Criminology and Criminal Justice Online

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Criminology and Criminal

Justice Online

Student Handbook

2009-2010

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Dear Student,

If you are a new student joining Portland State University’s (PSU) Criminology and Criminal Justice Online (CCJO) Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts program we want to welcome you. For those of you who are returning students, welcome back.

The faculty and staff of the CCJO program are excited about the start of a new academic year and we remain committed to providing you with the highest quality educational experience possible. As you may already know, all of our professors have advanced degrees in Criminal Justice, Criminology, Psychology, Law, or a related field. Most of us also have applied field experience, either as practitioners or researchers who consult with criminal justice agencies. This helps ensure that your coursework is both scholarly and practical.

To assist your educational progress we have put together an outstanding staff. Like most universities, we assign graduate students to our courses to facilitate discussions, address questions, and to provide students with feed-back. All of these teaching assistants are pursuing an advanced degree at PSU, mostly through the on-campus Criminology and Criminal Justice Master’s degree program. Based on prior course evaluations, we know that CCJO students find these teaching assistants extremely knowledgeable and helpful.

Other staff members are here to help you navigate the university’s various systems, including admissions, financial aid, records, and the bursar’s office. Later in this manual we provide you with further instructions on whom to contact when you have questions, but a good place to always start is your Program Manager.

Finally, we would add that your fellow students are a diverse group and they too will enhance your academic experience here at PSU. They come from across the country, a few even from other countries, and many are working professionals in criminal justice or related agencies. As such, they will bring valuable experience and insights to class discussions and projects.

Once again, therefore, welcome to PSU and the CCJO program. If you have specific questions about the program that are not answered in this manual, please feel free to contact your Program Manager. We look forward to “seeing you” in class soon.

Sincerely,

Kris Henning, Ph.D., Director CCJO Brian Renauer, Ph.D., Chair CCJ College of Urban and Public Affairs

Mark O. Hatfield School of Government Criminology & Criminal Justice - CCJ Online Post Office Box 751 503-725-5131 tel Portland, Oregon 97207-0751 503-725-5162 fax

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Table of Contents

Student Life Cycle

Registration . . . 2 Books . . . 3 Blackboard and Computer Requirements. . . . 3 Viewing Grades . . . 4 Graduation. . . . 5 Commencement . . . 5

Money

Financial Aid. . . . 6 Scholarships . . . 8

Tuition Payment Options . . . 8

Drops, Withdrawals, Refunds . . . 9

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements . . . 11 Academic Calendar . . . 15 Course Descriptions . . . 16 DARS . . . 20 Internship . . . 22

Useful Information

Academic Appeals . . . 23

Faculty and Staff Directory . . . 24

Useful PSU Contacts . . . 28

Honor Society . . . 29

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NOTE:

THIS HANDBOOK IS PROVIDED TO STUDENTS AS A GUIDE RATHER THAN AS A BINDING DOCUMENT. University regulations, program policies, and course offereings are subject to change. Students should consult the current PSU Bulletin for information on “official” university policies. Similarly, changes to the CCJO program will be documented in revised versions of the present handbook which can be found at the Student Advising Center.

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Student Life Cycle

Registration

Students will receive an emailed message from their Program Manager informing them of when regis-tration will open and what the Course Regisregis-tration Numbers (CRNs) will be.

Students should run their DARS (Degree Audit Reporting System) every term before registering in order to verify what courses they do and do not need to take. This is necessary to track your

academic progress and to prevent registration errors. If you need the instructions for how to run DARS see page 20, or if you need help reading the report, or if you have any questions at all, go to the Student Advising Center at:

http://studentcenter.ccj.pdx.edu/ccjo/student_advising Also, do not hesitate to contact your Program Man-ager at 866-225-7127 ext. 432.

Students should use DARS, and the Academic Calendar to plan their schedule. In most cases, students register online using the PSU Information System (AKA Banweb). Banweb is used to register for classes, view Financial Aid information, view grades, run DARS and more

Registration Holds

Holds are placed on student records for a variety of reason: past-due accounts, missing admissions data, unsatisfactory academic progress, and others. Often these holds restrict student access to registration. Information about holds and how to clear them is available as part of the PSU Information System, by contacting your Program Manager 866-225-7127 ext. 432 or by calling Student Accounts 503-725-3440 during business hours.

Online Registration Instructions

1. Go to www.banweb.pdx.edu

2. Login using your Student ID and PIN. A student’s PSU Student ID number (9xxxxxxxx) is found on the acceptance letter or by contacting your Program Manager. A student’s initial PIN is a six-digit number representing the month, day, and year of birth. For example, a student born on April 1, 1960, uses 040160 as the initial PIN. Students are required to change their PIN to a unique number upon their first login.

Portland State recommends changing PINs at frequent intervals and choosing PINs that are easy to remember, but difficult for others to guess. PIN changes may be made online. Please note that entering an incorrect PIN five times in a single session will disable the account. Instructions for resolving this issue are included in the “Help” link on the PSU Information System login page.

3. Select the “Student Services and Financial Aid” link, then select “Registration”. Update student information if appropriate (it is very important to keep your contact information current with your Program Manager and PSU), then click on “Continue to Registration Menu”. Note: This step only occurs the first time each term that you log into the PSU Information System.

4. Select “Add/Drop Classes.” Choose the appropri-ate term.

5. Enter the appropriate CRNs in the Add Classes Worksheet. Select Submit Changes.

6. When finished adding/dropping courses and/or making other changes, click on the

“Please click here to complete your registration” link at the bottom of the page. Students who fail to perform this crucial step are not registered.

7. View completed registration by selecting “Student Schedule Detail” from the main Registration Menu 02

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Books

Order textbooks at least 3 weeks in advance to the start of class. Not having the textbook is NOT a valid excuse for missing assignments.

Please follow the instructions below to order textbooks: • Go to www.portlandstatebookstore.com

• Select “Buy”. Read and accept the Terms of Agreement.

• Four items will appear, complete as follows: Select a Campus/Term Combination: SPA-CCJO-Online

Select a Department: AJ, CCJ, PHE or UNST Select a Course: Ex: 300

Select a Section: Instructor’s name

• The textbooks for each course will automatically populate. Select the required textbooks and then click the “add selected books to cart” button. This will add the selected book to your cart and bring you back to the main page. Repeat the above steps for all courses.

• Once you have added the required textbooks to your cart, click on the “View Cart” link at the top of the page. Verify all the required textbooks are in your cart, and then proceed to Checkout by clicking the “Checkout” button.

• If you need to create an account, simply follow the steps listed.

CCJO coordinates with Portland State Bookstore to provide a convenient place where textbooks will be available for purchase. However, students are not re-quired to use the bookstore, but may purchase their textbooks from whatever vendor they prefer.

Please be aware that if a textbook was originally packaged with a CD, a used copy of that text will most likely not contain the CD. Please buy new cop-ies for courses where the CD is required (CCJ 410 Applied Crime Mapping).

For Portland State Bookstore’s Textbook Return Policy, please see the Terms of Agreement available at www.portlandstatebookstore.com.

Blackboard and Computer

Requirements

Blackboard

CCJO courses are currently taught using Blackboard Campus Edition 6 (CE 6). All officially enrolled students will automatically have Blackboard CE6 accounts. To access Blackboard, visit http://bb.pdx.edu and use your ODIN username and password to login. If you encounter problems, contact the OIT Help Desk: 503- 725-HELP (local) or 1-800-547-8887 ext. 4357 (long distance).

Computer System Requirements

To participate in CCJO courses, students are expect-ed to be familiar with computers and the internet. Students are responsible for their own software and computer equipment maintenance and setup.

Basic System (Minimum)

• PC running Windows XP or newer

• 512 Mb RAM (1 GB highly recommended) and at least 2 GB of available disk space for assign-ments.

• Broadband connection (cable modem or DSL) and high-speed internet access

• DVD-ROM drive

• Blackboard certified or compatible browser (table on next page)

Other Required Software

• Microsoft Office 2000 or higher (includes, Word, Excel, and PowerPoint)

• Current Virus software installed and kept up to date.

• Multimedia plug-ins may be required to allow your browser to access online video, or interac-tive features.

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Blackboard certified or compatible browsers

: Certified = Fully tested and supported

Compatible = Key application areas tested

WINDOWS: Windows XP Windows Vista

Internet Explorer 6 Certified Not Supported

Internet Explorer 7 Certified Compatible

Firefox 1.5 Compatible Not Supported

Firefox 2.0 Certified Compatible

MAC: MAC OS 10.2 MAC OS 10.3 MAC OS 10.4

Firefox 1.0 Certified Certified Certified

Safari 1.3 Not Supported Compatible Compatible

Safari 2 Not Supported Certified Certified

Course Specific Requirements

Some classes may have other computer or soft-ware requirements, such as a microphone or crime mapping software. Please check the course sylla-bus to see if your class has other requirements. Passwords

For ODIN password issues, call the OIT Help Desk at 503 725-HELP (local) or 1-800-547-8887 ext. 4357 (long distance). For Banweb password issues, call 503-725-3435.

Viewing Grades

• Login to: www.banweb.pdx.edu

• Click “Student Services & Financial Aid, then click “Student Records,” then “Final Grades.” • Final grades will be shown in Blackboard after

the professor has completed grading.

If you need an “Official Grade Report” for tuition reimbursement purposes, grades won’t be posted via Banweb until the end of the term.

Final grades for classes in the first and second half of the term are not posted until the end of term. Ex: If the first class ends on 5/6/09 and the second class end on 6/15, you won’t see the final grade for either class until the end of the term.

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Graduation

Students need to begin planning for graduation

two terms ahead of time.

Step 1:

Go to the Graduation & Commencement Website: http://www.pdx.edu/registration/graduation.html

Step 2:

Review your DARS to assess your degree requirements. Contact Program Manager at

1-866-225-7127 ext. 432 if you have questions.

Step 3:

Submit Application for Undergraduate Degree to Program Manager. (Do not submit directly to PSU) The $20 degree application fee will be charged to your account. Under “Major(s) Sought” write “On-line Criminology & Criminal Justice On“On-line.” Diplomas can be mailed or picked up in Neuberger Hall 104. PSU will notify you by mail when your diploma is available.

Desired Term for Graduation Deadline

Fall 2009 Jun. 26, 2009

Winter 2010 Oct. 2, 2009

Spring 2010 Jan. 8, 2010

*If you miss these deadlines, you’ll then have to include with your application a DARS report which shows all your completed requirements (including in-progress work). You may have to wait until after your final registration to apply.

Commencement

Congratulations on all your hard work! Please plan to celebrate your graduation at Portland State Uni-versity’s commencement events in Portland, Oregon.

Step 1:

Register for commencement for those who are able to attend at:

http://www.pdx.edu/commencement

Example: Spring Commencement in June at Rose Garden Arena (Formal event for Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer graduates)

Summer Commencement in August at PSU South Park Blocks - for dates refer to website above. (Less formal event for summer or fall graduates)

Step 2:

Order graduation regalia, if desired at: http://www.portlandstatebookstore.com

Step 3:

Mark your calendar and watch for information on the Hatfield School of Government Social & Awards Par-ty the Friday before Spring Commencement (Spring Commencement only).

Step 4:

Plan your visit to Portland!

Check out http://www.travelportland.com. A great site for the Portland visitor. You sign up for a free monthly Portland Travel Update e-newsletter at: http://www.travelportland.com/visitors/ Hotels near Rose Garden Arena:

Red Lion Hotel Portland-Convention Center http://redlion.rdln.com

Holiday Inn Portland-Downtown Convention Cen-ter http://www.holidayinn.com

Doubletree Hotel Portland-Lloyd Center http://doubletree1.hilton.com

La Quinta Inn Portland Convention Center http://www.lq.com

Courtyard by Marriott Portland Downtown/ Lloyd Center

http://www.marriott.com

Hotels near Portland State University: University Place (on campus)

http://cegs.pdx.edu/stay/upl Econo Lodge City Center http://www.econolodge.com Hotel Modera

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Money

Financial Aid

Much of the information and forms you need for financial aid are available on the PSU website at http://www.pdx.edu/finaid/forms-and-publications-0 In addition, you may call or email the CCJO Financial Aid adviser if you still have questions:

Benjamin Wessel

bwessel@pdx.edu

Phone: (503) 725-2889 To Complete your FAFSA: 1. Request a PIN Number

• Visit www.pin.ed.gov and request a Personal Identification Number (PIN)

2. Fill out the FAFSA

• Go to www.fafsa.ed.gov and fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Assistance (FAFSA)

• Be sure to complete the correct aid year • You will need copies of the prior year’s

income tax return; if you do not have these available you may request a transcript of taxes be faxed to you by calling the IRS at 800-829-1040.

• University School Code: 003216 3. FAFSA Follow-up

• You may retrieve a student loan history from the National Student Loan Data System, lo-cated at the following website:

www.NSLDS.ed.gov Useful Websites

• Guide to Financial Aid:

http://www.pdx.edu/finaid/forms-and- publications-0

Scholarship Information • Fastweb.com:

www.fastweb.com

• Financial Information Page: www.finaid.org

• Avoiding Scams:

http://www.ftc.gov/bcp/conline/edcams/ scholarship/index.html

PSU Financial Aid Processing

1. Your FAFSA request is processed within 6-8 weeks after you have been ACCEPTED into the CCJO program. Check your status at www.banweb. pdx.edu or by calling the office directly at 1-800-547-8887 option 1.

2. Admissions evaluates your transcripts to deter-mine your transfer credits. Your information appears in the “Total System credits” system. The Finan-cial Aid will pull your information at any particular time. This means that they may pull your transfer credit information prior to the completion of your transcript evaluation. The purpose for this is for students to receive at least minimal funds to pay for their first set of classes.

3. If your award is based on a lower status (Ex: Sophomore instead of a Junior), then you will need to complete the online “Loan Revision Request” form to correct this information once your trans-fer credit evaluation has been completed. Once the form is submitted, your loan amount will be in-creased to the correct level. The corrected amount will be disbursed within 2-3 weeks. The Loan Revi-sion Request form can be located at:

https://survey.oit.pdx.edu/ss/wsb.dll/s/2bfgb6b 4. Your Financial Aid award is disbursed within 10 calendar days before the beginning of each quarter. A snap shot of your registration is taken at the end of the 4th week of the term. This will show if you are considered full-time or part-time. If your status has changed, adjustments will be made. For more information, you can read the “Census Date Dis-bursement Policy” at:

http://www.pdx.edu/finaid/disbursement

5. It’s better to proactively tell the Financial Aid office if you are going to be considered full-time, 3/4 time, 1/2 time or less than 1/2 time for each quarter. You can advise them of this information by completing the online “Revision Request” form. This form can be located at:

https://survey.oit.pdx.edu/ss/wsb.dll/s/2bfgb6b 06

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6. Students who submit their Financial Aid request close to the start of the quarter or have missing documents may be subjected to a late fee if they wait for the Financial Aid to pay the tuition balance. The penalty is $6 plus 1% of the balance owed (ap-proximately $25 for 8 credits). The Accounts Receiv-ables office checks for late payments on the 10th of each month. If you don’t want to pay the penalty, you can either pay out of pocket or create a Revolv-ing Charge Account, which splits your tuition into 3 payments. The Revolving Charge Account can be cancelled at any time.

7. You will receive a PSU One Card (unless opted out), shortly after you register for classes. Your card will initially have a zero balance until you accept your Financial Aid award and your tuition has been paid. Any remaining funds will be placed on the PSU One Card unless you opt for the paper check or direct account deposit option.

8. Further information on loans can be found at: http://www.pdx.edu/finaid/loans-0

Satisfactory Academic Progress & Financial Aid To remain eligible for financial aid, you must main-tain Satisfactory Academic Progress throughout your academic career at PSU. Requirements can be viewed here: http://www.pdx.edu/finaid/satisfactory- academic-progress

Undergraduate GPA Requirement

An undergraduate student must maintain a 2.00 cu-mulative grade point average or higher for all undergraduate courses taken at PSU. This policy ap-plies to all undergraduate credits taken at

PSU, regardless of whether financial aid was re-ceived for those courses.

If a student’s cumulative PSU grade point average falls below 2.00 as of the end of fall term, end of winter term and/or the end of spring term, the student will be placed on Financial Aid

Warning status.

The student will remain on financial aid Warning for each term during the academic year that a

2.00 cumulative PSU grade point average is not

achieved. If a 2.00 cumulativePSU GPA has not been achieved at the end of the academic year, the student will be in a Suspended eligibilitystatus.

Appeals

Students whose eligibility for financial aid has been suspended for failing to meet any component of the PSU policy have the right to appeal. Appeals must be submitted in writing to the Office of Student Financial Aid. Petitions are approved on a case-by-case basis. The student must have experienced special circumstances, such as death or illness of family member, illness or injury of the student, or other unforeseen circumstances that interfered with the completion of their coursework. Petitions will be approved only under these circumstances.

Students who are in a Suspended eligibility status due to failure to meet the GPA and/or completion rate requirement may submit a Satisfactory Academ-ic Progress Petition form to the OffAcadem-ice of Student

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Financial Aid. The student must respond to all ques-tions on the petition form and include documenta-tion supporting their claim of special circumstances. If a student’s petition is approved with conditions as a requirement for future aid eligibility, but fails to meet the stated conditions, the student may submit another petition to the Office of Student Financial Aid. However, in a case of failing to meet required conditions, the petition will be reviewed by a com-mittee selected by the Director of Student Financial Aid, in consultation with the Associate Vice Presi-dent for Finance and Controller. This committee will consist of staff from the Office of Student Finan-cial and from other departments. Students who have reached their maximum time frame limit may submit a Maximum Time Frame Petition form to the Office of Student Financial Aid.

Petitions must be submitted to the Office of Student Financial Aid no later than the end of the second week of the term for which the student wishes to regain aid eligibility. This allows timely processing of the petition and delivery of financial aid funds. Petitions received later than this deadline will be reviewed, but late petitions may result in loss of funding for that term.

Upon review, the Office of Student Financial Aid will rule on the student’s petition and notify the student in writing and/or e-mail about their financial aid eligibility.

Scholarships

PSU makes it easy to apply for scholarships by of-fering an online scholarship application and a search-able online scholarship database. Most scholarship application deadlines are between February and April for awards that begin the following fall term. If you have questions after reviewing the information on the scholarship website please contact:

scholarships@pdx.edu or call (503) 725-5400 The Criminology and Criminal Justice Division offers the Bradley N. Horner Memorial Endowed

Scholarship Fund each year. Students who are in their junior year, are a CCJO major, and have inter-est in law enforcement as a career can apply through the university website at:

http://www.pdx.edu/finaid/scholarships.html CCJ students have also been awarded the Oregon Sheriff ’s Association award, which is presented annually to two outstanding seniors. There is no ap-plication process for this; it is decided by the faculty.

Tuition Payment Options

You may pay online through PSU ePay using your VISA, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, Diners Card, or E-Check, or you may pay by U.S. Mail.

Please check the PSU website for these options: www.pdx.edu/bao/payments.html

NOTE: VISA charges a $25 service fee. All other major credit cards have a 2.75% service fee. NEW: If you want to make a payment on an account that is not your own, you must have the student’s PSU ID and the last name or account name, exactly as on record at PSU.

U.S. Mail

Send your payment with the bottom third of the billing statement in the envelope supplied with the bill. If you want to make a payment by mail and don’t have a bill, send your payment (make sure to write your student ID number on the check) to:

PSU Cashier’s Office PO Box 908

Portland OR 97207

For questions about your Student Account, please contact:

bursar@pdx.edu (503) 725-3440

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The Student Accounts team provides services for student accounts and third party accounts. These services include preparing monthly billing statements, explaining accounts, and issuing short-term loans. Payment Policy

All students who enroll incur a financial obligation. Oregon University System and Portland State Uni-versity policies require payment of tuition, housing and fees by the 10th of every month. If payment is not received, interest and billing fees will be applied on the billing statement on the 15th of the month. Students who cannot meet the payment deadlines may elect the Revolving Charge Account Plan (RCAP).

To accept the terms and conditions of carrying a balance and paying over time at the university, please log into your Banner account (www.banweb.pdx. edu) and click to accept the terms of the Revolving Charge Account Plan (RCAP).

Students are financially responsible for all classes for which they are registered on or after the first day of the quarter. Students who discover that they cannot attend must cancel their registration before the first day of the term to avoid financial obligation. Registration Holds

Holds are placed on student records for a variety of reason: past-due accounts, missing admissions data, unsatisfactory academic progress, and others. Often these holds restrict student access to registration. Information about holds and how to clear them is available as part of the PSU Information System (Select Student Services & Financial Aid, Student Records, and View Holds) or by calling (503) 725-3511 during business hours.

Drops, Withdrawals, and Refunds

The Criminology & Criminal Justice Online (CCJO) program uses Portland State University’s standard policies for dropping and withdrawing from courses

and obtaining refunds. Drop, withdrawal, and refund options for all courses are based on the university calendar. Please take a few moments to review these policies.

Drop, Withdrawal, and Refund Deadlines Consistent with the rest of the University, the CCJO operates on a quarter system using the PSU Academic Calendar. To accommodate the busy schedules of our online students we have organized some courses so that the actual class work happens in either the first half or the second half of the quarter. Nevertheless, the university deadlines for adding, dropping, withdrawing, and seeking refunds are based on the PSU Academic Calendar. These deadlines apply to all courses regardless of whether the primary work is scheduled for the first five or second five weeks of the term. In other words, the final day to receive a full refund for a dropped course (i.e., end of week 1) applies to all classes, even those where the coursework doesn’t fully begin until week six.

Deadlines Appeals Board

Students seeking to withdraw from a course beyond the cutoff and/or request a higher refund than the amount automatically determined based on the drop date can submit a petition to the Deadline Appeals Board (DAB). The DAB reviews petitions and makes decisions on requests for registration changes for the current term. To request a change you must explain the extenuating circumstances which pre-vented you from meeting the withdrawal/drop dead-line. Completed forms should be faxed to Barbara Maidel (503) 725-5162 at least three days prior to the end of the current grading period to allow sufficient time for the Director to document attendance. Scholastic Standards Committee

The Scholastic Standards Committee (SSC) reads and makes decisions on petitions to waive deadlines from prior terms. Such deadlines include those for adding/dropping classes, changing grading options, and resolving I (Incomplete) grades on courses.

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Completed forms should be faxed to Barbara Maidel (503) 725-5162. In general, students are notified by the university of committee decisions 2-4 weeks after submitting a petition.

Administrative Drops

Portland State University does NOT offer administra-tive drops. This means that you must acadministra-tively drop classes using the Banweb system or via a Special Regis-tration Form in the event that the deadline has passed. Non-attendance is not a valid excuse to earn a full refund and you may end up receiving a grade of “F”. Financial Aid Considerations

Students receiving financial aid need to understand that dropping or withdrawing from classes may impact the aid they receive if the change results in fewer credit hours. In some cases, money already credited to your account will be withdrawn, possibly leaving you with a deficit. For more information about how your financial aid will be affected by dropping or withdrawing from a class contact the Office of Student Financial Aid. Dropped Courses

Students may drop a class at any time during the first four weeks of a term using the Banweb system. Dropped classes are not recorded on transcripts and have no impact on your G.P.A. As noted previously, re-ducing the number of credits you are taking in a term may have implications for financial aid.

Withdrawal Grade (W)

Students electing to leave a class after the fourth week must officially withdraw. Withdrawals in week five can be submitted using the Banweb system. Withdrawals in weeks six through eight require that a Special Registra-tion Form be completed and faxed to Barbara Maidel (503) 725-5162. Withdrawals are recorded on your transcript with a “W” and full tuition is charged (i.e., there is no refund). “W” grades carry no credit and are not included when calculating your G.P.A. As noted previously, reducing the number of credits you are tak-ing in a term may have implications for financial aid. Dropping All Courses

Completely dropping all classes does not cancel a stu-dent’s obligation to pay a student loan or the balance of a revolving charge account. Refund calculations are 10

based on the total tuition and fees. Students with out-standing accounts such as short-term loans, deferred tuition notes, and any other financial obligations due the University, will have any refund due them applied against the obligation.

1. Contact the Professor

In some cases it may be possible for you work out an alternative with the professor prior to dropping a class. Remember that most CCJO courses are only offered once per year and missing a course may delay your eventual graduation.

2. Notify Your Program Manager

Either call or email your program manager to in-form her/him that you plan to drop the class. Your program manager will let you know if additional forms are needed. Please be advised that your access to the course will be denied from this point forward. 3. Submit Your Drop/Withdrawal

The method for dropping/withdrawing from a class depends on how far into the term you are. In some cases you can do this independently using Banweb or you may need to fax a Special Registration Form to the CCJO program. Your program manager can help you identify which approach to use.

4. Contact the Financial Aid Office

Dropping/withdrawing from a course may have implications for financial aid. Make sure you contact a financial aid counselor to explore

these changes.

Repeat Policy

Students must notify PSU if they repeat a PSU course in

order to obtain a higher grade. The Notice of Repeated Course form is used for this. The form may be faxed to CCJO at 503-725-5162.

Grades earned in all courses remain on students’ per-manent academic records; however, University policy holds that repeated courses affect the calculation of of-ficial G.P.A. as follows:

1. Credit is retained on the first A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, and all grades in subsequent attempts are included when calculating G.P.A., and

2. The first PSU grade of D+, D, D-, or F is excluded in calculating G.P.A. if the course is repeated at Port-land State University for a differentiated grade (not Pass/No-Pass). Credit is retained on the last grade received.

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All of these courses must be passed with a “C” or better. CCJ 404 should be completed during your last few terms in CCJO.

Please see DARS or Program Manager 866-225-7127 ext. 432 to learn if you have received any substitutions for these courses based on prior CCJ coursework.

Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts Requirements

Students may choose to pursue either a Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts degree.

The following requirements must be met if a student is to receive a Bachelor of Science degree: • 4 credits in college-level math/statistics

(exclud-ing Math 100 or lower)

• 12 credits in sciences (not including math/statis-tics; 8 of the 12 science credits must be course-work with lab or fieldcourse-work)

• 12 credits in arts/letters and/or social sciences (CCJ 330 counts toward this requirement) The following requirements must be met if a student is to receive a Bachelor of Arts degree: • 4 credits in fine and performing arts

• 8 credits in arts and letters

• 4 credits in Science or Math/Statistics (excluding Math 100 or lower)

• 8 credits in Sciences and/or Social Sciences (CCJ 330 counts towards this requirement) • 4 credits in a foreign language (at 203 level or

above, student with no previous knowledge of a foreign language may need to complete 2 years in a language to reach this level)

Transfer credits may be applied toward the B.S./B.A. requirements.

Please note that B.S./B.A. courses are not regularly

available online at PSU. Students may need to attend on-campus at PSU or attend a regionally accredited community college to complete these requirements and transfer them to PSU.

CCJO Degree

Requirements

Working toward a baccalaureate degree requires planning, choosing, and resolving to persevere through the process. It is important to understand the necessary steps and requirements needed to complete a Portland State University degree. Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Arts in Criminology & Criminal Justice Requirements There are 3 components to the requirements of a baccalaureate degree: Major Requirements, Bach-elor’s Degree Requirements and General Education Requirements (University Studies).

Major Requirements

A major is a primary field of study, an in-depth aca-demic focus. Here you will develop a significant level of knowledge in a specific academic area. Students in CCJO must complete the following courses:

CCJ 300 Criminology and Criminal Justice CCJ 301 Policing in America

CCJ 303 Punishment and Corrections CCJ 310 American Courts

CCJ 320 Theories of Crime CCJ 330 Crime Control Strategies CCJ 340 Crime Analysis

CCJ 380 Criminal Justice Research

CCJ 420 Criminal Law and Legal Reasoning 8 credits of CCJ 404 Cooperative Education/ Internship.

16 credits of CCJ electives at or above the 300 level. 8 credits of CCJ electives at or above the 100 level. CCJO has 9 electives available:

CCJ 370 Women, Crime and Justice CCJ 410 Correlates of Criminal Behavior CCJ 410 Juvenile Offenders

CCJ 410 White Collar Crime CCJ 410 Offender Rehabilitation CCJ 410 Geographic Criminology CCJ 410 Applied Crime Mapping CCJ 410 Organizational Change in CJ CCJ 435 Crime, Grime and Fear

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The below UNST courses are offered online for the CCJO students:

Sophomore Inquiry

UNST 234 Healthy People/Healthy Places Upper Division Cluster

From the Healthy People/Healthy Places cluster: PHE 326U Drug Education

PHE 335U Human Sexuality PHE 446U Community Health Senior Capstone

UNST 421 Senior Capstone

The cluster requirement can also be satisfied using any completed UNST 399 course that was offered between Fall 2006 and Spring 2007.

The Capstone should be completed during your last few terms in CCJO.

General Requirements/Limitations

Total credits required to graduate with a bachelor’s degree: 180 Total Upper Division (300/400 level) credits required: 72 Maximum number of credits accepted from accred-ited two-year institutions: 124

Maximum number of correspondence credits: 60 Maximum number of credits graded P (pass): 45 Maximum number of cooperative education credits: 12 Maximum number of vocational education credits: 12 Maximum number of PE credits: 12

Minimum cumulative grade point average (gpa): 2.0 on all PSU courses and 2.0 on all courses, regardless of where taken

Residence credit: 45 (excluding credit by examination) of your final 60 or 165 of your total credits must be com-pleted at PSU. At least 25 of the last 45 credits must be for differentiated grades (A-F).

Students who graduated from high school since 1997 may have to demonstrate competency in a foreign language.

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General Education Requirements (University Studies)

All colleges and universities have a general educa-tion requirement designed to provide the breadth of knowledge and skills expected from college gradu-ates. At Portland State University, these courses are known as University Studies (UNST).

The University Studies program emphasizes an un-derstanding of communication, critical thinking, social and ethical responsibility and diversity of the human experience at

all levels. These courses are unique to PSU and can-not be completed at other institutions. Transfer stu-dents begin UNST based on the number of transfer credits completed prior to the term of admission to PSU.

Sophomore Inquiry (SINQ): Gateway courses that introduce the themes to be further explored in the Upper Division Cluster. The specific content of these courses introduces students to ideas, research, theory and perspectives that are central to the clus-ter. Students entering PSU with 45-89 college credits begin with SINQ as follows:

• 45-59 credits: Three Sophomore Inquiry courses • 60-74 credits: Two Sophomore Inquiry courses • 75-89 credits: One Sophomore Inquiry

Upper Division Cluster (Junior Cluster): A group of approved upper division courses which explore in-terdisciplinary themes. Students complete a total of 12 credits in one cluster. Students who are required to take SINQ must take the SINQ that matches their cluster. Courses taught by a student’s major depart-ment may not be used to satisfy the cluster require-ments. Students entering PSU with 90 or more cred-its begin with the Upper Division Cluster courses.

Senior Capstone: A 6-credit community-based learning course developed and taught by a faculty member. Students work as a team to research and develop projects which address challenges within the community.

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Post-baccalaureate Degree (Second Degree) Requirements

Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree and are seeking their second must complete the following:

Major Requirements: Must complete all of the above major requirements.

Bachelor’s Degree Requirements: If the student’s 2nd degree will be the same as their 1st (B.S. to B.S./B.A. to B.A.), this requirement is fulfilled. If the 2nd degree will not be the same, the student must complete the above bachelor’s degree require-ments for the 2nd degree.

University Studies: UNST is not required.

Post-baccalaureate Certificate Requirements Students who already hold a bachelor’s degree and are seeking the post-baccalaureate certificate must complete the following courses:

CCJ 300 Criminology and Criminal Justice CCJ 320 Theories of Crime

CCJ 330 Crime Control Strategies CCJ 380 Criminal Justice Research

CCJ 420 Criminal Law and Legal Reasoning Any two courses from the list below:

CCJ 301 Policing in America

CCJ 303 Punishment and Corrections CCJ 310 American Courts

Any three courses from the list below: CCJ 435 Crime, Grime & Fear CCJ 370 Women, Crime and Justice CCJ 410 Juvenile Offenders

CCJ 410 White Collar Crime

CCJ 410 Organizational Change in CJ CCJ 410 Geographic Criminology CCJ 410 Applied Crime Mapping CCJ 340 Crime Analysis

CCJ 410 Correlates of Criminal Behavior CCJ 410 Offender Rehabilitation

All of these courses must be passed with a “C” or better.

There are no Bachelor’s Degree or University Studies requirements for the post-baccalaureate certificate.

Certificate in the American Justice System Requirements Students must complete the following courses:

CCJ 300 Criminology and Criminal Justice CCJ 301 Policing in America

CCJ 303 Punishment and Corrections CCJ 310 American Courts

CCJ 420 Criminal Law and Legal Reasoning CCJ 410 Organizational Change in CJ

All of these courses must be passed with a “C” or better.

Up to 8 credits of comparable coursework may be transferred in at the program’s discretion.

The Certificate in the American Justice System is awarded by the College of Urban and Public Af-fairs. You will receive a certificate of completion. The courses and credits will appear on your Portland State University transcript.

Certificate in Advanced Crime Analysis Requirements Students must complete the following courses:

CCJ 330 Crime Control Strategies CCJ 340 Crime Analysis

CCJ 380 Criminal Justice Research CCJ 410 Geographic Criminology CCJ 410 Applied Crime Mapping CCJ 435 Crime, Grime and Fear

All of these courses must be passed with a “C” or better.

Up to 4 credits of comparable coursework may be transferred in at the program’s discretion.

The Certificate in Advanced Crime Analysis is awarded by the College of Urban and Public Affairs. You will receive a certifi-cate of completion. The courses and credits will appear on your Portland State University transcript.

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Certificate in Criminal Behavior Students must complete the following courses:

CCJ 320 Theories of Crime

CCJ 370 Women, Crime and Justice CCJ 410 Correlates of Criminal Behavior CCJ 410 Juvenile Offenders

CCJ 410 Offender Rehabilitation CCJ 410 White Collar Crime

All of these courses must be passed with a “C” or better.

Up to 4 credits of comparable coursework may be transferred in at the program’s discretion.

The Certificate in Criminal Behavior is awarded by the College of Urban and Public Affairs. You will receive a certificate of completion. The courses and credits will appear on your Portland State University transcript.

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Academic Standing

Academic standing is a performance category in which a student is placed based on his/her GPA in courses completed at PSU. In order to graduate from PSU a student must be in good standing.

Good Standing

In order to maintain good standing with the University, a student must maintain a minimum cumulative PSU GPA of 2.00.

Academic Warning

Any student who has 12 or more attempted credits and whose cumulative PSU GPA falls below a 2.00 will be placed on academic warning. A registration hold will be placed on his/her record until he/she has attended a mandatory workshop facilitated by the Undergraduate Advising and Support Center (UASC). Students who are unable to attend this workshop need to contact Mirela Blekic, Academic Support Program Coordina-tor, 503-725-4498, to make arrangements.

Academic Probation

Any student on academic warning will be placed on academic probation if at least one of the following requirements is not met:

• Raise the cumulative PSU GPA to 2.00.

• Earn a PSU GPA for the given term of a 2.25 or above.

Academic Dismissal

Any student on academic probation will be dismissed at the end of the term if at least one of the following requirements is not met:

• Raise the cumulative PSU GPA to 2.0.

• Earn a PSU GPA for the given term of a 2.25 or above.

If only the second of these requirements is met, a stu-dent will remain on academic probation subject to the same requirements as those specified above.

If a student is academically dismissed from PSU, he/ she is not permitted to register for any PSU courses. A student who is dismissed may petition for reinstate-ment. Please see your Program Manager 866-225-7127 ext. 432 for more information.

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Fall 2009

CCJ 310 American Courts (4)

CCJ 303 Punishment and Corrections (4) CCJ 330 Crime Control Strategies (4)

CCJ 410 Criminal Behavior (4)

UNST 421 Senior Capstone (6)

PHE 326U Drug Education (2)

CCJ 404 Coop. Education/Internship (4) CCJ 407-1 Professional Ethics Seminar (2) CCJ 407-2 Collaboration, Collegiality Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-3 Leadership Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-4 Diversity and Change Seminar (2) CCJ 407-5 Discretion & Use of Force Seminar (2) CCJ 407-6 Restorative Justice Seminar (2) Winter 2010

CCJ 410 Juvenile Offenders (4)

CCJ 410 Organizational Change in CJ (4) CCJ 370 Women, Crime and Justice (4) CCJ 435 Crime, Grime & Fear (4) CCJ 380 Criminal Justice Research (4)

UNST 421 Senior Capstone (6)

UNST 234 Healthy People, Healthy Places (4)

PHE 335U Human Sexuality (4)

CCJ 404 Coop. Education/Internship (4) CCJ 407-1 Professional Ethics Seminar (2) CCJ 407-2 Collaboration, Collegiality Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-3 Leadership Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-4 Diversity and Change Seminar (2) CCJ 407-5 Discretion & Use of Force Seminar (2) CCJ 407-6 Restorative Justice Seminar (2)

15 Spring 2010

CCJ 301 Policing in America (4)

CCJ 420 Criminal Law & Legal Reasoning (4)

CCJ 410 White Collar Crime (4)

CCJ 410 Geographic Criminology (4) CCJ 410-ONB Applied Crime Mapping (4)

UNST 421 Senior Capstone (6)

PHE 446U Community Health (4)

CCJ 404 Coop. Education/Internship (4) CCJ 407-1 Professional Ethics Seminar (2) CCJ 407-2 Collaboration, Collegiality Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-3 Leadership Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-4 Diversity and Change Seminar (2) CCJ 407-5 Discretion & Use of Force Seminar (2) CCJ 407-6 Restorative Justice Seminar (2) Summer 2010

CCJ 320 Theories of Crime (4)

CCJ 300 Criminology and Criminal Justice (4) CCJ 410 Offender Rehabilitation (4)

CCJ 340 Crime Analysis (4)

UNST 421 Senior Capstone (6)

STAT 105 Statistics (4)

CCJ 404 Coop. Education/Internship (4) CCJ 407-1 Professional Ethics Seminar (2) CCJ 407-2 Collaboration, Collegiality Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-3 Leadership Seminar (2)

CCJ 407-4 Diversity and Change Seminar (2) CCJ 407-5 Discretion & Use of Force Seminar (2) CCJ 407-6 Restorative Justice Seminar (2)

Dates and courses are subject to change.

Academic Calendar

Portland State University

CCJ Distance Learning Program 2009-2010 Academic Calendar

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Course Descriptions

CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE REQUIRED COURSES CCJ 300 - Criminology and Criminal Justice (4 quarter credits)

An introduction and overview of the criminology and criminal justice major designed to provide students with an understanding of law, crime, and the criminal justice system in America. Examines the law’s proactive function in teaching people how to live peacefully within their communities and the law’s reactive function in sanctioning criminal behavior. Includes an introduction to various theories of crime causation and an overview of the criminal justice system and its response in processing those who transgress the law. CCJ 301 - Policing in America (4 quarter credits)

An introduction to the study of policing in the United States. Policing is studied from three perspectives: the police officer-citizen interaction, the agency-community relationship, and the legal and ethical questions of policing in a democratic society. The course considers the history and future of policing, the police task, po-lice strategies, and popo-lice relationships with the community and criminal justice system.

CCJ 303 - Punishment and Corrections (4 quarter credits)

Examines theories of punishment as they relate to the various treatment and rehabilitation policies and prac-tices that affect offenders in institutional and community settings. Specific approaches being examined include mandatory sentencing laws, offender education programs, institutional and community drug treatment programs, boot camps, house arrest, intensive supervision probation, work release, and community work service. CCJ 310 - American Courts (4 quarter credits)

Comprehensive survey of the role and function of courts in the United States. Emphasis placed on the op-erations of trial-level courts hearing criminal cases. Explores the roles and duties of courtroom participants, structure of the judiciary, relationship between the formal rule of law and daily activities of courts,

decision-making, and perspectives from which to view the courts. Attention also to appellate courts, juvenile courts, court reform, and issues of gender, race, and ethnicity.

CCJ 320 - Theories of Crime (4 quarter credits)

An overview of historical, sociological, biological, psychological, economic, and Marxist theories of crime causation. Particular attention is made to critically analyzing each theory presented in terms of its internal consistency and logic as well as its fit with data on crime, criminals, and victims. Policy implications stemming from these theories will be discussed.

CCJ 330 - Crime Control Strategies (4 quarter credits)

An analysis of the methods used to control crime in American society. Emphasis on understanding the sometimes conflicting goals of the criminal justice system; attention is given to the general categories of gen-eral and specific deterrence, aggressive enforcement, situational and environmental defensive measures, and modification of the social order. Special attention will be given to how other countries control crime and the problems of comparison because of political and cultural differences.

CCJ 340 - Crime Analysis (4 quarter credits)

An introduction to the basic methods used in analyzing data from criminal justice agencies, including tem-poral and spatial analysis of crime patterns, calculation of crime rates, descriptive analyses of victim and offender characteristics, recidivism, and the identification of offense typologies. Students get hands-on experi-ence coding, analyzing, interpreting, and presenting crime data from a number of sources like police homicide reports, the FBI, Department of Corrections, and attitudinal surveys. Prerequisite: basic computing skills (e.g., saving files, MS Windows or Vista operations).

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17 CCJ 380 - Criminal Justice Research (4 quarter credits)

Introduction to the basic concepts of social science research including hypothesis testing, research design, causality, sampling, and measurement. Course is intended to provide students with necessary skills to critically evaluate crime and delinquency research as well as design and implement basic research projects.

CCJ 404 Introductory Cooperative Education/Internship (8 quarter credits)

Supervised placement in a community criminal justice agency or on a criminal justice research project to be completed during a student’s senior year (135+ credit hours). Evaluations of students are completed by agency staff and/or University faculty.

CCJ 420 - Criminal Law and Legal Reasoning (4 quarter credits)

Study of the basic concepts related to criminal law, including: historical development, legal elements of crime and proof, defenses and mitigation, reasonable doubt, and presumptions of fact; with particular emphasis on the application of logical reasoning to make legal decisions.

CRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE ELECTIVES CCJ 435 - Crime, Grime, and Fear (4 quarter credits)

Course designed to study the social, economic, political, and physical factors underlying neighborhood crime and decline. Special attention is given to physical and social incivilities, the “broken windows” theory, police-com-munity partnerships, and problem-solving. Students will work on neighborhood-centered projects to explore solutions to neighborhood crime patterns, disorder, and fear of crime, and ideas for strengthening police-citizen relations, and community building.

CCJ 370 - Women, Crime, and Justice (4 quarter credits)

Women as criminals, victims, and professionals in the criminal justice system are the focus of this course. Theo-ries, policies, and relevant empirical studies will be discussed in the context of the historical, socio-political, and cultural forces that shaped them. Topics may include: girls in gangs, female police officers, mothers behind bars, domestic violence, and pregnancy and drug use.

CCJ 410 - Juvenile Offenders (4 quarter credits)

The course addresses some of the questions and debates regarding treatment and management of juvenile of-fenders. Special topics covered include delinquency theories, drug involvement, violence in schools, mistreated children, the “adultification” of youth, problems with incarceration, race and gender issues, the death penalty for juveniles, and prevention of juvenile delinquency. Students are asked to consider the roles of mental health, intelligence, environmental and socioeconomic factors as they relate to programmatic concerns for profession-als working in the juvenile justice field.

CCJ 410 - White Collar Crime (4 quarter credits)

This course examines the many facets of white-collar crime and deviance including corporate, occupational, professional, political, and organized criminal behavior. A major component of this exploration will include the nature of elite deviance as it relates to crime and power in contemporary American society. Examples of white-collar crime and deviance are drawn from a host of disciplines including criminology, sociology, political sci-ence, economics, public health/epidemiology, and environmental scisci-ence, to illustrate the breadth as well as the frequency of white-collar offending in elite settings. In addition to covering the major white-collar crime types, students will also learn about the law and social control of white-collar crime; the policing and regulating of white-collar crime; and the prosecuting, defending, and adjudicating of white-collar crime.

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CCJ 410 – Offender Rehabilitation (4 quarter credits)

This course introduces students to the foundations of correctional intervention, including the major theories and techniques underlying effective treatment programs in correctional settings. Topics include the principles of effective intervention, theory and application of offender therapy, and offender

classification systems.

CCJ 410 – Organizational Change in Criminal Justice (4 quarter credits)

The course provides an overview of the ways in which data may be used to address issues of crime and disorder in criminal justice. Usage of data will be viewed as one step in larger planning process that involves clearly identifying policy problems, articulating the ways in which crime problems are thought to occur, col-lecting and analyzing data about the problem, and feeding results back into agency operations. Topics to be covered will include data usage in policing, courts, and corrections.

CCJ 410 – Correlates of Criminal Behavior (4 quarter credits)

Overview of individual and family-level correlates of criminal behavior in children, adolescents, and adults. Explores factors associated with the onset and persistence of aggressive and criminal behavior using a biopsychosocial model. Topics may include family functioning, personality and personality disorders, attention and impulsivity problems, psychotic disorders, brain injury, substance use, sexual disorders, and dissociative disorders.

CCJ 410 - Geographic Criminology (4 quarter credits)

This course will provide a theoretical background for the geographic study of crime. Topics covered include criminological theories that address the geographic distribution of crime, an introduction to commonly used terminology in crime mapping, the use of spatial data in crime prevention efforts, and the ways in which crime mapping is currently used in criminal justice agencies.

CCJ 410 - Applied Crime Mapping y (4 quarter credits)

This course will provide students with the technical and analytical skills used in crime mapping. Various mapping applications will be made available to students for the geographic examination of crime data. As this course is an introduction to mapping software, no prior GIS knowledge is required. Students will learn to create useful maps that convey spatial crime data and the relationships between crime and other

geographic features.

CRIMINOLOGY & CRIMINAL JUSTICE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT SEMINARS

The CCJ 407 Professional Development Seminars are designed to increase knowledge and

understanding on various professional issues through selected readings from recent academic literature. Students will develop an annotated bibliography from articles relevant to the given topic and demonstrate their learning by discussing the articles, their implications and consequences in an oral exam with the ap-proval, they can be used to fulfill CCJ elective credits, or they can be used by students who need additional credits to reach PSU’s 180 credit requirement for a B.S. or B.A. degree.

The currently available topics include: CCJ 407 – Ethics (2 quarter credits)

Students will examine ethical dilemmas in a variety of criminal justice issues, including police officer integrity, correctional mental health workers, and values of criminal justice students.

CCJ 407 – Leadership (2 quarter credits)

Students will explore the characteristics of effective leaders, as well as the challenges and relationships they have with fellow employees and the public.

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18 CCJ 407 – Diversity (2 quarter credits)

Students will consider how differences in population characteristics affect hiring, promotion, relationships, policy, and decision-making within the criminal justice system.

CCJ 407 – Discretion (2 quarter credits)

Students will look at the ramifications of criminal justice professionals’ decisions based, not solely on a particular set of circumstances, but also on subjective judgments made on the nature of appropriate enforcement of the law.

CCJ 407 – Restorative Justice (2 quarter credits)

Students will explore the sentencing model which builds on restitution and community participation in an attempt to consider both community safety and offender accountability.

CCJ 407 – Collaboration (2 quarter credits)

Students will investigate some of the unique problems associated with working in the law enforcement field, such as the work-family impact, job satisfaction, medical issues, and job stress.

UNIVERSITY STUDIES

Like most universities, PSU requires that students take courses outside their major to broaden their educa-tional experience. At PSU these addieduca-tional courses are grouped under the title University Studies (UNST). The number and type of UNST courses required is somewhat dependent on the number of credits transferred into PSU.

All students at PSU must complete three courses (12 credits) in a Junior Cluster. Each cluster consists of thematically organized courses that provide students the opportunity to explore in depth a topic outside their major. The specific Junior Cluster we have available to students in the CCJ Online program is called Healthy People/Healthy Places. Courses in this cluster examine the nature and state of healthy individuals in their various environments. Individual behavior change, social policies, community development and social responsibility are emphasized.

The three Healthy People/Healthy Places courses currently available online are: PHE 326 – Drug Education (4 quarter credits)

Examines various approaches to drug education with an emphasis on prevention models. Epidemiology of and trends in drug use in the U.S. and effects on society. Reviews current and controversial issues and legal information on drug use effects.

PHE 335 – Human Sexuality (4 quarter credits)

A survey of the psychological, physiological, and behavioral aspects of human sexuality, with particular emphasis on the influence of popular culture on these dimensions.

PHE 446 – Community Health Principles and Practices (4 quarter credits)

Provides an overview of the scope of problems in the field of community health. Examines disease preven-tion/control, community health service delivery, the structure of official/unofficial agencies, and policy/ decision-making processes. Course may include field work in a community health agency.

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PSU students also have to complete a Senior Capstone, the culmination of the UNST program. Capstone courses are designed to build cooperative learning communities by taking students out of the classroom and into the field.

In Capstone courses, students bring together the knowledge, skills, and interests developed to this point through all aspects of their education, to work on a community project. Students work as a team, pooling resources, and collaborating with faculty and community leaders to understand and find solutions for issues that are important to them as literate and engaged citizens.

The Capstone currently available to CCJ Online students is described below:

UNST 421 – University Capstone (6 quarter credits)

This course is designed to familiarize students with the field of crime prevention. Course participants will start with a review of applicable theories. Students will then participate in a research project that docu-ments our current knowledge on a specific crime problem, including reviews of published research, analyses of relevant crime data, and qualitative interviews with criminal justice professionals. These materials will then be used to generate prevention and/or intervention strategies for the given crime problem. In addition to archiving the findings on the internet, students will end the class by developing scripts and storyboards for a crime prevention video that can be disseminated to the community and criminal justice agencies.

Finally, students who transfer into PSU with less than 90 quarter credit hours are required to complete

ad-ditional UNST courses called Sophomore Inquiries (SINQ).

SINQ courses are gateway classes that introduce students to the concepts, questions, methods, and other content that are to be further explored in their Junior Cluster. The number of SINQs required is based on the final credits transferred into PSU:

75 to 89 credits = 1 SINQ

60 to 74 credits = 2 SINQs 45 to 59 credits = 3 SINQs

Currently the CCJ Online program offers just one SINQ course: UNST 234 Healthy People/Healthy Places. This class is required for all students with fewer than 90 transfer credits who will later go on to complete the Healthy People/Healthy Places Junior Cluster described previously. Other online SINQ courses are available periodically through the regular campus.

UNST 234 – Healthy People/Healthy Places (6 quarter credits)

This sophomore inquiry will examine the nature and state of healthy individuals in their various environ-ments. A dynamic approach will be used to study the places in which people live and interact, such as the community, the workplace and the natural environment. Topics will focus on ways to solve and prevent problems that may affect the health and wellbeing of the individual, the local environment and/or the global community. Individual behavior change, social policies, community development and social responsi-bility may be emphasized.

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The Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS) is a valuable tool which aids in tracking degree progress and in understanding PSU degree requirements. This report applies your completed courses, including trans-fer courses accepted to PSU, to PSU’s graduation requirements.

DARS audits are to be used as unofficial advising tools and are not intended to be a promise or guarantee of progress toward a degree, major, minor, or certificate. Certification of completion of academic requirements will be made when you apply for graduation. At that time, your graduation application and DARS audit will be reviewed by the Office of Degree Requirements.

The following instructions are meant to show you how to run a DARS report online. This report is specific to the degree requirements for the Criminology and Criminal Justice online degree completion program only.

DARS is broken into groups and subgroups which match the vari-ous requirements students must fulfill in their degree. DARS will insert the classes that you take into their appropriate groups. DARS will display the following information about a course: • the term and year it was taken

• how PSU recognizes the course • the number of credits granted • the grade received

• the title of the course

Degree Audit Reporting System (DARS)

How to Run DARS

1. Go to the PSU Information System. (https://banweb.pdx.edu)

2. Enter your PSU ID number (9xxxxxxxx) and PIN.

A student’s PSU Student ID number (9xxxxxxxx) is found on the acceptance letter or by contacting your Program Manager. A student’s initial PIN is a six-digit number representing the month, day, and year of birth. For example, a student born on April 1, 1960, uses 040160 as the initial PIN. Students are required to change their PIN to a unique number upon their first login.

Portland State recommends changing PINs at frequent intervals and choosing PINs that are easy to remember, but difficult for others to guess. PIN changes may be made online. Please note that entering an incorrect PIN five times in a single session will disable the account. Instructions for resolving this issue are included in the “Help” link on the PSU Information System login page.

3. Under “Student Services & Financial Aid” select “DARS”. 4. Select “Submit an Audit”.

5. Select:

College/School = Not Declared/Not Applicable Audit Type = Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science Major = Criminology & Criminal Justice

Catalog Year/Term = student’s applicable catalog year

IMPORTANT: If any of the above selections are different, DARS will return an inaccurate report.

6. Run Analysis.

7. Click on “View Submitted Audits”. You will have the option to print the DARS.

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Several groups have Course Lists included in them. Course Lists show students from what courses they are able to choose to fulfill the particular requirement. When a re-quirement has been met DARS will show a + or OK to mark it as complete.

The legend at the beginning of the report explains what the various abbreviations mean.

You can run a DARS at any time. A DARS report is auto-matically deleted from the system after seven days. It is the student’s responsibility to verify information contained in the DARS and to comply with all PSU graduation require-ments. Failure to satisfactorily complete any in-progress courses may change the audit of degree requirements. For further help with running and reading DARS, please see the video tutorials on the CCJO Student Advising Center

How to Run A Post-baccalaureate Certificate DARS 1. Go to the PSU Information System.

(https://banweb.pdx.edu)

2. Enter your PSU ID number (9xxxxxxxx) and PIN. Follow step 2 from previous page.

3. Under “Student Services & Financial Aid” select “DARS”.

4. Select “Submit an Audit”. 5. Select:

College/School = Not Declared/Not Applicable Audit Type = Certificate

Major = Criminology & Criminal Justice

Catalog Year/Term = student’s applicable catalog year IMPORTANT: If any of the above selections are different, DARS will return an inaccurate report. 6. Run Analysis.

7. Click on “View Submitted Audits”. You will have the option to print the DARS.

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Internship

In our experience, all students, regardless of their occupational experience, benefit from completing an internship during their undergraduate training. For those with prior work experience the intern-ship provides the opportunity to explore new areas and learn new skills. For students who have never worked in the field this is a chance to get practical experience, form relationships, and add to your resume.

The 8-credit CCJ 404 internship requirement can be completed by:

Taking 8 credits in a single quarter (i.e., 200 hours of volunteer service)

Or by successfully completing two 4-credit courses over two quarters (i.e., 100 hours each).

Students who already have a minimum of one year of documented field experience at a criminal justice (or related) agency may bypass fulfilling the internship requirement of volunteering with a field site. The student is identified as having

Prior Work Experience (PWE).

The student must still fulfill the internship 8-credit

requirement by enrolling in the CCJ 407 Criminology and Criminal Justice Professional Development Seminars. To apply for the PWE option, the student must complete the Application for Internship Substitution Form - Prior Work Experience - and it must be approved by the CCJO program.

Each term, six (6) CCJ 407 Seminar courses will be offered. CCJ 407 seminars are designed to meet the internship requirement and learning needs of students who have prior work experience (PWE) in the criminal justice (or a related) field. They also provide an opportunity for students to complete credits missing to fulfill the requirement for the major.

CCJ 407 courses will replace CCJ 404 classes for students whose PWE has been approved.

Students with PWE who have already taken one or more AJ404 course will enroll in CCJ 407 courses, beginning with the Winter 2009 term, if they still have internship credits to fulfill. PWE students should enroll for the number of credits yet re-maining to complete the CCJO internship require-ment (or as many as they believe they can success-fully carry in any one term).

CCJO is offering six (6) CCJ 407 sections addressing contemporary criminal justice topics, all of which will be available each term, including the summer session. Each topic is 10-weeks and is worth two credits. Students may enroll in up to six sections, depending on the number of credits hours needed and the number of credit hours a student wants to manage.

CCJ 407 TOPIC AREAS INCLUDE:

Ethics

Collaboration

Leadership

Diversity

Discretion

Restorative Justice

AJ407 courses operate much like “reading and conference” classes. Each course contains a bibli-ography of selected readings on a topic of par-ticular relevancy to law enforcement professionals. For each topic, students are expected to choose five of the articles provided, from which they will develop an annotated bibliography, which will be submitted, then discussed by phone with their professor as the final exam.

Figure

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References