Press Releases PRESS RELEASE

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Press Releases

As you begin to develop and publicize your pay-as-you-throw pro- gram, coverage by local radio and print media outlets is likely. For MSW planners, this should be considered a public outreach oppor- tunity. At this point, you can provide local reporters, editors, and other news professionals covering your community with the key facts concerning pay-as-you-throw. This will help ensure that they understand the issues surrounding solid waste management in your municipality and why local officials are considering a pay-as-you- throw program--before they begin to develop their stories.

The most common way to accomplish this is to develop and submit press releases to local media outlets.

The press release should briefly describe the essential information about your program: what pay-as- you-throw is, why a change in the way residents pay for trash collec- tion and disposal is being pro- posed, and how residents can participate—and, if they reduce waste, save money—under the new program. Additional press releases can be developed later to announce other news, such as town meetings on pay-as- you-throw or any changes in the program.

You might also consider other ways to provide information to the local media, including devel- oping more comprehen-

sive press kits (in addition to press

releases, these can include items such as background

reports and newsclippings from other pay-as-you-throw communi- ties in your county or state) and conducting news conferences or briefings for residents about your program.

PRESS RELEASE

For Release: A ugust 1

5, 1996

Contact:

John Doe (7 08-555-5673) Department of Public W

orks Pay-As-Y

ou-Thr

ow Comes to Pleasantville Beginning October 1

, Pleasantville will be adopting a ne

w system of tr

ash collection and manage- ment called “pa

y-as-you-throw” that will help bo

th residents and the to wn save mone

y. While the recycling pr

ogram in Pleasantville has been a su

ccess, the amount of w aste the to

wn is collecting from residents continues to rise. The cost of disposing of all the w

aste in the landf ill used b

y Pleasantville is also rising. This has led of

ficials in the to wn’s Depar

tment of P ublic W

orks to sear ch for alternativ

es that w ould help r

educe waste acr

oss the community . What the

y have found is pa y-as-you-thr

ow. Curr ently, funding f

or trash collection and disposal comes fr

om the to

wn’s budget, which is suppor

ted by residents’ pr

operty taxes. Since r esidents are not charged directly for the collection and disposal of their tr

ash, the true cost of this ser

vice is hidden. P

ay-as-you-thr ow takes a dif

ferent appr oach. R

esidents under this sy stem are char

ged for each bag of w

aste the

y put out at the curb. This giv

es them an incentiv e to gener

ate less: the less they toss, the less the

y pay.

In this w

ay, waste collection becomes a f ee-based ser

vice, just lik e electricity

, gas, and o ther utilities.

This is f airer, because r

esidents ar e asked to pa

y only f or the ser

vice the y use. F

or the f irst time, r

es- idents ar

e in contr

ol of the amount the

y pay for waste collection. And since households will be gen

- erating less w

aste, the to wn’s w

aste collection and disposal costs also will decr

ease. In addition, r ecy- cling should incr

ease, because the mor e residents r

ecycle, the less w aste the

y will need to pa y for.

Participating in Pleasantville’s ne

w program will be easy

. Residents can pur chase special 3

5-gallon bags at se

veral different retailers in to

wn (a final list of par ticipating stor

es will be announced b y September 1). These bags will cost $1

.25 each and will be mark

ed with the city’s seal. Then r

esi- dents just place out tr

ash in these bags f

or collection. (Only tr

ash in the special bags will be collect- ed.) The ne

w system should begin sa ving mone

y both for residents and the to wn right away.

# # #

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Public Meetings

Town meetings and other public gatherings offer a good opportunity to introduce residents to pay-as-you-throw, discuss how it can help the community, and answer any questions that people might have. If you are planning such a presentation, you might want to develop an invitation flyer to promote the

event. (See Section One of this workbook for more information on planning a presentation on pay-as-you-throw.)

The meeting invitation can include information describ- ing the concept of pay-as- you-throw and its

advantages and letting res- idents know that their community is consider- ing such a program. It also can indicate that the meeting is being called not only to present the pro- posed program but to hear what residents think—

emphasizing that this input will

be seriously considered before decisions about the final program are

made. Be sure to include space on the invitation to list

the date, time, and location of the meeting, and invite residents to come ask questions and learn about the program.

Pay-As-Y

ou-Thr Presenta ow

tion

A Brief

ing on Pleasantville’s Pr

oposed Variable-Rate Pricing Pr

ogram

When:

August 2

2, 7:00 p.m.

Where: Pleasantville High School A

uditorium

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Newsletters

Many communities planning for pay-as-you-throw have developed newsletters to publicize their program. Creating and distributing a small (two- or four-page) monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly newslet- ter offers a chance to provide more information about your pro- gram than you are likely to get in the media. Newsletters also allow you to provide periodic updates as the program is developed—in many communities, the newsletter is launched well before program implementation—and help ensure that all residents are thoroughly aware of the program. You also can provide ongoing information about your program directly to the specific stakeholders you want to target.

Your newsletter can be used to introduce residents to pay-as-you-throw and clearly describe how the program can help both residents and

the municipality to reduce waste and save money. You also can use the newsletter to ask residents

for their input and provide them with infor- mation about how to participate before and during implementation. To effectively reach your audience, be sure to write the newsletter articles in clear, everyday language. In addition, resi- dents will be more likely to pick up and read a visually attractive newsletter. Refer to the Clip Art section, begin- ning on page 111 of this work- book, for a set of illustrations and mastheads that you can use when creating your newsletter.

In This Issue Pay-As-Y Throw Comes ou- to Pleasantville Less T 1

rash Is Good For the Environment Waste No 2 Want No t,

t 3

Recycling T ips5 Letters T The Editoro Haulers 6 Hotline

7

Pay-As-Y Thr ou-

ow Comes to Pleasantville

Beginning October 1

, Pleasantville will be adopting a ne

w system of tr ash collection and management called “pa

y-as-you- throw” that will help bo

th residents and the town sa

ve mone y. While the r

ecy- cling pr

ogram in Pleasantville has been a success, the amount of w

aste the to wn is collecting fr

om residents continues to rise. The cost of disposing of all the waste in the landf

ill used b y Pleasantville is also rising. This has led of

ficials in the town’s Depar

tment of P ublic W

orks to search for alternativ

es that w ould help reduce waste acr

oss the community . What the

y have found is pa y-as-you- throw. Curr

ently, funding f or trash col- lection and disposal comes fr

om the town’s budget, which is suppor

ted by residents’ pr

operty taxes. Since r esidents are not charged dir

ectly for the collection and disposal of their tr

ash, the true cost of this ser

vice is hidden. P ay-as-y

ou- throw takes a dif

ferent appr oach.

Residents under this sy stem ar

e charged for each bag of w

aste the y put out at the curb. This giv

es them an incentiv e to generate less: the less the

y toss, the less they pay.

In this w

ay, waste collection becomes a fee-based ser

vice, just lik e electricity

, gas, and other utilities. This is f

airer, because residents only ar

e asked to pa y for the service the

y use. F or the f

irst time, r esi- dents ar

e in contr

ol of the amount the y

pay for waste collection. And since households will be gener

ating less w aste, the town’s w

aste collection and disposal costs also will decr

ease. In addition, recycling should incr

ease, because the more residents r

ecycle, the less w aste they will need to pa

y for.

Participating in Pleasantville’s ne w pro- gram will be easy

. Residents can pur- chase special 3

5-gallon bags at se veral dif- ferent retailers in to

wn (a f inal list of par- ticipating stor

es will be announced b

y September 1). These bags will cost

$1.25 each and will be mark ed with the city’s seal. Then r

esidents just place out trash in these bags f

or collection. (Only trash in the special bags will be collected.)

PAY-AS-Y

OU-THR

N E W

OW

S L E T T E R

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Flyers and Brochures

Flyers and brochures are another way to provide pay-as-you-throw program information directly to households in your community. You can create a general flyer to introduce residents to pay-as-you-throw and its advantages or develop more specific versions that each focus on one particular aspect of your program (for example, procedures for purchasing bags or tips on how residents can reduce waste). Like newsletters, flyers and brochures can be used to deliver specific ideas about pay-as-you-throw to target audiences within your community.

An advantage to flyers and brochures is that they can be distributed through a number of different channels. They can be posted around town to advertise an upcoming pay-as-you-throw meeting or event, placed in stores and municipal

offices, or direct mailed to resi- dents individually with utility bills or in other periodic mailings. To help get your message across, try to design flyers that will attract the attention of your audiences. You can use the illustra- tions in the Clip Art section, beginning on page 111 of this workbook, to help create and assemble effective fact sheet

designs.

Waste Not, Pay Not

GARBA GE is a ser

vice just lik e electricity

, gas, and w ater. You pa

y for only f or what y

ou use of these utilities. Wh

y should garbage be an

y dif ferent?

It’s no

Thousands of communities acrt.

oss the United States ha

ve a new sy

stem f or pa

ying f or tr

ash pickup and disposal.

It’s called “P AY AS Y

OU THR OW.”

PAY AS Y OU THR

OW is a sy stem that char

ges r esidents for trash ser

vices based on the amount of w

aste the y throw away

. The sy stem is f

air to e veryone, and it puts you in contr

ol of ho

w much you spend on tr

ash.

Less tr ash is good f

or the en vironment.

Reducing the amount of w

aste y ou cr

eate can help:

lSave landf ill space.

lConser ve materials that ar

e used in manuf

acturing packaging and pr

oducts.

lRedu ce ener

gy usage in manuf

acturing and tr anspor

t- ing materials.

lPrevent pollution fr

om manuf acturing and tr

anspor t- ing materials.

lCurb global w arming b

y reducing the gr eenhouse gases that r

esult fr om some manuf

acturing pr ocesses and tr

anspor tation.

Less tr ash sa

ves y ou mone

y.

The fewer garbage bags or cans y

ou fill, the smaller y

our tr ash bill. In the past, you w

eren’t r

ewarded in dollars and cents f

or reducing, r eusing, and r

ecycling.

Now you can be!

Pay-as-y ou-thr

ow means w aste r

eduction counts. As y

ou take less and less tr

ash to the curb, y

ou’ll no tice the dif- ference when the bill arriv

es.

Less tr ash is good f

or the local econom

y.

Though y ou migh

t not realiz e it, y

ou ar e paying f

or your trash ser

vices no w. Your local tax

es pa y for tr

ash pickup and disposal.

It costs the community mor

e and mor e mone

y each y ear to pick up tr

ash. R

educing the amount of w

aste y ou throw away

will r

educe the cost to the community

. And that tr

anslates into less mone

y that y ou ha

ve to pa y as well. It also means that ther

e migh t be mor

e resour ces available f

or other community pr

ograms and ser vices.

TEN TIPS FOR REDUCING W

ASTE

1 Buy products with less packaging.

2 Buy products in bulk.

3 Use concentrated products, such as juice and household cleaners.

4 Buy reusable items, such as razors or batteries, instead of disposable ones.

5 Share items with a neighbor or friend.

6 Donate useful items once you are finished with them, such as books, supplies, furniture, or clothing, instead of throwing them away.

7 Rent items that you use only once in a while.

8 Find out what materials are recyclable in your community, and recycle them.

9 Compost food scraps and yard trimmings, and leave grass clippings on the lawn.

10Request that your name be removed from mailing lists and other sources of bulk mail.

Pay*As-You

* T h row

Figure

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References