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Education and Professional Development in

Nursing and Healthcare

2009/2010

Introductory courses

Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care

Pre-registration nursing programme

Degrees

Postgraduate programmes in advancing healthcare practice

Continuing Professional Development

Courses

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Something for everyone?

In the prospectus you’ll discover courses to meet the needs of students from many different backgrounds and at different stages in their lives and careers. We have long-established and very successful return-to-learning courses (Openings) and value the support of UNISON in encouraging and funding their members to explore these Openings courses.

I know from my time as a practitioner that many healthcare assistants and nursing auxiliaries dream of becoming a nurse – but for most, full-time study simply isn’t an option. I am therefore most proud of our ground-breaking pre-registration nursing programme which is work-based, enabling students to study part-time and retain their salaried post. It therefore helps employers to develop their local nursing workforce. And now, thanks to our strategic alliance with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN), we can extend this offer to Continuing Professional Development (CPD). We’re delighted to offer a number of new courses to support post-qualifying professional development at degree and postgraduate level. Courses can be studied independently for one-off CPD or as part of a qualifi cation pathway.

Highlights and celebrations

One of the many highlights this year was the award of the Northern Ireland RCN Student Nurse of the Year to one of our pre-registration students, Jackie Moore. Her story illustrates how the OU can develop the potential of healthcare staff and support their career progression.

Our student journeys are proof that our record in widening participation is unbeatable (but that’s what you’d expect from The Open University!).

We’ve also received a number of excellent accolades for the quality of our education and training. In the 2008 quality review on behalf of the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC), our pre-registration nursing programme was deemed outstanding for practice-learning and our quality assurance processes were praised as a model for other providers.

The high praise of NMC reviewers, external advisors and examiners provides an important independent endorsement of our unique approach to providing healthcare education via a non-traditional, supported open learning route. Students like Jackie Moore and hundreds of others have not only proved it is possible – but that it is possible to do it with outstanding success. I do hope you will be inspired by what you read and will take the next step to becoming/continuing as an OU student or supporting a member of your staff.

Professor Jan Draper Director of Nursing

Welcome

I’m delighted to welcome you to The Open University’s Nursing and

Healthcare Prospectus. Whether you’re an individual seeking to further

your own career or a line manager with responsibility for developing a

team of staff, I hope you’ll be inspired by stories from students whose

lives and careers have been transformed by OU study and how this can

make a positive impact on practice.

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Introduction

1

Contents

Introduction

2

An unrivalled learning experience ... 2

Introductory courses – The Openings Programme ... 3

Qualifi cations

4

Pre-qualifying Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care ... 4

Pre-registration nursing programme ... 8

Post-qualifying Degrees ... 14

Postgraduate programmes in advancing healthcare practice ... 18

Open access: other ways to read this publication

You may fi nd it easier to access information from our website at

www.open.ac.uk

If you would like this publication electronically, please call

0845 300 60 90

or email us at

general-enquiries@open.ac.uk

quoting

‘Alternative format’ in the subject box.

Other alternative formats are available on request.

Courses

20

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) ... 20

Level 1 ... 21

Level 2 ... 22

Level 3 ... 25

Postgraduate ... 30

How to fi nd out more

32

Ordering other prospectuses ... 33

Take a moment… to choose where to take your inspiration

Whether you want to study to develop your career or to open up a

whole new world of learning, the OU will support you in achieving your

aspirations.

This prospectus tells you about the OU experience and the qualifi cations and courses in nursing and healthcare that can help you to reach your goals in a refreshingly fl exible way.

To help you navigate this prospectus we’ve broken it down into separate sections and colour coded them. If, after reading through, you need more information or expert friendly advice, please contact us.

Throughout this prospectus we refer to Levels. Level 1 is usually the best place to start, especially if you haven’t studied at higher education level before, or haven’t studied for some time.

You could start at Level 2 if you have the right skills and experience. If you’ve studied before, you may be eligible to transfer credit from the points you’ve already earned.

Level 3 is equivalent to the final year of a full-time degree. Start here if you want to top-up an existing qualification or if

you’re an experienced professional looking for Continuing Professional Development. Click www.open.ac.uk/study or call 0845 300 60 90. We’re here to help.

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2

Introduction

An unrivalled learning experience

The OU is a remarkable organisation that has helped to transform adult

learning. The quality of our programmes – and tutors – is renowned and

respected across the globe.

We’re continually striving to improve accessibility and set new standards in higher education, and our health and social care provision is no exception. We offer fl exible, relevant courses – for support workers through to highly qualifi ed specialists – that will make a real difference to service delivery and the patient/client experience.

Why choose the OU?

• Our courses are directly relevant to the workplace. What is learnt today can be put into practice tomorrow. • Course development is driven by research,

collaboration with practitioners who are experts in their fi elds, and in partnership with major organisations – keeping courses fresh, innovative and relevant to our changing world.

• We are leaders in supported open learning, a unique and inspiring approach that means students are fully supported.

• Our network of dedicated, experienced tutors ensures teaching of the highest quality and excellent individual support1.

1Since the National Student Survey was first launched in 2005, the OU has featured among the top three for Student Satisfaction. Over 7000 OU students responded - far more than any other institution.

FACT:

The pre-registration nursing programme

is approved by the Nursing and Midwifery Council

(NMC) for delivery in England, Scotland, Northern

Ireland and the States of Jersey.

National reach – local delivery

The OU’s 13 regional and national centres work closely with employers throughout the UK to address local training needs. They also provide support to students and to the tutors who teach our courses locally. Turn to page 32 to fi nd your nearest OU regional or national centre.

All Royal College of Nursing (RCN) members and staff are entitled to a 10 per cent discount on many OU undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Simply provide a copy of your RCN membership or staff pass when you register and pay for your course. This doesn’t apply if you’re sponsored by your employer and is not currently available for online registration. To claim your discount, please register by contacting our Student Registration & Enquiry Service, where a member of staff will advise you.

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3

Introduction

You start with your own general knowledge and interests – taking examples from everyday life – and gradually build up to the kind of work you could expect at the beginning of a longer course. Key features include:

• activities that encourage you to link the discussions in the course to your own experience

• core questions and key points that help you to remember what you’re reading

• learning skills sections that enable you to refl ect on your learning.

You can use Openings courses to prepare for study at university level, get ready for a particular course, or to help you decide what subject area to choose. They use the same high quality teaching materials and study support that we’re famous for, but they’re shorter, and presented at an introductory level. They’re also fascinating and fun to do.

Healthcare workers are likely to be interested in Starting with maths (Y162) (successful completion of which meets the entry requirements for numeracy for pre-registration nursing); Understanding health (Y158) and

Understanding children (Y156), both of which give insights to the unique characteristics in their subject. We also offer courses about the arts, science and technology, and the social sciences.

What to do next

To register or fi nd out more about any of the Openings courses, visit our website at www.open.ac.uk/openings

or call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service on 0845 300 60 90.

Introductory courses

– The Openings Programme

Openings courses are perfect for people and employees with little or no

special knowledge or experience of studying.

“This was my fi rst course with the OU and I found it an interesting experience…

… my tutor was really great and

very supportive, the course was

well laid out and it gave me a

good grounding for future study.

I would recommend an Openings course, particularly this one, for anyone who is thinking about health-related studies and also like me hasn’t studied for a long time.”

Understanding health (Y158) student, Jayne Richer

All UNISON members are entitled to a 10 per cent discount on many OU undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Simply provide a copy of your UNISON membership when you register and pay for your course. This doesn’t apply if you’re sponsored by your employer and is not currently available for online registration. To claim your discount, please register by contacting our Student Registration & Enquiry Service, where a member of staff will advise you.

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4

Qualifications

Pre-qualifying

Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care (G05)

This foundation degree is a work-based supported open learning programme for support workers in a wide range of health and social care settings. It is designed to develop and motivate staff in their existing roles, and to open up routes to further career development. The programme:

• develops the knowledge, skills and competences which underpin practice at the level of support staff • takes an interdisciplinary approach, with opportunities

for specialisation – encouraging fl exible, refl ective practice

• develops students to the level of ‘Assistant Practitioner’ or equivalent, within the career structure for support workers defi ned by the NHS Knowledge and Skills Framework (KSF) and social care skills escalator schemes.

The foundation degree is offered in partnership with employers, enabling students to undertake the practice component of their study in their own workplace, and employers to get involved in the management and assessment of learning.

This programme was developed by the OU in

collaboration with UNISON, the University of Northampton and York St John College, and with advice from the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists and College of Occupational Therapists.

The programme content

The foundation degree is a carefully-integrated combination of knowledge-based and work-based courses, tutorials and assessment.

• The knowledge-based courses (delivered through supported open learning) cover the theoretical framework for the practice of support workers.

• The work-based courses link theory with practice in the context of the student’s own workplace.

The fi rst two courses, which are inter-disciplinary and generic in nature, are at academic Level 1. The remainder of the programme is at academic Level 2 where students can either continue with a broad-based approach, or specialise in a particular client group (such as children or mental health service users) and/or in a particular professional area.

The diagram on page 5 shows how students progress through their studies.

The foundation degree is available in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. In Scotland, the programme is offered as a Diploma of Higher Education in Health and Social Care (E40). For more information on this, contact your national or regional centre listed on page 32.

“Rather than work in an environment that cares for people I’d rather be working in an environment that enables people to care for themselves… I would never, never have considered that before.”

Foundation degree student

“I am very pleased I had the opportunity to undertake the foundation degree. I have extended my knowledge within my working practice, by using evidence-informed practice, learning a new skill as well as using research.”

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5

Qualifications

Find out more atwww.open.ac.uk/study.Simply type the course or qualification code (shown here in brackets) into the search window for full course descriptions.

The programme structure

Level 1

Level 2

Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care (G05)

Work-based course:

Introducing professional practice (K114) (60 points)

and

Knowledge-based course:

An introduction to health and social care (K101) (60 points)

Work-based course:

Extending professional practice (K214) (60 points)

and

Knowledge-based courses to the value of 60 points, chosen from the following list:

Interdisciplinary:

Care, welfare and community (K202) (60 points)

Working for health (K203) (60 points)

Children:

Working with children and families (K204) (60 points)

Mental health:

Challenging ideas in mental health (K272) (30 points)

Diverse perspectives on mental health (K225) (30 points)

End of life care:

Death and dying (K260) (30 points)

Other professional areas:

Human biology (SK277) (30 points)

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6

Qualifications

Pre-qualifying

Accreditation of Prior Experiential

Learning (APEL)

Students whose practice experience or existing qualifi cations meet the specifi c requirements for

Introducing professional practice (K114) may be able to get their prior learning and/or experience recognised. The course code for this route is KZL114. Entry to the course is through sponsorship by employers and you are required to have completed or be studying An introduction to health and social care (K101) (or the discontinued course Understanding health and social care (K100/KZX100)) before taking this course. For more information and a diagnostic tool to assess the suitability of this route, contact your regional or national centre (see page 32).

Entry with credit

Students who have already completed An introduction to health and social care (K101) (or the discontinued course

Understanding health and social care (K100/KZX100)) or other Faculty of Health & Social Care courses (prefi xed with a ‘K’) may be able to link their prior credit to this qualifi cation.

Employer sponsorship

Please note: you need to be sponsored by your employer to study for this qualification.

If you’re interested in becoming a student, please share this information with your line manager and encourage them to get in touch with their regional or national centre (see page 32).

How the programme works

The OU/Employer partnership

Employers share responsibility for students’ learning with the OU. Employers substantially manage the practice learning on the programme – including selecting and sponsoring staff, appointing a workplace supervisor, providing suitable teaching facilities and giving study leave. The University provides study materials, tutorial support, and support in training staff to become workplace supervisors.

Study time and study leave

Support of employers is essential to students’ success. Students need time to read their course material, complete their assignments, develop their practice skills and attend tutorials. For example, a 60-point course requires the equivalent of 16 days’ study leave during the 32-week study period (typically taken as half a day per week). Support for study leave is individually negotiated with the relevant employer. (On average, it takes about 16 hours per week to study a 60-point course, half that for a 30-point course. Students can study two 30-point courses together).

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7

Qualifications

Frequently asked questions

How long does the programme take?

It takes between two and fi ve years to complete the foundation degree, depending on factors such as previous study, experience of supported open learning, other commitments and the amount of study leave available. Study patterns are individually negotiated. Each course runs for 32 weeks, from February to October or October to June, except Challenging ideas in mental health (K272), which runs from November to July.

Is there a minimum number of students?

Yes, each group will have a minimum of ten students. Employers must register their students as part of a group – either with colleagues from within the same organisation, or with staff from a nearby partner

organisation. If your organisation cannot support groups of ten students, the OU will build up mixed groups from other organisations where possible.

How does practice learning work?

The work-based courses require students to spend suffi cient time in practice for them to learn and develop their practice. We recommend a minimum of two days a week on average (see www.open.ac.uk/study for details – type the qualifi cation code G05 into the search window). Practice learning opportunities are designed to meet a range of learning experiences and outcomes.

Do students need a computer?

Yes. The course materials are a dynamic mix of text, audio, and online resources, so students will need basic computing literacy and access to a computer with an internet link. We have a dedicated helpdesk to provide IT support to students. To fi nd out more visit

www.open.ac.uk/personal-computing

What support do you provide for students

with disabilities?

We have a wide range of assistive technology and enabling services, so students with additional requirements can participate fully in their chosen course. It’s a good idea to discuss needs with regional support staff as early as possible – contact your regional or national centre (see page 32) for more information.

How much does it cost?

The latest fee information can be found on our website

www.open.ac.uk/hsc – use the ‘Take me there’ function

to fi nd the Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care (G05). This will show you up-to-date prices for the individual courses within the programme.

Who pays for the programme, and how?

The employer or sponsoring organisation pays the fees. This is not always the students’ direct employer (for example, a Strategic Health Authority, or The Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety can pay rather than a specifi c hospital or Primary Care Trust/ Health Board). We’re happy to negotiate over the timing of invoices and payments, so they fi t in with the sponsors’ fi nancial year and/or commissioning arrangements.

What to do next

Employers: contact your regional or national centre (see page 32) for more information and a copy of the Employer’s Handbook, which gives guidance on organising and facilitating work-based learning, and appointing workplace supervisors.

Students: as you need to be sponsored by your employer to study this programme, please share this information with your line manager and encourage them to get in touch with their OU regional or national centre (see page 32).

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8

Qualifications

For employers, the programme offers:

• a high quality, effective way to develop support workers • the benefi ts of a home-grown workforce

• a boost to recruitment and retention.

By sponsoring healthcare support workers to study this programme, employers also meet government priorities such as widening participation, investing in staff, strengthening multi-professional working and meeting future workforce service needs.

For students, the programme is a gateway to a

professional career and a chance to unlock their potential. They can qualify as nurses in four years while continuing to earn – building on their healthcare experience as support workers, and putting new knowledge and skills into practice as they study. Students are facilitated in developing the skills needed by qualifi ed practitioners working in both community and in-patient care settings and have the opportunity to experience practice in complimentary settings during their studies.

This programme is approved by the NMC for delivery in England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and the States of Jersey. Since the qualifying route to registered nurse is solely through a degree in Wales, we are unable to offer the pre-registration nursing programme there.

When Marina McCuaig started work as a healthcare assistant at Argyll & Bute Hospital, she realised she was interested in taking her career further. With a young family to look after, Marina, 37, thought that pre-registration training was beyond her reach. But then she heard that her employers were offering healthcare assistants the opportunity to train through distance learning with the OU.

“Once I started working as a healthcare assistant, I knew it was something I would have been

interested in doing,” she says. “I had a young family so going away to college just wasn’t feasible. So distance learning seemed like a good opportunity to study and continue to be employed.”

With the support of her employer, Marina spent four years studying on the OU’s pre-registration nursing programme, and has been awarded a Diploma of Higher Education in Nursing (Mental Health). Marina says it has been a lot of work, but she says she and colleagues also doing the programme found they were well-supported.

“Obviously with a family it was quite hard-going. But the placements were all in or around the hospital I work in. We had tutorials and the support of each other – there were four of us at Argyll & Bute Hospital doing it – and there was always someone on the end of the phone if we had any problems with the course work.”

Marina has just started a new job as a staff nurse, and says most of the healthcare assistants who have completed the programme have already secured jobs. “Four of us were doing mental health – three of us have posts and the fourth one has just had an interview. We have been very lucky.”

Now that Marina has experience of success through distance learning with the OU, she is thinking about ‘topping up’ her diploma to a degree in the near future. “We do have an opportunity to go on and do the degree, which I am considering. I think I’ll have some time off fi rst though!”

The pre-registration nursing programme is a unique, flexible, work-based supported open learning route leading to registration with the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) and the Diploma of Higher Education (Nursing), in either adult or mental health nursing.

The programme’s high retention rate is testament to its supportive approach and quality of teaching. Almost all of the student nurses who’ve qualified with us have gone straight into employment.

Pre-qualifying

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9

Qualifications

Employer sponsorship

Please note: you need to be sponsored by your employer to study for this qualification.

If you’re interested in becoming a student, please share this information with your line manager and encourage them to get in touch with their OU regional or national centre (see page 32).

“This programme fi lls a big gap in our current provision and affords our healthcare assistants the opportunity to train to become qualifi ed nurses – which for many would not have been an option through any other route.”

Kath Hinchliff, Head of Education Commissioning, NHS Yorkshire and Humber

Programme content

The programme, which meets NMC requirements, is a balance of theory, practice, assessment and tutorials. It starts with a common foundation that everyone studies, and then focuses on either mental health or adult nursing. Students investigate the major issues that challenge contemporary healthcare practice such as how best to identify and meet the needs of service users, the role of evidence in nursing, and how to work effectively with practitioners in other fi elds. They’ll also consider the nature of professional practice, and what is meant by refl ective practice, leadership and autonomy.

By the end of the programme, students will be able to demonstrate and apply their understanding of: • the contemporary context in which care takes place • the experience of care from service users’

perspectives

• theories and concepts that underpin and challenge practice and professionalism

• different philosophies of practice, and their impact on service provision

• the legal and ethical frameworks in which care takes place

• research methods and their application to practice.

Nurses retained for remote communities

after support from the OU

Health services in some of Scotland’s most remote communities have benefi ted from the care and skill of the fi rst students to graduate from the OU’s pre-registration nursing programme. The fi rst 18 nurses received their diplomas in nursing at a ceremony attended by Scotland’s Chief Nurse in May 2008. For all these students it would have been impossible otherwise to access nurse training without severely disrupting their family lives and job security. Most are from small and remote communities, including Shetland, Tiree and Lochgilphead in Argyll. Employers were able to reap two main benefi ts – retaining the students as healthcare assistants during their studies, and ‘recruiting’ the newly qualifi ed nurses to areas where nursing posts can be diffi cult to fi ll.

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10

Qualifications

Find out more atwww.open.ac.uk/study. Type in the course or qualification code (shown in brackets) for full details. 1Students whose practice experience or existing qualifications are equivalent to the specific requirements for Introducing professional practice and knowledge (KYN107) and who have an appropriate 60 points of study at Level 1 may be able to have their prior learning and/or experience recognised as meeting the NMC’s outcomes for entry to branch programmes on a pre-registration nursing programme. The course code for this route is KZL107. Contact your OU regional or national centre (see page 32) for more details.

The programme structure

Common Foundation Programme

Successful completion of the Common Foundation Programme, all branch courses

and confi rmation of meeting NMC requirements entitles students to apply for registration

as a Registered Nurse with the NMC as well as gaining a Diploma of Higher Education

(Adult Nursing) or a Diploma of Higher Education (Mental Health Nursing).

Introducing professional practice and knowledge (KYN107) (60 points )1

and

An introduction to health and social care (K101) (60 points)

Adult branch

(normally 2 years)

Diploma of Higher Education

(Adult Nursing) (D67)

Mental health branch

(normally 2 years)

Diploma of Higher Education

(Mental Health Nursing) (D68)

Developing adult nursingpractice (KYN291) (30 points)

and

Reflecting on whole lives: diverse perspectives on health and illness (KYN275)

(30 points)

Refining adult nursingpractice (KYN292) (30 points)

and

Human biology (SKYN277) (30 points)

Developing mental health nursingpractice (KYN293) (30 points)

and

Diverse perspectives on mental health (KYN225) (30 points)

Refining mental health nursingpractice (KYN294) (30 points)

and

Challenging ideas in mental health (KYN272) (30 points)

Pre-qualifying

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11

Qualifications

How the programme works

All OU pre-registration nursing programmes are a balance of theory and practice designed to produce students who are fi t for practice. The added value of our programme is the opportunity to capitalise on the skills and experience that students bring to their learning. This results in demonstrable confi dence and competence – attributes highly valued by healthcare employers.

The OU/Employer partnership

Employers share responsibility for students’ learning with the OU.

• Employers sponsor individuals or groups of staff, provide some of the settings for practice learning, appoint mentors to support and assess students, and give their employees study/practice leave.

• The OU organises the administration, develops and delivers the learning materials, provides tutors and support staff, organises the assessment, monitors each student’s learning and practice development and takes the lead responsibility for quality assurance and enhancement.

The practice element

The practice element of the programme mostly takes place in the student’s own workplace, although at least one complementary practice experience in the Common Foundation Programme and one in the specialist branch will be undertaken. Students in practice will be supervised to review, develop and refi ne skills, whilst exploring the relationship between theory and practice. A programme tutor and mentor will support students throughout their practice experiences. A specifi c number of days are allocated for practice learning (arranged with the employer).

Throughout the programme, employer organisations continue to provide mandatory training for moving and handling, basic life support, health and safety, etc.

The theory element

The theory part of the programme is taught through OU supported open learning. Students study fl exibly within a structured framework. They are supported by a tutor throughout their studies, take part in tutorial activities and exchange ideas, engage in debates and share experiences through online forums. Students have a specifi c number of study days (arranged with employers) for each course. They receive all the learning materials they need and also have access to a state-of-the-art online library. As they study the courses, students prepare assignments, focusing on their learning experience, and their refl ection on that experience. The assignments are designed to consolidate learning and tutors support this learning by providing constructive feedback.

Jo Rance, placement development manager at Oxleas NHS Foundation Trust, said:

“Our students gained a very good reputation in practice placements. Their mature, pragmatic attitude together with initiative and motivation were well received and frequently commented on.”

RCN Northern Ireland Student Nurse

of the Year

Jackie Moore, an OU student nurse at Belfast City Hospital, won the RCN Northern Ireland Student Nurse of the Year 2008. She graduated with the Diploma (Adult Branch) at Belfast Waterfront Hall in May 2008 and has gone straight into employment as a registered nurse. Prior to this, Jackie was a nursing auxiliary for 14 years and a healthcare assistant before embarking on the OU’s pre-registration nursing programme.

Donna Gallagher from the Faculty of Health & Social Care said “It was always Jackie’s dream to become a nurse and she worked exceptionally hard to achieve her goal, gaining a number of distinctions in her studies along the way. What ultimately won her the status of RCN Northern Ireland Student Nurse of the Year was a demonstration of great leadership skills in identifying a gap in communication with a patient and trying to make the patient experience better for those that are transferred or referred from other hospitals”.

Pictured with Jackie are Donna Gallagher, Staff Tutor Nursing with The Open University, and Jackie’s Programme Tutor Amanda Tuckey, who also works as a ward sister in Belfast City Hospital.

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12

Qualifications

Frequently asked questions

Can anyone study the programme?

The programme is only open to those who are being sponsored by employers working in partnership with the OU. Applicants must meet the regulatory body’s minimum entry requirements for pre-registration programmes, which are: good health; a good character; and a minimum standard of literacy and numeracy. We have set the standard at Key Skills Level 2, which is equivalent to GCSE Grade C or above (SCQF 5 in Scotland) in English and maths prior to registration on the programme.

Is there a minimum number of students?

Yes, each group will have a minimum of ten students. Employers must register their students as part of a group – either with colleagues from within the same organisation, or with staff from another organisation. If your organisation cannot support groups of ten students, the OU will build up mixed groups from other organisations where possible.

How are the students selected?

Students are selected jointly by employers and the OU: • Employers identify and select candidates for

nomination, ensuring that the candidates have the approval of their manager.

• Candidates must be working in – or able to transfer to – a suitable practice area (adult or mental health) which is assessed and demonstrates relevant learning opportunities.

• Candidates need two satisfactory references (one from their current employer); an occupational health check; and an Enhanced Criminal Records Check.

Successful candidates are offered a place on the programme, subject to meeting all the selection criteria.

How long does the programme take?

It typically takes four years to complete the programme or two and a half years for students directly entering the branch. Applicants will need to agree a timetable with employers, taking into account factors like previous study, experience of supported open learning and other commitments. The Common Foundation Programme and the branch courses may not be studied at the same time. To comply with the regulations for nurse registration, the full programme must be completed within seven years of part-time study.

What are the arrangements

for study leave?

Support for study leave is individually negotiated with the relevant employer.

How does practice learning work?

The practice-based courses include a specifi ed number of practice days (see www.open.ac.uk/study for details). Practice learning opportunities are designed to meet a range of learning experiences and outcomes defi ned by the NMC.

The OU will help students to identify learning opportunities for specifi c and predetermined practice learning. Students record their learning in a portfolio, and are assessed by their mentor who supervises the student in practice.

Do students need a computer?

Yes. The course materials are a dynamic mix of text, audio, DVD-ROM and online resources. So students will need basic computing literacy and access to a computer with an internet link. Students will have the opportunity to develop their IT skills during the early parts of the programme. We have a dedicated helpdesk to provide IT support to students. To fi nd out more visit

www.open.ac.uk/personal-computing

Pre-qualifying

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13

Qualifications

What support do you provide for students

with disabilities?

We have a wide range of assistive technology and enabling services, so students with additional requirements can participate fully in their chosen course. It’s a good idea to discuss your needs with regional support staff as early as possible – contact your OU regional or national centre (see page 32) for more information.

How much does the programme cost?

The latest fee information can be found on our website and is based on Department of Health benchmark pricing where appropriate. Go to www.open.ac.uk/hsc and select Nursing under the ‘Take me there’ function to fi nd the section on pre-registration nursing. You’ll fi nd further information and a section on fees.

Who pays for the programme, and how?

The employer or sponsoring organisation pays the fees. This is not always the students’ direct employer (for example, a Strategic Health Authority, The Scottish Government or The Northern Ireland Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety can pay rather than a specifi c hospital or Primary Care Trust/Health Board). We’re happy to negotiate over the timing of invoices and payments, so they fi t in with the sponsors’ fi nancial year and/or commissioning arrangements.

What if a student needs time out of the

programme?

OU study is very fl exible, so if students need a break from studying it may be possible to arrange this in agreement with employers, as long as students complete their studies within the seven years part-time study stipulated by the NMC.

If students do have to leave the programme altogether, they’ll still have valuable recognition for their studies because every stage is a ‘stepping off’ point which carries its own academic credit.

What to do next

Employers: if you would like to fi nd out more, please contact your OU regional or national centre (see page 32). You can also visit www.open.ac.uk/hsc, or email HSC-NP-Queries@open.ac.uk. We would welcome the opportunity to visit your organisation and answer any further questions you might have about the programme.

Students: if your employer isn’t involved in the programme already, you could get things moving by sharing this information with them.

Terri Edwards studied for her Diploma of Higher Education (Adult Nursing) while continuing to work as a healthcare assistant at Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust.

“As we progressed through this course, we received comments from nurses, doctors and students from other universities about how we appear to be better prepared to fulfi l the role of a registered nurse than students who have trained in the traditional way. We feel this is because the OU programme gave us the opportunity to implement theories and practice immediately, therefore consolidating our skills and knowledge.”

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14

Qualifications

If you’re a qualified health practitioner (such as a nurse, midwife or health visitor) with a diploma of higher education (or equivalent) or you have a completed foundation degree in a relevant subject area, you may be able to achieve a degree in as little as two years by studying courses worth 120 points at academic Level 3.

If you do not have a relevant diploma of higher education you can apply for credit transfer and we will advise you of an appropriate study pathway which will lead to a degree. We are now able to award 120 points at Level 1 for pre-registration nursing qualifi cations in England, Wales and Northern Ireland (if started in January 1986 or later). We offer three degrees suitable for healthcare practitioners:

• The BSc (Hons) Nursing Practice (B53) was developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and builds on their reputation for high quality distance learning. As part of our strategic alliance with the RCN, we are proud to present these courses designed for qualifi ed nurses working in the NHS and independent sectors. The degree has three pathways in child health, older people or generic nursing practice and therefore focuses on specifi c patient/client groups. Courses are made up of 20 credit points and students study six over the duration of the degree pathway.

• The BA/BSc (Hons) Nursing Studies (B47) helps qualifi ed nurses develop the skills and knowledge needed to meet the challenges of complex

contemporary practice and is therefore more generic in focus than the BSc (Hons) Nursing Practice (B53). This degree pathway may be of particular interest to practitioners working in community settings and learning disability services. Course options include public health, communication, management and project-focussed study. Courses are open access and attract a wide variety of learners. This diverse student community adds richness to the learning experience. • The BA/BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care (B18) is

for staff working in a range of health and social care roles. The degree profi le is very fl exible, with a wide choice of courses across health, social care and management. It is therefore more generic. Courses within the qualifi cations can be studied as one off, single courses as well as part of a degree pathway, and many of the Level 3 courses carry their own certifi cate, which can be awarded on successful completion.

Post-qualifying

Degrees

BSc (Hons) Nursing Practice (B53)

Nursing is a complex, highly skilled activity that requires practitioners to refl ect critically on and evaluate their own performance. Each programme pathway enables you to cultivate a person-centred approach to your work with patients (whatever their age), their carers and families. As you question your practice you will become more critical, refl ective and effective in your work, continuing to develop your nursing expertise in the care setting in which you work. Structured in 20-point courses which are studied over approximately 14 weeks, your studies will help you build on your current knowledge and experience and, in this way, encourage you to integrate new ideas into practice and infl uence others to do so. Using a range of materials, including practice-based activities and assignments, you will be able to promote and advance innovative nursing practice.

The three study pathways are organised so that you can choose a programme of learning that best meets your professional needs. You study three core courses and three others from a menu of specialist options (see

www.open.ac.uk/study for course choices and

descriptions – type the qualifi cation code (B53) into the search window).

“Over the course of my studies, which have sometimes challenged me to the limit, I have been encouraged to develop my leadership qualities and become involved in debating issues of national importance, enabling me to make my nursing voice heard.

Therefore the degree has not only been an academic voyage of discovery, but also one of mapping out my personal values and beliefs.”

Sabina Kelly

BSc (Hons) Nursing Practice (older people pathway)

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15

Qualifications

The programme structure

Core courses

Nursing: people, policy and practice (K330) (20 points)

and

Using research to develop practice (K331) (20 points)

and

Using evidence to develop practice (K332) (20 points)

BSc (Hons) Nursing Practice (B53)

Specialist courses

And at least 60 points from one of these specialist pathways:

Child health

pathway

Enhancing child health nursing practice

(K334) (20 points)

Making a difference to child health nursing

(K335) (20 points) Understanding the experience of childhood (K333) (20 points)

Older people

pathway

Developing leadership (K338) (20 points) Exploring ageing (K336) (20 points) Maximising older people’s potential (K337) (20 points) Promoting person-centred practice (K339) (20 points)

Nursing practice pathway

Developing leadership

(K338) (20 points)1

Enhancing child health nursing practice

(K334) (20 points)

Exploring ageing

(K336) (20 points)

Making a difference to child health nursing

(K335) (20 points)1

Maximising older people’s potential

(K337) (20 points)

Promoting person-centred practice

(K339) (20 points)

Shaping professional practice

(K341) (20 points)

Understanding and influencing policy

(K340) (20 points)

Understanding the experience of childhood

(K333) (20 points)

1You may study either K335 or K338 but not both.

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16

Qualifications

BA/BSc (Hons) Health

and Social Care (B18)

Designed for qualifi ed practitioners across a range of health and social care roles, this degree will enable you to develop a sound and critical understanding of policy, theory, and practice in health and social care. It will help you to develop as an independent and refl ective learner in the context of health and social care provision, policy and practice. You will examine the context and processes of change in yourself, in groups and in services, including new ways of working across agencies and practice boundaries. By the end of your studies you’ll be able to evaluate your own and others’ roles in the context of policy developments and engage in developing strategic solutions. You will recognise and value diversity and difference. You will also understand how ethical, legal, social, economic and political factors infl uence the provision and development of services, and you’ll have developed the critical and analytical skills needed to engage in the development of evidence-based practice. If you have a foundation degree in a relevant subject area, such as the Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care (G05), you can apply for credit transfer and you may be able to achieve this degree in as little as two years. To achieve the BA/BSc (Hons) Health and Social Care (B18), you need at least 120 points from the list below, including at least one of K303, K309, K311, KE308 or KE312 (see www.open.ac.uk/study for full descriptions of all courses):

Communication in health and social care (K309) (60 points)

Managing care (K303) (60 points)1

Managing health and social care (K307) (60 points)1 • Promoting public health: skills, perspectives and

practice (K311) (60 points)

Research with children and young people (EK310) (60 points)

Youth: perspectives and practice (KE308) (60 points) • Working together for children (KE312) (60 points) 1You may study either K303 or K307 but not both.

Post-qualifying

Degrees

BA/BSc (Hons) Nursing

Studies (B47)

This degree will prepare you to meet the challenges of providing nursing care within the complexity of a modern healthcare system. It will enable you to develop your refl ective and evidence-based practice, and equip you to develop the generic skills needed to critically challenge nursing care – taking into account the dynamic social, cultural, spiritual, legal, political and economic factors affecting care delivery in a particular context.

You have the potential to develop specialist, pathway-focussed approaches through the qualifi cation by combining Exploring practice (K316) with a specialist theme e.g. public health or management.

To achieve the BA/BSc (Hons) Nursing Studies (B47), you need at least 120 points from the list below

(see www.open.ac.uk/study for full course descriptions): • Communication in health and social care (K309)

(60 points)

Exploring practice (K316) (60 points) • Managing care (K303) (60 points)1

Managing health and social care (K307) (60 points)1 • Mentorship and assessment in health and social care

settings (K320) (30 points)

Promoting public health: skills, perspectives and practice (K311) (60 points)

Working together for children (KE312) (60 points) • Youth: perspectives and practice (KE308) (60 points) 1You may study either K303 or K307 but not both.

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17

Qualifications

What to do next

If you’d like to fi nd out more about our degrees, visit

www.open.ac.uk/study or contact our Student

Registration & Enquiry Service (see page 32). If you think you’re eligible to study for one of these degrees and would like to apply, please contact our Credit Transfer Centre at www.open.ac.uk/credit-transfer

“A well run and very interesting course. The subject material was relevant, up-to-date and easy to understand. My background in nursing and midwifery meant that all the concepts were familiar but I still learnt a lot that was useful for management practice, and not just in clinical areas.”

Toni Whitman,

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18

Qualifications

The postgraduate programmes in advancing healthcare practice have been developed by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and are now presented as part of our

strategic alliance with them. The programmes enable a diverse range of healthcare professionals to develop the qualities and skills necessary to meet multifaceted and complex healthcare needs, problems and challenges.

All entrants to the advancing healthcare practice programme are expected to be registered healthcare professionals and to have:

• a fi rst degree in a relevant subject

• a minimum of one year’s post-qualifying experience • access to a practice environment that can be clinical

or based in education, management or research.

Each stage of the programme is valuable in its own right. You can study for a postgraduate certifi cate or postgraduate diploma and stop there, or progress through to masters level study.

Post-qualifying

Postgraduate programmes in advancing healthcare practice

Progression route through the postgraduate programme

Postgraduate Certificate in Advancing Healthcare

Practice (C92) (60 points)

Three courses:

Change, policy and practice

(K826) (20 points)

Innovating in practice

(K821) (20 points)

Leading health care

(K822) (20 points)

Postgraduate Diploma in Advancing Healthcare

Practice (E46) (120 points)

Postgraduate certifi cate courses

plus

three additional courses:

Developing skills for practice

(K823) (20 points)

Designing healthcare research

(K824) (20 points) Conducting healthcare research (K825) (20 points) MSc in Advancing Healthcare Practice (F52) (180 points)

Postgraduate certifi cate and diploma courses

plus

an additional course:

Dissertation (60 points) – either a research project

(K800), or a practice innovation project (K801)

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19

Qualifications

Assessment

There are no written exams. Instead, you’ll be applying your learning to your workplace through a range of work-based assignments. For example:

• a critical analysis of a chosen policy associated with inter-professional healthcare and its impact on practice • a rationale to support a practice innovation

• a critical analysis of change agency, leadership techniques and strategies that could be used to achieve specifi c goals

• critical discourse on the ways in which a chosen skill might be developed

• a research proposal

• a year-long research or practice innovation project.

What to do next

To register or fi nd out more, visit our website at

www.open.ac.uk/study or phone our Student Registration

& Enquiry Service (see page 32).

Skills for advancing practice

While studying the postgraduate programmes you will: • use information technology to support scholarship and

professional practice

• retrieve, interpret and use data (qualitative and quantitative), information and evidence for strategic purposes

• work collaboratively with others in a range of different and complex contexts to advance practice

• manage uncertainty which is inherent in advancing practice and the development of scholarship • translate concepts into practice, using techniques,

skills and approaches that are timely, sensitive and well thought-out

• demonstrate self-direction and originality in tackling and solving problems.

These skills are transferable across both your personal and professional life and are generally highly valued by any employer.

Programme content

The programme starts from the premise that, although practice contexts and client groups vary, there are key concepts that liberate thinking about healthcare across all professional boundaries. Based on a comprehensive understanding of these issues, you will explore what can be achieved when practice is critically evaluated, and when creative solutions to practice issues are identifi ed. You will:

• adopt a more strategic approach to the services you deliver to patients and clients

• be able to address competing demands or interpretations of what should happen next • engage with and make sense of hotly contested

arguments about what represents advanced practice or quality healthcare provision

• lead others in ways that should enhance the design and delivery of healthcare services

• make informed choices about your professional development needs.

“My manager decided to nominate the innovative weight management group that I developed for the ‘chronic disease management’ category of the NHS South Yorkshire Health and Social Care Awards… and we won! The leadership course assignment was particularly relevant, as the assignment allowed me to look at how I could roll this piece of good practice out to other areas. The research and dissertation courses will provide me with a further opportunity to explore relevant issues.”

Karen Barrass,

MSc in Advancing Healthcare Practice (F52) student

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20

Courses

Courses

Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

We offer a wide range of courses, helping you keep pace with the fast-changing health and social care environment, to update and develop your knowledge and skills. They include:

• leadership and management • practice • mentorship • education1 • leadership • palliative care • mental health

• working with older people • working with children and families • life sciences

• public health

• the research of a special project.

We also have an increasing choice of short, fl exible staff development courses, specially designed for busy practitioners. They’re perfect for updating and extending your skills in areas like project management, leadership and mentoring.

1The Postgraduate Certifi cate in Academic Practice (H812), presented by the OU’s Institute of Educational Technology, has just received NMC approval for recordable teacher status.

What to do next

Our website is the best place to browse through the courses and qualifi cations on offer. Visit:

www.open.ac.uk/study for details of all our courses and

qualifi cations, answers to frequently asked questions, electronic copies of most of our prospectuses, and online registration.

www.open.ac.uk/hsc for information about career

development and study pathways in health and social care. If you’d like to be kept up-to-date with developments in CPD, please email us at HSC-Partnerships@open.ac.uk. If you’d prefer to talk to someone or would like to order copies of other prospectuses, please call our Student Registration & Enquiry Service (see page 32).

The OU is ideally placed to support continuing development and lifelong learning. In addition to our qualification pathways, many courses from our healthcare programmes can be studied individually as standalone courses, and you receive the same high standard of supported open learning that we’re famous for.

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21

Courses

Openings – Level 1

Starting with maths (Y162) (10 points)

(Openings course)

Mathematics, as well as being a fascinating subject in its own right, also underpins practically every aspect of modern life. Whether you are keeping tabs on a budget, tackling a DIY project, devising a formula for a spreadsheet or deciding how to present some information graphically, you’ll need to understand maths. You’ll be introduced to a range of key ideas (including using a scientifi c calculator effectively), which will help you to tackle everyday mathematical problems at home, work, or in your further studies. Case studies, activities, puzzles, historical snapshots and more recent mathematical discoveries are included, as well as advice on studying generally.

Understanding children (Y156) (10 points)

(Openings course)

How can you improve a child’s confi dence? What do children need in order to develop their self-esteem? How can being consistent, open and honest help to support a child’s personal growth? Understanding children is a course that focuses on children up to the age of 11. It follows a family and asks students to consider the choices and rights of the children as they grow up in the modern world. Unit 1 starts with what babies can do and how we can help make them feel valued and secure. Unit 2 moves on to consider how adults can listen more effectively to young children at home and at school. Unit 3 looks at the importance of friendships to older children and how much children of this age group contribute to family life.

Understanding health (Y158) (10 points)

(Openings course)

What is health? What infl uences our health and illness? How is health maintained and who is responsible for maintaining it?

Understanding health is a course that focuses on the health of individuals, families, localities and societies. It looks at how much people infl uence their own health, and how much it is infl uenced by our families, the places we live, and wider society. It looks at what we can do as individuals to maintain our health, as well as looking at how the medical profession and politicians intervene to try to keep us healthy.

Level 1

An introduction to health and social care

(K101/KYN101) (60 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: D67, D68, E40, G05)

We all depend on care services at some time in our lives – at home; in hospitals, clinics or GP surgeries; in community and residential settings. This course provides an up-to-date, authoritative overview of health and social care. Real-life case studies take you deep into the experience of receiving care and working in care services. Whether you’re involved in care work (paid or unpaid), use services yourself, or simply have a general interest, this course will help you to build knowledge and understanding, develop practical skills, and prepare for further study.

You can also choose to integrate an NVQ Level 3 Health and Social Care qualifi cation with your study of K101. There will be an additional cost for this. For further information, contact nvq-enquiries@open.ac.uk or visit

www.open.ac.uk/nvq

Course codes

Where multiple course codes are shown against a single heading, those including the letters ‘YN’ denote pre-registration nursing courses and those including the letters ‘ZL’ are the APEL (Accredited Prior Experiential Learning) access route options.

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22

Courses

Courses

Introducing professional practice

(K114/KZL114) (60 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: E40, G05)

This is the second of the Level 1 courses in the health and social care foundation degree programme. It’s a highly practical course that uses work-based learning techniques to enable you to apply the theory learned from An introduction to health and social care (K101) in your practice environment. It is designed for support staff working in a variety of health and social care settings. The course is offered in collaboration with your employer, and it includes a practice assessment that will assess your skills against the generic competencies specifi ed by the Health Professions Council.

Introducing professional practice and

knowledge (KYN107/KZL107) (60 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: B47, B53, D67, D68)

This course is the fi rst of four practice-based courses running through the pre-registration nursing programme. It is common to all branches of the programme. Applying your study to your specifi c practice settings, you will work towards professional learning outcomes. The course begins to establish areas of knowledge and competence in nursing, and addresses professional-identity formation. You will study a variety of material from different sources, make links between practice and theory in your own working lives, and develop accounts of how practice and theory fi t together in your work.

Level 2

Care, welfare and community (K202)

(60 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: E40, G05)

Why is care important in our daily lives? How does it relate to welfare more generally and the communities within which we live? This course offers you the opportunity to examine the different kinds of care relationships we are involved in, not only within families and between friends and neighbours, but also within the health and social care services. Bearing in mind the shifting boundaries between health and social care, the course examines the issues involved in delivering sensitive care and support

for vulnerable adults. You’ll explore who gives and who receives care; its history in the home and community; changing notions of welfare; theories and models of disability; assessment and planning; protection from abuse; quality of care; and developments in policy and provision across the countries of the UK. The course enables you to develop new learning skills and, if you work in the fi eld of health or social care, to evaluate your own and others’ practice.

Challenging ideas in mental health

(K272/KYN272) (30 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: D68, E40, G05)

As the title suggests, this course invites you to take a new and different look at mental health. It invites you to think differently about life’s dilemmas by taking account of the views of all concerned, especially people experiencing mental distress. Using a holistic framework, it explores ideas and practice in mental health; it encourages you to review your own beliefs and experiences; and to challenge yourself and others on a more informed footing. The course will appeal to a wide range of people – workers in health and social care, service users/survivors, their friends and families, as well as anyone with a general interest in mental health and distress.

Death and dying (K260) (30 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: E40, G05)

How has the way society handles death changed over time? Where do most people die and who delivers care to dying people? Has palliative care radically transformed end-of-life care for all dying people? What are the ethical dilemmas that make decisions about care at the end-of-life so complex and how helpful are theoretical explanations about grief to bereaved people? This course considers these and other questions that concern all issues of death, dying and disposal practices. It has been completely rewritten for February 2009 and is relevant to people working in death and dying and those with an interest in this fascinating topic.

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23

Courses

Diverse perspectives on mental health

(K225/KYN225) (30 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: D68, E40, G05)

What causes mental distress and what can be done about it? What factors in the external environment affect mental health? This course examines the ways in which social, environmental, economic and political factors shape and constrain our understandings and experiences of mental health and distress. It explores the wide range of diverse and frequently competing perspectives that characterise the world of mental health and looks at the impact of these perspectives on mental health practice and service provision. The course will appeal to anyone – lay or professional – who seeks greater understanding of this fascinating and complex area of service provision.

Extending professional practice (K214)

(60 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: E40, G05)

Extending professional practice is the second and fi nal work-based learning course in the Foundation Degree in Health and Social Care (G05). It enables you to develop as a skilled and knowledgeable assistant practitioner in your specifi c fi eld. This is a practice-based course integrating theory and practice in a way that is sensitive to your practice development needs and work context, allowing a personalised learning experience. The course is offered in collaboration with your employer and it includes practice assessments that measure your skills against specifi c skills performance criteria in addition to the generic competences specifi ed by the Health Professions Council.

NEW

Developing adult nursing practice

(KYN291) (30 points)

(Included in the following qualifications: B47, B53, D67)

This course is the fi rst practice-based course in the Adult Branch of the pre-registration nursing programme and leads to the Diploma of Higher Education (Adult Nursing) (D67). It enables you to develop your performance in practice, theorise practice and develop nursing skills. It also builds upon and develops skills of learning, including information literacy and ICT skills. It begins with perspectives on health and public health, moving towards studying increasing levels of illness and dependency. It is studied alongside Reflecting on whole lives: diverse perspectives on health and illness (KYN275) (see page 24) which develops the theoretical debate that underpins this nursing practice course.

NEW

Developing mental health nursing

practice (KYN293) (30 points)

(Included in the following qualification: D68)

This is the fi rst course in the Mental Health Branch for pre-registration nursing students. It provides opportunities for you to develop your knowledge, practical skills and evidence-based care in mental health practice. As well as introducing you to the concept of public health it also explores promoting mental health across the lifespan. Community mental health is a key feature of this course with specifi c reference made to the use of cognitive behavioural therapy in the treatment of mental health problems. Care and treatment options for service users and the application of mental health policy to practice are fully addressed.

Course codes

Where multiple course codes are shown against a single heading, those including the letters ‘YN’ denote pre-registration nursing courses and those including the letters ‘ZL’ are the APEL (Accredited Prior Experiential Learning) access route options.

References

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