How To Educate People About The Earned Income Tax Credit

22  Download (0)

Full text

(1)
(2)

 

 

Dollars and Sense:

Examining the Impact of the Federal Earned Income Tax Credit in San Diego County

Vince Vasquez

Senior Policy Analyst

July 2010

 

(3)

      Key Findings     The federal earned income tax credit (EITC) rewards work and helps more than 177,000 San  Diego County residents stay out of poverty each year.   The annual direct spending of EITC refunds in San Diego County is more than three times greater  than the direct economic impact of Comic‐Con.   Though more than $314.8 million in EITC payments is received by county workers each year,  approximately 1 out of 4 EITC‐eligible taxpayers fail to claim the EITC, forfeiting more than $78.7  million annually.   Regional efforts to educate San Diegans about the EITC and assist low‐income workers with free  tax filing are successful overall, but can be improved to increase the number of tax credit claims  and close the “EITC collection gap.”       Recommendations     The City of San Diego, San Diego County and other municipal governments should all consider  passing an honorary EITC Awareness Day each year, to help promote the federal program and  boost local EITC outreach.   Government access television channels such as CityTV should be utilized during the tax season  to educate residents about the EITC and inform them of free tax filing assistance centers.   Local Spanish‐speaking celebrities and community leaders should be recruited to participate in  EITC public service announcements and promotional events, to increase EITC claims from Latino  and Spanish‐speaking workers.    Local EITC outreach advocates should consider encouraging private employers to print  educational EITC materials in Spanish and Tagalog and distribute them along with IRS W‐2  forms. 

(4)

              Executive Summary   The earned income tax credit (EITC), a federal refundable credit, helps more than 177,000 San Diego  County residents stay out of poverty each year but more can be done locally to improve public outreach  to working families in our difficult economic times.    Previous research has shown that EITC dollars are largely spent in local economies, creating jobs and  advancing work mobility for low‐income Americans. However an estimated 25% of EITC‐eligible  taxpayers fail to claim the credit each year. San Diego County working families are missing out on more  than $78.7 million, particularly residents in our South Bay communities. This policy brief, we also  provide disaggregated city‐by‐city data on the more than $314.8 million in refunds claimed by taxpayers  in San Diego County in 2006.1   With refunds worth up to $5,600 for low income individuals and their families, the EITC also serves as an  economic stimulus for municipal governments, generating tax revenue and employment opportunities. 

The annual direct spending of EITC refunds in San Diego County is more than three times greater than  the direct economic impact of Comic‐Con.  

   

What is the EITC? 

Enacted into law by Congress in 1975, the federal earned income tax credit assists the economic  prospects of low‐ and moderate‐income workers by reducing their tax burden, and in many cases  supplementing their earned income with a tax refund in excess of their tax liability. To be eligible for the  earned income tax credit, workers must be U.S citizens or legal residents, have a valid Social Security  number, and must have earned income in the current tax year. Refund amounts are based on the filing  status of the taxpayer (single, jointly filing as married, etc.), the number of their qualifying dependents,  and their gross income level. For Tax Years 2009 and 2010, the cap on EITC refund allotments has been  temporarily raised, as part of an effort to provide economic relief through the American Recovery and  Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The maximum refund for single, head of household or qualifying widow(er)  with no children is $457; for those with one qualifying child, $3,043; for those with two qualifying  children, the maximum is $5,028; and for three or more children, the maximum is $5,657. The program    1 The 2006 tax year is the most current year available that the IRS has provided local tax return data.  

(5)

is concentrated towards assisting those workers making less than $20,000 a year with three or more  children.  

 

Figure

 

One:

 

Tax

 

Year

 

2009

 

EITC

 

Refunds

 

for

 

Tax

 

Filers

 

That

 

File

 

as

 

Single,

 

Widowed,

 

or

 

Head

 

of

 

Household

 

 

  Source: Internal Revenue Service  80% of EITC receipts are estimated to be spent in a local economy.2 Evidence also suggests that a  significant number of EITC claimants directly use refunds to stay in the workforce. A 2008 economic  analysis of how EITC refunds are spent found that the tax credit has a marked effect on increasing  spending for durable “big ticket items,” particularly automobiles.3 Analyzing ten years of reports from         2 The University of Baltimore’s Jacob France Institute published a study in 2004 entitled “The Importance of the  Earned Income Tax Credit and its Economic Effects in Baltimore City” which assumed that two‐thirds of EITC  payments made to residents were re‐spent in Baltimore. A 2006 study from Vanderbilt University entitled “The  State of the Earned Income Tax Credit in Nashville” assumed that 87% of EITC payments would be spent within the  region.  3 Andrew Goodman‐Bacon and Leslie McGranahan. “How do EITC recipients spend their refunds?” Federal Reserve 

(6)

        the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Consumer Expenditures Survey, researchers found that recipients are  much more likely to purchase a vehicle shortly after receiving EITC refunds. Since an estimated 88% of  low‐income households commute to work with personal vehicles, the ETIC refund can be critical in  keeping low income recipients in the workforce. Additionally, EITC eligible families increase spending on  other durable goods such as trips and food, and transportation expenses (vehicle repairs) are the largest  source of nondurable expenditures after receipt of EITC refunds.   

How EITC Refunds are Used 

In 2008 more than 23 million taxpayers received an EITC refund worth an estimated $49.3 billion. Most  recipients were urban dwellers (81.3%), had two or more qualifying children (42%), and filed as heads of  their household (52%).  EITC payments raised an estimated five million Americans above the federal  poverty line.   At the state level, 2.5 million Californians received a cumulative $5.2 billion worth of EITC refunds in Tax  Year 2008. On average, state residents received refunds in the amount of $2,039.   By comparing tax filer data against zip code lists4, NUSIPR has determined that more than 13% of tax  filers (177,108 out of 1,329,698) in San Diego County received an EITC refund in Tax Year 2006, worth a  cumulative $314.8 million.5 EITC refunds for San Diegans were an average $1,778 per person, slightly  lower than the estimated 2006 statewide average return of $1,883.   Geographic information system (GIS) mapping software can be used to disaggregate the EITC  information by municipality. Figure 2 provides data on the 2006 tax year.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  4 The complete list of San Diego County zip code data figures, sourced from the San Diego Association of  Governments, can be found in Appendix A.  5 2006 is the most recent year for which zip code level data is publicly available from the IRS.  

(7)

 

Figure

 

Two:

 

Tax

 

Year

 

2006

 

EITC

 

Refunds

 

Estimates

 

in

 

San

 

Diego

 

County,

 

by

 

Municipality

 

 

Municipality  Total Tax 

Filers 

EITC Filers Total EITC Refunds 

($000)  Average Refund  Received  % EITC filers  Carlsbad  46,892  2,919  4,306  $      1,475  6.2%  Chula Vista  94,755  17,143  32,088  $      1,872  18.1%  Coronado  7,968  492  659  $      1,339  6.2%  Del Mar  7,513  255  224  $      878  3.4%  El Cajon  67,367  10,496  19,281  $      1,837  15.6%  Encinitas  29,050  2,025  2,540  $      1,254  7.0%  Escondido  65,165  9,103  16,868  $      1,853  14.0%  Imperial Beach  10,789  2,505  4,809  $      1,920  23.2%  La Mesa  32,525  3,282  5,019  $      1,529  19.7%  Lemon Grove  10,812  2,008  3,634  $      1,810  18.6%  National City  20,633  5,885  11,633  $      1,977  28.5%  Oceanside  76,651  11,721  21,893  $      1,868  15.3%  Poway  21,567  1,449  2,289  $      1,580  6.7%  San Diego  577,830  76,016  132,695  $      1,746  13.2%  San Diego  County  152,932  18,744  33,408  $      1,782  12.3%  San Marcos  33,929  3,926  7,045  $      1,794  11.6%  Santee  23,197  2,291  3,730  $      1,628  9.9%  Solana Beach  6,495  304  360  $      1,184  4.7%  Vista  43,628  6,544  12,354  $      1,888  15.0%  TOTAL  1,329,698  177,108  314,835  $      1,778  13.3%    Source: Internal Revenue Service, NUSIPR  Not surprisingly, EITC participation correlates with income level; cities south of the City of San Diego  (Chula Vista, Imperial Beach, National City) have a higher percentage of EITC filers while the northern  coastal communities (Del Mar, Solana Beach, Encinitas) fall below the countywide average. Additionally,  the largest refunds in the county are mostly concentrated in the South Bay as well as the Inland cities.     

(8)

 

Assessing the EITC Collection Gap 

Previous research indicates that approximately 25% of earned income tax credits are unclaimed by  eligible workers each year.6 The National University System Institute for Policy Research conducted its  own analysis of 2006 IRS tax data and identified approximately $78.7 million in unclaimed EITC  payments for 59,036 San Diego County workers7, as well as disaggregated that data by jurisdiction.     

Figure

 

Three:

 

Unclaimed

 

EITC

 

Refunds

 

Estimates

 

in

 

San

 

Diego

 

County,

 

Tax

 

Year

 

2006

 

 

Total Tax Returns    Total EITC 

Returns  

% EITC 

filers 

 Est. EITC Returns 

Unclaimed     Federal EITC  Payments (000)    Est. Unclaimed  EITC Payments  (000)   1,329,698  177,108  13%  59,036  $     314,835  $      78,709    Source: Internal Revenue Service, author’s calculations                       6 A March 2010 study released by the New America Foundation (NAF) estimates that 800,000 California workers  failed to claim $1.1 billion in EITC refunds for the 2006 tax year, with San Diego County weighing in with the third  largest unclaimed total at $77.7 million.  7 By comparing statewide IRS zip code data with current regional zip code lists found on the SANDAG website,  NUSIPR accurately identified taxpayers in San Diego County.  

(9)

 

Figure

 

Four:

 

Unclaimed

 

EITC

 

Refunds

 

Estimates

 

by

 

Municipality,

 

Tax

 

Year

 

2006

 

                             

Municipality

 

 

Total

 

Est.

 

Unclaimed

 

EITC

 

Refunds

  

CARLSBAD  $1.08 million  CHULA VISTA  $8.02 million  CORONADO  $164,750  DEL MAR  $56,000  EL CAJON  $4.82 million  ENCINITAS  $635,000  ESCONDIDO  $4.22 million  IMPERIAL BEACH  $1.20 million  LA MESA  $881,250  LEMON GROVE  $908,500  NATIONAL CITY  $2.91 million  OCEANSIDE  $5.47 million  POWAY  $572,250  S.D. COUNTY  $8.35 million  SAN DIEGO  $33.17 million  SAN MARCOS  $1.76 million  SANTEE  $932,500  SOLANA BEACH  $90,000  VISTA  $3.09 million       

EITC’s Economic Impact in San Diego County  

EITC payments have an impact not only on the recipients but also indirectly benefits local businesses  and residents. Tax refunds enter the local economy and are spent for goods and services, supporting  jobs and generating tax revenues for state and municipal governments. As these dollars are re‐spent and  re‐circulated, they create a “multiplier effect” that can be measured.  NUSIPR conservatively estimates that at least $248,532,074 in EITC refunds from the 2006 tax year were  spent locally in San Diego County, inducing $349,996,925 in sales activity, supporting 2,075 jobs and 

(10)

        $87,798,005 in wages.8 The foregone economic benefits of unclaimed EITC refunds are also  determinable. It can be safely assumed that at least $77,666,273 would have been spent in our region,  inducing $87,499,231 in sales, supporting 519 jobs, and $21,949,501 in wages.   To put these figures into perspective, local spending of EITC refunds each year is more than three times  greater than the estimated direct economic impact of Comic‐Con ($67.8 million).9 The number of  foregone jobs resulting from unclaimed EITC payments is greater than the total number of employees  working at Von's Grocery Stores in San Diego County.10   

A Profile of San Diego’s EITC‐eligible Workers 

Using a proprietary statistical tax modeling program that cross‐compares Census and IRS data, the  Brookings Institute estimated that in the 2007 tax year there were approximately 199,762 EITC‐eligible  “tax units” in San Diego County.11 When dependents are included, the total population directly touched  by EITC refunds swells to approximately 610,144, or more than 1 out of 5 of all county residents.    Most EITC‐eligible San Diegans are Latino (44.4%), though a sizeable number are Caucasian (34.6%) and  Asian/Pacific Islanders (9.4%). The overwhelming majority are parents; Brookings found that 37% have  one qualifying child, and another 41.6% have two or more children. Few however, are married with only  slightly more than a quarter (26.7%) filing their taxes as married status. More than half (53.5%) filed as  an unmarried “head of household.” The majority (51.8%) speak English at home, while 38.3% speak  Spanish.  More than four out of ten (43.5%) EITC‐eligible San Diegans are 34 years old or younger, while  41.1% are middle aged (35 to 54 years).     8 The New America Foundation’s estimates for claimed and unclaimed EITC refunds in San Diego County are only  marginally smaller than the author’s calculations, and thus, their IMPLAN analysis is a strong conservative estimate  of economic impact. Source: Antonio Avalos and Sean Alley. Left on the table: Unclaimed Earned Income Tax  Credits cost California's economy and low‐income residents $1 billion annually. New America Foundation.  Washington, D.C.: March 2010. Pgs. 10‐16. An estimated $62.1 million in EITC refunds went to San Diego residents  and were spent outside the region.  9 The $67.8 million was derived from a study conducted by CIC Research on behalf of the San Diego Convention  Center Corp., and cited in the following article: Weisberg, Lori. “Gauging the power of Comic‐Con’s punch.” San  Diego Union‐Tribune. 24 June 2010.   10  Source: San Diego Daily Transcript. “2009 Sourcebook: Companies.” Accessed June 8, 2010.  <http://sourcebook.sddt.com/Source/companies.cfm?BusinessCategory_ID=205>.  11  Brookings Institute. “Characteristics of EITC‐Eligible Taxpayers, 2007; San Diego‐Carlsbad‐San Marcos, CA.”  Accessed May 10, 2010. <http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/Files/Programs/Metro/EITC/San%20Diego.pdf>. 

(11)

        The economic challenges of EITC recipients are also striking. Few have received more than a high school  diploma (22.4%). Only 18.6% have earned an associate’s, bachelors or advanced college degree. Slightly  less than a quarter (23.3%) have not earned a high school diploma. This low level of education  attainment unsurprisingly translates into low income. 59.5% of EITC filers make less than $20,000 a year  in adjusted gross income. EITC‐eligible San Diegans work mostly in office administration (14.4%) and  sales work (10.1%), concentrated primarily in the retail, hospitality and construction industries. While  Brookings estimates that while 61.3% of EITC‐eligible San Diegans work in the private for‐profit sector, a  significant number work in the public sector – 9.2% are employed by the military, and 7.1% are  employed by the government.   Individual EITC refunds split between the highest and the lowest amounts. Three out of ten (30.1%)  EITC‐eligible residents received under $500 for the 2007 tax year, while 45.7% received $2,000 or more,  reflecting the large number of eligible taxpayers with qualifying children.    

Outreaching to EITC‐Eligible Workers in San Diego County 

Though there is no federal requirement, many municipal governments across the country hold EITC  awareness campaigns every tax season. San Diego is no exception. In 2003, the San Diego County Board  of Supervisors launched an EITC awareness campaign on a pilot basis. Hosting five free tax preparation  sites, county workers successfully helped at‐need residents file 832 tax returns, which facilitated  $626,623 in claimed EITC refunds.12 Since that time, county officials estimate that their direct efforts  have cumulatively helped secure $29 million in EITC refunds for the region. Most recently in 2009,  county officials partnered with non‐profit and community groups to host approximately 75 free tax  preparation sites, allowing approximately 500 volunteers to assist completing more than 18,100 federal  tax returns worth $5.86 million in EITC refunds.13               12  Board of Supervisors, County of San Diego Agenda Item. “Countywide Expansion of the Earned Income Tax  Credit Pilot Program.” San Diego: July 29, 2003.   13  United Way of San Diego County. “San Diego County Earned Income Tax Credit Campaign: ‘Earn It, Keep It, Save  It.’ End of Year Report. 2008/2009 Tax Season.” 

(12)

 

Figure

 

Five:

 

EITC

 

Outreach

 

Efforts

 

in

 

San

 

Diego

 

County,

 

2003

2009

 

 

  2003  2004  2005  2006  2007  2008  2009 

# Tax Prep Sites  5  22 16 58 95  75 75

# Taxpayers Served  832  2,958 3,710 12,169 14,627  19,296 18,103 Total EITC  $626,623  $2,439,281 $2,566,677 $4,994,801 $5,605,218  $7,286,472 $5,866,509 Source: United Way of San Diego  In 2010, local EITC outreach and enrollment efforts were conducted principally through the San Diego  Countywide EITC Coalition, a working partnership between the United Way of San Diego, the Internal  Revenue Service, the County of San Diego, and other community organizations. Notable changes this  year include the heightened role of youth volunteers in the Coalition’s campaign.  On February 22nd,  2010, San Diego County’s Health and Human Services Agency, San Diego State University, and California 

State University – San Marcos announced a new partnership called Thrive San Diego that directed 

approximately 70 students and university employees to help prepare tax returns as well as screen for  food stamp eligibility at nine different sites, two of which were fully managed by students. Thrive San  Diego participants were also directly involved in EITC marketing efforts at schools, grocery stores,  religious institutions and community centers.   For Tax Year 2009, the United Way of San Diego’s website listed 78 free tax assistance sites for EITC  enrollment (a complete list of EITC sites is included in the Appendix of this brief). Using GIS software, the  National University System Institute for Policy Research plotted the street address of the tax sites on a  county zip code map, shaded to indicate the number of EITC claimants in Tax Year 2006.                    

(13)

Figure

 

Six:

 

EITC

 

Claimants

 

in

 

San

 

Diego

 

County

 

by

 

Zip

 

Code,

 

Tax

 

Year

 

2006

 

  Source: Internal Revenue Service, United Way of San Diego  The map reveals that county EITC coordinators have done a good job of aligning EITC assistance centers  with the neighborhoods where such services are needed. Tax assistance sites in 2010 were heavily  concentrated in the South Bay, as well as the Southeastern neighborhoods of San Diego County, two  areas where EITC claimants reside in large numbers. A small cluster of sites are positioned near Camp  Pendleton, likely serving the needs of military personnel that qualify for EITC dollars based on their pay  grade. While the tax data used in this illustration is from Tax Year 2006; however it is unlikely that tax  filings have changed dramatically since that time.    Although EITC outreach has improved over the years, it is still helping too few San Diegan workers. The  14,627 tax filings directly facilitated by EITC Coalition volunteers in 2007 was only 1.1% of the tax filings  that tax year. Instead, most low‐income workers, like all other California workers, pay to have their taxes  professionally prepared. According to the research published February 2010 by the Public Policy  Institute of California (PPIC), more than 3 out of 4 EITC claimants (76%) pay for tax filing preparation, a 

(14)

        higher rate than the national average (69%).  PPIC estimates that statewide, only 1.6% of EITC claimants  used free tax preparation services in 2006.   The findings by Brookings particularly suggest the importance of developing a culturally competent  outreach initiative to Hispanic residents. Survey data and anecdotal evidence suggests that Spanish  language speakers and Latino workers are less likely to know of and enroll for the EITC than English  speaking, non‐Latino workers. Figures from the 2001 National Survey of American Families (NAF) found  that only a small number of low‐income Latino parents (27%) have heard of the EITC, compared to 58%  of all low‐income parents.14 Additionally, parents with less than a high school education are significantly  less likely to be aware of the federal tax credit. NAF also indicated in their 2010 study that communities  with high non‐claimant rates tend to be more Latino, low‐income, and high participation in food stamp  programs.                                  

14 Maag, Elaine. “Disparities in Knowledge of the EITC.” Tax Policy Center: Tax Notes, March 14, 2005. Washington, 

(15)

Figure

 

Seven:

 

Latino

 

Residents

 

in

 

San

 

Diego

 

County

 

by

 

Census

 

Block,

 

2000

 

  The United Way outlines an aggressive strategy for Latino worker outreach in their 2009 EITC End of  Year Report. Promotional materials included distributing 60,000 bilingual postcards and 2,000 bilingual  posters throughout the region, and providing a four minute informational video in English and Spanish  about the EITC and free tax preparation sites at county government offices.  Other cities enlist local  Spanish‐speaking actors and musicians to participate for free in EITC public service announcements, as  well as media events. It is unclear whether San Diego EITC Coalition leaders have undertaken a similar  strategy.   There may be additional opportunities. As of January 1, 2008, California law requires all employers to  notify their employees of the EITC in person or by mail, within one week of providing IRS Form W‐2.  However, there is no requirement to provide Spanish‐language information. Moreover, previous studies  have also shown that Latinos are more likely to receive their news from the radio than non‐Latino  Americans, a resource which may not be fully utilized by EITC campaign organizers.  

(16)

Local elected officials at the City of San Diego and other municipal governments should also consider  officially recognizing an Earned Income Tax Credit Awareness Day each year. Other large metropolitan  cities, such as San Francisco, Chicago, and New York City have made EITC outreach a signature annual  program.    Conclusion  When San Diego County workers fail to enroll for the EITC, our entire region suffers. Increasing program  participation today would make significant inroads as nearly half of all EITC recipients reside in the City  of San Diego, which collected $132.6 million in the 2006 tax year. By collaborating with county officials  to expand the ranks of volunteers and the number of city facilities used for public awareness and tax  filing centers, City Hall can begin closing the gap on the estimated $20.4‐$34.1 million of unclaimed EITC  refunds lost each year.   Improving San Diego’s EITC public outreach can result in a financial benefit that exceeds the maximum  annual refund cap, as qualified workers can legally “back‐file” for the EITC and receive up to three years  of tax credit refunds they’ve earned but not yet claimed. Improving EITC enrollment should also be a  matter of community pride, as it can help San Diego receive back more of its fair share of tax dollars  from Washington D.C., reversing the deplorable “net donor” status we have today. With approximately  1 out of 5 San Diego County residents living in EITC‐eligible families, raising the bar on program outreach  is one more component to securing our region’s economic recovery.      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(17)

APPENDIX

 

A:

 

Claimed

 

&

 

Estimated

 

Unclaimed

 

EITC

 

Refunds

 

to

 

San

 

Diego

 

County

 

Residents,

 

2006

 

 

Zip Code  Total Tax  Returns    Total EITC  Returns   % EITC  filers   Federal EITC  Payments  (000)    Est.  Unclaimed  EITC Payments  (000)   91901        6,467          495   8%  $       783    $      =   91902        8,140          718   9%  $         1,197    $       299   91905         643          92   14%  $       136    $       34   91906        1,317          198   15%  $       333    $       83   91910         32,130          5,885   18%  $       10,954    $       2,739   91911         33,969          7,989   24%  $       15,326    $       3,832   91913         14,573          1,842   13%  $         3,310    $       828   91914        5,528          486   9%  $       809    $       202   91915        8,555          941   11%  $         1,689    $       422   91916         852          73   9%  $       117    $       29   91917         399          115   29%  $       235    $       59   91931         194          43   22%  $       78    $       20   91932         10,789          2,505   23%  $         4,809    $       1,202   91934         260          64   25%  $       132    $       33   91935        3,945          304   8%  $       481    $       120   91941         21,023          2,240   11%  $         3,525    $       881   91942         11,502          1,042   9%  $         1,494    $       374   91945         10,812          2,008   19%  $         3,634    $       909   91948        48         ‐     0%  $      ‐      $      ‐     91950         20,633          5,885   29%  $       11,633    $       2,908   91962         903          60   7%  $       108    $       27   91963         516          155   30%  $       321    $       80   91977         23,363          4,523   19%  $         8,837    $       2,209   91978        3,882          547   14%  $       906    $       227   91980         887          290   33%  $       564    $       141   92003        2,677          254   9%  $       477    $       119   92004        1,417          282   20%  $       527    $       132   92007        5,650          424   8%  $       524    $       131  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(18)

 

 

92008         13,159          1,039   8%  $         1,461    $       365   92009         17,623          864   5%  $         1,239    $       310   92010        6,339          410   6%  $       640    $       160   92011        9,771          606   6%  $       966    $       242   92014        7,513          255   3%  $       224    $       56   92019         18,401          1,895   10%  $         3,340    $       835   92020         22,172          3,952   18%  $         7,208    $       1,802   92021         26,794          4,649   17%  $         8,733    $       2,183   92024         23,400          1,601   7%  $         2,016    $       504   92025         16,850          2,967   18%  $         5,849    $       1,462   92026         19,903          2,340   12%  $         4,016    $       1,004   92027         19,957          3,147   16%  $         5,941    $       1,485   92028         18,673          2,566   14%  $         4,864    $       1,216   92029        8,455          649   8%  $         1,062    $       266   92036        1,601          184   11%  $       295    $       74   92037         19,541          750   4%  $       744    $       186   92040         18,282          2,300   13%  $         3,745    $       936   92054         30,072          6,161   20%  $       12,071    $       3,018   92055        6,467          339   5%  $       422    $       106   92056         23,660          2,481   10%  $         4,217    $       1,054   92057         22,919          3,079   13%  $         5,605    $       1,401   92058         932          221   24%  $       422    $       106   92059         701          101   14%  $       185    $       46   92060         169          13   8%  $      5    $      1   92061        1,291          214   17%  $       414    $       104   92064         21,567          1,449   7%  $         2,289    $       572   92065         15,212          1,519   10%  $         2,692    $       673   92066         148          17   11%  $       23    $      6   92067        5,595          152   3%  $       145    $       36   92069         17,319          2,456   14%  $         4,524    $       1,131   92070         540          88   16%  $       157    $       39   92071         23,197          2,291   10%  $         3,730    $       933   92075        6,495          304   5%  $       360    $       90   92078         16,610          1,470   9%  $         2,521    $       630   92081         12,004          1,033   9%  $         1,692    $       423   92082        8,052          889   11%  $         1,660    $       415   92083         13,521          2,739   20%  $         5,358    $       1,340   92084         18,103          2,772   15%  $         5,304    $       1,326      

(19)

92086         627          65   10%  $       90    $       23   92091         497         ‐     0%  $      ‐      $      ‐     92093        48         ‐     0%  $      ‐      $      ‐     92096         ‐           ‐     0%  $      ‐      $      ‐     92101         14,851          1,294   9%  $         1,184    $       296   92102         15,983          3,966   25%  $         7,605    $       1,901   92103         18,097          1,119   6%  $       764    $       191   92104         21,424          3,218   15%  $         5,060    $       1,265   92105         23,298          7,357   32%  $       15,762    $       3,941   92106        9,263          656   7%  $       820    $       205   92107         14,786          1,106   7%  $         1,071    $       268   92108         10,014          563   6%  $       564    $       141   92109         24,994          1,594   6%  $         1,383    $       346   92110         11,825          1,185   10%  $         1,617    $       404   92111         20,310          2,877   14%  $         5,051    $       1,263   92113         15,396          5,345   35%  $       11,505    $       2,876   92114         26,076          5,757   22%  $       11,236    $       2,809   92115         22,108          3,919   18%  $         7,132    $       1,783   92116         16,980          2,000   12%  $         2,643    $       661   92117         24,572          2,253   9%  $         3,141    $       785   92118        7,968          492   6%  $       659    $       165   92119         11,355          745   7%  $         1,023    $       256   92120         13,217          804   6%  $         1,055    $       264   92121        2,483          152   6%  $       122    $       31   92122         18,751          845   5%  $       920    $       230   92123         12,675          1,573   12%  $         2,576    $       644   92124         12,765          1,518   12%  $         2,556    $       639   92126         32,430          3,432   11%  $         5,644    $       1,411   92127         14,022          832   6%  $         1,305    $       326   92128         22,566          896   4%  $         1,098    $       275   92129         22,997          1,636   7%  $         2,684    $       671   92130         20,085          751   4%  $         1,034    $       259   92131         15,168          641   4%  $       844    $       211   92134         264          17   6%  $       29    $      7   92135         565          35   6%  $       45    $       11   92136         392          38   10%  $       63    $       16   92139         15,036          2,875   19%  $         5,291    $       1,323   92140         257          10   4%  $       10    $      3   92145        1,775          78   4%  $       111    $       28   92154         33,504          8,165   24%  $       16,262    $       4,066   92155         616          42   7%  $       57    $       14   92161         ‐           ‐     0%  $      ‐      $      ‐     92173         17,341          5,972   34%  $       12,684    $       3,171   92182         ‐           ‐     0%  $      ‐      $      ‐     92259         162          12   7%  $       18    $      5   92536        1,325          196   15%  $       290    $       73   92672         16,748          1,655   10%  $         2,749    $       687                                                              

(20)

APPENDIX

 

B:

 

2010

 

San

 

Diego

 

County

 

EITC/Tax

 

Filing

 

Assistance

 

Sites

 

CENTRAL REGION ‐ VITA     ADDRESS    

Home Start (Mid‐City)  5296 University Ave.  Suite F‐2  San Diego, CA 92105  Home Start/Tubman Chavez Center  415 N. Euclid Ave.  San Diego, CA  92114  Bronze Triangle CDC  2959 Imperial Avenue  San Diego, CA  92101  San Diego State University  5500 Campanile Drive  San Diego, CA  92182  MAAC/President John Adams Manor  5471 Bayview Heights Place  San Diego, CA  92105  MAAC Mercado Apartments  2001 Newton Ave.  San Diego, CA  92113  ACORN  22 W 35th Street Suite 203  National City, CA  91950  Alliance for African Assistance  5952 El Cajon Blvd.  San Diego, CA 92115 

EAST REGION ‐ VITA  ADDRESS    

MAAC‐ San Martin de Porres Apartments  9119 Jamacha Road  Spring Valley, CA  91977  Home Start ‐ East El Cajon  1123 N. Mollison Ave  El Cajon, CA  92021  Home Start ‐ Lemon Grove Recreation 

Center  3131 School Lane  Lemon Grove, CA  91945 

Home Start ‐ El Cajon  338 W. Lexington Ave., Ste. 105  El Cajon, CA  92020 

NORTH CENTRAL REGION ‐ VITA  ADDRESS    

SAY San Diego‐Clairemont  4340 Genesee Ave.  Suite 207  San Diego, CA 92123  SAY/Linda Vista Recreation Center  7064 Levant Street  San Diego, CA  92111  Catholic Charities  9535 Kearny Villa Rd, Ste. 100  San Diego, CA  92126  Catholic Charities – Refugees  4575‐A Mission Gorge Place  San Diego, CA  92120  Chinese Service Center  8775 Aero Dr., Ste. 138  San Diego, CA 92123  Mabuhay Alliance  9630 Black Mountain Rd., Ste. G  San Diego, CA  92126 

NORTH COASTAL REGION ‐ VITA  ADDRESS    

North County Lifeline  707 Oceanside Blvd.  Oceanside, CA 92054  MAAC Laurel Tree Apartments  1307 Laurel Tree Lane  Carlsbad, CA  92009 

SOUTH REGION ‐ VITA  ADDRESS    

South Bay Community Services  1124 Bay Blvd., Ste. D  Chula Vista, CA  91911  MAAC ‐ National City  2345 E. 8th St.  Suite 105  National City, CA  91950  MAAC‐ San Ysidro Ctr  663 San Ysidro Blvd.  San Ysidro, CA  92173  MAAC ‐ Chula Vista  845 Broadway  Chula Vista, CA  91911 

(21)

NORTH INLAND REGION ‐ VITA  ADDRESS    

Interfaith Community Services  550‐B  W. Washington Ave.  Escondido, CA  92025  North County Lifeline  200 Michigan Ave.  Vista, CA  92084 

AARP EITC Sites  ADDRESS    

AARP Information Center  4075 30th Street   San Diego, CA 92102  Alpine Community Center  1830 Alpine Blvd  Alpine, CA 91901  Atonement Lutheran Church  7250 Eckstrom Avenue  San Diego, CA 92111  Champagne Village Mobile Home Park  8975 Lawrence Welk Drive  Escondido, CA  92026  Brengle Terrace Senior Service  1400 Vale Terrace  Vista, CA  92084  Carlsbad Senior Center  799 Pine Avenue  Carlsbad, CA  92008  Chula Vista Main Library  365 F Street  Chula Vista, CA  91910  CITI Bank  740 S Rancho Santa Fe Rd  San Marcos, CA  92078  Claremont Community Svce Ctr  4731 Clairemont Drive  San Diego, CA  92117  College Avenue Senior Center  4855 College Avenue  San Diego, CA  92115  Coronado Public Library  640 Orange Avenue  Coronado, CA  92118  Coronado Senior Center  1019 7th Street  Coronado, CA  92118 

Edgemoor Nutritional Center  9065 Edgemoor Drive  Santee, CA  92071  Elderhelp of San Diego  4069 30th Street  San Diego, CA  92104  Encinitas Senior Center  1140 Oakcrest Park Drive  Encinitas, CA  92024  El Cajon Public Library  201 E Douglas Ave  El Cajon, CA  92020  Oceana Community Association Clubhouse  550 Vista Bella  Oceanside, CA  92057  First Lutheran Church  1420 3rd Avenue  San Diego, CA  92101  Imperial Beach Senior Center  1075 8th Street  Imperial Beach, CA 91932  Joslyn Senior Center  399 Heald Lane  Fallbrook, CA  92028  La Mesa Senior Center  8450 La Mesa Blvd  La Mesa, CA  91941  Lakeside Community Center  9841 Vine Street  Lakeside, CA  92040  Meadowvrook Mobile Estates  8301 Mission Gorge Road  Santee, CA  92071  Lemon Grove Senior Center  8235 Mount Vernon Street  Lemon Grove, CA  91945 

(22)

Live Well San Diego  4425 Bannock Avenue  San Diego, CA  92117  Mira Mesa Senior Center  8460 Mira Mesa Blvd  San Diego, CA  92126  National City Library  1401 National City Blvd  National City, CA  91950  New Frontier Mobile Home Park  9225 N Magnolia Ave  San Diego, CA  92119  North University Community Library  8820 Judicial Drive  San Diego, CA  92122  Oceanside Senior Ctr  455 Country Club Lane  Oceanside, CA  92054  Peninsula Comm Service Ctr  3740 Sports Arena Blvd #L  San Diego, CA  92110  Poway Valley Senior Ctr  13094 Bowron Road  Poway, CA  92064  Rancho Bernardo Senior Service  16769 Bernardo Center Drive  San Diego, CA  92128  Rancho Sante Fe Senior Center  16780 La Gracia Street  Rancho Santa Fe, CA 92091  Ray & Jon Kroc Community Ctr  6605 University Ave  San Diego, CA  92115  Saint Brigid's Church  4735 Cass Street  San Diego, CA  92109  Saint James Catholic Church  645 S Nardo Avenue  Solana Beach, CA 92075  Salvation Army  825 7th Street  San Diego, CA  92101  San Marcos Joslyn Senior Ctr  111 Richmar Avenue  San Marcos, CA  92069  Senior Service Council  728 N Broadway  Escondido, CA  92025  Serra Mesa Library  9005 Aero Drive  San Diego, CA  92123  Sharp Cabrillo Senior Resource  3475 Kenyon Street  San Diego, CA  92110  Sharp Chula Vista Hospital  751 Medical Center Court  Chula Vista, CA  91911  Shut‐Ins Cheryl Porter  655 Brockwood Drive  El Cajon, CA  92021  Solana Beach Presbyterian Church  225 Stevens Avenue  Solana Beach, CA 92075  South Chula Vista Library  389 Orange Avenue  Chula Vista, CA  91911  South Bay Nutritional Center  945 18th Street  San Diego, CA  92154  St. John Baptist Church  1524 Lemon Street  Oceanside, CA  92054  St. Paul's Manor  2635 2nd Avenue  San Diego, CA  92103  Washington Mutual Bank  4627 College Avenue  San Diego, CA  92115  Wells Community Center  1153 E Madison Avenue  El Cajon, CA  92021 

Figure

Figure Six: EITC Claimants in San Diego County by Zip Code, Tax Year 2006    Source: Internal Revenue Service, United Way of San Diego  The map reveals that county EITC coordinators have done a good job of aligning EITC assistance centers  with the neighbo

Figure Six:

EITC Claimants in San Diego County by Zip Code, Tax Year 2006 Source: Internal Revenue Service, United Way of San Diego The map reveals that county EITC coordinators have done a good job of aligning EITC assistance centers with the neighbo p.13
Figure Seven: Latino Residents in San Diego County by Census Block, 2000    The United Way outlines an aggressive strategy for Latino worker outreach in their 2009 EITC End of  Year Report. Promotional materials included distributing 60,000 bilingual postc

Figure Seven:

Latino Residents in San Diego County by Census Block, 2000 The United Way outlines an aggressive strategy for Latino worker outreach in their 2009 EITC End of Year Report. Promotional materials included distributing 60,000 bilingual postc p.15

References