1. Introduction Definitions Project Status Condition

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Contents

1. Introduction ... 1 2. Definitions ... 1 3. Project Status ... 2 4. Condition 5-1 ... 3 4.1 Risk Management ... 3 4.2 Environmental Performance ... 3

4.2.1Key Performance Achievements and Best Practice ... 3

Environmental Management System ... 3

Flora and Vegetation Health Monitoring ... 4

Feral Animal Management ... 4

Approvals Request and Ground Disturbance ... 4

Mine Closure Planning ... 5

Water Management ... 6

Scholarships ... 6

4.2.2Technological Environmental Management Improvements ... 7

Renewable energy alternatives – Stage 1 ... 7

Fauna Monitoring and Research ... 7

Flora Surveys and Research ... 8

Aerial Stringing ... 8

Speed Camera ... 8

4.2.3Environmental Management Applicable to Similar Projects ... 8

Dry Tailings ... 8

Rehabilitation ... 8

Approvals Request and Ground Disturbance Process ... 9

5. Condition 5-2 ... 34

6. Photos ... 34

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1. INTRODUCTION

This report has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of Condition 5 of both Ministerial Statement No. 805 (Statement 805) – Karara Iron Ore Project (KIOP) and Ministerial Statement No. 806 (Statement 806) – Mungada Iron Ore Project (MIOP). This conditions requires the submission of a Performance Review Report at the conclusion of the first, second, fourth, sixth, eighth and tenth years after the start of project implementation. This report relates to the conclusion of the second year and is a combined report for both Statements 805 and 806.

Both the KIOP and MIOP (hereafter referred to as the Project) encompass the construction and operation of a hematite and magnetite iron ore mine, associated processing plant and infrastructure, located 215 km east-southeast of Geraldton and 320 km north-northeast of Perth, within the Shire of Perenjori. A significant portion of the infrastructure corridor is outside the Project footprint and was approved under Clearing Permits. The linear infrastructure corridors, which have been constructed or are in the process of construction, accommodate the following:

 a portion of the raw water pipeline from the Yandanooka bore field;

 an access road from Morawa;

 a rail line between Tilley (located 5km north of Morawa) to the mine site; and

 a 330kV power line between Eneabba and Koolanooka, connecting the mine site. The work therefore does not directly relate to Statement 805 or 806 but is included in this report, where appropriate, for context. The Project and the linear infrastructure corridor are collectively referred to as The Greater Karara Project.

This report follows the submission to the Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) of the Compliance Assessment Report (CAR) prepared in accordance with the approved Compliance Assessment Plan (CAP)1.The report summarises environmental achievements in the annual reporting period, including risk reduction strategies, and industry leading technology and practice employed by KML.

2. DEFINITIONS

DEC Department of Environment and Conservation CEO Chief Executive Officer

KIOP Karara Iron Ore Project

MIOP Mungada Iron Ore Project

KML Karara Mining Limited

PER Public Environmental Review

1

Report – 111024 2011 ACAR MS 805 and 806 DEC was submitted and received on the 26 October 2011. Receipt was acknowledged by the Office of the Environmental Protection Authority (OEPA) on 27October 2011. This Report is currently under review by the OEPA.

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DMP Department of Mines and Petroleum

AR Approvals Request

GD Ground Disturbance

PEC Priority Ecological Community

EMS Environmental Management Systems

OHSMS Occupational, Health and Safety Management System CEMP Construction Environmental Management Plan

JHA Job Hazard Analysis

SEWPaC Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities

CRAW Construction Risk Assessment Workshop SBTD spider Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider

WST Skink Western Spiny-tailed Skink

HSEQ Health, Safety, Environment and Quality

GW Groundwater

3. PROJECT STATUS

During the reporting period, construction of mine related infrastructure continued with many significant milestones achieved.

The majority of the clearing required for the 376 towers for the transmission line was completed this year and tower foundations were established. Towers have been fully erected at many of the foundation sites and stringing via helicopter of approximately 10 km of the transmission line has been completed.

Construction of the raw water pipeline between the Yandanooka borefields and minesite neared completion during the reporting year, with all trenching completed in September 2011.KML also received approval for a Licence To Take Water for the raw water pipeline, granted under Section 5C of the Rights in Water Irrigation Act 1914.

Significant aspects of the railway construction included the rail loop and partial development of the sidings that will be required for product loading. The majority of the bulk earth works were completed for the 80km Karara to Tilley section of the rail line. All earthworks were completed for the construction of the rail loop and the sleepers and rail were laid.

Low scale trial mining activities for hematite are in their early stages on site. KML commenced mining of hematite ore atrial mining pits located at Karara South and Karara

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East, as well as the implementation of mining at Karara’s Blue Hills North pit.The trial mining allowed testing of logistics and transport strategies,whilst assisting in the production of approximately 1,300,000 tonnes of crushed iron ore for the calendar year.

A significant amount of construction for the processing plant and other mining related infrastructure commenced and/or was completed this year including the implementation of a crushing and screening plant at Blue Hills North, tailing storage facility and waste dumps. During the reporting period, disturbance predominantly related to land clearing for the construction of infrastructure (including roads, access tracks, rail and powerlines), exploration and clearing for mining activities (including pits, borrow pits and waste dumps). As construction continued to dominate the Project, rehabilitation to date has been minimal.

4. CONDITION 5-1

4.1 Risk Management

The success of risk reduction and impact mitigation measures and the results of monitoring related to management of the major risks and impacts associated with the Project have been tabulated. Please refer to Table 1.

4.2 Environmental Performance

KML is committed to utilising best practice methods in respect to maintaining high levels of environmental performance where possible and part of this continues to be achieved through investigating the viability of new technologies.

The progress over the current reporting period in 2011, including the use of industrial benchmarking and best available technology is described in section 4.2.1 – 4.2.2.

4.2.1 Key Performance Achievements and Best Practice

KML have prepared and implemented several management, monitoring and research plans and procedures in the current reporting period which have resulted in a number of key environmental performance achievements. These achievements are detailed below.

Environmental Management System

KML has implemented an Environmental Management System (EMS) which has been aligned to the AS/NZS ISO14001:2004 Environmental Management Systems standard. Meeting this standard ensures that environmental risks are considered in the planning phase and mitigated and monitored during operations. The functioning of the KML EMS relies on the integration of a continuous improvement cycle whereby the EMS continues to be internally audited, reviewed and enhanced to accommodate changes to activities or risk profile as operations develop. During the current reporting period, KML made some significant improvements to the EMS including:

 Development of an obligations register for operations;

 Completion of an Environmental Risk Register for the operations phase of the project;

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 Refining and completion of a legal and other aspects register for The Greater Karara Project; and

 Update and completion of an Environmental Policy for KML (over and above that of the parent company, being Gindalbie metals).

Flora and Vegetation Health Monitoring

KML have designed a monitoring programme ‘Flora and Vegetation Health Monitoring (KML-EN-PLN-1013)’ to conform to commitments made in the Flora and Vegetation Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1012) and to fulfil requirements of Ministerial Statement No. 805 and 806. The programme is designed to meet the objective of ensuring the health and longevity of the Priority Ecological Community (PEC) and other relevant vegetation and best account for activities around significant vegetation communities. The programme includes a monitoring schedule that addresses potential impacts caused by dust deposition, water overspray (from suppression activities) and altered surface hydrology in the disturbance footprint to significant flora and vegetation (i.e. the Blue Hills Priority Ecological Community). KML established and implemented nine vegetation health monitoring transects in July 2011; four of these being within the PEC at Blue Hills North. The five additional locations were established around the Project footprint in key locations adjacent to infrastructure. Monitoring at each transect includes photography and a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the condition of the vegetation2.

Feral Animal Management

KML has established a Feral Animal Management Programme to control the occurrence of feral species. KML engaged Animal Pest Management Pty Ltd to undertake a review of the methods implemented onsite and provide valuable knowledge and training to the onsite environmental team. This knowledge bank has resulted in an ongoing programme involving a regional approach. Analysis of stomach contents of the cats was undertaken to broadly determine the food source of this species to better determine management strategies3. Current data is enabling KML to establish a baseline. Statistical analysis of current and future data is planned to determine the effectiveness of the programme.

Approvals Request and Ground Disturbance

KML maintains a rigorous internal Approvals Request and Ground Disturbance (AR GD) process in order to limit environmental incidents by KML staff and contractors throughout construction and operations. This detailed process was designed to capture all approval requirements and formulate them into conditions of works. Aspects that formed these conditions included land access, significant environmental constraints such as rare flora and fauna, Aboriginal heritage sites and ecologically sensitive areas. The Ground Disturbance Permitting system is initiated when a need to conduct ground disturbing work and scope of works is identified by a KML Project Manager or Contractor. A request for approval of a defined footprint is submitted and assessed by the specialist environmental management team. Following the placement of appropriate conditions, the GD approvals team release a GD permit to a contractor and audits the works undertaken. Significant improvements to the GD process occurred within the reporting year including the following:

 Review and update of the GD Induction and progress with inducting all personnel;

2

Refer to PEC section of Table 1 for more information and results.

3

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 Completion of an improved AR GD Master Register which incorporates both desktop (desktop review, AR reviews, etc.) and site based works (GD release, pre disturbance inspections and post disturbance close out);

 Improved record keeping;

 Improvements to the GD close-out procedure; and

 Regular reporting to senior management on GD status.

Mine Closure Planning

Closure Modeling and Provisioning

Karara identified a requirement, and subsequently developed preliminary cost estimate for the establishment and management of rehabilitation and mine closure for the Project. The estimate includes progressive rehabilitation, final closure activities, monitoring and long-term site management, and does not include return on sale of assets or costs recovered from salvage of materials.

Conceptual reclamation and closure methods were used to evaluate the various components of the project to estimate the Asset Retirement Obligation (ARO) and Life of Mine (LOM) costs for the Karara and Mungada Iron Ore mining operations. Version 1.4 of the Standardized Reclamation Cost Estimation model (SRCE) was used to prepare this closure cost estimate, which uses first principle methods to estimate quantities, productivities, and work hours required for various closure tasks based on input from the user. This methodology is considered Best Practice due to the level of input data, the calculations, contingency considerations and practical applications of the model.

SRCE requires inputs cost data and user input data. Cost data is based on 2010 standardised industry unit costs for labour, equipment and materials. This cost data is updated annually. User input data describing the physical layout, geometry, dimensions of project components were obtained from the Closure Plan, AutoCAD and GIS information provided by Karara mine personnel.

The benefit of such a model allows KML to budget, monitor and assess the cost, quality and quantity of rehabilitation undertaken annually, to meet the stringent rehabilitation parameters set for the project by the West Australian government. The model will be run biannually to ensure changes are accurately captured and in alignment with the auditing schedule.

Closure Plan

A Mine Closure Plan (MCP) was developed in the current reporting period to guide KML in to determine the most appropriate mine rehabilitation and closure outcomes. The plan was developed in line with the Department of Mines and Petroleum (DMP)’s Guidelines for Preparing Mine Closure Plans and Administrative Closure Plans and applies to the activities of KML and its contractors throughout the life of MIOP (including the post-mining phase). The plan identifies strategies to reduce impacts to the post-mining environment through the application of appropriate and effective planning, design and risk management. The closure and rehabilitation objectives and strategies described in the plan addresses both planned and unplanned closure events, including temporary closure (“care and maintenance”), other than planned maintenance shut down events.

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Water Management

KML developed a Water Conservation and Efficiency Plan (WCEP) for the KIOP. The WCEP was developed in accordance with the Department of Water’s Operational Policy No. 1.2 – Policy on water conservation / efficiency plans.

The WCEP outlined the water use requirements, opportunities for improving water use and selected water use efficiency measures required by KML for current and ongoing operations. KML has continuously looked at best practice methods in the design of the KIOP and water efficiency strategies are implemented across all activities including dust suppression and waste management.

A key efficiency measure about to be implemented for the project is the use of dry stacked tailings over conventional tailings dams, which is discussed further in section 4.2.3. Dry-stacked tailings will reduce the project’s water requirements by approximately a third, ensuring that the project is one of the most water efficient mining developments in Western Australia.

KML has also identified water supplies close to the minesite for the purpose of low-quality water uses (such as dust suppression) and identified supplementary water supplies for the construction of the linear infrastructure.

KML is investigating or undertaking the following processes to minimise water usage at site:

 4 - 5 star water efficient appliances within the camps;

 Grey water reuse for dust suppression;

 Completed a risk assessment and preliminary design for the reuse of treated effluent from wastewater treatment plants into the ore processing circuit;

 Installation of sumps within the processing plant area to capture stormwater runoff and overspray and return to the processing water dam; and

 'Shandying' of the main water supply with lower-quality supplies close to the minesite, reducing pumping requirements and ensuring efficient water use.

Scholarships

KML launched its Mid-West University Scholarship Programme. The programme represents an opportunity for KML to develop innovative new pathways for students to gain a long-term career with the Company, helping to address the skills shortage in the region and provide new employment opportunities for residents in local communities. Six university students from a range of disciplines, including a graduate Environmental Engineer student from UWA, participate in the programme and are now transitioning into formal graduate positions within KML. Environmental Science students from Murdoch University (WA) were also offered the opportunity to be involved in land surveys identifying existing Malleefowl breeding sites. In conjunction with Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority, KML supported a third year UWA student to investigate the viability and germination requirements of seed from a range of native plants endemic to the Karara site. Modern techniques of seed assessment such as x-ray diffraction were utilised to gain early insight into the difficulties that KML may face with

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growing rehabilitation plants from seed. KML are now incorporating these seed testing and germination techniques into nursery trials onsite.

4.2.2 Technological Environmental Management Improvements

Renewable energy alternatives – Stage 1

KML have commissioned independent assessors to determine renewable energy alternatives to diesel gen-set power production, including assessing energy efficiency improvements available at the accommodation villages and administration offices. The assessment involved monitoring a 4 person accommodation block to determine ‘base line’ energy needs, as well as evaluating the levels of natural resources available at the site such as solar and wind resources

KML will utilise this assessment to implement a mining accommodation village renewable energy system incorporating various renewable technologies such as solar, wind and bioenergy power. The results of the Stage 1 power loading trial indicate that solar and wind technologies combined are a viable renewable energy and resource solution. The initial report and results will be presented early in the next reporting year to senior management. KML believes that this initial assessment will provide a significant improvement from standard industry practice.

Fauna Monitoring and Research

A number of technologies have been commissioned by KML in the reporting year for the use of fauna monitoring and research. Due to initial logistical problems of tracking and locating translocated Western Spiny-tailed Skink (WSTS), KML have recently employed micro-chipping technology to identify and track this priority fauna species. To date, KML have micro-chipped nine translocated WSTS and continue to conduct monitoring of these animals as part of a greater research programme aimed at developing a better understanding of appropriate management and conservation strategies. During the year, efforts to locate the micro chipped skinks were unsuccessful. The exercise proved worthwhile as it showed that the colonies are more mobile than anticipated which will assist in planning future monitoring events.

Following the success of motion sensor cameras in the monitoring of Malleefowl and their mounds at Badja Station (a former pastoral station leased by Gindalbie Metals Limited), KML recently purchased a number of motion sensor cameras to monitor active Malleefowl mounds in the vicinity of The Greater Karara Project. The cameras are solar powered and have the ability to immediately forward footage onto the KML Environmental Department via electronic media. KML believes this will not only provide valuable research on Malleefowl located adjacent to KML infrastructure and exploration, but also general research into Malleefowl mound formation and predator activity.

KML also utilised avian transmitters to monitor the movement and behaviour of two young Malleefowl translocated at Badja Station, after rearing. These Malleefowl were retrieved as eggs from mounds within KML’s approved disturbance zones and were reared offsite at the Yongergnow Australian Malleefowl Centre. The avian transmitters will allow KML to monitor the success of the translocation program. As the Malleefowl were translocated outside of the reporting year, the results will be discussed in subsequent reports.

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Flora Surveys and Research

KML commissioned the Botanic Gardens and Parks Authority to conduct a study into the possibilities of developing a bar-coding tool utilising plant DNA for rapid identification of Acacia species. The objective of the study is to develop a tool for quickly identifying many types of plant species in the future through DNA markers, thereby improving the efficiency and accuracy of future biological surveying in any environment. This research is in the preliminary stages and will be ongoing through the next reporting period.

Aerial Stringing

KML used aerial stringing via helicopter to install the electrical cable along the 330kV power transmission line. The use of a helicopter resulted in a significant reduction in the disturbance footprint, from 140 hectares down to less than 35, or 25% of the original expected clearing footprint that would have otherwise been needed to construct this infrastructure. This strategy reduced the clearing requirements for protected vegetation, saved significant habitat, prevented fauna deaths and reduced dust generation that is normally associated with land clearing.

Speed Camera

KML’s security contractor utilises speed cameras as one means of enforcing the speed limit on and around site. This aids in incident investigations as well as encouraging adherence by KML staff and contractors to the speed limits onsite. Maintaining lower speeds also reduces dust generation and prevents the potential for fauna death.

4.2.3 Environmental Management Applicable to Similar Projects

Dry Tailings

KML has incorporated a clarification stage into the overall ore beneficiation process. This process allows the dewatering of tailings resultant from ore beneficiation and the subsequent return of this wastewater to the plant for reuse, which greatly reduces the overall water requirements. The resulting tailings area dry, inert material that can be stockpiled and progressively rehabilitated. Dry Stack Tailings have been approved in KML’s Mining Proposal and shall be implemented in the next reporting year. These tailings are understood to be the first of their kind in Australia and will provide several significant environmental benefits, namely reduced water requirements by one third, improved rehabilitation potential, smaller total volume deposited to the tailings facility, reduction to overall footprint and disturbance area and a reduced potential for contamination through leaching within the tailings.

This innovation and the Dry Stack Tailings methodology will be applied to future expansion projects and KML will provide more details in subsequent reports once the benefits are formally quantified.

Rehabilitation

The KML research and development programme, specifically that pertaining to rehabilitation, is a significant opportunity to further develop and extend corporate, scientific and community knowledge and expertise in the fields of biodiversity and restoration ecology. The overall objective of this project is to develop a knowledge base and a suite of rehabilitation methods that enable the development of self-sustaining ecosystems on areas that have either been

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mined or are known to be degraded within the KML land holding. This could undoubtedly be applied to other similar projects and provides significant environmental benefits.

During the reporting year, KML conducted a research trial of assessing the techniques required to successfully translocated (transplant) over 90 individual Lepidosperma Sp. Blue Hills (Declared Rare Flora) plants which were excavated from an approved disturbance footprint at Karara Hill. To date, KML have had a success rate of approximately 50-60 per cent and the team is working to refine transplanting techniques to increase this rate.

Approvals Request and Ground Disturbance Process

As detailed in Section 4.2.1, KML has been actively improving its rigorous AR GD process in the reporting year, and remains the only company in the Mid-West using the process. KML has developed an ARGD online education package to supplement the process, which ensures that all employees and contractors involved in the process are aware of their roles and responsibilities.

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

Priority Ecological Community

(PEC) Ministerial Statements: Condition 6

Maintain a system to delineate area of work to minimise disturbance or loss of the Blue Hills Vegetation Complex.

KML’s Environmental Procedure – Approvals Request and Ground Disturbance (AR GD) (KML-EN-PRO-1004) includes several specific measures to reduce the risk and impact of mining related activities upon the PEC. This includes but is not limited to:

 Avoiding PEC areas when considering infrastructure areas and corridors;

 A visual map showing approved GD area, any adjacent PEC area including a 30m buffer zone;

 Specific conditions relating to PEC stated within the GD permit; and

 Completion of pre GD inspection, GD release, and post GD inspection forms.

The Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) has been continually implemented and improved throughout the reporting period. One incident involving a GD breach occurred during the reporting period. This involved an employee parking their light vehicle off the track for safety reasons, however, resulting in minor disturbance to the PEC. Since this incident there has been no other incidents involving the PEC due to regular monitoring of routine procedures. Additionally, the applicable employees and contractors were re-trained.

Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) Pre GD Inspection Form (KML-EN-FRM-1027) GD Release Form (KML-EN-FRM-1014) Post GD Site Inspection Form (KML-EN-FRM-1015) Event (Enviro – Incident) Report, 09 June 2011 AR and GD (Internal) Audits: March 2011 and August 2011 AR and GD (Internal) Audits complete. One incident relating to breach of Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004)

Specific activities that support the system to minimise disturbance of the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex include:

 Survey controls such as demarcation, signage and fencing;

 Site security which limits access to site; and

 Completion of pre GD inspection, GD release, and post GD inspection forms.

All contractors are educated on the process through specific GD training sessions, mandatory inductions and less formal awareness session such as pre-start and toolbox meetings.

No vehicle access is permitted to the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex other than on existing tracks and access tracks are

rehabilitated progressively to reduce means of access. In the event

Pre GD Inspection Form (KML-EN-FRM-1027) GD Release Form (KML-EN-FRM-1014) Post GD Site Inspection Form (KML-EN-FRM-1015) AR GD Induction Event (Enviro – One incident relating to breach of Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004)

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

that this process is breached, it is reported as an incident in KML’s online reporting system. An incident is subject to an investigation which identified both corrective and preventative measures. One incident involving a GD breach has occurred during the reporting period. This involved an employee parking their light vehicle off the track for safety reasons, however, resulting in minor disturbance to the PEC. Since this incident there has been no other incidents involving the PEC due to regular monitoring of routine procedures. Additionally, the applicable employees and contractors were re-trained.

Incident) Report, 09 June 2011

Minimise clearing and manage/control adverse impacts from mining and mining related activities.

This risk is managed as per the above as well as through additional specific flora management. KML has a Flora and Vegetation Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1012) and an Environmental Procedure – Flora, Weeds and Plant Pathogen (KML-EN-PRO-1009) implemented which includes measures designed to protect the PEC and the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex.

The Flora and Vegetation Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1012) contain details of PEC and specific management actions to prevent accidental clearing of the PEC. Details of intensive monitoring of potential indirect impacts from dust deposition, weeds, dust suppression water, and feral animals are also included.

Flora and Vegetation Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1012) Environmental

Procedure – Flora, Weeds and Plant Pathogen (KML-EN-PRO-1009) No significant incidents in relation to flora, weed or pathogen impacts from KML’s mining activities.

Manage adverse impacts from fire, weeds, disease and feral animals arising from operations.

Adverse impacts from fire, weed, disease and feral animals are managed through the EMS and the OHSMS. Specifically the CEMP (KML-EN-PLN-1001) provides overall guidance and refers to the Feral Animal Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1001) and the Environmental Procedure - Flora, Weeds and Plant Pathogen (KML-EN-PRO-1009). The Occupational Health and Safety Management Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1001) also provides overall guidance and refers to the Emergency Response Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1003) and the hot work permitting system (1000-HS-FRM-1023). These plans and procedures include management strategies such as feral animal trapping, vehicle inspections for weed control, engaging a contractor for onsite weed control and conducting emergency response drill exercises. CEMP (KML-EN-PLN-1001) Feral Animal Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1001) Environmental Procedure – Flora, Weeds and Plant Pathogen (KML-EN-PRO-1009) Occupational Health and Safety Management Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1001) One incident relating to breach of Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) within the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex. Impact to native vegetation was minimal.

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

Emergency Response Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1003)

Vehicle And Mobile Equipment Weed Inspection Form (1000-EN-FRM-1009) Karara Iron Ore Hot Work Permit (1000-HS-FRM-1023) Fauna Register Prior to work commencing, risk assessments and/or JHAs are

performed to mitigate and manage operational risks. This ensures that task based risks are considered and mitigated as much as possible prior to undertaking the specific operational task.

Construction Risk Assessment

Workshops (CRAWs)

During the year, 26 CRAWs were completed.

Weeds and flora pathogen impacts are managed with the use of designated washdown areas/facilities. Prior to entering site all machinery is inspected for weed and seed. If work is to be conducted in known weed areas, vehicles are regularly washed down and inspected.

KML implemented a Weed Control/Spraying Program and Weed Monitoring during the reporting year.

Vehicle And Mobile Equipment Weed Inspection Form (1000-EN-FRM-1009) Weed Management Register 2011 Weed Monitoring commenced during the reporting year.

KML has established a Feral Animal Management Program to control the occurrence of feral species which includes targeted trapping. KML also maintains records of feral sightings and feral trapping results.

Feral sightings are required to be reported and are recorded in a Fauna Register. Incidents involving feral animals are recorded in the INX system. KML engaged Animal Pest Management Services during the reporting year to conduct intensive feral animal

eradication, specifically targeting feral cats. Analysis of the stomach contents was also undertaken to determine the food source of feral

Fauna Sighting and Mortality Form (KML-EN-FRM-1045) Fauna Register During the reporting year, 15 feral species (8 foxes and 7 cats) were trapped. Gut contents of feral cats captured (n=2):  2 mammals

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

species captured.  0 rabbits

 1 bird  0 reptiles  2 insects  0 carrions  1 plant  0 food scraps  0 empty stomach

Restrict access to areas that support the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex.

Various procedures, such as the Traffic Management Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1008), have been implemented to restrict access to the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex.

All employees and Contractors are educated on the process through specific GD training sessions, mandatory inductions and less formal awareness session such as pre-start and toolbox meetings. No vehicle access is permitted to the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex other than on existing tracks and access tracks are

rehabilitated progressively to reduce means of access. In the event that this process is breached, it is reported as an incident in KML’s online reporting system. An incident is subject to an investigation which identified both corrective and preventative measures. One incident involving a GD breach has occurred during the reporting period. This involved an employee parking their light vehicle off the track for safety reasons, however, resulting in minor disturbance to the PEC. Since this incident there has been no other incidents involving the PEC due to regular monitoring of routine procedures. Additionally, the applicable employees and contractors were re-trained. Traffic Management Plan(1000-HS-PLN-1008) Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) One incident relating to breach of Environmental Procedure - AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) within the Blue Hills (PEC) Vegetation Complex. Impact to native vegetation was minimal.

Monitor impacts from dust, saline water for dust control, fire and feral species on the Blue Hills complex.

KML conduct dust monitoring as required by the Environmental Procedure – Dust Management (KML-EN-PRO-1005). The monitoring includes:

 Dust deposition is monitored monthly from recording stations located around the site and is sent to an external labs for analyses; and

 E-BAM dust monitoring (including a weather station) data is

Dust Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1011) Environmental Procedure – Dust Management (KML-No reportable dust deposition exceedences. Various feral sightings have been reported

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

maintained be the KML site Environmental personnel. The requirement for immediate dust control measures in specific locations can then be communicated to Contractors.

KML benchmarks dust levels against criteria from the National Environmental Protection Measures, World Health Organisation and the EPA. In the event of an exceedance, KML investigates the cause and the appropriate mitigation strategies are implemented. KML has developed and implemented a Water Monitoring Program. Water quality sampling is conducted at all Turkey’s nests onsite to ensure the quality of water used for dust suppression is within the guidelines of the Environmental Procedure – Dust Management (KML-EN-PRO-1005). Where an exceedance of the guidelines is identified, water cannot be used for dust suppression until it is mixed with a non-saline water source and the levels are within the

specified guidelines. Saline water use is also reduced through the use of dribble bar water carts instead of the less efficient spray alternatives.

KML manages the risks of fire onsite through a Fire Control and Mitigation Strategy. Burning of vegetation materials is not permitted. KML also maintains an Emergency Response Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1003) which includes bushfire management. KML and Contractors periodically conduct drills against the Emergency Management Plan. KML have designed a monitoring programme ‘Flora and Vegetation Health Monitoring (KML-EN-PLN-1013)’ to conform to commitments made in the Flora and Vegetation Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1012). The monitoring addresses potential impacts caused by dust depositions, dust suppression water overspray and altered surface hydrology on flora and vegetation. KML established and

implemented four vegetation health monitoring transects for the Priority Ecological Community (PEC) during the reporting year. Vegetation health monitoring at five additional locations was also established around the project footprint.

Feral sightings are required to be reported and are recorded in a Fauna Register. Incidents involving feral animals are recorded in the INX system.

To date KML believes these efforts will aid in the determination that they have successfully managed this risk and impacts are being

EN-PRO-1005) Flora and Vegetation Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1012) Water Monitoring Program

Turkeys Nest Water Monitoring

Fire Control and Mitigation Strategy (KML-EN-PRO-1022) Emergency Response Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1003)

Flora and Vegetation Health Monitoring Program Design and Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1013) Feral Animal Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1010) Fauna Register including foxes, cats, goats, rabbits and wild dogs.

As the Flora and Vegetation Health Monitoring program is still in its infancy, results to date are inconclusive. During the reporting year, two fires were reported. These were not located in PEC.

Water results for all bored are annually submitted to Department of Water (DoW). KML maintains a register of monitoring results from turkey nests.

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

adequately monitored although it is too early in the project to conclude any further.

Groundwater Dependent

Vegetation Ministerial Statements: Condition 7

Ensure GW abstraction does not adversely affect GW supporting Gilgai.

An assessment conducted by Soil Water Consultants (on behalf of KML) has confirmed that the potential groundwater dependent vegetation (Gilgai) is not groundwater dependent.

During the reporting year, KML submitted a Section 46 to the OEPA with the details of the report and to seek removal of the associated conditions from the ministerial statement. Notwithstanding this, KML continues to monitor the groundwater and has established trigger levels. Section 46 Application, Removal of Condition 7, Ministerial Statements No 805 and 806 (29 July 2011) Groundwater Monitoring Procedure GDE Investigation for the Drainage

Depression

(previously referred to as the ‘Gilgai’ area) at the proposed Karara minesite. Prepared by Soil Water

Consultants, 2009 Ongoing groundwater level monitoring at the Drainage Depression To date, KML has not observed any change in depth to groundwater, reflecting impact from abstraction in the drainage depression. Develop GW trigger levels

and contingency prior to implementation of proposal.

Monitor GW levels near Gilgai against trigger levels.

Monitor the health and condition of vegetation in the Gilgai formation.

An assessment conducted by Soil Water Consultants (on behalf of KML) has confirmed that the potential groundwater dependent vegetation (Gilgai) is not groundwater dependent.

During the reporting year, KML submitted a Section 46 with the details of the report and to seek removal of the associated

conditions from the ministerial statement. As a result, KML did not conduct monitoring of the health and condition of vegetation in the Gilgai formations during the reporting year.

Section 46 Application, Removal of Condition 7, Ministerial Statements No 805 and 806 (29 July 2011)

GDE Investigation for the Drainage

Depression

(previously referred to as the ‘Gilgai’ area) at the proposed Karara mine site. Prepared by Soil Water Consultants, 2009

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

Fauna Protection from

Trenches Ministerial Statements: Condition 8

Limit the length of any continuous open trench for pipelines to a max of 2.5km at any time.

The Contractor is contractually bound to ensure trench requirements are met. The risks associated with fauna in trenches were

addressed in the CRAW prior to the commencement of work and incorporated into the Contractors Environmental Management Plan. KML worked with the Contractors to limit the length of any

continuous open trench for pipelines to a maximum of 2.5km. KML conducted scheduled audits against the Daily Trench Inspection Forms (1000-HS-FRM-1059) during the reporting year. Where audits identified areas of non-compliance, corrective actions were implemented.

Daily Trench Safety and Environmental Report Form (1000-HS-FRM-1059) Environmental Audits – Trench (Internal), January 2011, February 2011, May 2011 and June 2011 Daily Trench Safety and Environmental inspections complete. Trench (Internal) Audits complete.

Fauna refuges and ramps not more than 50m intervals.

The Contractor is contractually bound to ensure trench requirements are met, including fauna refuges and ramps at 50m intervals. The risks associated with fauna in trenches were addressed in the

CRAW prior to the commencement of work and incorporated into the Contractors Environmental Management Plan.

KML conducted scheduled audits against the Daily Trench

Inspection Forms (1000-HS-FRM-1059) during the reporting year. Where audits identified areas of non-compliance, corrective actions were implemented.

Daily Trench Safety and Environmental Report Form (1000-HS-FRM-1059) Environmental Audits – Trench (Internal), January 2011, February 2011, May 2011 and June 2011 Daily Trench Safety and Environmental inspections complete. Trench (Internal) Audits complete. Internal Trench Audit results indicate a breach of this condition on 2 occasions. KML worked with the Contractor to rectify this.

Employ at least 2 qualified fauna handlers (obtain fauna handling licences from the DEC).

The Contractor is contractually bound to ensure trench requirements are met, including the employment of at least 2 qualified fauna handlers. The risks associated with fauna in trenches were addressed in the CRAW prior to the commencement of work and incorporated into the Contractors Environmental Management Plan.

Environmental Audits – Trench (Internal), January 2011, February 2011, May 2011 and June 2011 KML worked with the DEC and the Contractor during the reporting year to obtain the necessary Regulation 15 Licences for the Contractor and KML to fulfil this

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

condition.

Inspection and removal of fauna to occur twice a day and within half an hour prior to backfilling. First daily inspection to occur no later than 3.5 hours after sun rise and the second between the hours of 3pm and 6pm.

The Contractor is contractually bound to ensure trench requirements are met, including inspection of the trench and removal of fauna at the applicable timeframes. The risks associated with fauna in trenches were addressed in the CRAW prior to the commencement of work and incorporated into the Contractors Environmental Management Plan.

The Contractors are required to complete a Daily Trench Inspection Form (1000-HS-FRM-1059) within the applicable timeframes and submit these to the KML Environment Department.

Daily Trench Safety and Environmental Report Form (1000-HS-FRM-1059) Environmental Audits – Trench (Internal), January 2011, February 2011, May 2011 and June 2011 Daily Trench Safety and Environmental inspections complete. Trench (Internal) Audits complete. During the reporting year, KML received non-compliance from the Office of the Environmental Protection Authority relating to the inspection of trenches during the applicable timeframes. KML worked with the Contractor to ensure corrective actions were implemented.

In the event of significant rainfall, following the removal of fauna, pump out

excessive rain, discharge via mesh to adjacent area.

The Contractor is contractually bound to ensure trench requirements are met, including in the event of significant rainfall, following the removal of fauna, pump out excessive rain, and discharge via mesh to adjacent area. The risks associated with fauna in trenches were addressed in the CRAW prior to the commencement of work and incorporated into the Contractors Environmental Management Plan. KML conducted scheduled audits against the Daily Trench

Inspection Forms (1000-HS-FRM-1059) during the reporting year. Where audits identified areas of non-compliance, corrective actions were implemented.

Daily Trench Safety and Environmental Report Form (1000-HS-FRM-1059) Environmental Audits – Trench (Internal), January 2011, February 2011, May 2011 and June 2011 Daily Trench Safety and Environmental inspections complete. Trench (Internal) Audits complete.

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

Within 14 days of the completion of the pipeline, provide a report to the CEO on removed fauna and fauna deaths.

KML completed the construction of the pipeline, following the necessary integrity testing on 20 October 2011. KML submitted a report to the CEO detailing the removed fauna and fauna deaths on 26 October 2011. Letter ‘Ministerial Statement 805 and 806, Condition 8.6 Pipeline Corridor Completion Fauna Report’ to the CEO, 26 October 2011 Report submitted within 14 days of the completion of the pipeline. During construction, 278 individuals were removed from a trench. One injured kangaroo was not able to be rescued from a trench.

Spider Monitoring Ministerial Statements: Condition 9

Prior to disturbance activities implement a spider

monitoring program for population in proposed pit and in control areas.

KML has implemented a SBTD spider Monitoring Procedure (KML-EN-PRO-1025). KML monitors spider borrows in the established quadrats on an annual basis.

This Procedure was submitted to and approved by DEC.

Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider: Management and Monitoring Procedure, September 2009 (KML-EN-PRO-1025) SBTD spider annual monitoring was complete in August 2011. Monitoring program to demonstrate the persistence of the population in Blue Hills will not be impacted as a result of the proposal and improve knowledge of the ecology and impacts of proposal on the SBTD spider.

This reporting year, the SBTD spider annual monitoring was completed at Blue Hills, as well as at Mungada, Karara and Terapod. This monitoring focused on the following parameters:

 Internal diameter of the burrow;

 Whether or not it was active (based on presence of a well-maintained door, presence of twig-lining, the burrow being free of debris and sighting of the spider); and

 Whether the spider was seen with a milliscope and if so, at what depth.

At Karara, 51 of 98 burrows were relocated; at Mungada, 80 of 156 burrows were relocated; at Terapod, 46 of 78 burrows were

relocated; and at Blue Hills North, 49 of 73 burrows were relocated. There were 18, 7, 15 and 6 new burrows identified and measured in 2011 at Karara, Mungada, Terapod and Blue Hills North

Bamford Summary Report, ‘Monitoring Survey of the Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider in the Karara Iron Ore Project area: Summary of survey conducted in August 2011.’ Report: Review of distribution and abundance of the Shield-backed

trapdoor Spider in the Karara Iron Ore Project area: surveys

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

respectively.

Good rainfall over the year meant the wildflowers were prolific and it is possible that burrows may have been camouflaged despite intense searching. It will be possible to search for these burrows again in the 2012 survey.

KML has commissioned Bamford Consulting Ecologists to conduct numerous spider surveys across The Greater Karara Project area and spider burrows have been recorded in 13 ironstone ridges. In general, the number of active burrows per ha of suitable habitat was between 250 and 300 burrows suggesting that the distribution is fairly consistent across the sites surveyed.

conducted from 2007 to August 2011. Bamford Consulting Ecologists, 3 October 2011 Monitor changes in population in terms of number and size of areas inhabited by spiders;

number, size and distribution of burrows in occupied areas; and number of burrows occupied by spiders.

This reporting year, the SBTD spider annual monitoring was complete. This monitoring focused on the following parameters:

 Internal diameter of the burrow;

 Whether or not it was active (based on presence of a well-maintained door, presence of twig-lining, the burrow being free of debris and sighting of the spider);

 Plant species it was utilizing for its fan;

 Whether the spider was seen with a milliscope and, if so, at what depth; and

 Habitat by examining vegetation and soil type.

This reporting year, the annual Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider Impact Monitoring was complete. Approximately 60% of borrows identified in 2010 were relocated in 2011.

Preliminary findings were that burrows either stayed the same size or increased in diameter.

The total number of active spider burrows known in the KIOP area is 1,365. The extent of occupied habitat at Karara was 240 hectare with an estimated population size of 72,000. The population at Mungada ridge was estimated to be 19,000. Analysis of the surveys conducted from 2007 has identified likely under reporting of burrows and therefore spider populations in previous years due to smaller burrows being overlooked. The review also describes the spiders as

Bamford Summary Report, ‘Monitoring Survey of the Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider in the Karara Iron Ore Project area: Summary of survey conducted in August 2011.’ Report: Review of distribution and abundance of the Shield-backed

trapdoor Spider in the Karara Iron Ore Project area: surveys conducted from 2007 to August 2011. Bamford Consulting Ecologists, 3 October 2011

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

occurring in the KIOP area in higher abundance than previously expected. In addition, survey results indicate that the density of SBTD spiders in the Greater Karara Project area is 293 per hectare which is significantly higher than that of the initial estimation of 0.5 per hectare.

Submit monitoring results annually to the DEC.

These results will be submitted to the DEC following the finalisation of the report by Bamford Consulting.

Nil. Nil.

Fauna Mortality Register Ministerial Statements: Condition 10

Prepare and implement strategies to avoid fauna deaths in areas of mining or mining related activities.

KML has successfully prepared and implemented strategies to avoid fauna deaths in the areas of mining or mining related activities. This includes, but not limited to:

 Minimisation of habitat loss through design and habitat connectivity through the inclusion of habitat corridors;

 Inductions, training and education (Toolbox meetings and educational posters) to address fauna protection requirements;

 Construction and maintenance of foundation holes, excavations, trenches and turkey nests;

 GD permits prior to any ground disturbing work;

 Risk assessments and JHA’s;

 Signage;

 Prevention of feral animals;

 Dust minimisation;

 Fire prevention and control strategies;

 Weed control and management;

 Noise and vibration minimisation;

 Traffic management including restricted speed limits, road widening and speed cameras/radars;

 Specific management for conservation significant fauna;

 Reporting of conservation significant fauna deaths; and

 Rehabilitation of sites as soon as practicable.

CEMP (KML-EN-PLN-1001)

Fauna Environmental Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1009) Flora, Weed and Plant Pathogen Management Plan (KML-EN-PRO-1009) Traffic Management Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1008) Feral Animal Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1010) Environmental Procedure - Terrestrial Fauna Management (KML-EN-PRO-1010) This reporting year;  71 fauna deaths, including; o 5Malleefowl deaths.  203 other conservation significant fauna sightings  15 feral trappings and disposal; comprising. o 7 cats; and o 8 foxes.  53 other feral sightings.  7 injured animals relocated to external carers.

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

KML also participates in relocation of the WST Skink, the removal of Malleefowl mounds in vulnerable areas including offsite weaning, and annual SBTD spider impact monitoring.

KML has also set up a network of native wildlife carers in the region, who in the reporting period have successfully cared for animals requiring treatment from injury or illness. By using specialist fauna carers in Geraldton and the Darling Range Wildlife Shelter in Perth for larger marsupials and reptiles, KML has increased the chance of animal recovery and reduced the risk of fauna deaths through appropriate treatment and care.

Fauna Register 7 injured animals

relocated to external carers.

In the reporting period KML has continually improved and expanded these strategies. KML has developed an interactive online HSEQ induction package, along with a dedicated Environmental

Awareness training package containing presentations for toolbox meetings and contractors. Presentations include:

 Water Conservation

 Soil Resource and Rehabilitation Management

 Significant Flora  Weed Identification  Groundwater Monitoring  Dust Awareness  Fauna Management  Malleefowl Awareness  Snakes at Karara

 Feral Cat Awareness

 Hydrocarbon Management

 Spill Response

Presentations are continually updated and to ensure all personnel are aware of their environmental responsibilities for the Project. An ARGD training package has also been set up to ensure

Training attendance records Various training presentations All employees and Contractors inducted.

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

environmental caution is demonstrated by contractors and KML staff as well as the Environmental Department.

Prior to ground disturbing activity, prepare and

implement a fauna mortality register for conservation significant species in the area.

In the reporting period the Fauna Mortality Register has been

maintained. The number of mortalities increased during the reporting period. KML consider this increase to be due to an increase in use of the register, with contractors and non-environment personnel now actively engaged in the reporting process.

Fauna Register Fauna Mortality Register (Internal) Audit - March 2011 Fauna Mortality Register (Internal) Audit completed. Since audit, reporting efficiency in the Fauna Sightings and Mortality Registers has increased significantly.

Submit the strategies to the CEO of the DEC.

Three conservation significant species have been identified in the area requiring management plans: the Malleefowl (KML-EN-PRO-1023), WST Skink and SBTD Spider. The species specific

Management Plans were submitted to the DEC in the previous reporting period.

KML’s Malleefowl Management and Monitoring Procedure (KML-EN-PRO-1023) has been submitted to the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (SEWPaC) and has been implemented. KML’s compliance with this procedure has seen a number of positive outcomes and initiatives implemented into its Environmental Management. These include:

 Continuous updating of known and new Malleefowl mounds, with a detailed register of all mounds on KML’s GIS;

 Identification of several prominent Malleefowl crossing along transport routes, and demarcation of these crossings to encourage cautionary driving;

 Avoidance of Malleefowl habitat when determining GD areas through KML’s Environmental Procedure - AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004); Malleefowl Management and Monitoring Procedure, October 2009 (KML-EN-PRO-1023) Western Spiny-tailed Skink Management and Monitoring Procedure, October 2009 (KML-EN-PRO-1024) Shield-backed Trapdoor Spider: Management and Monitoring Procedure, May 2009 (KML-EN-PRO-1025) The original Plans were subsequently submitted and approved by the DEC. Fauna Management (Internal) Audit completed. No issues with practical Malleefowl Management were identified. However several procedural improvements

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

 Reducing Malleefowl habitat impact and risk from fire through KML’s Fire Control Strategy (KML-EN-PRO-1022);

 All permanent infrastructure lighting is placed to minimise light overspill, particularly into adjacent vegetated areas;

 Reducing risk of predation through KML’s Feral Animal Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1010) and associated feral monitoring and abatement practices;

 Regular training and awareness programs containing information related to Malleefowl at inductions, toolbox meetings, and posters at prominent site locations; and

 Demarcation of active Malleefowl mounds adjacent to GD sites and all mining and mining related activities.

In the reporting period several improvements to Malleefowl management have been made, including;

 Surveying of a 50m buffer zone around all GD sites during pre-disturbance surveys, to identify any Malleefowl habitat adjacent to the activity and to consider removal of any Malleefowl mounds. This will reduce the inherent risk of Malleefowl inhabiting the disturbed area and associated works/infrastructure.

 Planning and implementation of Malleefowl radio tracking to gain a better understanding of Malleefowl movement and behaviour. This information will be used to assess impacts of mining and mining related activities on Malleefowl.

 An increase in feral animal baiting and expanded trapping program.

 Significant collaboration with the Yongergnow Malleefowl Centre regarding plans for on-site Malleefowl relocation and further research into the effectiveness of this practice.

All management actions and subsequent improvements to these actions have reduced the residual risk for any environmental impacts to fauna including Malleefowl.

Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) Fire Control Strategy (KML-EN-PRO-1022) Feral Animal Management Plan (KML-EN-PLN-1010) HSEQ online induction Fauna Management (Internal) Audit – October 2011. were triggered due to the audit. A review of the procedure has been actioned.

Review and revise the strategies as required by the CEO of the DEC.

Yet to be required. KML maintains an EMS Document Review Schedule and the plans will be reviewed accordingly. The reviewed plans will be submitted to the DEC for re-approval.

EMS Document Review Schedule

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TABLE 1

Proposal Implementation Monitoring Section

PROJECT: KARARA IRON ORE PROJECT, 215 KILOMETRES EAST-SOUTHEAST OF GERALDTON AND 320 KILOMETRES NORTH-NORTHEAST OF PERTH,

SHIRE OF PERENJORI

Environmental Impact Risk Determination Performance

Objective/Standard/Criteria Success in Risk reduction strategies/risk mitigations methods Relevant documents

Monitoring Results

Conservation significant Reptiles

Ministerial Statements: Condition 11 and EPBC Approval

Prior to disturbing, carry out field surveys for

conservation significant reptile species.

Surveys are conducted as part of KML’s Environmental Procedure - AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) which requires a permit to be issued prior to any ground disturbing activities. Permits are only issued once risks such as impacts to conservation significant reptile

species have been assessed and areas that are avoidance sites are specified on the Permit.

Surveys (GD Release) are conducted in habitat prior to GD and deemed an avoidance site if WST Skink colonies are located. If avoidance is not possible, the individual skinks are translocated in accordance with an approved Licence to Take Fauna. In the reporting period there has been no instance where relocation has been necessary.

KML has also increased the pre-disturbance surveys to include a 50m buffer around the perimeter of the disturbance site. This buffer will allow fauna at risk of any subsequent activity at the disturbance site to be recognised and assessed for translocation if necessary.

Western Spiny-tailed skink Management and Monitoring Procedure, May 2009 (KML-EN-PRO-1024) Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) Pre GD Inspection Form (KML-EN-FRM-1027) GD Release Form (KML-EN-FRM-1014) Post GD Site Inspection Form (KML-EN-FRM-1015) No WST Skinks have been identified for relocation from pre-disturbance surveys in the reporting period.

Conduct mining and mining activities in a manner that avoids impacts on areas where they are found.

KML has implemented a WST Skink Management and

Monitoring Procedure (KML-EN-PRO-1024) which includes Impact Control (General Management, Avoidance and Translocation). The Procedure has been submitted and approved by the DEC. The impact controls include (but are not limited to):

 Environmental Procedure - AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004);

 Fire Control Strategy;

 Feral Animal Management Plan;

 Traffic Management Plan;

 Inductions, training, awareness sessions and education posters;

 Re-creating habitats, i.e. retaining large trees and logs; and

 Relocation of skinks where necessary.

Field surveys monitor known colonies and a controlled area

annually. These surveys are enhanced by micro chipping the adult

Western Spiny-tailed skink Management and Monitoring Procedure, May 2009 (KML-EN-PRO-1024) Environmental Procedure – AR GD (KML-EN-PRO-1004) Fire Control Strategy (KML-EN-PRO-1022) Traffic Management Plan (1000-HS-PLN-1008) Fauna and Feral Management (Internal) Audit complete. No issues with practical Skink Management were identified. However the WST Skink Monitoring Procedure was flagged for review, and has since been included in an EMS Document Review

Figure

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