MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS WILLIAMSTOWN, NEW JERSEY. Forensics

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS

WILLIAMSTOWN, NEW JERSEY

Williamstown High School

Forensics

Written by: Lori Long

Revised July 2013

Stanley Krzyminski, Director of Curriculum and Instruction

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Monroe Township Public Schools

Williamstown, New Jersey

Philosophy of Education

The administration, faculty, and staff of Monroe Township Public Schools, in cooperation with parent and the community, and with active participation of the students, are committed to viewing each other as individuals, respecting each person’s uniqueness, and setting high expectations for all students. The school system will assist each student to become a contributing member of our society by

providing a learning environment that is responsive to the needs of the individual student, community, and changing society by providing a learning environment that nurtures values and morals. This environment will be conducive to acquisition of knowledge, as well as to the development of problem solving, critical thinking, and organizational skills. We will provide a learning environment that is

responsive to the needs of the individual student, community, and changing society. We will aid our students in developing responsible behavior, a positive attitude toward themselves and others, the necessary life skills to become productive citizens and lifetime learners. We accept the challenge and responsibility of accomplishing these goals.

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Williamstown High School

Williamstown, New Jersey

Mission Statement

Williamstown High School provides an atmosphere where our students become responsible,

productive citizens, and life-long learners.

BELIEFS

Students are responsible for their education and are accountable for their actions and decisions.

Students and staff respect all people regardless of race, color, creed, religion, gender, and sexual orientation.

Students, regardless of learning styles and abilities, need to be challenged and inspired in order to achieve their full potential. Students and staff are provided a safe and supportive environment in which they can pursue their educational goals.

High expectations are communicated to the students from all members of the school’s community.

Effective education is a student, staff, and community partnership, which prepares students for the future in a technologically changing society.

High school personnel serve as catalysts for academic and personal success for all students.

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Williamstown High School

Williamstown, New Jersey

The Science Department

Philosophy

The Science Department is committed to teaching what all students should know and be able to do as they grow towards scientific literacy. Students should be able to develop an understanding of fundamental scientific principles while promoting the use of science-related skills for life experiences. These skills will include, but not be limited to, measuring, graphing, problem-solving, interpreting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions and communicating results.

Through a basic understanding in life, earth, and physical sciences, critical thinking skills will be encouraged. To promote positive attitudes in learning science, students will actively participate in hands-on activities. Students should develop qualities inherent in the practice of science through curiosity, skepticism, open-mindedness and honesty when collecting and interpreting their findings.

Through the course of a student’s science education they should be able to justify its connection to other subjects and the needs of the society. This realization will server to enrich the student’s science literacy.

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Williamstown High School

Williamstown, New Jersey

Course Proficiency Requirements

COURSE: Forensic Science Syllabus – A Study in Criminalistics & Genetics TEACHER: Staff

Credits: Five (5)

WEIGHTED FOR CLASS RANK: (No)

Pursuant to the High School Graduation Standards Act (NJSA 18A;7 et. seq.) successful completion of this course will require: A. Regular attendance as mandated by Board Policy.

B. Mastery of the below listed content / objectives and achievements of the proficiencies required.

________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

OVERVIEW

This advanced science course will provide the fundamental concepts of the application of science to criminal investigation and the role of science in the criminal justice system. Actual case histories will be discussed and students will learn how forensic science has impacted the “Crimes of the Century”. Up-to-date technologies, such as DNA profiling and crime scene investigation: including the collection/recovery of forensic evidence from physical crime scenes, victims and suspects, the processing of evidence in the crime lab, and preservation of evidence for presentation in the courtroom will be discussed in detail. Students will make correlations/connections, share discoveries and apply these crimalistic concepts after successful completion of laboratory work and projects. Strong science background is essential, as well as parental permission required with regard to violent subject matter and details.

CAREER OBJECTIVES

Whenever appropriate, information concerning requirements, qualifications and opportunities for careers in or related to the field of science will be presented and discussed with the students. Use will be made of various resources available through the Student Personnel Services and the Media Center.

Information will be obtained from other sources such as: booklets, pamphlets, films, filmstrips programs, tapes, VCR, guest speakers, and various "career day" programs sponsored by industry and colleges.

Examples of careers explored are: Engineering, Environmentalists, Laboratory Technician, Medical Technician, Pharmacy, Medicine, Nursing, Mechanics, Pilots, Surveyors, Chemists, Biologists, and Computer Programming.

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MEASUREMENT OF STUDENT’S ACHIEVEMENT

To successfully complete the course a student shall earn a minimum passing grade as outlined by the established Board of Education policy. The following criteria may be employed to evaluate student proficiency: tests, and quizzes, class work, homework assignments, laboratory work, and class participation.

COURSE OUTLINE

1. General Introduction to Forensic Science 2. The Crime Scene

3. Physical Evidence 4. Fingerprints 5. Organic Analysis

6. Genetics & DNA: As a Forensic Tool 7. Forensic Serology: Blood and Body Fluids 8. Inorganic Analysis

9. Physical Properties: Glass and Soil 10.Hair, Fibers, and Point Analysis

11.Firearms, Tool Marks, Bite Marks, and Other Impressions 12.Forensic Toxicology

13.Drugs

14.Forensic Aspects of Arson and Explosion Investigations 15.Document and Voice Examination

16.Crimes & Criminal Activity

CASE STUDIES

Individual case histories will be analyzed for each topic discussed. Topics include all course content listed above, as well as psychological

retrospectives of the criminal mind and serial perpetrators of a variety of criminal activity. Students will be responsible for writing reviews of each case history studied.

PROJECTS

Each marking period every student is responsible for submitting an independent research project involving use of internet resources, as well as any other reference materials, and constructing a presentation of work following a grading rubric illustrating project objectives.

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN

FOCUS TOPIC 1: Introduction to Forensic Science

Content Standard CPI Content Objectives Suggested Instructional Strategies / Activities 1. Specific Frameworks 8. Reading 2. Lecture 9. Practice by doing

3. Discussion Groups 10. Teaching Others 4. Audio / Visual 11. Homework 5. Demonstration 12. Field Trip 6. Cooperative Groups 13. Projects 7. Lab 14. Other ( explain)

Assessment Strategies

1. Multiple Choice 9. Self – Evaluation 2. Essay 10. Class Survey 3. Fill – In – Blanks 11. Timing / Drills 4. Open –ended 12. Participation / 5. Writing samples Discussion 6. Auth. / Per Based 13. Teacher Observation

7. Problem solving 14. Portfolio 8. Oral Presentation 15. Other ( explain) a. Lab Work Materials, Technology Resources 1.Textbooks 2. Software 3.Survey 4.AVA/Video 5.Supplemental 6. Resource People 7. Other (explain)

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Content Standard CPI Content Objectives Suggested Instructional Strategies / Activities 1. Specific Frameworks 8. Reading 2. Lecture 9. Practice by doing

3. Discussion Groups 10. Teaching Others 4. Audio / Visual 11. Homework 5. Demonstration 12. Field Trip 6. Cooperative Groups 13. Projects 7. Lab 14. Other ( explain)

Assessment Strategies

1. Multiple Choice 9. Self – Evaluation 2. Essay 10. Class Survey 3. Fill – In – Blanks 11. Timing / Drills 4. Open –ended 12. Participation / 5. Writing samples Discussion 6. Auth. / Per Based 13. Teacher Observation

7. Problem solving 14. Portfolio 8. Oral Presentation 15. Other ( explain) a. Lab Work Materials, Technology Resources 1.Textbooks 2. Software 3.Survey 4.AVA/Video 5.Supplemental 6. Resource People 7. Other (explain) 5.1.12.C.1 5.1.12.C.1 5.1.12.C.3 5.1.12.D.1 5.1.12.B.3 5.1.12.C.1 5.1.12.B.2 5.3.12.C.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.2

A. Define forensic science and criminalistics. B. Recall the major contributors to the development of forensic science. C. Give examples of typical crime laboratories as they exist on the national, state, and local levels of government in the United States.

D. Describe the services of a typical comprehensive crime lab in the criminal justice system.

E. Explain the different approaches espoused by the Frye & Daubert decisions to the admissibility of scientific evidence in the courtroom.

F. Explain the role and responsibility of the expert witness.

G. Demonstrate the ability to problem solve using the scientific method. (Emphasizing laboratory safety)

H. Discuss the impact of forensic science on everyday life.

(Careers, current issues & research) I. Correctly use instruments, apparatus & technologies of science.

(Microscope, dissection tools, assorted laboratory equipment)

J. Maintain a notebook and complete lab reports

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Branches of Forensics Quiz: Deductive Thinking Quiz: Crime Labs

Quiz: Safety

Test: Intro to Forensics

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 2: The Crime Scene

5.2.12.A.2 5.1.12.B.1 5.1. 12 B.2 5.1.12.B.1 5.1.12.B.4 5.1.12.D.3

A. Define physical evidence.

B. Discuss the responsibilities of the first criminalist to the crime scene.

C. Explain the steps to be taken for thoroughly recording the crime scene. D. Describe the proper procedures for conducting a systematic search of crime scenes for physical evidence.

E. Describe the proper techniques for packaging common types of physical evidence.

F. Define chain of custody.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: CSI

PPT: Investigators and the Investigative Process

PPT: Forensic Science and the Law

Handout: Diagram of a Crime Scene

Handout: Examples of Search Patterns

Lesson: On the Scene Forensic Search for Clues

Worksheet Packet #2: Crime Scene Search

Worksheet Packet: The Crime Scene

Lesson: Crime Scene Evaluations Lesson: Crime Scene Drawings Lab: Crime Scene Drawings Lesson: Packaging

Lesson: Chain of Custody

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Recording the Crime Scene Quiz: Crime Scene Search Patterns Quiz: Specimen Packaging

Test: The Crime Scene

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 3: Physical Evidence

5.1.12.B.2 5.1.12.B.1 5.2.12.A.2 5.2.12.A.2 5.2.12.B.2 5.2.12.A.2 5.2.12.B.2 5.1.12.C.1 5.1 12.C.2

A. Identify the items classified by the FBI as types of physical evidence, and

successfully interpret the FBI Handbook on Evidence Collection.

B. List the common types of physical evidence encountered at crime scenes C. Explain the difference between the identification and comparison of physical evidence.

D. Define individual and class

characteristics of physical evidence, and give examples of physical evidence possessing these characteristics.

E. Discuss the value of class evidence to a criminal investigation.

F. Explain the purpose physical evidence plays in reconstructing the events

surrounding the commission of a crime.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 FBI Handbook on Evidence PPT: Physical Evidence

Worksheet: Crime Scene Search Packet

Lesson: Reconstruction Lab: As it Was

Lab: Tell the Tale

Forensic Search for Clues Worksheet Packet #3: Proof of Identity

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Physical Evidence

Quiz: Reconstruction

Test: Physical Evidence

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 4: Fingerprints

5.1 12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.3.12.A.6 5.3.12.A.6 5.1.12.C.2 5.1.12.D.1 5.1.12.B.1 5.2.12.B.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.1

A. Name those individuals who have made significant contributions to the acceptance and development of fingerprint technology.

B. Define ridge characteristics. C. Explain why a fingerprint is a

permanent feature of the human anatomy. D. List the three major fingerprint patterns and their respective subclasses.

E. Classify a set of fingerprints by the primary classification of the Henry System.

F. Explain what is meant by visible, plastic, and latent fingerprints.

G. List the techniques for developing latent fingerprints on nonporous objects. H. Describe chemical techniques for developing prints on porous objects. I. Describe the proper procedures for preserving a developed latent fingerprint. J. Explain how a latent fingerprint image can be enhanced by digital imaging.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Fingerprint

Worksheet Packet: Fingerprint Characteristics

Handout: Ridge Characteristics Handout: Matching Ridges Handout: Loop Patterns Handout: Whorl Patterns Handout: Arch Patterns Handout: Fingerprint Patterns Handout: Fingerprint Ridge Characteristics

Handout: Latent Fingerprint Detection with Lasers Forensic Search for Clues Worksheet Packet #4: Fingerprinting

Lesson: Print Patterns

Lab: Pointing Out Perpetrators Demonstration: Print Techniques Activity: Individual ID Cards Lab: ID Fingerprints

Activity: Reverse X-Ray Activity: Graphite Prints

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Fingerprinting

Test: Fingerprinting

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 5: Organic Analysis

5.3.12.A.1 5.1.12.A.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.2.12.D.4 5.1.12.D.4 5.1.12.D.3 5.2.12.A.2 5.2.12.A.2

A. Distinguish between organic and inorganic compounds.

B. Distinguish between a qualitative and quantitative analysis.

C. Describe the process of

chromatography and describe the parts of a gas chromatograph.

D. Explain the difference between thin-layer and gas chromatography.

E. Describe electrophoresis.

F. Describe the electromagnetic spectrum. G. Explain the relationship between color and the selective absorption of light by molecules.

H. Name the parts of a simple absorption spectrophotometer,

I. Describe the utility of an ultraviolet and infrared absorption spectrum for the identification of organic compounds. J. Describe the significance of a mass spectrum and describe the concept of mass spectrometry.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Organic Chemistry and its Use in Forensics

Handout: Periodic Table

Lesson: Electromagnetic Spectrum and the Use of Lights in Crime Scene Analysis

Handout: Chromatography Process Handout: Gas Chromatography Handout: Gas Chromatography & Mass Spectrometry

Handout: Thin-Layer Chromatography

Handout: Emission spectrograph Handout: Dispersion through a prism

Handout: Spectrophotometer Handout: Parts of a GC-MS Handout: How GC-MS works Lesson: Chromatography Mixtures Lab: Chromatography Inks

Lesson: Lip Print Patterns Lab: Chromo Lipstick Lesson: Lip Prints Lab: Red Lips

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Chemistry Techniques Test: Organic Chemistry

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 6: Genetics & DNA as a Forensic Tool

5.3.12.D.1 5.3.12.D.2 5.3.12.D.3 5.3.12.D.2 5.3.12.D.3 5.3.12.D.1 5.3.12.D.1 5.3.12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.3.12.D.1 5.3.12.D.1

A. Describe how a double-strand DNA replicates itself, and know what the implications of this process for forensic science are.

B. Explain what is meant by a restriction fragment length polymorphism (RLFP) C. Describe the process of typing DNA by the RFLP technique and explain how DNA band patterns are interpreted. D. Explain the technology of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and how it is applied to forensics.

E. Explain the latest DNA typing technique (Short Tandem Repeat Analysis)

F. Discuss the application of a DNA computerized database to criminal investigation.

G. List the necessary procedures to be taken for the proper preservation of bloodstained evidence for laboratory DNA analysis.

H. Explain how DNA fingerprinting is different from traditional fingerprinting. I. Describe the biological materials that may be used for DNA fingerprinting

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: DNA Review

Handout: Nucleotides Handout: DNA Helix

Handout: DNA Typing Process PPT: Genetics Review

PPT: DNA as a Forensic Tool DNA Fingerprinting

Handout Separation of DNA by electrophoresis

Handout: Mitochondrial DNA Handout: STR Multiplex System DNA in the Lab

Lesson: DNA Fingerprinting Lab: DNA Fingerprinting Lab: Incriminating Evidence

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: DNA

Quiz: DNA Fingerprinting Test: DNA as a Forensic Tool

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 7: Forensic Serology, Blood, and Body Fluids

5.3.12.A.6 5.3.12.A.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.1 5.3.12.D.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.3.12.A.2 5.3.12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3

A. List the A-B-O antigens and

antibodies found in the blood for each of the four blood types: A, B, AB, and O. B. Explain why agglutination occurs. C. Explain how whole blood is typed. D. Describe tests used to characterize a stain as blood.

E. Explain the significance of the precipitin test to forensic serology. F. Describe the absorption-elution technique.

G. Describe how the existence of polymorphic enzymes and proteins contributes to blood’s individualization. H. Use a Punnett Square to determine the genotypes and phenotypes of offspring.

I. List the laboratory tests necessary to characterize seminal stains.

J. Explain how suspect stains are to be properly preserved for laboratory examination.

K. Describe the collection of evidence related to a rape investigation.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 Lesson: Inheritance of Blood Types

PPT: Punnett Squares Lab: Blood Types

Handout: Blood Antigens

Handout: Production of Antibodies Handout: Precipitin Test

Handout: Cross-Over Electrophoresis

Lesson: Presence of Blood Demonstration: Luminol Lab: Testing for Blood PPT: Blood Spatter Patterns Handout: Bloodstain Convergence Lesson: Falling Blood Drops Worksheet: Spatter Patterns Lesson: Blood Drop Analysis Lab: Cold Blood

PPT: Biological Fluids Notes: Body Fluids Handout: p30 Detection Handout: Detection of PSA Sex Crimes

Demonstration: Sex Crimes Evidence Collection Kits Forensic Searching for Clues Worksheet Packet #5 Body Fluids

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Blood Inheritance Patterns Quiz: Blood Test

Quiz: Blood Spatter Patterns Quiz: Body Fluids

Test: Serology

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 8: Inorganic Analysis

5.2.12.A.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3

A. Describe the usefulness of trace elements for the forensic comparison of various types of physical evidence. B. Distinguish between a continuous and line emission spectrum.

C. Describe the parts of a simple emission spectrograph.

D. List the parts of a simple atomic absorption spectrophotometer.

E. Explain the forensic advantages of linking a microscope to a

spectrophotometer.

F. Compare the mechanism for image formation of a light microscope to that of a scanning electron microscope.

G. List the advantages and forensic applications of a scanning electron microscope

H. Describe why an X-ray diffraction pattern is useful for chemical

identification.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Inorganic Chemistry and its Applications to Forensic Science PPT: Trace Evidence

Lesson: Unknown Substances Lab: White Powder

Lesson: Chemical Identification Review of Microscopy

Handout: Principles of the Compound Microscope

Handout: Compound Microscope Handout: Parts of IBIS System

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Inorganic Chemistry

Quiz: Trace Evidence

Quiz: Microscopy

Test: Inorganic Chemistry

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 9: Physical Properties, Glass, and Soil

5.2.12.A.2 5.1.12.A.2 5.2.6.A.1 5.2.6.C.2 5.2.12.A.2 5.2.6.C.2 5.2.6.C.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.A.3 5.4.8.C.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.A.3

A. Define physical and chemical properties.

B. List and define the (SI) Metric System’s basic units and prefixes. C. Determine the density of irregular-shaped objects.

D. Define refractive index.

E. Distinguish crystalline from amorphous solids.

F. Define double refraction

G. Describe the dispersion of light through a prism.

H. Describe the flotation and immersion methods for comparing glass specimens. I. State how to examine glass fractures to determine the direction of impact from a projectile.

J. Describe the proper collection of glass evidence.

K. List the important forensic properties of soil.

L. Describe the density-gradient tube technique.

M. Describe the proper collection of soil evidence

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Physical & Chemical Properties

PPT: Basic Units of Measurement Handout: Glass Fractures

Handout: Bullet Holes in Glass Lesson: Forces that fracture glass Lab: Glass is breaking up! Lesson: Glass Chip Tips Lab: Glass Can Tell on You! Lesson: Evidence from the Soil Lab: Dirty Characteristics PPT: Forensic Anthropology Lesson: Skeletal Evidence Lab: Male and Female Bones Lesson: Shallow Graves Lab: Bits and Pieces Lesson: Preserving Flesh Lab: Mummy

Lab: Mummy Reasoning PPT: Forensic Archaeology Lesson: Digging up the Past Lab: Dig a Little Deeper! Lesson: Date from the Past Lab: Radioactive Dating Lesson: Message from Bones Lab: Missing Persons

PPT: Taphonomy

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Glass

Quiz: Soil

Quiz: Forensic Anthropology

Quiz: Forensic Archaeology

Quiz: Taphonomy

Test: Inorganic Forensics

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 10: Hairs, Fiber, and Paint Analysis

5.3.12.A.6 5.3.12.E.2 5.3.12.A.6 5.1.12.A.3 5.3.12.E.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.A.1 5.3.12.A.6 5.1.12.A.3 5.2.12.A.2 5.1.12.D.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3

A. Describe the cuticle, cortex and medulla of hair, and describe the three phases of hair growth.

B. Distinguish between animal and human hairs.

C. List hair features that are useful for the comparison of human hairs.

D. Explain the proper collection of hair evidence.

E. Describe the role of DNA typing in hair comparison.

F. Classify fibers.

G. Describe the structure of a polymer. H. List the properties of fibers that are most useful for forensic comparison. I. Describe the proper collection of fiber evidence.

J. Describe the components of paint. K. Classify automobile paints.

L. List those examinations most useful for performing a forensic comparison of paint. M. Describe the proper collection and preservation of paint evidence.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Trace Evidence

PPT: Hairs & Fibers

Worksheet Packet: Hair & Fiber Handout: Structure of Hair Handout: Hair Scale Patterns Lesson: Hair Identification Lab: Hair ID

Lab: Different Species Lesson: Fiber Analysis Lab: Picking Up the Pieces PPT: Paint Characteristics Handout: Program of Auto Paint Forensic Search for Clues

Worksheet Packet #6: Trace Materials

Activity: Jewel Theft Mystery

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Hair

Quiz: Fibers

Quiz: Paint

Test: Trace Evidence

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 11: Firearms, tool marks, bite marks, and other impressions

5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.1

A. Describe the techniques for riffling a barrel.

B. List the class and individual

characteristics of bullets and cartridge cases. C. Explain the utilization of the comparison microscope for the comparison of bullets and cartridge cases.

D. Distinguish caliber from gauge.

E. Explain the procedure for determining the distance from a target a weapon was fired. F. Describe the laboratory tests utilized for determining whether an individual has fired a weapon and emphasize the limitations of present techniques.

G. Explain why it is possible to restore an obliterated serial number.

H. List procedures for the proper collection and preservation of firearm evidence.

I. Explain how a suspect tool is compared to a tool mark.

J. Explain the forensic significance of class and individual characteristics to the

comparison of impressions.

K. List some common field reagents used to enhance bloody footprints.

L. Discuss the importance of forensic deontology.

M. Explain the forensic significance of bite marks.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Forensic Deontology Lesson: Teeth Talk

Lab: Take a Bite out of Crime Lab: Your Impression

Lesson: Tool Marks Lab: Tool Marks the Spot

Forensic Search for Clues Worksheet Packet #7: Tool Marks

PPT: Firearms, Projectiles and Other Weapons

Handout: Interior view of a Gun Barrel

Handout: Determining the Path of a Bullet

Worksheet Packet: Bullet and Projectile Trajectory

Demo: Casings

Slide Show : Ballistic Wounds Forensic Search for Clues Worksheet Packet #8: Firearms & Ballistics PPT: Footwear and Shoeprints Lesson: Making and Evaluating a Shoe Print

Lab: Casting

Forensic Search for Clues Worksheet Packet #11: Casting & Residual Prints

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Bite marks

Quiz: Tool Marks

Quiz: Projectiles

Quiz: Footprints

Test: Forensic Impressions

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 12: Forensic Toxicology

5.3.12.A.6 5.3.12.A.6 5.3.12.A.6 5.3.12.A.6 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.A.1 5.1 12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.1 12.D.1 5.1 12.D.1

A. Explain how alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream, transported throughout the body, and finally eliminated by oxidation and excretion.

B. Name the important parts of the human circulatory system.

C. Describe the process by which alcohol is excreted in the breath via the alveoli sacs. D. Describe the design of the Breathalyzer, infrared breath-testing device, field sobriety tests, and common lab procedures for measuring alcohol’s concentration in the blood.

E. Describe the precautions to be taken to properly preserve blood for analysis for its alcohol content.

F. Know the presumptive impairment level for blood alcohol in New Jersey and its surrounding states.

G. Develop an appreciation for the role of the toxicologist in the criminal justice system.

H. Describe some of the techniques that forensic toxicologists use for isolating and identifying drugs and poisons.

I. Discuss the significance of finding a drug in human tissues and organs.

J. Discuss how best the Drug Recognition Expert and the forensic toxicologist can coordinate their efforts to support the significance of a positive drug finding.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Toxicology

Lesson: Absorption in the Human Body

Lesson: Lab Procedures Lesson: Alcohol Absorption Handout: Breathalyzer

Handout: Infrared Breath Testing Device

Handout: Driving Risk vs. Alcohol Concentration

Handout: Blood Alcohol after Drinking

Lesson: Urinalysis

Lab: Don’t Flush the Evidence

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a Quiz: Alcohol

Test: Toxicology

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 13: Drugs

5.1.8.A.3 5.2.8.A.5 5.1.12.C.3 5.1.12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3

A. Define psychological and physical dependence.

B. Name and classify commonly abused drugs.

C. Describe the tendency to develop psychological and physical dependency for the more commonly abused drugs.

D. Describe the schedules of the Controlled Substances Act.

E. Describe the laboratory tests that forensic chemists normally rely upon to comprise a routine drug identification scheme.

F. Explain the testing procedures utilized for the forensic identification of marijuana. G. Discuss the proper collection and preservation of drug evidence.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

PPT: Controlled Substances Worksheet Packet: Drugs

Lesson: Drug Dogs Guest Speaker: K-9 Unit

Forensic Search for Clues

Worksheet Packet # 9: Illegal and Legal Drugs

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Drugs

Test: Controlled Substances

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 14: Forensic Aspects of Arson and Explosion Investigations

5.2.12.B.2 5.2.4.C.1 5.2.4.C.2 5.2.12.D.2 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.2.12.B.2 5.2.12.B.2 5.2.12.B.2 5.1.12.D.3

A. Define oxidation and explain why rust oxidation is not accompanied by a

flaming fire.

B. Define energy and give examples of its different forms.

C. Describe the role of heat energy in chemical reactions, define heat of combustion, ignition temperature, and differentiate between exothermic and endothermic chemical reactions. D. List the requirements necessary to initiate and sustain combustion.

E. Describe how physical evidence must be collected at the scene of a suspected arson or explosion.

F. Describe laboratory procedures used for the detection and identification of drocarbon and explosive residues.

G. Explain how explosives are classified. H. Explain the differences between an initiating and non-initiating explosive. I. List some common commercial, homemade and military explosives. J. List some common laboratory tests employed for the detection of explosives.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

PPT: Arson

Worksheet Packet: Arson

Handout: Gas Chromatograph of Gas After a Fire

Handout: Accelerant Recovery Handout: Utilization of GC-MS in Fire Investigation

Video: Catching a Serial Arsonist Guest Speaker: Firefighter

Forensic Search for Clues

Worksheet Packet #10: Chemicals Forensic Search for Clues

Worksheet Packet #14: Arson and Explosive Devices

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Arson

Test: The Forensics of Explosives

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 15: Document and Voice Examination

5.1.12.A.1 5.1.12.A2 5.1.12.A.3 5.1.12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.A.3 5.1.12.D.3 5.1.12.D.1

A. Define questioned document. B. List some common individual characteristics associated with handwriting.

C. List important guidelines to be followed for the collection of known writing for comparison to a questioned document.

D. Describe the precautions to be taken to minimize deception when a suspect when a suspect is requested to write exemplars for comparison to a questioned document. E. List some of the class and individual characteristics of a typewriter.

F. Describe the proper collection of typewritten exemplars.

G. List some of the techniques utilized by document examiners for uncovering alterations, erasures, obliterations, and variations in pen inks.

H. Describe the three parameters of speech that a voice print represents.

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 PPT: Questioned Documents PPT: Deception

PPT: Aggression

Lesson: Document Forgery Lab: Write On!

Lesson: Typed Print Comparison Lab: Tattle Tale Type

Forensic Search for Clues

Worksheet Packet #13: Document Analysis

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Quiz: Handwriting Analysis

Test: Questioned Documents and Voice Evidence

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MONROE TOWNSHIP PUBLIC SCHOOLS INSTRUCTIONAL PLAN FOCUS TOPIC 16: Crimes and Criminal Activity

5.1.12.A.1 5.1.12.B.4 5.1.12.C.3 5.1.12.D.1 5.1.12.D.3

Discussed Throughout Course A. Injury and Death Investigation B. Murder

C. Serial Killers D. Serial Crimes E. Sex Crimes

F. Crimes Against Children G. Robbery H. Burglary I. Larceny J. Car Theft K. Computer/Internet Crimes L. Agricultural Crimes M. Terrorism 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 Forensic Search for Clues Final Packet: Processing the Crime Scene Scenario

PPT: Injury and Death Investigation

PPT: Murder PPT: Serial Killers PPT: Serial Crimes

PPT: Women that Marry Serial Killers

PPT: Sex Crimes and NJ Law PPT: Crimes Against Children PPT: Robbery PPT: Larceny PPT: Car Theft PPT: Computer/Internet Crimes PPT: Agriculture Crimes PPT: Terrorism

Burglaries and Murders: A Five Part Crime Scene Analysis

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 15a

Forensic Project: each marking period following strict rubric utilizing technology to illustrate student work.

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COURSE REFERENCE MATERIAL

Textbook: Criminalistics: An Introduction to Forensic Science, 8

th

edition (Saferstein, 2004): Publisher: Pearson/Prentice Hall

Lori R. Long: Diplomat of the American Board of Forensic Examiners

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