It doesn t get better than this!

16  Download (0)

Full text

(1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It doesn’t get

better than this!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Studies 9-13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hebrews

September 2014

B I B L E

S T U D Y

M I N I S T R I E S

(2)

STUDY

 

9

 

 

HEBREWS

 

8:1

13

 

 

F

OR STARTERS

 

Do you think it’s possible for God to change his mind?   

     

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

8:1

6

 

1. What is the big point the author makes in verses 1‐2?   

   

According to verse 1, Jesus is the “high priest who sat down at the right hand of the Majesty in  heaven.” What Old Testament passage is the author alluding to (Hint: it’s one he has referred to twice  already), and what is he saying about Jesus by this? 

     

What is the “true tabernacle” in verse 2, and what “service” does Jesus perform there right now?   

     

2. What kinds of things did the earthly priests offer, and what did Jesus offer (verses 3‐4)?   

   

According to verse 5, why are the offerings of the earthly priests different from the offering of the  heavenly high priest? What does this tell us about the value of those earthly offerings? 

     

In verse 5 the author quotes Exodus 25:40. How does this quote prove the inferiority of the earthly  priests and their ministry? 

     

3. Since Jesus’ ministry is so obviously superior to the ministry of the earthly priests, what else does that  imply (verse 6)? 

     

Given that the readers of Hebrews were being tempted to turn away from Jesus to Judaism, what do  In chapter 7 the author of Hebrews showed why a priest in the order of Melchizedek is so much better  than any of the old, Levitical priests: he is holy, blameless, pure, set apart from sinners, exalted above the  heavens; he serves in the power of an indestructible life; he has been made perfect forever. Chapter 8,  then, marks the author’s big conclusion – the central point of the whole letter. 

(3)

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

8:7

13

 

4. In verse 7 the author suggests that there was something wrong with the first covenant – that is, the  covenant God made with Israel through Moses. Does this mean that God made a mistake? What was  “wrong” with that covenant (see verses 7‐8a & verse 9)? 

       

5. In what ways would the new covenant be different from the covenant of Moses (verses 10‐11)?   

   

In the old covenant Moses said, “If we are careful to obey all this law before the Lord our God, as he  has commanded us, that will be our righteousness” (Deuteronomy 6:25). In the new covenant of  Jeremiah, obedience isn’t even mentioned. Why not? What will the new covenant be based on instead  (verse 12)? 

     

Back in verse 6 the author had commented that the new covenant is “founded on better promises”  than the old covenant of Moses. What are those “better promises”? 

       

6. In what ways is the new covenant superior to the old, and why does it render the old covenant  obsolete? 

     

From chapter 8, what is so wrong with the readers’ desire to turn back to Judaism?   

   

  For someone who loves quoting from the Old Testament, the author of Hebrews has outdone himself  in chapter 8. The lengthy quote from Jeremiah 31:31‐34 is, in fact, not only the longest single Old  Testament quote in Hebrews, but the longest in the whole of the New Testament. This is the centrepiece  of his letter. 

  Furthermore, this quote is doubly noteworthy because, in contrast with all the other significant Old  Testament quotes in Hebrews, the author doesn’t engage in detailed commentary on this text; he leaves  it to speak almost entirely for itself. 

  Jeremiah lived and worked during the darkest period in ancient Israel’s history – at the time of Israel’s  defeat and exile at the hands of the Babylonians. He watched as God brought his final punishment on his  people for their centuries of disobedience. Even as the noose was tightening, Jeremiah saw how the  people continued to rebel against God and to distrust his word. The covenant made through Moses had  obviously failed! 

  It was in this context that Jeremiah prophesied a new covenant that God would have to make – a new  way of relating to his people – so that he could fulfil his commitment to bless his world. 

  Jeremiah wasn’t alone in speaking like this, by the way. Ezekiel – among others – also looked forward  to a new kind of intervention by God in history (e.g., Ezekiel 36:25‐27). 

(4)

H

EBREWS AND US

 

7. Living as we do, in the age of the new covenant, the old covenant has been declared by God to be  obsolete. What does this mean about all the laws God gave Israel through Moses? How should we think  about them? What relevance do they have to us – if any? 

         

God promised that under the new covenant his laws would be written on the hearts and minds of his  people. What does this mean in practice? Because we are no longer bound by the laws of Moses (since  the old covenant is obsolete), how should our lives compare to the lives of people who lived under the  old covenant? 

         

8. There is still a tendency in some Christian traditions today to refer to parts of our church buildings as  “the sanctuary”, and/or to  ascribe  to our church buildings some  kind of independent spiritual  significance (e.g., as “the Lord’s house”). What would the author of Hebrews say about this? Where is  God’s true sanctuary and how do we enter it? To what should we ascribe true spiritual significance?   

       

9. Reflect on God’s new covenant promises that are yours through Jesus. Are there any you find difficult  to understand? Are there any you find particularly precious? 

         

10. The new covenant, founded on forgiveness and inner transformation, is God’s provision in response to  the failure of people to obey his first covenant. Despite that provision, however, humans (including  Christians) always seem to default towards law‐religion. Why is this the case? What can we do to guard  against falling into that trap? 

(5)

STUDY

 

10

 

 

HEBREWS

 

9:1

10:18

 

 

F

OR STARTERS

 

We’ve all done things we feel very guilty about. How do you intuitively respond to your feelings of guilt?  How should you respond? 

       

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

9:1

10

 

1. What names were given to the first and second rooms of the tabernacle (verses 1‐5)? What did the  second room represent? 

     

2. What was the difference between the outer room of the tabernacle and the inner room (verses 6‐7)?   

   

What extra thing did the high priest have to do before he could enter the inner room (verse 7)?   

     

3. Why did the continuing existence of the ‘outer tabernacle’ (or ‘room’) mean that the way into the Most  Holy Place could not be disclosed (verses 8‐10)? In other words, what was going on in the outer room?  What was that not able to accomplish? And what does all of that have to do with access into the Most  Holy Place? 

     

What is the ultimate value of all the old sacrifices of Judaism (verse 10)? Therefore, what value would  there be in the readers of Hebrews returning to Judaism? 

 

  In our last study we came to the centrepiece of the letter – Jesus’ installation as our high priest in  heaven and mediator of God’s new covenant based on his unilateral forgiveness of our sins. 

  Today’s passage continues to explore these ideas, focussing on a comparison between Jesus’ ministry  in the new covenant and the ministry of the priests with their sacrifices under the old covenant. And the  author turns his attention first to the physical sanctuary of the old covenant – its layout and furnishings. 

A

 

translational

 

note

 

  Our English translations use as many as four different words to translate one word that is used  consistently in Hebrews 9:1‐8. That is, the Greek word for ‘tent’, which appears in verses 2, 3, 6 and 8, is  translated variously as ‘tabernacle’ (NIV, Holman, NASB), ‘room’ (NIV, Holman), ‘section’ (ESV), ‘tent’  (ESV). In Hebrews the word can refer to either the tabernacle as a whole (e.g., Heb 8:5), or to one of the  two compartments within the tabernacle (e.g., Heb 9:3). 

  However, whenever ‘tent’ is preceded by a number (‘first’ or ‘second’), in Hebrews that always refers  to the first or second ‘compartment’ within the tabernacle – the ‘outer’ room and the ‘inner’ room.    Therefore, verse 8 should read (as in the NASB translation): “The Holy Spirit is signifying this, that the  way into the holy place has not yet been disclosed while the outer tabernacle is still standing”. 

(6)

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

9:11

14

 

4. How is the tabernacle in which Jesus serves as high priest different from the tabernacle of the old  covenant (verse 11; see also verse 24)? 

     

Which room in his tabernacle was Jesus able to enter, and on what basis (verse 12)? What does this  mean? 

   

In terms of the effect it has, how does Jesus’ sacrifice compare with the regular sacrifices of the old  covenant (verses 9‐10 and 13‐14)? 

     

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

9:15

28

 

5. We have just seen that Jesus death is able to cleanse our consciences. How does this relate to the new  covenant (verse 15)? 

       

6. Why was it necessary for something to die before the old covenant system could be activated (verse  22)? 

     

From verses 23‐26, how does the process of inauguration of the new covenant compare with the old?  In what way is the new covenant more effective than the old (see especially verse 26b)? 

     

What doesn’t need to be done anymore, and what is left for Jesus to do (verses 27‐28)?   

   

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

10:1

18

 

7. What does the author’s description of the Law as being a ‘shadow’ (verse 1) imply about God’s Old  Testament revelation? 

 

The author now returns to the big theme of the new covenant, which he introduced in chapter 8, and he  combines that with his discussion so far in this chapter about the earthly versus heavenly tabernacles,  and how we enter God’s presence. 

In verses 16‐21, the author describes some commonly accepted legal realities: that a will (which is a type  of covenant) is not put into effect until the person who made the will dies. He then points to the  similarity with the inauguration of the old covenant under Moses – that (as we find described in Exodus  24:4‐8) the old covenant was only put into effect after something died – in this case, sacrificial animals. 

(7)

The author states that the old covenant sacrifices could never actually deal with sin (verses 1‐4). Why  couldn’t they? What did they achieve instead? 

       

8. What does God not want, and what does he want instead? In other words, in verses 5‐10, what is God’s  ‘will’? 

   

What does this imply about the Old Testament sacrificial system?   

   

9. Once again, in verse 12, the author insists that Jesus has already “sat down at the right hand of God”  (remember Heb 1:3, 13 & 8:1). In verses 11‐18, how does he summarise everything he has been saying  from Hebrews 8:1 onward about the new covenant? 

       

H

EBREWS AND US

 

10. Some Christians feel quite anxious – even terrified – about the coming day of Jesus’ return, because  they fear that all their sinful deeds will be exposed to the universe. What do you think Hebrews 9:27‐28  has to say to such people? How do these verses make you feel? 

       

11. Hebrews 9:1‐10:18 hammers home the point that Jesus’ sacrifice was a “once for all” event (see 9:12,  25‐26, 27‐28; 10:10, 12, 14). Why is this important? What does it mean for: 

 

‐ how we should think about Roman Catholic practices such as the Mass and ‘sacraments’ like  confession and penance? 

     

‐ the way we should deal with ongoing sin in our lives?   

     

12. Why is assurance of salvation a mark of true Christian faith, and why do all false faiths fail to provide  their adherents with any genuine assurance? Are you sure you’re going to heaven? Why/why not?   

  In verses 5‐10 are two very important word‐chains to follow. The first is the repetition of the word  ‘body’ in verses 5 and 10. This refers to the ‘body’ of the sacrificial victim. The author contrasts the  sacrifices the worshippers brought under the old covenant with the ‘body’ (i.e., the sacrificial victim) God  himself had prepared for them. 

  The second is the word ‘will’. This actually first appears in verse 5, which literally says, “Sacrifice and  offering you did not will.” The word is then picked up in verses 7, 9 and 10. 

(8)

STUDY

 

11

 

 

HEBREWS

 

10:19

11:40

 

 

F

OR STARTERS

 

We inhabit one of the most privileged points in history, in one of the most beautiful parts of the world,  enjoying an unparalleled standard of living. Why is it especially important for people like us to be meeting  regularly with other Christians? Or is it? 

       

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

10:19

25

 

1. This is one of the most famous passages in Hebrews, and justifiably so! It draws to a close the  arguments of the last 10 chapters. In study 9 we saw that the central point of the letter is encapsulated  in 8:1‐2. How do these verses here complement what the author said in 8:1‐2? 

       

2. In verses 19‐21 the author lists two things that those who trust in Christ have. What are they? How are  they related to each other? 

       

In verses 22‐24 the author lists three things that we should do in response. What are they? How are  they related to each other, and to the two things we have from verses 19‐21? 

         

The author’s third exhortation (in verse 24) is fleshed out in two further exhortations in verse 25 – one  negative and one positive. What are they? Why are they the logical conclusion to the whole paragraph?  (Hint: Why does the author finish by drawing their attention to the “approaching Day”?) 

   

  By this point in Hebrews we have essentially come to the end of the major teaching sections of the  letter. The author has demonstrated how much greater than everyone else Jesus is and how perfect is  the salvation we have in him. In particular, he has demonstrated why returning to Judaism would be, not  simply a backward step, but a tragic step! To do so would be to lose all of God’s promises to Abraham  and to come under his judgment. However, to press on in faith means to receive all the blessings of the  new covenant – everything the old covenant was incapable of providing. 

  In short, persevering faith in Christ is the only course of action worth even considering. It doesn’t get  better than this! 

  From here to the end of the letter, then, after drawing a final conclusion in 10:19‐39, most of the  author’s focus is on encouraging his readers through a series of significant examples: first through their  own example (10:32‐39), then the example of all the faithful saints who preceded them (chapter 11),  then the example of Christ (12:1‐3), and finally the example of their leaders in the present (13:7‐8). There  are other exhortations and other encouragements sprinkled about, but the bulk of the doctrinal heavy‐ lifting is now behind us. 

(9)

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

10:26

31

 

3. This passage is very reminiscent of a previous warning passage in Hebrews – Hebrews 6:4‐8. Compare  the two passages: what common points do they make? 

     

Why does this warning follow so close on the heels of the exhortations in verses 19‐25?   

   

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

10:32

39

 

4. What can the readers learn from their own example (verses 32‐34)? What motivated them in the past  to persevere despite persecution? 

     

What is the author’s simple message to his readers (verses 35‐39)? How does this relate to the  exhortations in verses 19‐25? 

     

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

11:1

2

 

5. How does verse 1 relate to the last verse of chapter 10? What significant word or concept is common to  both? 

       

As we will soon see, this chapter presents a chronological list of spiritual heroes from the Old  Testament. According to verse 2, why is this list here, and what encouragement does the author intend  for his readers by it? 

       

A

 

(tricky)

 

translational

 

note

 

  Verse 1 is a notoriously difficult verse to translate. There are two issues involved: (1) whether the two  halves of the verse are strictly parallel to each other (which is what most of our translations assume); (2)  and whether the two key words in this definition are to be understood as subjective convictions within  the believer (‘assurance’, ‘certainty’ – NIV), or objective statements about the things believed in (‘reality’,  ‘proof’ – Holman). 

  I have been persuaded* that: (1) the two clauses are not parallel, but rather complementary; and  therefore, (2) that the two key words are to be understood differently – as ‘confidence’ (subjective) and  ‘proof’ (objective) respectively. 

  Therefore, I believe the verse should read: 

Now faith is the assurance of what is hoped for, the proof of what is not seen. 

  In other words, the first clause tells us what faith is; the second clause tells us what faith does. Faith is  a personal conviction that what God has promised is true; what faith does is to demonstrate, through our  faith‐driven choice to persevere despite persecution, that the things we don’t yet see are, in fact, real  (because why would we persevere if they weren’t?). 

(10)

6. Take it in turns reading through Hebrews 11:1‐38 (stop before the last paragraph). I suggest that  whenever you get to a new Old Testament character, you pass the reading on to the next person. As  you read, take note of every time someone acts in accordance with “what they hope for” and “what  they do not see”. 

     

Summarise what you have discovered: what were these people from the Old Testament hoping for?  What did they not yet see? How do those things relate to the hope we have in Jesus? 

     

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

11:39

40

 

7. How many of God’s Old Testament people had already received during their earthly lives what God had  promised them? 

     

What was God’s reason for not giving them what he had promised? How does this relate to Jesus and  to the readers of Hebrews? 

     

What does this tell us about the relative value of the old covenant?   

   

H

EBREWS AND US

 

8. The great exhortation of Hebrews 10 is to draw near to God, and to make sure others draw near as  well, keeping our eyes fixed on the Day when Christ will appear to take us into God’s presence once and  for all (verses 22‐25). When Christians get into the habit of not meeting regularly with God’s people,  what usually happens? In particular, what happens to their confidence in God’s promises, and why?   

   

How does the claim in Hebrews 11:1 that “faith is the proof of what is not seen” further underline the  importance of regularly meeting together? How does meeting with other Christians help us? How can  we help those who are struggling to make this the priority it should be? 

     

9. The author of Hebrews certainly doesn’t pull his punches when it comes to warning his readers about  the real danger they’re in. Hebrews 10:26‐31 is now the second time in the letter he has done this.  However, compare Hebrews 10:39 with Hebrews 6:9‐12. Why are the very severe warning passages  there in Hebrews? How can they be of benefit to us today? 

     

10. Examples can be very helpful, because they give us a concrete picture of what it means to persevere in  faith in Christ. Which of  the  examples  from Hebrews  10‐11 do you  find most  challenging or  encouraging? Are there other examples of persevering faith – in friends or acquaintances – that inspire 

(11)

STUDY

 

12

 

 

HEBREWS

 

12:1

29

 

 

F

OR STARTERS

 

What is worse than suffering?   

   

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

12:1

4

 

1. The paragraph begins with a big “Therefore”. Remind yourselves what Hebrews has been about in the  preceding one and a bit chapters (from 10:39). 

       

2. Who is this “cloud of witnesses”? What are they bearing witness to? (Hint: They are not watching on as  the readers of Hebrews run their race.) 

       

What is the difference between “everything that hinders” (in some translations, “every weight”) and  “the sin that so easily entangles”? Why must we throw both of them off, and what will this mean in  practice? 

       

Why should the witnesses from chapter 11 be an encouragement to us to run the race?   

     

3. Way back in study 3 we saw that “author” has the sense of “pioneer” or “trailblazer”, and that  “perfection” is about being made “complete”. If Jesus is the “pioneer” in the race, then what  similarities do we see between Jesus’ experience and that of the readers of Hebrews (verses 2‐3)? How  should that encourage them? 

       

What difference is there between Jesus’ experience and that of the readers of Hebrews (verse 4)? How  should that encourage them? 

       

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

12:5

13

 

4. Compare this passage with Deuteronomy 8:1‐5. What is the purpose of God’s discipline of us?   

   

(12)

In what way can we see “hardship” as discipline (verse 7)?   

     

Why does God allow us to experience hardship (verses 7‐11)? What does it tell us about God’s  relationship to us? How can we expect to benefit from it? 

       

5. How, then, can the author call a message about “discipline”, “rebuke” and “punishment” (verses 5‐6) a  “word of encouragement” (verse 5)? What is encouraging about it? What should be our attitude to  hardship in the present, especially the hardships we might experience because we want to single‐ mindedly follow Jesus? 

         

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

12:14

17

 

6. These instructions don’t just come out of the blue; they are a continuation of the exhortations of this  chapter. How do they fit with both the exhortation to run the race (verses 1‐4) and the teaching about  discipline (verses 5‐13)? 

       

What should the hardships that faith in Christ brings do for the way we relate to our fellow‐believers?   

       

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

12:18

24

 

7. What event do verses 18‐21 refer to (if you need to, look up Exodus 19)? What was that like?   

     

What does the author describe in verses 22‐24? How does this compare with Israel’s experience at Mt.  Sinai? 

       

Why does the author make this comparison? How does his picture of heaven fit with what he has been  saying in this chapter so far? 

     

(13)

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

12:25

29

 

8. Once again the author turns from encouragement to warning. What should be our attitude to God and  his promises? Why? 

         

H

EBREWS AND US

 

9. What are some of the things you find to be the biggest distractions from the race – that is, that get in  the way of you living single‐mindedly for Jesus? What can you do about them? 

         

10. In our contemporary world, where things like ‘voluntary euthanasia’ continue to be publicly debated, it  seems that suffering is about the worst possible thing anyone can experience. We will do anything to  try to ensure it doesn’t happen to us. Given this context we live in, how can we find deep comfort in  God’s discipline of us? How should we learn to speak with our non‐Christian friends about our own  experiences of hardship? 

         

11. God treats us as beloved children (verses 5‐11), yet we are told to “worship God with reverence and  awe, for our God ‘is a consuming fire’” (verses 28‐29). Is there a contradiction here? How can we  resolve the apparent tension? 

   

(14)

STUDY

 

13

 

 

HEBREWS

 

13:1

25

 

 

F

OR STARTERS

 

We often worry that others will think we’re strange. Are we justified in worrying like that?   

     

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

13:1

7

 

1. In our urban, cosmopolitan world, a ‘stranger’ could be virtually anyone we see any day of the week.  However in the ancient world people were not nearly as mobile, so in a local town everyone knew  everyone else. In fact, in Greek the word ‘stranger’ also meant ‘foreigner’ – a ‘stranger’ was someone  who was different and didn’t fit in with everyone else. In what way, therefore, would a ‘stranger’ (verse  2) have been similar to a prisoner or a mistreated person (verse 3)? 

       

In verses 1‐3, then (and recalling Hebrews 10:32‐34), what is he exhorting his readers to do? How does  entertaining strangers and remembering prisoners and the mistreated relate to the command to “keep  on loving each other as brothers”? 

       

2. Looking at verses 4‐5a, where previously in Hebrews has the author exhorted his readers to get rid of  sin and other distractions? Why are they to do that? 

       

Read Deuteronomy 31:1‐8. Why does God tell Joshua and Israel that he will never leave or forsake  them? Why does the author of Hebrews quote that in verse 5? How does it (and also the quote from  Psalm 118 in verse 6) add to verses 1‐5a? 

       

3. In verse 7, what is it about their leaders that the readers were to take particular note of and to imitate?  Where have we seen similar encouragements in Hebrews before? 

       

Given the things they were to take note of in verse 7, why does the author add his comment in verse 8  about Jesus never changing? 

   

This chapter seems to contain a fairly random collection of instructions. But if you look carefully, you will  see that everything here echoes or reinforces things the author has been saying throughout the letter. 

(15)

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

13:9

19

 

4. What are the “strange teachings” (or “foreign teachings”) they were in danger of being carried away by  (verses 9‐10)? Why refer to them as “strange”? 

       

The teachings of Judaism might now be “strange” to God’s purposes, but how will the rest of the world  view those who hold to the gospel of Jesus (verses 11‐14)? Why? 

         

5. If the teachings and practices of the old covenant are now “foreign” to God’s purposes, what are the  new covenant “sacrifices” (the worship practices) that God is truly pleased with (verses 15‐16)? Why do  they please him? 

         

6. In what way do you think the readers of Hebrews were being tempted to disobey their leaders (verse  17; compare verse 7)? Why should they obey them? 

         

7. The author has had some extremely harsh things to say to his readers (especially 5:11‐6:8 and 10:26‐ 31), yet he is still comfortable not only in asking for their prayers (verse 18), but in thinking they might  be happy to see him again (verse 19)! What does this say about what the author expects will be the  effect of this letter? 

         

 

Read

 

Hebrews

 

13:20

25

 

8. Verses 20‐21 contain a wonderful short summary of the thrust of the whole letter. What does the  author ask God to do for the readers? 

       

On what basis will they be able to do God’s will and to be pleasing to him? Whose initiative is it? How  does all of this relate to the major exhortations of this letter? 

   

From verse 9 the author shifts focus a little away from personal examples, especially of those who have  suffered for their faith, and begins to focus more on the doctrinal issues his readers were wrestling with. 

(16)

9. The author has a gentle dig at himself in verse 22, urging his readers to “bear with” (or “endure”) this  short little letter – as though their suffering for Jesus wasn’t enough! However, in verse 23 he returns  to his serious, encouraging purpose. How would the mention of Timothy’s release (verse 23) have  strengthened his exhortations to them in this letter? 

         

10. How would his specific greeting to their “leaders” (verse 24) have strengthened his exhortations to  them? 

         

H

EBREWS AND US

 

11. Which of the many practical instructions and encouragements in Hebrews 13 do you find particularly  helpful, inspiring or challenging? 

         

12. Reflect on verses 20‐21: how can these verses educate the way you pray for yourself and for your  brothers and sisters in Christ? 

         

13. Share with the group one thing in particular that you will take away from studying Hebrews this year,  and one thing arising out of these studies that you would like the group to be praying for you. Then  pray for each other! 

               

Could I encourage you this week to set aside some time to read through the whole of Hebrews again and to  reflect again on what God has been saying to you through this part of his word. 

As was the usual custom in the first century, the letter to the Hebrews concludes with a list of personal  greetings. However, we shouldn’t dismiss them as mere trivia. They illustrate something of the concerns  of the letter as seen in the lives of real people, and they show that the race continues even after the  letter has finished. 

Figure

Updating...

References