PHASE I ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSMENT AND LEAD AND ASBESTOS SURVEY

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HASE

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BAYER NEIGHBORHOOD PARK AND GARDENS SITE

1550 and 1632 West Avenue

Santa Rosa, California

For: Royston Hanamoto Alley & Abey Mill Valley, California

Y9366.00.01289

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Y9366.01289.V2-10/5/09

5 October 2009 Y9366-00.01289

Scott Wilkinson

Royston Hanamoto Alley & Abey (RHAA) 225 Miller Ave

Mill Valley, CA 94941

Subject: Final Phase I Site Assessment and Lead and Asbestos Survey, Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens Site, Santa Rosa, California

Dear Mr. Wilkinson:

Please find enclosed our final report documenting activities and findings of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment and Lead and Asbestos Survey performed at the Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens Site in Santa Rosa, California. This report includes the findings of a lead and asbestos survey conducted by NorBay Consulting on 24 August 2009.

If you have any questions or comments, please contact us at your convenience. Sincerely,

Yane Nordhav Todd Taylor, REA

Principal Environmental Associate

Prof. Geologist No. 4009 YN:TT

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P

HASE

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NVIRONMENTAL

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EAD AND

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CTOBER

2009

BAYER NEIGHBORHOOD PARK AND GARDENS SITE

1550 and 1632 West Avenue

Santa Rosa, California

For:

Royston Hanamoto Alley & Abey Mill Valley, California

Y9366-00.01289

BASELINE Environmental Consulting

5900 Hollis Street, Suite D, Emeryville, California 94608 (510) 420-8686

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Y9366.01289.V2-10/26/09 -iii- TABLE OF CONTENTS page EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ... iv  1.  INTRODUCTION ...1  2.  SITE DESCRIPTION ...1 

3.  HISTORICAL LAND USES ...4 

4.  CURRENT LAND USES AND SITE RECONNAISSANCE ...5 

5.  REGULATORY AGENCY FILES AND DATABASES ...10 

6. LEAD AND ASBESTOS SURVEY ...14 

7.  DATA GAPS ...15  8.  FINDINGS ...16  9.  CONCLUSIONS...16  10.  RECOMMENDATIONS ...16  11.  LIMITATIONS ...17  12.  REFERENCES ...18  APPENDICES A: Lead and Asbestos Survey Report (Portable Document Format on CD ROM) B: Historical Resources (Portable Document Format on CD ROM) C: ASTM Phase I Questionnaire D: Regulatory Database Report (Portable Document Format on CD ROM) E: Qualifications of Preparers FIGURES 1: Regional Location ...2

2: Project Site ...3

3: Photographs From Site Reconnaissance ...6

4: Photographs From Site Reconnaissance ...7

5: Photographs From Site Reconnaissance ...8

6: Photographs From Site Reconnaissance ...9

8: Sites on Regulatory Databases Within One Half Mile of the Project Site...11

TABLES 1: Sites on Regulatory Databases Within One Half Mile of the Project Site...12

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Y9366.01289.V2-10/26/09

-iv-EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

PHASE I ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSMENT AND

LEAD AND ASBESTOS SURVEY

Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens Site

1550 and 1632 West Avenue

Santa Rosa, California

BASELINE Environmental Consulting (“BASELINE”) performed a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (“Phase I”) for the Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens site at 1550 and 1632 West Avenue (“Project site”) in Santa Rosa, California. The purpose of this assessment was to determine whether recognized environmental conditions (“RECs”) were present at the Project site as defined in the American Society of Testing and Materials (“ASTM”) Method E1527-05, Standard Practice for Environmental Site Assessments: Phase I Environmental Assessment Process.

The scope of work for this Phase I included: a review of historical land use information, including historical topographic maps, aerial photographs, and city directories; a site reconnaissance; a review of regulatory agency files and databases; and interviews with persons familiar with the Project site.

BASELINE subcontracted with NorBay Consulting to conduct a lead and asbestos survey for the Project site. This survey is discussed in Section 6 of this report and the complete survey report included as Appendix A. The survey was designed to determine whether buildings at the Project site that may be reused in the future contain lead paint and/or asbestos-containing materials.

FINDINGS

 The Project site was developed by the 1920s and was used as prune orchard and residence until around 1960, when the orchard was gradually converted to livestock operations. The likely historical use of agricultural chemicals has the potential to affect surface soils at the Project site.

 No stressed or damaged vegetation, stained or discolored surfaces, odors, or other evidence that might be indicative of a hazardous materials release from past or present land uses was identified at the Project site or adjoining areas during the site reconnaissance. The presence of three abandoned fuel and oil drums and the storage of pesticides, paints, and other common maintenance products suggests that hazardous materials were likely used at and near outbuildings at the Project site. Although not apparent during the site reconnaissance, historical releases, if they occurred during hazardous materials use, have the potential to affect soils and/or groundwater.

 A review of federal, state, and local agency databases identified six hazardous materials release sites within one-half mile of the Project site. Three of those sites are hazardous materials release sites under active regulatory oversight. Based on available information for

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-v-the three hazardous materials release sites, contamination would not likely affect subsurface conditions beneath the Project site.

 A survey determined that several building materials and surfaces at the Project site contain asbestos and lead. Based on the type of material and asbestos content, none of the building materials would be classified as a regulated asbestos containing material (RACM), requiring permitting by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) prior to demolition. Only one painted surface, a window frame on a barn, contained loose and peeling lead-based paint, and would therefore be considered a lead-based paint hazard under U.S. Housing and Urban Development (HUD) guidelines. However, Cal-OSHA worker safety regulations would apply to any demolition or renovation that disturbs lead or asbestos at the Project site.

CONCLUSIONS

We have performed a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment in conformance with the scope and limitations of ASTM Practice E1527-05 for the Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens Project site at 1550 and 1632 West Avenue in Santa Rosa, California. Evidence of RECs include historical cultivation likely involving agricultural chemicals and storage of fuel, oils, pesticides, and other hazardous materials that suggests the potential for historic releases to have occurred.

RECOMMENDATIONS

A limited shallow soil investigation should be conducted on former agricultural cultivation areas and around buildings at the Project site to determine whether residues of agricultural chemicals or lead from lead-based paint may be present in soils above relevant health screening levels. Drums and other hazardous materials containers should be removed from the Project site and disposed of in accordance with DTSC requirements. If evidence of a historic release is discovered during removal, additional investigation and remedial action may be required. Recommendations in the asbestos and lead survey report should be followed if buildings at the Project site will be remodeled or demolished. If the on-site well water will no longer be used, it should be destroyed in accordance with California Department of Water Resources requirements.

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-1-PHASE I ENVIRONMENTAL SITE ASSESSMENT

AND LEAD AND ASBESTOS SURVEY

Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens Site

1550 and 1632 West Avenue

Santa Rosa, California

1. INTRODUCTION

This report describes the activities and presents the findings and conclusions of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (“Phase I”) and Lead and Asbestos Survey for the for the Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens site at 1550 and 1632 West Avenue (“Project site”) in Santa Rosa, California. The Project site is owned by the City of Santa Rosa in 2006 and a portion is currently being operated as a community garden in conjunction with Landpaths, a local non-profit organization.

The purpose of this assessment was to determine whether recognized environmental conditions1 (“RECs”) are present at the Project site as defined in the American Society of Testing and Materials (“ASTM”) Method E1527-05, Standard Practice for Environmental Site Assessments: Phase I Environmental Assessment Process. This information is intended to assist the City in further development of the park.

The scope of work for this Phase I included: a review of historical land use information, including historical topographic maps, aerial photographs, and city directories; a site reconnaissance; a review of regulatory agency files and databases; and interviews with persons familiar with the Project site.

BASELINE subcontracted with NorBay Consulting to conduct a lead and asbestos survey for the Project site. This survey is discussed in Section 6 of this report and the complete survey report included as Appendix A. The survey was designed to determine whether buildings at the Project site that may be reused in the future contain lead paint and/or asbestos-containing materials.

2. SITE DESCRIPTION

The 6.73-acre Project site is located at 1550 and 1632 West Avenue, in an unincorporated portion of Sonoma County within the City of Santa Rosa’s sphere of influence (Figures 1 and 2). It consists of two parcels: the 0.89-acre parcel APN 125-381-003 (1550 West Avenue), which contains the northern portion of the community gardens site, and the 5.84-acre APN 125-381-004 (1632 West Avenue), which contains a residence, barn, outbuildings, and the remainder of

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RECs are defined in ASTM E1527-05 as “the presence or likely presence of any hazardous substances or petroleum products on a property under conditions that indicate an existing release, a past release, or a material threat of a release of any hazardous substances or petroleum products into structures on the property or into the ground, ground water, or surface water of the property.” According to ASTM E1527-05, the term “REC” is not intended to include de minimis conditions that generally do not present a material risk of harm to public health or the environment and that generally would not be the subject of an enforcement action if brought to the attention of appropriate governmental authorities.

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REGIONAL LOCATION

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1550 and 1632 West Avenue

Santa Rosa, California

Project Site

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-PROJECT SITE

Figure 2

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Project Site

Livestock Barns Garage Tractor Barn Brooding Shed Pump House Residence Elementary School - 3

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-4-the community garden site. The Project site is level with an elevation of approximately 135 feet above mean sea level (USGS, 1980). Based on Soil Conservation Service mapping, soils at the Project site consist of silty and gravely clays to a depth of at least 59 inches below the ground surface (“bgs”) (EDR, 2009a). Two groundwater investigations reviewed for this report, for sites located within one-half mile of the Project site, determined that depth to groundwater fluctuates seasonally, varying between about 5.5 and 14 feet bgs (McEdwards Group, 2009; SCS Engineers, 2008). Groundwater flow direction at these sites was measured toward the west-southwest, roughly following topography in the Project site vicinity (McEdwards Group, 2009; SCS Engineers, 2008).

3. HISTORICAL LAND USES

Historical land uses in the Project site vicinity were determined by reviewing historical topographic maps from 1944 through 1980, city directories from 1930 through 2006, and historical aerial photographs from 1953 through 2005, and interviewing the previous property owner. Sanborn Fire Insurance historical maps were not available for the Project site (EDR, 2009b). Historical land use resources reviewed for this Phase I are included in Appendix B. According to the former property owner, the Project site was first developed for prune orchards, which were present in the early 1920s when the residence and pump house were constructed (Bayer, 2009). After around 1960, the orchards were gradually converted to pastures and chickens, sheep, cattle, and horses were introduced to the site. Eventually, the orchards were completely removed, and aside from small plots of corn and hay, no crops were cultivated on the Project site (Bayer, 2009).

Topographic maps from 1944 through 1973 show small buildings along West Avenue and orchards at and adjoining the Project site. The first available aerial photograph, from 1953, showed a livestock barn, residence, pump house, and tractor barn were on the Project site in their current locations. Orchards were located north of the livestock barn, as well as east of the barns and residence. The southwestern portion of the Project site was vacant, with just one tree in a field. Orchards were located on all adjoining properties, with some rural residences to the west, across West Avenue.

By 1965, an additional livestock barn, the brooding shed, and the garage had been constructed at the Project site. Approximately 90 percent of the orchard trees were removed from the Project site between 1953 and 1965. Additional residential development was apparent on adjoining properties, replacing most of the orchard land, and the Shepard Elementary School had been built southwest of the Project site by 1965.

By 1971, all of the orchard trees had been removed from the Project site. Additional orchards on adjoining properties had been removed, and only small areas to the east and southeast of the Project site contained trees.

No changes in land use at the Project site were apparent in aerial photographs after 1971. The last remaining orchards adjacent to the Project site were shown replaced with residential development on the 1980 topographic map and 1982 aerial photograph. No changes in land use were noted on adjoining properties in aerial photographs after 1980.

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-5-The 1550 West Avenue address was not listed in any City directory reviewed for this report. Members of the Bayer family were listed for the 1632 West Avenue address (Charles F. Bayer from 1953 through 1965 and Dr. Edmond V. Bayer from 1970 through 2006). The first listings on West Avenue in the Project site vicinity were in the 1947 city directory. Addresses near the Project site were names, indicating residences, from 1947 to 2006, with the exception of three addresses: the Arbor Rest Home at 1518 West Avenue during the years 1958 through 1965, a chicken breeder listed at 1717 West Avenue in 1958, and Shepard Elementary School, listed at 1777 West Avenue from 1965 through 1994.

The historical use of the property for orchards and field crops is a potential source of shallow soil contamination. Most agricultural chemicals in use today quickly degrade into less toxic compounds. Some classes of agricultural chemicals commonly used in the past, however, such as organochlorine pesticides and inorganic compounds, can leave residues in shallow soils that persist for many decades. Inorganic pesticides, containing heavy metals such as lead, arsenic, and mercury, were commonly used prior to the 1940s. Agricultural use of organochlorine pesticides, such as DDT, was widespread starting in the 1940s before being banned for most uses in the 1970s. If these classes of agricultural chemicals were used at the Project site during historical cultivation, residues could potentially be present in shallow soils that could pose a health risk to future workers, gardeners, and park patrons.

4. CURRENT LAND USES AND SITE RECONNAISSANCE

Current land uses in the Project vicinity were determined by a site reconnaissance performed by BASELINE on 14 July 2009. The site reconnaissance was conducted to identify evidence of past or current use, storage, disposal, or releases of hazardous materials at the Project site and on adjoining properties. Evidence of hazardous materials releases that could be identified during a site reconnaissance include apparent odors, stained or discolored surfaces, and stressed or damaged vegetation. The reconnaissance was conducted by walking through the Project site, including building interiors, and observing adjacent properties from the Project site and public rights-of-way. The previous Project site owner was available during the reconnaissance to answer questions. The property owner’s ASTM questionnaire is included as Appendix C. Photographs from the site reconnaissance are included as Figures 3 through 6.

The Project site consisted of a community garden with barns in the northern portion of the property, a residence and several outbuildings in the central portion of the property, and a vacant field in the southern portion of the property (Figure 2).

The community garden area (Figure 3, Photo 3A) was divided into a number of garden plots. The central area of the property contained a residence and pump house (Figure 3, Photo 3B), a garage (Figure 4, Photo 4A), a tractor barn (Figure 4, Photo 4B), and a brooding shed (Figure 5, Photo 5A). The southern portion of the Project site was a grassy area, with some landscaping activity apparent (Figure 5, Photo 5B). No evidence of hazardous materials releases was noted at the Project site.

Behind the garage, three steel drums were identified, which were covered with blackberry bushes (Figure 6, Photo 6A). The property owner stated that these drums had not been used for decades and that the two 55-gallon drums were used for storing gasoline for the tractors and the smaller

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PHOTOGRAPHS FROM SITE RECONNAISSANCE

Figure 3

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1550 and 1632 West Avenue

Santa Rosa, California

Photo 3A: Community Garden Area in Northern Portion of Project Site.

Photo 3B: Residence and Pump House.

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PHOTOGRAPHS FROM SITE RECONNAISSANCE

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Photo 4A: Garage.

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PHOTOGRAPHS FROM SITE RECONNAISSANCE

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Photo 5A: Brooding Shed.

Photo 5B: Vacant Area South of Residence and Outbuildings.

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PHOTOGRAPHS FROM SITE RECONNAISSANCE

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Photo 6A: 55-Gallon Steel Drum Covered With Vegetation.

Photo 6B: Paints and Pesticide Storage in Garage (note red Ortho DDT container on top of paint cans).

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-10-drum, approximately 30 gallons in capacity, was used for engine oil (Bayer, 2009). No evidence of former spills was apparent during the reconnaissance, but thick vegetation prevented observation of most of the drum area

Hazardous materials storage was apparent in the garage, tractor, and brooding shed. Small containers of paints, pesticides, and other common maintenance products were located on shelves and on the concrete floor in these areas. Many containers appeared decades old, including a box of DDT pesticide, an organochlorine pesticide that was banned in the United States around 1972 (Figure 6, Photo 6B).

Adjoining land uses are residential, with the exception of the Sheppard Accelerated Elementary School, 1777 West Avenue, located across West Avenue to the southwest of the Project site. No hazardous materials storage or evidence of hazardous materials releases was observed adjacent to the Project site.

5. REGULATORY AGENCY FILES AND DATABASES

BASELINE contracted with EDR, Inc., an environmental information service, to search Federal, State, and local regulatory agency databases pertaining to hazardous material use and releases on properties at and near the Project site (EDR, 2009a). The complete environmental database report is included as Appendix D. Six sites associated with hazardous materials were identified within a one-half mile radius of the Project site in the database review (Figure 7 and Table 1). The Project site was not listed on any of the databases searched.

Only one site was located within one-quarter mile of the Project site, a site at 1730 Dutton Avenue with a registered gasoline underground storage tank (“UST”) (Site 1 on Figure 7 and Table 1). The remaining five sites were hazardous materials release sites, located between one-quarter and one-half mile from the Project site. Two of the sites have been closed by regulatory agencies, indicating that investigation and remediation of the sites is complete. Available regulatory files for the remaining three sites were reviewed to determine if releases from those sites had the potential to affect the Project site. Those files are summarized below.

Site 3 - New Roseland Area Elementary School, 1683 Burbank Avenue

This site is being evaluated by the Department of Toxic Substances Control (“DTSC”) as a proposed school site. A preliminary environmental assessment (“PEA”) was conducted at the site in late 2006. The potential sources of contamination investigated included former agricultural operations, lead-based paint from structures, abandoned junk, and petroleum released to groundwater from an off-site source. Sampling for the PEA investigation identified elevated polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (“PAH”), lead, and zinc in one sediment sample collected from a road-side sink-hole in Roseland Creek. Elevated lead was found around the house and garage structures (DTSC, 2009).

Six organochlorine pesticides were detected in site surface soils in a suspected pesticide handling area near to the residence: chlordane, 4,4’-DDD, 4,4’-DDE, 4,4’-DDT, endrin, and methoxychlor (Iris Environmental, 2007). Two organochlorine pesticides, 4,4’-DDE and 4,4’-DDT were detected in surface soil samples within the orchard. However,

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Legend

Site on regulatory database

Site on regulatory database with hazardous materials release under active regulatory oversight

Project Site Half Mile Radius

SITES ON REGULATORY DATABASES WITHIN

ONE-HALF MILE OF THE PROJECT SITE

Figure 7

4 5 6 3 1 2 3 1

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-12-TABLE 1: SITES ON REGULATORY DATABASES WITHIN ONE-HALF MILE OF THE PROJECT SITE

Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens Site

1550 and 1632 West Avenue, Santa Rosa, California

Site No.

Site Name/Address List Site Details

SITES WITHIN ONE-QUARTER MILE OF THE PROJECT SITE

1 Victor D. Newfield

1730 Dutton Avenue

UST One 550-gallon gasoline UST reported

at site.

SITES BETWEEN ONE-QUARTER AND ONE-HALF MILE OF THE PROJECT SITE

2 Jack Smith Glass and Sash

1050 Dutton Avenue

LUST; CORTESE

Release of gasoline affecting soil reported from UST at site.

Remediation completed - case closed.

3 New Roseland Area

Elementary School 1683 Burbank Avenue

ENVIROSTOR; SCH

School site investigated from 2005-2008 under DTSC oversight. Site approved for school under condition that lead in soils around two buildings and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contamination in Roseland Creek sediments be addressed prior to occupancy.

4 Fouche Auto Wreckers

2290 Dutton Avenue

CERCLIS; ENVIROSTOR; SLIC

Auto dismantler. Site evaluated by EPA and DTSC from 1988 to 2001. Release of gasoline affecting soil and groundwater reported. Case referred to RWQCB for remediation under SLIC program. Active site - site assessment underway.

5 Dutton and Associates

1850 Burbank Avenue

SLIC Release of diesel affecting soil reported.

Remediation completed - case closed.

6 B and M Automotive and

Truck Repair/Ray's Food Store 2423 Dutton Avenue

HAZNET; LUST; CORTESE

Site listed as generator of organic liquid mixture and empty container waste. Release of gasoline affecting soil and groundwater reported from UST at site. Active site - remediation of release is underway.

Source: EDR, 2009a

Notes: Site locations are shown on Figure 7

CERCLIS = US EPA database of known and suspected hazardous materials sites CORTESE = State list of hazardous material sites

ENVIROSTOR = DTSC database of known and suspected hazardous materials sites LUST = Sonoma County remedial program for leaking USTs

SCH = DTSC school evaluation program site

SLIC = RWQCB remedial program for non-UST related hazardous material release sites UST = registered underground storage tank site

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-13-only the suspected handling location contained concentrations of pesticides above screening levels (Iris Environmental, 2007).

A Removal Action Workplan (“RAW”) including excavation and off-site disposal of 40 cubic yards of lead-contaminated soil and a Land Use Covenant (“LUC”) restricting the impacted portion of Roseland Creek to non-residential use was approved in March 2009. The cleanup is expected to take place in March 2010 (DTSC, 2009).

Site4 - Fouche Auto Wreckers, 2290 Dutton Avenue

This site, which is in the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) Spills, Leaks, Investigations, and Cleanups (“SLIC”) remedial program, operated as an auto wrecking facility from the early 1970s until 2001, when cleanup of the site began. Several soil removal actions were conducted from 2004 through 2006, including the removal of the top 2 to 6 inches of surface soils at the site. A “no further action” letter for soils was received from the North Coast RWQCB in 2007, although quarterly groundwater monitoring continues.

Between December 2005 and November 2007, seven groundwater sampling events were conducted. During these sampling events, three halogenated solvents were identified in groundwater: 1,1,1-trichloroethane (“TCA”), 2,200 µg/L trichloroethene (“TCE”), and 1,1-dichloroethane (“1,1-DCA”). Sampling data indicates that the halogenated solvent contamination is limited to the Project site, and does not extend west of Dutton Avenue (SCS Engineers, 2008). Therefore, releases from this site would not affect the Project site.

Site 6 - B and M Automotive and Truck Repair/Rays Food Store, 2423 Dutton Avenue

A release of gasoline from a former UST at this site is currently being remediated under the Sonoma County Environmental Health Division Local Oversight Program. A total of 31 groundwater sampling events have been conducted at this site since July 1996. Total petroleum hydrocarbons as gasoline, and associated volatile organic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes have been detected in groundwater in each of these events. Sampling data indicates that the groundwater contamination does not extend beyond the property boundary, and is limited to an area within approximately 100 feet of the former underground storage tanks (McEdwards Group, 2009).

An oxygen-releasing compound has been used in wells since May 2005, but does not appear to have significantly affected groundwater contaminant concentrations. Additional remedial activities, likely to include removal of contaminated soils, will be required in the future (McEdwards Group, 2009).

Based on this review, none of the sites in the environmental database report would be likely to affect the Project site. The environmental database report listed 23 sites with known hazardous materials use and releases with poor or inaccurate address information in an “orphan summary” (Appendix D). Based on available information, none of the sites listed in the orphan summary is

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-14-located within one-half mile of the Project site and therefore would not likely affect subsurface conditions at the Project site.

6. LEAD AND ASBESTOS SURVEY

As the buildings at the Project site were constructed during the 1920s through the 1950s, there is a potential for lead-based paint and asbestos-containing materials to be present. Prior to 1978, lead compounds were commonly used in interior and exterior paints. Prior to the 1980s, building materials often contained asbestos fibers, which were used to provide strength and fire resistance. When lead-based paint peels or is scraped from a building, it can affect nearby soils. Demolition or renovation of the buildings at the Project site has the potential to release lead particles, asbestos fibers, and/or other hazardous materials to the air, where they may be inhaled by construction workers and the general public.

To evaluate the potential for lead and asbestos at the site, a survey was conducted at the project site on 24 August 2009 by NorBay Consulting, a Certified Asbestos Consultant. The complete report is included as Appendix A and is summarized below.

Asbestos-Containing Building Materials Survey

A total of 37 samples of suspect asbestos-containing building materials (ACBMs) were collected from the property and analyzed for asbestos. Six of the materials were found to contain at least a trace of asbestos:

 Exterior window putty on the residence and an outbuilding;

 Roofing sealant on the residence;

 Asbestos cement "transite" shingles on the back porch of the residence;

 9-inch vinyl floor tile in the mudroom of the residence;

 Plaster throughout the residence; and

 Drywall and taping mud in the second floor southeast bedroom of the residence.

All of these materials either were non-friable (could not be crumbled by hand) and/or contained less than one percent asbestos by weight. Therefore none of these ACBMs are regulated asbestos-containing materials (RACMs) regulated by the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD). However, demolition of these materials would require notification and registration of the contractor under Cal-OSHA regulations, and worker protection would be required during removal. The survey report recommended that all identified ACBMs be removed by a licensed asbestos abatement contractor prior to any activity that would disturb them.

Lead-Based Paint Survey

A total of 125 readings were collected of painted and glazed surfaces at the project site using an X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) device. The samples were collected in accordance with US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) guidelines.

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-15-Forty-seven of the readings were greater than 1.0 milligrams per square centimeter (mg/cm2), which is considered lead-based paint under HUD guidelines. These readings were identified on the following surfaces:

 Exterior wooden window systems on the residence;

 Exterior wooden door systems on the residence;

 Exterior wooden soffits on the residence;

 Exterior stucco walls on the residence;

 Exterior wood structural columns on the residence;

 Interior plaster walls in the mudroom of the residence;

 Interior porcelain sinks in the mudroom, kitchen, and second floor bathroom of the residence;

 Interior ceramic kitchen countertops in the residence;

 Interior plaster ceiling and walls in the kitchen of the residence;

 Interior older wooden trip including outdoor, windows, and baseboards in the residence;

 Exterior wooden siding on the garage and another outbuildings;

 Exterior wooden door on the garage; and

 Exterior wooden windows and doors on the barn.

Current HUD guidelines recommend that surfaces containing lead-based paint in damaged condition be addressed through abatement, while surfaces containing intact lead-based paint should be monitored, but are not considered to be lead-based paint hazards under the guidelines. Only the wooden window on the south side of the barn had loose and peeling lead-based paint; all other surfaces with lead-based paint were intact and in good conditions. However, Cal-OSHA regulations for lead exposure to construction workers would apply to all work where any lead may be encountered.

The survey report recommended that any renovation or demolition activities be conducted in a manner that would minimize the potential for airborne release of lead-contaminated dust. The report recommended, at a minimum, that surfaces with lead-based paint be wetted while they are disturbed and removed in sections, as feasible, to minimize the potential for dust emissions.

7. DATA GAPS

The ASTM Standard Method E1527-05 requires the identification of data gaps, along with actions taken to address these gaps, and an opinion as to whether these gaps are significant. Information sources at intervals greater than five years between sources from the present to 1940 or the first developed land use, whichever is earlier, can be considered a data gap.

The first land use data gap is from the date the Project site was developed to the first available land use information, which was the 1930 city directory, 1944 topographic map, and 1953 aerial photograph. Several gaps in historical land use resources greater than five years were noted from 1930 to the present. These data gaps are not considered significant because land uses were consistent between each data gap, and the former property owner was able to describe historical

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-16-land uses from 1944, when his family acquired the Project site, through the present. The property owner’s account was consistent with available historical land use resources.

8. FINDINGS

 The Project site was developed by the 1920s and was used as prune orchard and residence until around 1960, when the orchard was gradually converted to livestock operations. The likely historical use of agricultural chemicals has the potential to affect surface soils at the Project site.

 No stressed or damaged vegetation, stained or discolored surfaces, odors, or other evidence that might be indicative of a hazardous materials release from past or present land uses was identified at the Project site or adjoining areas during the site reconnaissance. The presence of three abandoned fuel and oil drums and the storage of pesticides, paints, and other common maintenance products suggests that hazardous materials were likely used at and near outbuildings at the Project site. Although not apparent during the site reconnaissance, historical releases, if they occurred during hazardous materials use, have the potential to affect soils and/or groundwater.

 A review of federal, state, and local agency databases identified six hazardous materials release sites within one-half mile of the Project site. Three of those sites are hazardous materials release sites under active regulatory oversight. Based on available information for the three hazardous materials release sites, contamination would not likely affect subsurface conditions beneath the Project site.

 A survey determined that several building materials and surfaces at the Project site contain asbestos and lead. Based on the type of material and asbestos content, none of the building materials would be classified as RACMs, requiring permitting by BAAQMD prior to demolition. Only one painted surface, a window frame on a barn, contained loose and peeling lead-based paint, and would therefore be considered a lead-based paint hazard under HUD guidelines. However, Cal-OSHA worker safety regulations would apply to any demolition or renovation that disturbs lead or asbestos at the Project site.

9. CONCLUSIONS

We have performed a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment in conformance with the scope and limitations of ASTM Practice E1527-05 for the Bayer Neighborhood Park and Gardens Project site at 1550 and 1632 West Avenue in Santa Rosa, California. Evidence of RECs include historical cultivation likely involving agricultural chemicals and storage of fuel, oils, pesticides, and other hazardous materials that suggests the potential for historic releases to have occurred.

10. RECOMMENDATIONS

 A limited shallow soil investigation should be conducted on former agricultural cultivation areas and around buildings at the Project site to determine whether residues of agricultural chemicals or lead from lead-based paint may be present in soils above relevant health screening levels. Sampling for agricultural chemicals should be conducted in accordance

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-17-with DTSC’s Interim Guidance for Sampling Agricultural Properties (Third Revision, dated 30 April 2008). For a site the size of the Project site, the Interim Guidance recommends 14 sampling locations, with samples composited into six samples for analysis for organochlorine pesticides (EPA Method 8081A) and heavy metals (EPA Method 6010B series). Additional samples near outbuildings where pesticides may have been mixed or stored should also be collected and analyzed discretely for the same compounds. Shallow soil samples should also be collected adjacent to Project site buildings and analyzed for total lead (EPA Method 6010B).

 Drums and other hazardous materials containers should be removed from the Project site and disposed of in accordance with DTSC requirements. If evidence of a historic release is discovered during removal, additional investigation and remedial action may be required.

 Recommendations in the asbestos and lead survey report should be followed if buildings at the Project site will be remodeled or demolished. These recommendations include adherence to Cal-OSHA regulations for lead and asbestos for construction workers, removal of identified asbestos-containing building materials prior to demolition, and work practices to minimize the potential for lead-containing dust to be generated during demolition.

 If the on-site well water will no longer be used, it should be destroyed in accordance with California Department of Water Resources requirements.

11. LIMITATIONS

This Phase I/lead and asbestos survey report is intended to provide an understanding of the current environmental conditions at the Project site. BASELINE’s interpretations and conclusions regarding this information and presented in this report are based on the expertise and experience of BASELINE in conducting similar assessments and current local, state, and federal regulations and standards.

BASELINE’s objective is to perform our work with care, exercising the customary thoroughness and competence of earth science, environmental, and engineering consulting professionals, in accordance with the standard for professional services for a consulting firm at the time these services were provided. It is important to recognize that even the most comprehensive scope of services may fail to detect environmental conditions and potential liability at a particular site. Therefore, BASELINE cannot act as insurers and cannot “certify or underwrite” that a site is free of environmental contamination, and no expressed or implied representation or warranty is included or intended in this report except that the work was performed within the limits prescribed with the customary thoroughness and competence of our profession.

The passage of time, manifestation of latent conditions, or occurrence of future events may require further exploration at the Project site, analysis of the data, and re-evaluation of the findings, observations, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in the report.

The findings, observations, conclusions, and recommendations expressed by BASELINE in this report are limited by the scope of services and should not be considered an opinion concerning the compliance of any past or current owner or operator of the site with any federal, state, or

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-18-local law or regulation. No warranty or guarantee, whether express or implied, is made with respect to the data reported or findings, observations, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this report.

12. REFERENCES

Bayer, Edmond V., DVM, 2009, personal communication with Ralph Russell of BASELINE, 14 July.

Department of Toxic Substances Control (“DTSC”), 2009, Envirostor database , New Roseland Area Elementary School (70000113), accessed July 22.

Environmental Data Resources (“EDR”), 2009a, environmental database report, Bayer Park and Gardens Site, 1550 West Avenue, Santa Rosa, CA 95407, Inquiry Number: 2530414.2s, 30 June.

Environmental Data Resources (“EDR”), 2009b, Certified Sanborn Map Report, Bayer Park and Gardens Site, 1550 West Avenue, Santa Rosa, CA 95407, Inquiry Number: 2530414.3, 30 June. IRIS Environmental, 2007, Preliminary Endangerment Assessment (“PEA”) Report, 1683 Burbank Avenue, Santa Rosa, California, June 29.

The McEdwards Group, 2009, Remedial Action Progress Report and March 2009 Quarterly Monitoring Report, 2423 Dutton Avenue, Santa Rosa, California.

SCS Engineers, 2008, Results of the 4th Quarter 2007 Groundwater Monitoring and Sampling Event Dutton Avenue Development Site 2290 Dutton Avenue Santa Rosa, California (APNs 043-041-001, 043-041-046, & 125-501-007), January 11.

United States Geologic Survey (“USGS”), 1980, Santa Rosa quadrangle, 7.5-minute topographic map.

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APPENDIX A

LEAD AND ASBESTOS SURVEY REPORT

(Portable Document Format on CD-ROM)

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