Master of Accounting & Diploma Programs

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Master of Accounting

&

Diploma Programs

Information Guide

2015

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IMPORTANT DATES

Fall 2014

October 15 ... Deadline to submit Diploma Application to SAF Office (HH 3157)

October 15 ... Deadline to apply to MAcc through OUAC

October 17 ... Deadline to complete LEARN Winter course selection quiz November 23 ... Quest course enrolment for Winter term opens

December 1 ... Deadline to submit Undergrad Intent to Graduate Form to Registrar’s Office

December 10 ... Winter Term Fees Due Winter 2015 January 5 ... Winter Term Lectures Begin

January 30 ... Deadline to complete LEARN Spring course selection quiz February 16-20 ... Reading Week

April 3 ... University closed – Good Friday April 6 ... Winter Term Lectures End

April 7-17 ... MAcc/Diploma Examination Period

Spring 2015 April 27 ... Spring Term Fees Due May 4 ... Spring Term Lectures Begin May 18 ... University closed – Victoria Day July 1 ... University closed – Canada Day July 24 ... Spring Term Lectures End July 27-July 31 ... MAcc Examination Period

August 3 ... University closed – Civic Holiday

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Making Informed Decisions

As a UW undergraduate accounting student considering the Diploma or the MAcc Program, you have many important decisions to make. This Guide provides you with most of the information you will need to make informed decisions about these programs, but you should also attend the Program and Course Information sessions, speak to faculty who teach in these programs, and talk to alumni who have made these decisions in prior years.

As you are aware, the Canadian accounting profession has undergone major change recently, with CAs, CMAs, and CGAs uniting under the Chartered Professional Accountant (CPA) designation (see the CPA Canada website for more information). The unification process has resulted in new pathways to the Common Final Evaluation (CFE) and CPA designation, while still allowing students to have the CA designation tagged on to their CPA if certain conditions are met. Most importantly, as CPA-Accredited programs, the UW undergraduate/MAcc degree combination still provides direct access to the CFE for successful graduates. Full details of the new pathways and CA tagging are provided in this Guide, so please be sure to read it thoroughly and carefully so that you understand all of your options.

As Directors of the Diploma and MAcc programs, we are keen to uphold the high standards of both programs and will provide you with whatever assistance you may need to make informed decisions about these programs. If you have questions about admission or course selection issues, you should direct them to Julie at the email address below. Any issues of a purely administrative or clerical nature should be directed to Karen Schooley, the Graduate Studies Co-ordinator (kschooley@uwaterloo.ca). All other queries can be directed to Greg at the address below.

All the best in your 2015 program!

Greg Berberich, CPA, CA, PhD Julie Robson, CPA, CA, MAcc CPA (Illinois)

Director Associate Director, Admissions

MAcc & Diploma Programs MAcc & Diploma Programs greg.berberich@uwaterloo.ca jrobson@uwaterloo.ca

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MAcc & Diploma Program Information Guide

Table of Contents

Overview of Programs ... 1

Admission & Degree Requirements ... 8

Course Information ... 15

Application & Course Selection ... 62

Tuition and Scholarships ... 68

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THE MACC PROGRAM PROGRAM OVERVIEW

The MAcc is a professional degree designed to combine the exploration of career interests with preparation for the CFE. Students with a specific career interest may select courses that provide them with a head start on this career. Students without a specific career interest may take courses in several practice areas to determine which careers they might like to pursue. All MAcc students must take five courses that develop the technical and enabling competencies needed to pass the CFE and obtain the CPA designation. The MAcc program is accredited by CPA Canada, so students who successfully complete the program may proceed directly to the September 2015 CFE

.

Career Paths

The MAcc program is designed to combine professional accounting career interests with preparation for the CFE. Some students considering the MAcc program may have already identified a particular career path by the end of their undergraduate program, whereas others may still be uncertain about the accounting career they want to pursue. The MAcc program offers benefits to both groups.

Students who have determined a particular career path can select courses that will develop the competencies required for success in their chosen career. Students considering a career as part of the management team of an organization can, for example, take courses that will expand their knowledge of contemporary management issues, assist them in designing and implementing incentive systems, improve their financial statement analysis competencies, or expand their ability to develop and execute profitable business models.

Students who are less certain about their careers can select courses that will provide them with exposure to a variety of practice areas, such as forensic accounting, tax or business valuations, to determine the practice areas they would like to pursue upon completing the MAcc.

The Course Information section of the Guide provides some guidance on selecting courses pertaining to specific designations and careers.

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THE MACC PROGRAM PROGRAM OVERVIEW

MAcc Pathways to a CPA(, CA) Designation

The 2015 MAcc program has been accredited by CPA Canada, which provides students holding an MAcc degree with direct access to the CFE. Within the MAcc program, however, there are four distinct pathways to the CFE and, ultimately, to a CPA designation, possibly with a CA designation tagged on to it. These pathways are described briefly below and the decision tree on the next page helps you determine which of these pathways you are eligible to follow, along with the MAcc courses you must take for each pathway.

The 51-Credit-Hour Pathways

Any MAcc student with a grade less than 60 in any CPA-required undergraduate course completed after April 30, 2014 (see next page for list of courses) must follow one of the two 51CH pathways through the MAcc. All other MAcc students may follow one of the two other pathways in the next subsection.

The 51-Credit-Hour-CA/Public Accounting (51CH-CA/PA) Pathway: Students who fall in the above category must follow this pathway if they want to (1) be eligible for a Public Accounting Licence or (2) be eligible to have the CA designation tagged on to their CPA designation, which also requires employment with an Approved Training Office by January 31, 2015.

The 51-Credit-Hour-CPA (51CH-CPA) Pathway: Students who follow this pathway will receive a CPA designation, but will not be eligible for either a Public Accounting Licence or a CA tag.

The CA/PA and CPA Pathways

The CA/Public Accounting (CA/PA) Pathway: Students must follow this pathway if they want to (1) be eligible for a Public Accounting Licence or (2) be eligible to have the CA designation tagged on to their CPA designation, which also requires employment with an Approved Training Office by January 31, 2015.

The CPA Pathway: Students who follow this pathway will receive a CPA designation, but will not be eligible for either a Public Accounting Licence or a CA tag.

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THE MACC PROGRAM PROGRAM OVERVIEW

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THE DIPLOMA PROGRAM PROGRAM OVERVIEW

IMPORTANT NOTE: The SAF has been accredited by CPA Canada to offer a Graduate Diploma in Accounting, but this new Diploma program has not yet been approved by UW Senate or by the Ontario Ministry of Colleges and Universities, so it cannot be offered as an option to students at this time. All references to the “Diploma” or the “Diploma program” in this Guide refer to UW’s legacy Post-Baccalaureate Diploma program, which is not a graduate-level program and is not accredited by CPA Canada.

The UW Post-Baccalaureate Diploma in Accounting provides students with the courses they need to gain exemptions from much of the coursework required in the new CPA Canada Professional Education Program (PEP). Students who successfully complete the Diploma courses and meet CPA Ontario’s minimum 51-credit-hour requirements (see table on next page) will be exempted from the coursework involved in the two Core modules and the Assurance and Tax Elective modules of the PEP, allowing them to simply challenge the exam for each of these four modules before proceeding to complete the two Capstone modules of the PEP and then challenging the new CPA Common Final Exam (CFE). Students who follow this path can reach the CFE by May 2016 at the earliest, although September 2016 is more likely (beginning in 2016, the CFE will be offered twice a year in May and September).

The Diploma Program was designed for students who did not want to complete or could not gain admission to the Master of Accounting Program. It allowed aspiring CA students to complete the ICAO’s legacy 51-credit-hour (51CH) requirements and then proceed to the now-defunct Core Knowledge Exam and School of Accountancy before challenging the UFE. As such, the program was not designed with the new CPA PEP or CFE in mind and except for slight alterations, CPA Ontario will not allow changes to it.

Prerequisite Undergraduate Courses

Students who wish to enroll in the Diploma program must have successfully completed the following 15 51CH courses as part of their undergraduate degree:

AFM 102, 231 (or MTHEL 100 or COMM 231), 271 (or 272), 291, 341 (or CS 330), 361, 371 (or 372), 391, 401, 451, 461, 481, 491, and ECON 101 and 102.

Non-MAcc Pathways to a CPA(,CA) Designation

The decision tree that follows the next page presents the four pathways to the CFE that are available to students who do not want to or are ineligible to complete the MAcc program. As the tree shows, the Diploma makes sense only for two groups of students, all of whom should also have a reasonable chance of achieving CPA Ontario’s required minimum average of 70% across all 19 51CH courses (the 15 above plus the four Diploma courses) upon completion of the program, which based on past experience means they should have at least a 69% average across the 15 51CH courses listed above. The two groups who should consider the Diploma are:

1. Students who will be eligible for and want to obtain the CPA, CA designation rather than the CPA designation only. To be eligible for the CA tag on your CPA designation, you must be registered as a legacy CA student with CPA Ontario by January 31, 2015, which requires that you have secured ATO employment by this date or have had ATO employment in the past and maintained your student registration in good standing up to this date. Students in this group must follow the Diploma-CA

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THE DIPLOMA PROGRAM PROGRAM OVERVIEW

2. Students who have a grade below 60 in any of the 17 undergraduate courses required by CPA Canada for entry to the PEP program (see list in bottom-left corner of tree), regardless of when the course was completed (the April 30, 2014 cut-off date applies only to students who are proceeding to the CFE through a CPA-accredited graduate program such as the MAcc). Students in this group must take the Diploma-CPA Pathway to the CFE or will otherwise have to take the PREP/PEP Pathway, which requires you to retake the courses with grades below 60 or take the equivalent CPA PREP

courses before being eligible for entry to the full PEP.

Students not in one of these two groups are strongly advised to follow the PREP/PEP Pathway (if you have any CPA-required courses below 60) or the PEP Pathway rather than follow one of the two Diploma pathways to the CFE.

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THE DIPLOMA PROGRAM PROGRAM OVERVIEW Non-MAcc Pathways Decision Tree

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Admission & Degree

Requirements

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ADMISSION & DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Admission Requirements - MAcc Program

Admission to the MAcc program requires ALL of the following:

1. Successful completion of one of the following University of Waterloo undergraduate degrees by no later than February 1, 2015:

• Bachelor of Accounting and Financial Management

• BMath Chartered Professional Accountancy Studies, or

• BSc in Biotechnology Chartered Professional Accountancy Studies

2. Achievement of at least a 75% average (calculated with rounding) in the last two years of the undergraduate program above. This admission average is calculated using the grades obtained in all courses completed beginning in the 3A term and ending in the term immediately preceding commencement of the MAcc program. Where a course has been repeated, grades from all attempts will be included in the calculation of this admission average.

3. Achievement of at least a 75% average (calculated with rounding) in the following set of courses. Where a course has been repeated, the grade obtained in the student’s first attempt at the course will be included in the calculation of this admission average. Students who took any of the following courses at an institution other than UW must include with their MAcc application an official transcript from the other institution that provides details of the course(s) taken and the grade(s) received. • AFM 331 • AFM 341 or CS 330 • AFM 361 • AFM 431 or PHIL 215 • AFM 451 • AFM 481 • AFM 491 • AFM 401 • AFM 461 • AFM 482 • AFM 471 or AFM 476 • AFM 411

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ADMISSION & DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Conditional Admission Offers – MAcc Program

Once all MAcc applications have been received and reviewed, conditional offers of admission will be made to all applicants meeting both of the following requirements:

1. Achievement of at least a 75% average (calculated with rounding) across all courses completed between and including the student’s 3A term and the Spring 2014 term. Where a course has been repeated, grades from all attempts will be included in the calculation of this admission average.

2. Achievement of at least a 75% average across all courses in the list below that have been completed by the time of application to the program. Where a course has been repeated, the grade obtained in the student’s first attempt at the course will be included in the calculation of this admission average. Students who took any of the following courses at an institution other than UW must include with their MAcc application an official transcript from the other institution that provides details of the course(s) taken and the grade(s) received.

• AFM 331 • AFM 341 or CS 330 • AFM 361 • AFM 431 or PHIL 215 • AFM 451 • AFM 481 • AFM 491 • AFM 401 • AFM 461 • AFM 482 • AFM 471 or AFM 476 • AFM 411

Students who have not received a numerical grade in at least five of these courses by the time of application will be deemed to have not met this requirement.

All students who do not receive a conditional offer of admission will be considered for admission once all 4B grades are final.

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ADMISSION & DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Degree Requirements – MAcc Program To receive an MAcc degree, students must:

1. Achieve a grade of at least 60% in each MAcc course and a minimum overall average of 75% in all eight MAcc courses (calculated without rounding).

AND

2. Complete the online Graduate Academic Integrity Module (Graduate AIM).

At the conclusion of the winter term, a panel of SAF faculty is convened to conduct a review of each MAcc student whose cumulative average is below 75%. These students may be given the opportunity to proceed to the spring term if, in the opinion of the review panel, they have a reasonable prospect of achieving the degree requirements upon completion of the spring term. Any student who is deemed not to have a reasonable prospect of satisfying the degree requirements by the end of the spring term will be required to withdraw from the MAcc program.

Students who do not satisfy MAcc degree requirements in 2015 are not eligible to challenge the CFE. These students will be eligible to complete the CPA PEP program with the exemptions available to Diploma students if they meet the PEP exemption requirements detailed in the “Graduation Requirements – Diploma” section of this Guide, which appears two pages after this one. Students who do not meet the PEP exemption requirements must complete the full CPA PEP program.

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ADMISSION & DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Admission Requirements – Diploma Program

Admission to the Program requires successful completion of one of the following University of Waterloo undergraduate degrees:

• Bachelor of Accounting and Financial Management

• BMath Chartered Professional Accountancy Studies, or

• BSc in Biotechnology Chartered Professional Accountancy Studies AND successful completion of the following 15 51CH courses:

AFM 102, 231 (or MTHEL 100 or COMM 231), 271 (or 272), 291, 341 (or CS 330), 361, 371 (or 372), 391, 401, 451, 461, 481, 491, and ECON 101 and 102.

Applicants to the Diploma program who have not met all their undergraduate degree requirements by the end of the fall term preceding commencement of Diploma studies may be permitted to complete their undergraduate degree and Diploma concurrently. Admission on this basis is limited to those who have no more than the equivalent of one undergraduate course outstanding in meeting their undergraduate degree requirements and requires the approval of both the Undergraduate Officer and the Associate Director. Special permission will be granted based on an assessment of whether the applicant has a reasonable prospect of completing the requirements of both programs in the winter term. Applicants given admission on this basis should note that accommodations for any conflicts (particularly with respect to exam scheduling) in the Diploma program arising from their enrolment in non-Diploma program courses cannot be made.

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ADMISSION & DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Graduation Requirements – Diploma

To receive a Diploma in Accounting, students must achieve a grade of at least 50% in each Diploma course and a minimum overall average of 72% in the four Diploma courses (calculated without rounding). Note that the Diploma is not required for the PEP exemptions or for entry to the PEP, so students who do not satisfy the Diploma requirements may still be eligible for the exemptions or for PEP entry (see below for PEP exemption and entry requirements).

PEP Exemption Requirements

To be eligible for the PEP exemptions available to Diploma students, you must have (1) a cumulative average of at least 70% in the 19 51-CH courses below and (2) a 50% passing grade in each course (the minimum-60% rule for CPA-required courses does not apply to 51-CH students who satisfy the preceding two criteria). The 19 courses included in the 51 credit hours are:

AFM 102, 231 (or MTHEL 100 or COMM 231), 271 (or 272), 291, 341 (or CS 330), 361, 371 (or 372), 391, 401, 451, 461, 481, 491, 501, 502, 503, 504, and ECON 101 and 102.

PEP Entry Requirements

Diploma students who fail to meet the above requirements must meet the requirements for entry to the full PEP if they still wish to pursue a CPA. The full PEP entry requirements consist of: (1) completion of an undergraduate degree, (2) a cumulative average of 65% in the 17 CPA-required courses listed below, and (3) a minimum grade of 60% in each course listed below, regardless of when it was completed (the April 30, 2014 cut-off date applies only to students who are proceeding to the CFE through a CPA-accredited graduate program such as the MAcc). Diploma students who do not meet these requirements will either have to retake the courses with grades below 60 or take the equivalent CPA PREP courses before being eligible for entry to the full PEP.

• AFM 231 or MTHEL 100 or COMM 231

• AFM 271 or 272 • AFM 291 • AFM 331 • AFM 341 or CS 330 • AFM 361 • AFM 371 or 372 • AFM 391 • AFM 401 • AFM 451 • AFM 461 • AFM 481 • AFM 482 • AFM 491 • ECON 101 • ECON 102 • STAT 211, 231 or 241 or ECON 221

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OTHER MAcc/DIPLOMA PROGRAM POLICIES

Academic Integrity

All MAcc and Diploma students are subject to UW’s Academic Integrity policies, which can be found under Policy 71 at the UW Secretariat’s website.

Missing Final Exams for Valid Reasons

Students should note that while UW's examination policy does allow certain valid reason for missing a final examination, it does not automatically entitle a student to an alternate exam before the end of the program year (See UW’s Exam Regulations at the Registrar’s website for more information.). Because it is not possible to set, administer, and grade a deferred final exam by the end of the program year, completion of the MAcc/Diploma degree requirements is effectively deferred by one year for any students missing a final exam for a valid reason.

Section Assignments

Students enrolled in courses with multiple sections must attend the section in which they are registered, unless they receive prior instructor approval to attend another section due to an acceptable, non-recurring conflict.

Communicating with Students

All program-related email is sent to your @uwaterloo.ca address. If you wish to have email redirected to another address, please refer to the mail-forwarding guidelines at UW’s Official Student Email Address webpage.

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THE MACC PROGRAM COURSE INFORMATION

MAcc Courses

MAcc course offerings fall into three categories: CPA-Required Courses

ACC 610 – Professional Accounting Practice ACC 611 – Financial Reporting with Integration

ACC 680 – Management Accounting, Strategy and Finance

All students pursuing a CPA designation must take these three courses. CPA-Elective Courses

ACC 607 – Tax Issues Integration ACC 650 – Assurance and Governance ACC 685 – Performance Management

ACC 690 – Corporate Financial Management

All students pursuing a CPA designation must take two of these courses and can take as many as three. Students following the CA/PA or 51CH-CA/PA pathway through the MAcc must take ACC 607 and ACC 650. Students following the 51CH-CPA pathway must take ACC 650. All other CPA students may choose any of the electives. MAcc-Elective Courses

ACC 605 – International Tax ACC 606 – Business Valuations

ACC 609 – Financial Statement Analysis ACC 621 – Core IT Concepts for Accountants ACC 622 – Electronic Commerce

ACC 623 – Business Technology Law - IT Challenges & Opportunities ACC 626 – Information System Assurance & Computer-Assisted Auditing ACC 652 – Forensic Accounting

ACC 662 – Tax Policy & Working with the CRA ACC 690 – Professional Judgement

ACC 690 – Tax for the CFO

Students who take two CPA-Elective courses must take three MAcc-Elective courses, while those who take three CPA-Elective courses must take two MAcc-Elective courses. All students following a 51CH pathway through the MAcc must include ACC 621 as one of their MAcc-Elective courses, so can take only two CPA-Elective courses.

The table on the next page provides key details on these course offerings and also suggests which elective courses to consider if you are interested in a particular career path. The pages following the table provide descriptions of each course.

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MAcc Course Offerings

Winter MAcc Courses # of

Sections Instructors

Elective Suggestions by Sample Career Paths

Controller Taxation Corp. Finance Assurance Info Systems CPA-Required Courses

ACC 611 Financial Reporting w/ Integration 5 Weidman 2/Mann 3 ACC 680 Mgt. Accounting, Strategy & Finance 5 Libby 3/Vanden Bosch 2 CPA-Elective Courses (must take 2 of these)

ACC 607 Tax Issues Integration* 5 Robson 4/Rockx 1 X

ACC 650 Assurance & Governance* 5 Pomeroy/Wainberg X

ACC 685 Performance Management 2 Webb 2 X

ACC 690 Corporate Financial Management 2 Hayes 2 X X

MAcc-Elective Courses

ACC 621 Core IT Concepts for Accountants** 1 Datardina X X X

ACC 622 Electronic Commerce 1 Boritz X

ACC 652 Forensic Accounting 1 Robinson X

Spring MAcc Courses

CPA-Required Course

ACC 610 Professional Accounting Practice 5 Berberich MAcc-Elective Courses

ACC 605 International Tax 1 TBD X

ACC 606 Business Valuations 4 Vert X X X

ACC 609 Financial Statement Analysis 3 Chen X X

ACC 623 Business Technology Law 1 Charters X

ACC 626 IS Assurance & CAATs 1 IV X X

ACC 662 Tax Policy & Working with the CRA 1 Macnaughton X

ACC 690 Tax for the CFO 1 Lin X X

ACC 690 Professional Judgement 1 Boritz * CA/PA and 51CH-CA/PA pathway students must take these two CPA-Elective courses. ** All students following one of the 51CH pathways must take this MAcc-Elective course.

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ACC 610

Professional Accounting Practice

CPA-Required

Faculty: Greg Berberich and various Group Facilitators Term Offered: Spring

Career Relevance

This course is required for all students pursuing a CPA designation. It will be used to deliver CPA Canada’s Capstone 1 module and will also provide extensive exam-writing practice to prepare students for all three days of the CFE.

Course Overview and Objectives

Group Case Component

The first day of the CFE consists of one large case featuring the same company that is the subject of CPA Canada’s Capstone 1 module, which consists solely of a major group case analysis with a related written report and oral presentation. One significant component of ACC 610 is the direct delivery of this Capstone module. Per CPA Canada’s Capstone 1 guidance, this module’s primary objectives are to:

1. Continue the development of candidates' enabling competencies, particularly their teamwork and leadership, professional and ethical behaviour, problem-solving and decision-making, and communication competencies;

2. Simulate an authentic business problem, including gathering and evaluating relevant information, developing a written report, and preparing an oral presentation suitable for delivery to a board of directors or senior management team;

3. Prepare candidates for the Common Final Examination, particularly Day 1, which will draw on both the content and the skills developed in Capstone 1;

4. Continue the development of candidates' integration of technical competency areas;

and key aspects of the module include:

• a significant written report that simulates a report to a board of directors or team of senior executives

• an oral team presentation that simulates a presentation to a board or team of senior executives

• structured time for questions and answers that simulates a question period from a board or team of senior executives

• individual reflections and peer evaluations.

Each group will be assigned an outside facilitator who will provide guidance (not solutions!) as the group completes its work.

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ACC 610

Professional Accounting Practice

Course

Overview and Objectives (continued)

Individual Exam-Writing Component

This component of the course will provide extensive opportunities to fine-tune the competencies required for success on the CFE. Its broad objectives are to:

1. Continue your development of the CPA Competency Map’s enabling competencies, particularly your written communication and self-management competencies;

2. Continue the development of your ability to draw on and integrate knowledge from the CPA Competency Map’s six technical competency areas;

3. Prepare you for the various types of cases you will encounter across all three days of the CFE.

These objectives will be accomplished using weekly practice exam-writing sessions, in-class debriefing of cases, peer evaluations, and formal case examinations.

Course Materials

All required materials will be distributed via the course website. The CPA Handbook and Canadian Income Tax Act will also be important resources. Proposed

Course

Evaluation and Workload

NOTE: The workload in this course will be very heavy. All work related to the Capstone 1 group project will be done outside of class time and the project will be much more challenging than any you’ve encountered before: “The case for Capstone 1 is unlike other cases that candidates would have seen in the CPA PEP [or university] due to its complexity and length, its increased focus on strategic analysis, its integrative nature, its requirement for external research, and the potential for increased ambiguity and lack of directedness for critical variables and assumptions.” (CPA Canada)

In addition, the work required for the individual exam-writing component will be roughly equivalent to that of a standard MAcc course. You should therefore be prepared to work very hard in this course.

Final grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Component Evaluation

Class Participation Group Case Requirements

10% 40%

Midterm Examination 25%

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ACC 611

Financial Reporting with Integration

CPA-Required

Faculty: Professors Shari Mann & Christine Wiedman Term Offered: Winter

Career Relevance

This course is required for all students pursuing a CPA designation. It will help you develop an in-depth knowledge of financial reporting and integrate this knowledge with other CPA technical competencies .

Course Overview

and Objectives The main objectives of the course are:

 To further develop your understanding of key financial reporting issues,

 To help you apply your knowledge in the analysis of cases, through the identification of issues, and the evaluation and discussion of alternatives and recommendations,

 To develop your ability to critically assess existing standards, and

 To enhance your ability to integrate and communicate financial reporting, assurance and tax information.

Relevance for Professional Designation Accreditation

The course is primarily concentrated in the Financial Reporting area of the CPA Competency Map. This specific competency is very significant in that it is tested at the highest level (perform) of the three possible levels of proficiency. The course will also develop many of the Map’s enabling competencies and cover some topics from the Assurance and Tax areas, mainly through the use of multi-subject cases.

Course Materials Required Materials:

1. ACC 611 / AFM 504 Course Package (includes readings and cases) – purchased at the University bookstore

2. The CICA Handbook, Part I – International Financial Reporting Standards, Part II – Accounting Standards for Private Enterprises, and Public Sector Accounting Standards Available through the UW library system

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ACC 611

Financial Reporting with Integration

Anticipated Workload and Course Grades

Final grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Graded Component Weight

Class Contribution and Participation Interim Case Submission

20% 5%

Group Presentation and Handout 30%

Final Exam 45%

Total 100%

Tentative Course Outline

FOR REFERENCE ONLY & SUBJECT TO CHANGES

Week Topic

1 Introduction and Case Analysis

2 Conceptual Framework and Financial Statement Presentation 3 Revenue Recognition

4 Inventory and Employee Benefits 5 Leases

6 Financial Instruments 7 Reading Week – No Class 8 Liabilities

9 Tangible and Intangible Capital Assets 10 Impairment and Fair Value

11 Business Combinations and Strategic Investments 12 Income Taxes

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ACC 680

Management Accounting, Strategy, and Finance

CPA-Required

Faculty: Theresa Libby, PhD, CPA, CA and Nancy Vanden Bosch, CPA, CA, CMA

Term Offered: Winter Career

Relevance

This is an essential course for anyone interested in obtaining a professional accounting designation or pursuing a career where in-depth knowledge of management accounting is important.

Course Overview and Objectives

The main objectives of the course are:

• To further develop your ability to apply key management accounting methods and analytical tools;

• To improve your case analysis capabilities, through the identification of issues, and the evaluation and discussion of alternatives and recommendations;

• To further develop your ability to integrate strategic thinking and financial management considerations while making

recommendations; and,

• To enhance your ability to communicate management accounting information and to communicate analysis performed to support management decision-making.

Relevance for Professional Designation Accreditation

The course focuses on the Management Accounting competency of the CPA Competency Map. This competency is significant in that it is one of two areas of depth to be examined on the new Common Final Exam (CFE). The course integrates specific competencies from the Strategy and

Governance competency area and the Finance competency area of the CPA Competency Map.

The course also provides the opportunity to further develop enabling competencies, including problem-solving and decision-making capabilities and communication skills.

Course Materials

The course materials include a set of cases bundled in the ACC 680 Course Package, which you may purchase at the University bookstore. Additional review resources may be assigned for some topics from:

− your AFM 481 and AFM 482 textbooks;

− Management Accounting Standards published by CPA Canada; and,

Harvard Business Review - articles are available for free through the university library’s Business Source Complete database.

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ACC 680

Management Accounting, Strategy, and Finance

Anticipated Workload and Course Grades

The course is a case-based learning experience. The assigned cases are discussed and debriefed during class. Face-to-face class time is used

primarily for case discussion and group debrief exercises. Prior to class, you analyze the case assigned for the class, completing assigned readings as needed to reinforce technical competencies learned during undergrad courses. After class, you do a more detailed case debriefing to identify your individual areas of strength or needed improvements.

In this course, you are expected to apply knowledge and skills developed during your undergraduate program. You are also exposed to additional readings to deepen your understanding of the following topics:

• management information requirements (identification of data requirements to address performance and risk management needs),

• business planning and analysis (integration of strategy development, capital budgeting, operational budgeting, and reporting against performance targets)

• cost management (cost allocation principles and methods using an integrated classification scheme of direct/indirect and fixed/variable costs)

• revenue management (revenue analysis and forecasting techniques), and

• segment profitability (product and customer segment profitability reporting for specific decision-making purposes).

Course grades will likely be determined in the following manner:

Graded Component Weight

Class Participation/Case Debrief Contribution 20%

Team Presentation 20%

Mid-term Exam 20%

Final Exam 40%

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ACC 607

Tax Issues Integration

CPA-Elective

(All students following the CA/PA or 51CH-CA/PA pathway must take this course.) Faculty: Professor Julie Robson CPA, CA

Term Offered: Winter Career

Relevance

The course is relevant to students interested in developing tax issue identification and understanding the interrelationship of tax issues in practical settings. The course is useful to students reviewing tax and preparing for the CFE.

Course Overview and Objectives

The course provides students with experience identifying tax issues, and integrating tax knowledge and principles learned in the undergraduate tax courses. This objective will be achieved through preparation and in-class discussion of case studies, and by completing case assignments.

Relevance for Professional Designation Accreditation

The course will be of benefit to students preparing for the CFE. Course content will take into account the enabling competencies and the specific taxation competencies in The CPA Competency Map for entry level

accounting professionals. Issue identification and case writing skills will be emphasized.

Course Materials

Required texts:

• Course Case Package (posted in Learn)

• The Canadian Income Tax Act (edition used in 4B)

• R.E. Beam, S.N. Laiken and J.J. Barnett, Introduction to Federal Income Taxation in Canada, current edition

Proposed Course

Evaluation and Workload

Evaluation of advance preparation through participation in class discussions and periodic submission of advance preparation is a significant component of the final grade. The Group Case Assignment is completed in groups of four.

Final grades in the course will be determined in the following manner:

Workload Evaluation

Advance preparation 20%

Case Assignment (Group): Due around week 4 25% Case Assignment (Individual): Due around week 8 25%

Case Exam (Computer lab) 30%

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ACC 650

Assurance & Governance

CPA-Elective

(All students following the CA/PA, 51CH-CA/PA, or 51CH-CPA pathway must take this course.)

Faculty: James Wainberg and Bradley Pomeroy Term Offered: Winter

Career Relevance

This course is for students interested in joining the public accounting profession. The public accountant’s traditional role, as an external auditor working at an accounting firm, is to plan and perform audits of company financial statements. However, the public accountant can take on a variety of other assurance roles for companies (e.g., as an internal auditor), regulators (e.g., as an inspector for the Canadian Public Accountability Board or CPAB), and other organizations (e.g., as an auditor for Fairtrade Canada). This course will help you prepare for a career as a public accountant by enhancing the breadth and depth of your understanding of assurance and governance practices.

Course Overview and Objectives

This course is designed to develop your ability to exercise appropriate professional judgment in the areas of assurance, governance, and financial reporting. In particular, you will gain experience identifying, ranking, analyzing, and integrating assurance, governance, and financial reporting issues. By the end of the course, you should be able to perform such tasks with a high level of professional competence.

Cases and associated readings are assigned on a weekly basis. Class sessions consist primarily of class and group discussions of assigned readings and cases. Relevance for

Professional Designation Accreditation

This course is designed to develop your ability to apply your knowledge and understanding of assurance concepts in a competency-based learning framework. In terms of the CPA Competency Map, this course is focused on the audit and assurance technical competency area, but also integrates technical competencies from the strategy and governance and financial reporting areas. This course will also help you develop many of the enabling competency areas.

Course Materials

Courseware Package CPA Handbook

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ACC 650

Assurance & Governance

Overview of Course Outline

This course will help you develop the following competencies:

 Identify the client’s assurance needs and recommend an appropriate engagement type to satisfy those needs.

 Evaluate issues related to the decision to accept or continue providing assurance services for your prospective or existing clients.

 Identify and mitigate threats to auditor independence.

 Plan the assurance engagement by first assessing materiality based on a user analysis.

 Assess the design and operational effectiveness of the client’s system of internal controls.

 Evaluate the appropriateness of the client’s accounting policies and disclosures.

 Use the audit risk model to assess the risk of material misstatement (including fraud risk) at the financial statement level and the assertion level for classes of transactions, accounts balances, and disclosures.

 Adopt an audit approach and design audit procedures that are appropriate in terms of addressing the risks you identify.

 Execute the audit plan, evaluate the evidence collected, and document the results.

 Draw conclusions based on the results, and prepare a communication for the users.

 Evaluate the role of the audit committee in the financial reporting process.  Understand the role of the Canadian Public Accountability Board (CPAB)

and other regulatory bodies in evaluating the quality of the work performed by public accountants.

Course

Grades Final grades in this course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Learning Assessment Course Grade Weight

(Subject to Change) Participation and Professional Behaviour 10%

Midterm Exam 30%

Team Assignment 15%

Team Presentation 15%

Final Exam 30%

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ACC 685

Performance Management

CPA-Elective

Faculty: Alan Webb, PhD, FCPA , FCA Term Offered: Winter

Career Relevance

This course is intended for individuals interested in developing capabilities relevant for careers in performance management and control.

Course Overview and Objectives

This course will provide in-depth coverage of several performance management and control topics, many of which were introduced in AFM 102, 280 and 482. The topics include: strategy development and

implementation, performance measurement, corporate social responsibility reporting, cost management, revenue management, relative performance evaluation, goal-setting, and indivivdual incentive programs. These topics are of considerable interest to managers in practice and are relevant to anyone considering a career in performance management. The course will also cover numerous theories of human behavior and motivation (e.g., goal theory, agency theory, equity theory, expectancy theory, etc.).

Relevance for Professional Designation Accreditation

2015 CPA Competency Map

This course covers several competencies under Strategy and Governance: Mission, Vison, Values and Mandate (2.2), Strategy Development (2.3), Strategy Implementation (2.4); and Management Accounting: Cost Management (3.3), Revenue Management (3.4), Organizational

Performance Measurement (3.6), Individual Performance Measurement (3.7). Moreover, the use of cases and group projects to illustrate and reinforce key concepts will facilitate development of some of the key CPA Enabling Competencies: Problem-Solving and Decision-Making (2), Communication (3), and Teamwork and Leadership (5).

Course Materials

No textbook. Readings will include cases, background articles, and research articles. These readings will either be posted to the course website or will be available in the form of a course readings package purchased (approx. $40) online.

Course Grades Final Grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Workload Evaluation Class participation 20% Individual assignments 10% Mid-term exams (I & II) 50% Group case analysis 20%

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ACC 690

Corporate Financial Management

Cases and Applications

CPA-Elective

Faculty: Frank Hayes

Term Offered: Winter 2015 Career

Relevance

This course is designed for students seeking careers within corporate finance divisions in large corporations, consulting firms, and in equity analysis and investment roles in the financial sector.

Course Overview and Objectives

The objective is to further develop your ability to make decisions facing financial managers and investors based on corporate finance theory; and to develop your communication capabilities so you can converse in

mainstream corporate finance issues. Relevance for

Professional Designation Accreditation

The course focuses on the Finance competency area of the CPA

Competency Map, but integrates with other specific competencies on a case-by-case basis. You will also have the opportunity to further develop enabling competencies, including problem-solving and decision-making capabilities and communication skills.

Course Materials

The ACC 690 Course Package available at the University bookstore includes cases and articles to be used in the course.

Anticipated Workload and Course Grades

The classes encompass both case analysis and discussion of articles from practice-oriented academic journals. The course includes a substantial class participation requirement, and correspondingly, a relatively large amount of preparation for each class. The material leads to a practical, in-depth

application of corporate finance competencies for decision-making

purposes, including analysis of financing sources and financing plans, cash flow and working capital management, investment management and financial risk management including derivatives, capital budgeting

decisions, distribution decisions, and valuation of businesses and intangible assets.

Course grades will likely be determined in the following manner:

Grade Component Weight

Individual Class Participation 20%

Group Written Case Report 15%

Group Written Case Presentation 25%

Final Exam 40%

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ACC 605

International Tax in a Canadian Context

MAcc-Elective

Faculty: Professor TBA Term Offered: Spring

Career Relevance

The course is designed to provide students with a foundation in the basics of international tax law in Canada. The course is of most interest to students interested in a specialization in Taxation and a necessity to those planning to specialize in International Tax. It would also be relevant to students who will not specialize in tax but want to understand the tax implications of international transactions.

Course Overview and Objectives

The course reviews the Canadian income tax implications of individual and corporate transactions that have a foreign element. It also examines the role of tax treaties in international tax planning with particular emphasis on the Canada-US Income Tax Convention. These objectives are accomplished by applying the statutory provisions to practical problems and cases.

Relevance for Professional Designation Accreditation

Most of the technical material covered in the course is beyond the expectations set out in the CPA competency map. However, the course does include some review of basic tax principles including residency, interest deductibility and shareholder loans that may augment a student’s CFE preparation.

Course Materials

Required texts:

1. Problem Set Package (posted in Learn)

2. Textbook: International Taxation in Canada (Arthur Cockfield, Scott Wilkie and Jinyan Li).

3. The Canadian Income Tax Act. Anticipated

Workload and Course Grades

Final grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Workload Evaluation

Advance Preparation 20%

Assignment (Tax Case) 25%

Assignment (Seminar/Submission) 25%

Final Exam (Take Home) 30%

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ACC 606

Business Valuations

MAcc-Elective

Faculty: Professor Dave Vert CPA, CA, CBV Term Offered: Spring

Career Relevance

Some say a company is worth exactly what another person is willing to pay. Or is it? How about the value of the assets? Or earnings and income? Is it the potential of the business? Or goodwill? Is it all or some of it? How do you arrive at that magic number, fairly? More importantly, who can provide that assessment? An accountant? A lawyer? A relative who just sold their business? How can you be certain? The Chartered Business Valuator (CBV) is the pre-eminent designation for Canadian business valuation experts. More information on the CBV designation is available from the Canadian Institute of Chartered Business Valuators’ (CICBV) website at www.cicbv.ca.

Course Overview and Objectives

This course is intended to provide students with the educational equivalent of the CICBV’s Programme of Studies’ Introductory and Intermediate Business and Securities Valuations courses. Topics to be covered include role of the valuator, principles of valuation, valuation approaches and techniques, risk and growth considerations, determining rates of return, goodwill, minority and controlling interests, CICBV professional standards, etc.

Relevance for Professional Designation Accreditation

CBV

Students completing this course are eligible for advanced standing in the CBV Programme of Studies for a period of 2 years following MAcc graduation. This advanced standing includes an exemption from completing the CICBV's

Introductory Valuations course and only having to challenge the CICBV's final exam for Intermediate Valuations in order to proceed through the remainder of the

CICBV's Programme. CICBV course examinations take place in September and March of each year.

CPA

The material covered in this course goes well beyond the expectations of CPA candidates and is not geared specifically towards preparation for the CPA's Common Final Exam.

With regard to the CPA Competency Map, the concepts covered in this course have some relevance to the CPA Technical Competency areas. Specifically, there is a high degree of relevance under the Finance competency area with some modest integration with both the Financial Reporting and Taxation competency areas.

Also, students will have the opportunity to further develop some of the skills set out in the CPA Enabling Competencies in the latter half of the course where both the in-class case problems and the final examination will have an increased emphasis on how valuation practitioners apply and communicate their knowledge in

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ACC 606

Business Valuations

Course

Materials

Required text:

1. Canada Valuation Service (Student Edition, 2014), Campbell, I., Carswell Publishers – ISBN 9780779851195 – cost $156.00.

2. Materials package: Readings and cases from the CICBV’s course material for Introductory and Intermediate Business Valuations. Students registered in this course will be required to submit a course materials payment during the first week of the term to the CICBV in the amount of $169.50 (includes $19.50 HST). Anticipated

Workload and Course Grades

The course material is divided into a series of weekly modules. Before coming to each class students will be expected to have completed the assigned readings and assigned problems for the corresponding module. Lectures and class discussions will focus on the application of the concepts in the assigned readings to the assigned problems.

Final Grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Graded Component Weight

Class Preparation 10%

Midterm Exam - Introductory Business Valuation 45% Final Exam - Intermediate Business Valuation 45%

Total 100%

Tentative Course Outline

FOR REFERENCE ONLY & SUBJECT TO CHANGES

Week Concepts Reviewed

1 Introduction to Business and Securities Valuations 2 Valuation Engagements & Asset-Based Approaches 3 Return Based Approaches – Part 1

4 Return Based Approaches – Part 2 5 Capitalization & Discount Rates 6 MID-TERM EXAMINATION

7 CICBV's Practice & Reporting Standards

8 Valuation Approaches – Going Deeper / Take Up Mid-term 9 Cost of Capital / Comparable Company Multiples

10 En Bloc Value and Goodwill 11 Discounts and Premiums 12 FINAL EXAMINATION

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ACC 609

Financial Statement Analysis

MAcc-Elective

Faculty: Changling Chen, Associate Professor, Accounting PhD Term: Spring

Career Relevance Financial statement analysis is an essential skill for firm valuation in a variety of occupations including investment management, corporate finance, commercial lending, and extension of credit. Since accounting information is used for valuation, both inside and outside the firm, valuation analysis should guide the accountant in providing accounting service. The accounting professional needs to understand how financial statements are used by investors and other stakeholders.

Course Overview and Objectives

This course is intended to improve your ability to analyze financial reports, with an emphasis on equity valuation. We will study accounting principles and their implications on the information presented in financial statements, and learn how to use that information in valuation models. Relevance for

Professional Accreditation

CPA/CFA

The capabilities developed through this course are included in the: - CPA Candidates Competency Map in the Organizational

Effectiveness, Control and Risk Management, Finance, and Performance Measurement competency areas.

- CFA Institute’s Candidate Body of Knowledge within the knowledge required for Financial Reporting and Analysis and Equity

Investments.

- While the course contents are not designed for the CFE or CFA exams, they are relevant as a body of knowledge. Students also have the opportunity to improve skills for problem-solving, decision-making, and communication.

Course Materials Text: Krishna Palepu and Paul Healy. Business Analysis & Valuation: Using Financial Statements (with cases), 5th edition. ISBN 13: 978-1-111-97229-5

Course package: Additional reading materials.

ACC 609

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Graded Component Weight (Tentative)

Midterm exam 35%

Team Projects 40%

Homework and Participation 25%

Total 100%

ACC 609

Financial Statement Analysis

Anti-Requisite Students who have completed AFM 492 are not permitted to enrol in this course. Anticipated Workload, Research Paper Option and Course Grades

Prior to class, students are required to complete assigned readings and homework (prepared summaries of the readings). Face-to-face class time is mainly used for discussing key issues, case-based problem solving, and presenting group works. A great deal of learning takes place when you articulate your views on issues, problems and cases. Thus, class participation is very beneficial and is required.

During the semester, one midterm will be given and there will be a final term project (no final exam). The purpose is to evaluate your

understanding of the covered material. Two team projects (including the final term project) will be given during the semester. You will be asked to present the results of your project in class.

Final Grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

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ACC 621

Core IT Concepts for Accountants

MAcc-Elective

(All students following the 51CH-CA/PA or 51CH-CPA pathway must take this course.)

Faculty: Malik Datardina Term Offered: Winter

Career Relevance

Accountants must deal with technology in a variety of ways. The goal of this course is to demystify IT from a strategic, analytic and risk perspective, so you can take the lead in your future roles as accountants when dealing with IT issues and IT professionals.

Course Overview and Objectives

This course will look at the following key areas:

• IT Investments: What should you consider when evaluating technology from a business case perspective? We look at the Gartner Hype Cycle and other related concepts around technology innovation

• Big data and analytics: How will big data impact accountants?

• IT Risk and control: How can my information get messed up? What can I do to protect it? Take a risk-based look at controls and what are key controls you should know to be viewed as a leader in the field. Relevance for

Professional Designation Accreditation

CPA

This course covers material that is relevant for practitioners in both public practice and industry. Many of the concepts covered in this course will assist students in dealing with the types of IT issues commonly found on CPA exams.

CISA, CA*IT, CIA

The material in this course is part of the foundation coverage for other professional certifications such as the CISA, CA*IT and CIA.

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ACC 621

Core IT Concepts for Accountants

Course Materials

Required Text: TBD

All other materials supplied on course web-site.

Anticipated Workload and Course Grades

Final Grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Workload (Subject to Change) Evaluation Participation in weekly class lecture and/or case

discussion/workshop.

20%

Group assignments 30%

Individual final report 50%

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ACC 622

Electronic Commerce

MAcc-Elective

Faculty: Professor Efrim Boritz Term Offered: Winter

Career Relevance

E-business is a prominent feature of today’s economy. Even traditional businesses have or need e-business capabilities. This course provides an overview of the essential features of an e-business and integrates e-business concepts with key topics covered in other business and accounting,

auditing, tax and law courses. Course

Overview and Objectives

This course will address the features and related implementation issues of electronic business systems, including:

 Business Models, Value Propositions and Strategies (including the Internet, regulatory issues and small business issues)

 E-Business Architecture (including web site design, order processing, payment processing, integration with enterprise systems and issues arising from mobile devices, social networks and cloud computing)

 E-Business Applications (including supply chain management, customer relationship management and business intelligence)

 Conducting E-Business (including e-marketing and advertising, and performance measurement)

Relevance for Professional Designation Accreditation

Due to the pervasiveness of e-business activities, examinations often involve e-business/e-commerce scenarios. The material covered in this course addresses the types of e-business and e-commerce issues and

problems that commonly arise in examinations, although the coverage in the course does not specifically address final examination issues and goes well beyond the minimum expectations of CPA candidates.

The e-business issues covered in this course relate not only to IT Competencies but to several other Competency areas such as Enabling Competencies, Strategy and Governance, Management Accounting, Planning and Control, Audit and Assurance and Taxation. Thus, there is a significant integrative component to this course which is implemented through weekly readings and case discussions and course projects. Course

Materials

Required Text:

E-business – A Canadian Perspective for a Networked World, 4th edition, 2013, Gerald Trites and J. Efrim Boritz, Pearson

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ACC 622

Electronic Commerce

Anticipated Workload, and Course Grades

Final Grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Graded Component Weight

Weekly self-directed online review 20% 20% 10% 30% 20% 100% Participation in weekly class lectures and case

discussions

Report (done individually)

Project & presentation (done in groups) Final exam

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ACC 623

Business Technology Law

IT Challenges & Opportunities

MAcc-Elective

Faculty: Professor Darren Charters Term Offered: Spring

Delivery: Self learning with weekly topic intro/recap sessions Career

Relevance

This will be a useful course for anyone contemplating a management career in the information technology field or who, in a professional capacity, plans to specialize in this area.

Course Overview and Objectives

Businesses operate in an environment proscribed as much by legal principles as by financial rules and performance expectations. The course will show students how legal issues of a technology oriented nature insinuate themselves into most management activities, including those of both ‘old’ and ‘new’ economy businesses. It will provide an introduction to legal issues impacting business professionals generally and an examination of legal issues that create obligations and opportunities for business that are uniquely dependent on the law to protect some of their core business assets. The course will address:

 The legal environment for product development – focusing on core areas of intellectual property (IP) including patents, copyright, valuation of IP, and basic philosophical underpinnings IP

 Employee matters in technology focused business environment as well as traditional business confronting technology –

including employees’ rights, privacy, appropriate company policies, etc.

 Ecommerce legal issues – including privacy, consumer protection, jurisdiction, etc.

 Providing products and services to third parties – including contract considerations in software licencing, IP licencing, etc. CFE Relevance Course will provide useful background to information technology

competencies that are integrated throughout the competency map although not directly relevant to CFE.

Course Materials

Required Text: Courseware Package

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ACC 623

Business Technology Law

IT Challenges & Opportunities

Anticipated Workload and Course Grades

The material will be a combination of relatively short in-class or online substantive content, additional directed reading, and further learning assignments. Students may review one (perhaps two) online information resources, read course material addressing substantive law as well as the business context of the relevant law, and undertake a variety of learning and review tasks that reinforce concepts covered and/or provide for the

introduction of related concepts. There are weekly sessions that will be used to introduce the module being studied, recap the module just

completed, and provide some substantive content in relation to each. It is expected that a couple of the sessions will involve invited speakers with a professional background in one of more areas of law addressed in the course.

Final Grades in the course will likely be determined in the following manner:

Workload Evaluation

Quizzes (self-assessment) 10%

Individual Research Summaries 25%

Bulletin Board 15%

Open Ended Questions 20%

Final Case or Paper 30%

Total 100%

Evaluation will involve a combination of self-study exercises and individual assignments. Do not be alarmed by the ‘number’ of evaluated components, the total time spent allocated will not exceed that which you would spend on a course were we solely utilizing a traditional lecture format.

Conversely, note that just because there is less ‘in class’ time and more flexibility on when you do the course work, do not expect it to be less work than a lecture/class based course. This is intended to provide general information on the nature and type of evaluation used in this course and is subject to change.

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ACC 626

Information System Assurance & Computer-Assisted Auditing

MAcc-Elective

Faculty: Kieng Iv Term Offered: Spring

Career Relevance

This is an essential course for anyone considering a career in IT assurance in internal or external audit settings involving significant IT-based

processes or interesting in performing analytics as part of an internal or external audit.

Course Overview and Objectives

Throughout the course, you’ll be tasked with performing audit analytics engagements using tools such as IDEA and Tableau. Some of the past workshops include journal entries, accounts receivable, accounts payable, fixed assets, warranty liability, revenue assurance and data visualization. During the semester, we will also discuss IT assurance topics such as XBRL, third party reporting, cloud computing and ERP auditing. Relevance for

Professional Designation Accreditation

The material covered in this course specifically addresses IT competencies that commonly arise in the UFE, although the coverage in the course goes well beyond the minimum expectations of CA candidates.

There is a significant integrative component to this course which is implemented through the assignments, weekly readings and case discussions. The IT issues covered in this course most strongly to the Assurance area on the UFE Competency Map but also relate to other UFE competency areas such as Pervasive Qualities and Skills, Governance, Strategy and Risk Management and Performance Measurement and Reporting.

Course Materials

Required Text:

J. Efrim Boritz, Computer Control & Audit Guide (15th edition 2011) University of Waterloo, Centre for Information Systems & Assurance

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