product covered by letters patent. Neither shall anything contained in the publication be construed as insuring anyone against liability for infringement of letters patent.

construed as insuring anyone against liability for infringement of letters patent.

This publication is intended to assist those involved in the refining, distribution and supply of This publication is intended to assist those involved in the refining, distribution and supply of aviation fuel. Every effort has been made by the EI and JIG to assure the accuracy and aviation fuel. Every effort has been made by the EI and JIG to assure the accuracy and reliability of the data contained in this publication; however, EI and JIG make no reliability of the data contained in this publication; however, EI and JIG make no representation, warranty, or guarantee in connection with this publication and hereby representation, warranty, or guarantee in connection with this publication and hereby expressly disclaim any liability or responsibility for loss or damage resulting from its use or expressly disclaim any liability or responsibility for loss or damage resulting from its use or for the violation of any local or regional laws or regulations with which this publication may for the violation of any local or regional laws or regulations with which this publication may conflict.

conflict.

Suggested revisions are invited and may be submitted to the Technical Department, Energy Suggested revisions are invited and may be submitted to the Technical Department, Energy Institute, 61 New Cavendish Street, London, W1G 7AR (

Institute, 61 New Cavendish Street, London, W1G 7AR ( technical@energyinst.orgtechnical@energyinst.org) or to the) or to the Joint Inspection Group (via

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 ACKNOWLED

 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

GEMENTS

This publication was prepared by representatives of the following, on behalf of the Energy This publication was prepared by representatives of the following, on behalf of the Energy Institute Aviation Committee and the Joint Inspection Group Operations Committee.

Institute Aviation Committee and the Joint Inspection Group Operations Committee.

 Air BP Limited  Air BP Limited

 Air TOTAL Internation  Air TOTAL Internationalal

Central European Pipeline Management Agency Central European Pipeline Management Agency

Kuwait Petroleum International Aviation Company Ltd. Kuwait Petroleum International Aviation Company Ltd. ExxonMobil Aviation International Ltd.

ExxonMobil Aviation International Ltd. SGS

SGS

Shell Aviation Ltd. Shell Aviation Ltd.

The participation and contributions of technical representatives of the following are greatly The participation and contributions of technical representatives of the following are greatly appreciated in the development of

appreciated in the development of this publication:this publication:

To be added To be added

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DRAFT

DRAFT EI/JIG EI/JIG 1530 1530 FOR FOR STAKEHOLDER STAKEHOLDER REVIEW. REVIEW. Copyright Copyright © © EI EI & & JIG JIG 2012 2012 EI12/059EI12/059 Please submit any comments to

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1 INTRODUCTION, SCOPE, APPLICATION AND

1 INTRODUCTION, SCOPE, APPLICATION AND

IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS

IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS

1.1 INTRODUCTION

1.1 INTRODUCTION

For many decades those involved in aviation fuel manufacture and handling have worked to For many decades those involved in aviation fuel manufacture and handling have worked to ensure that all fuel delivered to airports is fully on-specification, clean and dry, and ensure that all fuel delivered to airports is fully on-specification, clean and dry, and fit-for-purpose.

purpose.

In various regions worldwide, this activity was undertaken by a relatively small number of In various regions worldwide, this activity was undertaken by a relatively small number of integrated oil companies or National Oil companies, working to company proprietary integrated oil companies or National Oil companies, working to company proprietary manuals. This situation has significantly changed in recent years, with a diverse range of manuals. This situation has significantly changed in recent years, with a diverse range of companies and organisations having responsibility for aviation fuel manufacture and companies and organisations having responsibility for aviation fuel manufacture and distribution to airports.

distribution to airports.

The need to highlight the availability of industry standards for the management of aviation The need to highlight the availability of industry standards for the management of aviation fuel quality throughout the supply chain has been recognized by the International Civil fuel quality throughout the supply chain has been recognized by the International Civil  Aviation

 Aviation Organization (ICAO), Organization (ICAO), which which has has issued issued Doc Doc 99779977 Manual on civil aviation jet fuelManual on civil aviation jet fuel supply

supply. This has been issued to the civil aviation authorities of the 191 Member States of. This has been issued to the civil aviation authorities of the 191 Member States of ICAO.

ICAO.

Industry stakeholders have recognized the need to document the key mandatory provisions Industry stakeholders have recognized the need to document the key mandatory provisions that are considered essential for the maintenance of aviation fuel quality from its point of that are considered essential for the maintenance of aviation fuel quality from its point of manufacture through (sometimes complex) distributio

manufacture through (sometimes complex) distribution systems to n systems to airports. In addition, goodairports. In addition, good practice recommendations and informative material have been provided, based on existing practice recommendations and informative material have been provided, based on existing company operating materials, and collective industry specialist knowledge developed over company operating materials, and collective industry specialist knowledge developed over many years of

many years of safe and efficient operations. This forms the safe and efficient operations. This forms the content of this publication.content of this publication.

While this publication establishes mandatory provisions and good practice While this publication establishes mandatory provisions and good practice recommendations, all companies/organisations involved in maintaining aviation fuel quality recommendations, all companies/organisations involved in maintaining aviation fuel quality are encouraged to seek

are encouraged to seek continuous improvemencontinuous improvement in t in their operations.their operations.

The overriding philosophy implicit in this document is that, at each step in the fuel’s journey The overriding philosophy implicit in this document is that, at each step in the fuel’s journey from refinery to airport, all the parties involved, from its initial production to subsequent from refinery to airport, all the parties involved, from its initial production to subsequent storage and handling, have a shared responsibility for maintaining the quality and storage and handling, have a shared responsibility for maintaining the quality and cleanliness of the fuel at that point in the supply chain, and should not expect the parties cleanliness of the fuel at that point in the supply chain, and should not expect the parties further downstream to remedy

further downstream to remedy any deficiencies.any deficiencies.

It should be noted that maintaining aviation fuel quality relies upon the involvement of It should be noted that maintaining aviation fuel quality relies upon the involvement of competent and experienced practitioners. This publication has been prepared for use by competent and experienced practitioners. This publication has been prepared for use by such individuals only.

such individuals only.

1.2 SCOPE

1.2 SCOPE

This publication provides mandatory provisions and good practice recommendations for This publication provides mandatory provisions and good practice recommendations for maintaining aviation fuel quality in refineries and in storage, distribution and transport maintaining aviation fuel quality in refineries and in storage, distribution and transport systems including those delivering to

systems including those delivering to airports, covering:airports, covering: −

− facilities facilities design design and and construction,construction, −

− product product manufacture,manufacture, −

−  batching,  batching, −

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−  release,

− storage and handling, − receipt and discharge,

− quality assurance requirements, and − operational procedures.

This publication does not address:

− the storage and handling of aviation fuels at airports. Requirements for airport installations can be found in:

− EI 1540 Design, construction, operation and maintenance of aviation fuelling facilities,

− JIG 2 Standards for aviation fuel quality control and operating procedures for airport depots,

− JIG 1 Standards for aviation fuel quality control and operating procedures for into-plane fuelling services, and

− A4A 103 Standards for jet fuel quality control at airports.

− Health, safety, environmental protection and supply integrity controls (which it is assumed companies/organisations have in place).

1.3 APPLICATION

This publication is intended for adoption worldwide, by any company or organisation involved in the manufacturing, testing, blending or handling of aviation fuel upstream of airports. This includes those companies/organisations responsible for the design, construction, operation, inspection or maintenance of refineries, pipelines, marine vessels, coastal/inland waterway barges, road tankers, rail tank cars or storage installations, aviation fuel testing laboratories and inspection companies.

The requirements and recommendations detailed in this publication incorporate those previously published as JIG 3 Standards for aviation fuel quality control and operating procedures for supply and distribution facilities   (Issue 11, January 2012) and are in alignment with those in API Recommended Practice 1595 Design, construction, operation, maintenance and inspection of aviation pre-airfield storage terminals   and API Recommended Practice 1543 Documentation, monitoring and laboratory testing of aviation fuel during shipment from refinery to airport.

Throughout this publication the words “shall”, “should” and “may” are used to qualify certain requirements or actions. The specific meaning of these words is as follows:

• “shall” is used when the provision is mandatory

• “should” is used when the provision is recommended as good practice • “may” is used where the provision is optional

Companies/organisations wishing to claim compliance with this publication are required to meet all of the mandatory provisions of the relevant chapter(s). All companies/organisations are also encouraged to follow the provisions which are recommended as good practice.

In the case of existing facilities that do not comply fully with mandatory provisions of this publication, steps shall be taken to make the improvements necessary to facilities and/or procedures. The goal should always be full compliance. Where full compliance has not been achieved, it shall be demonstrated that the combination of existing facilities and the quality assurance procedures applied to them (based on a full risk assessment) are capable of always meeting the objective of delivering only clean, dry, on-specification fuel. Risk

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assessments shall be clearly defined and documented, and available for auditing purposes. The reliance on the combination of existing facilities and quality assurance procedures shall not be considered as a permanent means of complying with mandatory provisions of this publication.

1.4

IMPORTANT DEFINITIONS

1.4.1 On specification

 Aviation fuel specifications contain a table (or tables) of fuel property requirements, with their minimum and/or maximum allowable values. However, in addition to the table of properties, aviation fuel specifications contain numerous requirements related to permitted materials (both fuel components and additives), quality assurance, management of change, testing and documentation (traceability), and cleanliness, which are designed to ensure that fuel delivered into aircraft is fit-for-purpose.

 A declarati on of “ on sp eci fi cation” or “ meet ing th e s pec if ic ati on” means meet ing th e various maximum/minimum limit s for fuel property tests and also satisfying all other aspects of the specification such as material composition, approved additives, quality assurance, management of change, cleanliness, traceabilit y, etc.

1.4.2 Glossary of terms and abbreviations

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2 AVIATION FUEL QUALITY ASSURANCE AND

TRACEABILITY

2.1 INTRODUCTION

The potential consequences of a failure to supply the correct, on-specification and fit-for-purpose fuel to aircraft are such that it is essential for every organization in the supply chain from refinery to airport to have an effective, documented and auditable aviation fuel quality assurance system. The system shall be designed to ensure the provision and maintenance of appropriate facilities, equipment and competent personnel for the safe and uncontaminated production and delivery of aviation fuels.

2.2 QUALITY ASSURANCE SYSTEM

2.2.1 Quality assurance system princ iples

 Aviation fuel quality assurance is based on certification at point of manufacture and procedures to verify that the quality of the aviation fuel concerned has not significantly changed and remains within the specification limits during distribution and delivery to airports (and subsequently to aircraft). Proper documentation is an essential part of this process. The key documents are:

− Refinery Certificate of Quality − Certificate of Analysis

− Recertification Test Certificate − Release Certificate.

In addition, other field tests are undertaken, and results recorded, to provide quality assurance as part of the detailed operating procedures, including:

− Periodic Test

− Appearance Check − Membrane filtration test − Control Check

−  Conductivity

− Microbiological Assay

2.2.2 Refinery Certifi cate of Quality (RCQ)

The RCQ is produced at the point of manufacture and is the definitive original document describing the quality of a batch of aviation fuel. It contains the results of measurements, made by the product originator’s laboratory (or laboratory working on behalf of the product originator), of all the properties required by the specification to which the fuel is manufactured and includes all other details mandated by the relevant specification. It therefore represents a complete certification of a product's conformance with the relevant specification. In the case of jet fuel manufactured to DEF STAN 91-91, the RCQ also provides information regarding composition of the fuel in terms of the percentage of mildly hydroprocessed, severely hydroprocessed and synthetic components, and details of the addition of additives, including both type and amount of any such additives permitted in the fuel specification.

The RCQ shall always be dated and signed by an authorised signatory (see Annex B).

In addition to the information mandated for inclusion in the RCQ by the cited aviation fuel specification, the following information shall be included:

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− Specification name, issue and any amendment number;

− Name and address of testing laboratory; including telephone and fax numbers and e-mail address;

− Batch number or unique identifier; − Quantity of fuel in the batch;

− Properties tested including specification limit, test method and result of test;

− Name and position of authorised test certificate signatory or electronic signature, and − Date of certification.

The RCQ can be produced by an independent contracted laboratory working on behalf of a refinery but the RCQ shall state the manufacturing source refinery.

2.2.3 Certificate of Analysis (CoA)

 A CoA is issued by a laboratory other than that of (or working on behalf of) the originating refinery, usually at some point downstream of the point of manufacture, typically in intermediate supply terminals where several batches of jet fuel may be co-mingled and that product re-batched. It contains determinations of all the properties required in the relevant specification (often referred to as the “Table 1” properties), but will not necessarily provide information regarding the type and amount of any additives in the fuel or the percentage of hydro-processed or synthetic components. CoAs shall be dated and signed by an authorised signatory.

The minimum information that shall be included on the CoA is: − Specification name, issue and any amendment number;

− Name and address of testing laboratory, including telephone and fax numbers and e-mail address;

− Batch number or unique identifier; − Quantity of fuel in the batch;

− Properties tested including specification limit, test method and result of test;

− Name and position of authorised test certificate signatory or electronic signature; and − Date of certification.

 A CoA shall not be treated as a RCQ.

2.2.4 Recertif icati on Test Certi fic ate (RTC)

Where aviation product is transferred to an installation under circumstances which could in any way allow the possibility of cross-contamination (e.g. marine tanker or multi-product pipeline), Recertification Testing is necessary before further use or product transfer.

Recertification testing is carried out to verify that the quality of the aviation fuel concerned has not changed during distribution and remains within the specification limits. Recertification testing comprises a reduced set of tests (compared with the full set in the RCQ or CoA) which are particularly sensitive to contamination (see chapter 4 for minimum requirements). The RTC shall be dated and signed by an authorised representative of the laboratory carrying out the testing. The results of all recertification tests shall be checked to confirm that:

− the specification limits are met, and

− no significant change is noted for each property on the test certificate (see Annex D). The minimum information that shall be included on the RTC is:

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− Name and address of testing laboratory, including telephone and fax numbers and e-mail address;

− Batch number or unique identifier;

− Quantity of fuel in each component in the batch;

− Properties tested including specification limit, test method and result of test including comparison checks;

− Name and position of authorised test certificate signatory or electronic signature, and − Date of testing.

2.2.5 Release Certificate (RC)

The Release Certificate is an operational document linked to one or more laboratory test certificates. It authorises any transfer of aviation fuel (including to airports), confirming compliance with the relevant specification(s) and contains, as a minimum, the:

− Reference to Batch number or other unique identifier (e.g. Tank number, date and time); − Test report number (last full certification (RCQ or CoA) or RTC on this batch);

− Date and time of release; − Certified batch density;

− Quantity of fuel (this may be added subsequently for pipeline transfers);

− Statement that product complies fully with the visual appearance requirement (and conductivity if SDA is present) and is free from bulk water;

− Grade of fuel and specification; and − Authorised signatory.

The RC need not duplicate existing information but shall be part of the consignment notes.

2.2.6 Period ic Test Certi fic ate

This test is carried out to certify that product which has been static in storage for more than 6 months (see Annex I) conforms to the relevant specification and that the quality of the product has not changed since the last tests were carried out. The Periodic Test Certificate contains the results of the Periodic Test (see chapter 4). It shall be dated and signed by an authorised signatory.

2.2.7 Duration o f validit y of c ertificates

DEF STAN 91-91 specifies that fuel supplied to airport is supported by a RCQ, CoA or RTC that is less than180 days old.

NOTE: drum stocks are exempt from this requirement; here the certification is valid for 12 months from filling date or last re-test date for the batch of drums.

Should there have been subsequent changes to the fuel specification since the date on the RCQ, any additional testing required by the current specification at the time of re-testing shall be conducted.

2.2.8 Utilisation of test d ata

Test data (as recorded by the above documents/certificates) shall be used throughout the fuel handling system to establish conformance, as detailed in chapter 8.

2.3 TRACEABILITY

Traceability for aviation fuel indicates the ability to track any batch of fuel in the distribution system back to its original point of manufacture. This requires certification documentation (RCQs and/or CoAs, RTCs and RCs), with information on additive concentration and content of hydroprocessed and synthetic components (if required by the specification).

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To avoid the need to view excessive documentation at each point in the supply chain, traceability may be fulfilled by listing on the CoA (or on a cross-referenced attached document – see Figure 1) all the component batches that make up the new batch that the CoA represents.

Figure 1 – Examples of batch make-up and batch expor t record s

Batch Number: Tank Number: Quantity: litres/USG

Grade: Date Sampled: Test Cert Number:

Quantity Batch Test Cert. Import Consignor Receipt

(Litres/USG) Number Number Release Note Location Date

  Initial Stock 1 2 New 3 Product 4   Received 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Loss/(Gain) Total Litres/USG

Quantity Inspectors Method of Despatch Ex port Consignee Delivery

(Litres/USG) Number Release Note Location Date 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Loss/(Gain) Total Litres Ex ported

Total of this Batch Left in Tank

Signed

Batch Make-Up Record

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The flow chart in Figure 2 indicates the documentation that is required at each stage of delivery.

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2.4 QUALITY ASSURANCE ORGANIZATION

Every manufacturing, storage and distribution location shall have a product quality assurance organisation. The specific details of such an organisation may vary according to the nature of the operating unit. Within the organisation, individuals shall be nominated for specific roles, authorised and documented (nomenclature may vary according to local requirements). At each level of the structure, records shall be kept of the responsible individuals in the succeeding level together with details of training received. As a minimum the organisation shall include a site product quality manager and nominated personnel responsible for tasks critical to the product quality assurance system.

2.4.1 Site Prod uct Quality Manager

 At each site that manufactures, blends, stores or handles aviation fuel there shall be a nominated site product quality manager responsible for the efficient and effective operation of the quality assurance system at that site.

 As a minimum, the Site Product Quality Manager shall be accountable for: − Implementation of correct quality assurance procedures;

− Maintenance of satisfactory documentation;

− Only releasing product that meets the appropriate specification), and

− Training of all staff at the site who are nominated to undertake tasks critical to the product quality assurance system.

2.4.2 Personnel with du ties that incl ude tasks crit ical to the prod uct qualit y assurance system

 All staff whose duties include tasks critical to the product quality assurance system shall be nominated, documented and fully trained in such tasks.

See Annex B for additional requirements for staff responsible for the signing of documents supporting the release of product (“authorised signatories”).

2.4.3 Training requirements

The manager of the operation is responsible for defining training and competency requirements for the personnel under their control. The manager shall ensure that all personnel have appropriate job descriptions and are adequately trained. The training records shall be well documented including details of theoretical and practical content, how competency is assessed and signed off, when training was first accomplished and when refresher training is required.

New personnel (permanent and temporary) shall be thoroughly trained in all operations and procedures that they will be called upon to perform in the course of their duties. Existing personnel called upon to undertake new tasks shall be similarly trained before undertaking the new task without supervision. Existing personnel shall also be observed periodically when carrying out tasks, and refresher training provided when necessary.

The following components are important to appropriately assess the competence requirements of personnel:

− the experience, knowledge and skills required in each position; − any legal and other requirements applicable to the role, and

− differing levels of responsibility, ability, language skills and literacy and risks associated with the Job Description/ role

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− an executive and decision-making role, which oversees an operation to prevent the occurrence or escalation of incidents, and

− a role that is responsible for “Key Risk Areas”, i.e., areas of the operation where there are identified risks, which would be classified as “High Risk” if they were left unmitigated. Requirements for training apply equally to any sub-contractors.

2.5 DOCUMENT RETENTION REQUIREMENTS

 Aviation quality control documents shall be kept for certain minimum periods to provide adequate history and reference. The following retention requirements specify minimum periods, but local regulations or external quality assurance requirements may require longer retention periods. Records of all daily, weekly and monthly checks shall be retained for at least 1 year. Records of all less frequent routine checks, filter membrane test results and logbooks on all non-routine matters shall be retained for at least 3 years. Other maintenance records shall be retained for at least 1 year, or longer if still relevant to equipment condition (e.g., major repair work or extension(s) to facilities).

− Supply and distribution depot logs - 12 months from last dated record.

− Laboratory quality control and product testing records and certificates - 10 years.

− Local and international inspections and follow-up - 3 years or until all recommendations have been closed out if longer.

− Filtration differential pressure and membrane filtration (Millipore) records - a minimum of either 3 years or current and previous change-out if longer.

− Storage tank cleaning and maintenance records - life of tank + 6 years. If the tanks are buried underground, these records shall be kept indefinitely.

− Depot design, modification and major maintenance - life of depot + 10 years.

− Underground pipeline design, modification and testing records - life of installation + 10 years.

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3 MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE/NEW

PROCESSES

3.1 INTRODUCTION

Both DEF STAN 91-91 and ASTM D1655 highlight the need for refineries to conduct a Management of Change (MoC) evaluation to include the impact of process changes, including refinery process chemicals, on jet fuel performance to ensure that the finished fuel remains fit-for-purpose. The industry recognized that product performance needed to be included in MoC processes following a serious incident in Australia in 1999 where the breakthrough of a refinery process chemical into the finished aviation fuel caused several aircraft incidents, despite the fact that the finished fuel was in complete compliance with all specification test limit requirements. Both specifications also require a MoC evaluation for any changes in facilities and/or operating procedures at manufacturing locations, storage installations and distribution systems to ensure product integrity is maintained.

The basic requirements of an MoC process are detailed in this chapter. Although it is intended to be specifically applicable to refinery operations, the principles of MoC shall be applied to all operations/installations downstream of refineries.

More detailed information can be found in ISO 31000 Risk management - Principles and guidelines.

3.2 PRINCIPLES

 All temporary and permanent changes shall be evaluated before the change is implemented, and managed to ensure that risks arising from changes remain at acceptable levels.

There are practical reasons for managing change because when a “change” is introduced, there may be increased risk of the fuel not meeting the specification requirements. Implementing a MoC process provides a system to evaluate, authorize and document changes and ensure proper closure after the changes are complete.

The process should apply to all permanent and temporary changes to organisation, staffing, systems, procedures, equipment, products materials or substances.

The process requires competent personnel fulfilling clearly defined roles and responsibilities with clearly defined technical authority levels for the approval of changes. Note: Personnel with wide ranging areas of expertise should be involved so that all the hazards and consequences can be listed and worked through.

 Appropriate training, support and competency assessments should be provided for those with accountabilities in the MoC process.

 A register of all MoCs initiated should be established and used.

3.3 MANAGEMENT OF CHANGE PROCESS

The management of change process shall consider as a minimum the following before the change is implemented:

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− is it a permanent, temporary or emergency change. − the duration of the change if applicable.

− is it a “like for like” change? (Is any action required). − what are the hazards associated with the change?

− will it be possible to control the risks associated with any new hazards? − will the risks associated with existing hazards change?

− will the change adversely affect any existing risk controls?

− what are the most appropriate controls to mitigate the risks associated with the change?  An action plan shall be developed, with assigned responsibilities and timelines identified,

and the change process documented.

For the review of the MoC process, see example in 3.6. The team should include all the necessary knowledge and competency for the change proposal being evaluated/assessed. Once approval for the change is given, a pre-implementation review should be carried out to ensure that the plans and resources associated with implementing the change are in place. Once the change has been made, a post implementation review shall be carried out to ensure that all the actions have been completed and that the documentation, in particular that defining procedures, has been updated.

3.4 MoC PROCESS IMPLEMENTATION

It has been documented in a number of incident investigations that the following activities help support an effective MoC system:

a) Recognise change

Define safe limits for process conditions, variables, and activities—and train personnel to recognize significant changes. Combined with knowledge of established operating

procedures, this additional training will enable personnel to activate the MoC system when appropriate.

b) Apply multidisciplinary and specialized expertise when analyzing changes c) Hazard screening and risk analysis

Use appropriate hazard and risk analysis techniques.

d) Authorize changes at a level commensurate with risks and hazards.

e) Communicate the essential elements of new operating procedures in writing f) Communicate potential hazards and safe operating limits in writing.

g) Provide training in new procedures commensurate with their complexity. h) Conduct periodic audits to determine if the program is effective

3.5 SPECIFIC CHANGES

Specific changes that may have to be managed include, but are not limited to:

a) Change in crude or crude mix. Note: Although not necessarily communicated to the crude user, it has been known for changes in oil field chemicals to impact aviation fuel quality.

b) Introduction of new process(es) or product streams, or suspension of existing processes. c) Change in process (change in hydroprocessing severity, catalyst exchange).

d) Change in process additives e.g. anti-corrosion additives.

e) Change in use of pipelines and tanks (see Annex C for specific requirements) impacting e.g. segregation effectiveness, mixing/homogeneity, residence time, sampling facilities. f) Importing of finished aviation fuel or blending components.

Figure

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References

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