Foundations & Early History of Clinical Psychology. A long time ago. Early Conceptions of Mental Illness 8/26/2009

10 

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

Foundations & Early History of 

Clinical Psychology

y

gy

A long time ago….

• “Psychology has a long past, but a short 

history.”

• The roots of psychology go very far back inThe roots of psychology go very far back in  time • Clinical psychology as a specific field, however,  is a relatively recent development

Early Conceptions of Mental Illness

• Several Greek philosophers and physicians  were pivotal to our understanding of MI • Looked beyond supernatural explanations forLooked beyond supernatural explanations for 

illness, saw natural influences (bio/psycho/  social) as important

• Saw mind and body as interconnected, not  separate

(2)

Greeks & Mental Illness

• Hippocrates(460‐377 BCE) –Saw illness as a result of  humor imbalance, heredity  and health as determiners  of mental well‐being –Started a more naturalistic  view of illness, dominant  view until Middle Ages 

Greeks & Mental Illness

• Plato (427‐347 BCE) –Saw soul as being in charge of  the body

–Mental illness came fromMental illness came from  sickness in the logistikon (controlled reason) –Poor personality, lack of  internal harmony and self‐ knowledge all caused MI

Greeks & Mental Illness

• Aristotle (384‐322 BCE) –Kept naturalistic view and  recognized emotional states  impacted physical functioningp p y g –Thought treatment should  focus on using logic and  reason to change the psyche –HUGE influence on modern  cognitive therapies

(3)

Greeks & Mental Illness

• Galen (130‐200 CE) –Developed comprehensive  system of medicine based on  humor systemy –Treatments such as bloodletting  were used for centuries

Middle Ages

• Saw a return to the more supernatural, pre‐ Hippocratic conceptions of illness

• You were sick because you had sinned, beenYou were sick because you had sinned, been  possessed by a demon, or cursed by a witch • Treatments were thus spiritual, relying on  priests and clergy, and often not humane –Innocent VIII’s witch hunts

Middle Ages

• Persecution of mentally ill (and many others)  led to an estimated 150,000 deaths

• During 16During 16 century, celestial influence thcentury, celestial influence became popular

• Paracelsus (1490‐1541) thought        moon could influence behavior       and mood (lunatics)

(4)

Renaissance

• Resurgence of interest in science, great  discoveries in chemistry, biology, physics • Swing back towards naturalistic explanationsSwing back towards naturalistic explanations 

for illness, but… • The philosophy of Rene Descartes argued for  mind‐body dualism, and this became widely  accepted 

Renaissance

• Treatment of mental illness was still very poor • Typically confined to asylums or hospitals, 

with either little care or painful treatments with either little care or painful treatments

–Bloodletting, hunger cures, hydrotherapy

• The word “bedlam” comes from a corruption  of a notable asylum, St Mary’s of Bethlehem

(5)

19

th

Century

• Work by Virchow and Pasteur emphasized  connection between biology and illness via  germs • Dualism was still prevalent, but began to have  some strong opponents –Benjamin Rush & Claude Bernard –Franz Mesmer & Jean Martin Charcot

19

th

Century

• Better understanding of  illness in general led to  great sensitivity in  treatment • Moral therapy movement  began with Philippe Pinel in France, Eli Todd and  Dorthea Dix in US, William  Tuke in England

19

th

Century

• Diagnosis and understanding of mental  disorders began to increase as well  • Kraeplin’s dementia praecox and Bleuler’sKraeplin s dementia praecox and Bleuler s

schizophrenia

• Led to the development of classification  systems for mental disorders

(6)

Birth of Psychology

• In the mid to late 1800s, philosophy and 

natural science began to collide • The methods of physiology and physicsThe methods of physiology and physics 

were adapted to answer questions  about the mind •Fechner’s The Elements of PsychophysicsWundt’s Principles of Physiological Psychology

Birth of Psychology

• Wundt founded the first psych  lab in Germany in 1879,  establishing psych as an  experimental science • William James (Harvard), G  Stanley Hall (Johns Hopkins),  and James Cattell (Clark)  established psych labs and  departments in the US

Birth of Psychology

• APA was founded in 1892 –Most members were academics and  experimentalists, few clinicians or applied  researchers • There was an interest in developing “mental  tests” to examine aspects of thinking and  cognition

(7)

Founding of Clinical Psychology

• Traced to Lightner Witmer at 

the U of Penn in 1896 • Established first psychological 

clinic worked with children with clinic, worked with children with  learning problems • Not well received by other  psychologists, who felt psych  should study general (not  abnormal) behavior

Founding of Clinical Psychology

• Witmer began publishing   The Psychological Clinic in  1907, proposing the term  “clinical psychology”clinical psychology • Has more in common with  today’s clinical psychologists  than many of the other  early clinicians

Intelligence Testing

• Alfred Binet and Theodore Simon were  commissioned by French government to  develop intelligence tests –Purpose was to ID students who needed special  education –Binet did not recommend it for use outside the  classroom, stressed it’s limitations • Henry Goddard translated it into English for  use at Vineland Training School in NJ

(8)

Intelligence Testing

• Lewis Terman further  adapted and revised the  scale, renamed it the  Stanford‐Binet d kl d l –Spread very quickly, widely  adopted • IQ testing became a  hallmark of early clinical  psychologists’ work

Mental Health & Child Guidance Movement

• Through the advocacy of  Clifford Beers, a former  mental patient, numerous  child guidance clinics g sprung up in early 1900s –Supported by Adolph  Meyers, a psychiatrist, and  William James • Focused on disruptive  behaviors and delinquency

Sigmund Freud

• Little influence until his lecture series at Clark  University in 1909

• Also included Carl Jung and Otto Rank, stimulatedAlso included Carl Jung and Otto Rank, stimulated  widespread acceptance of psychoanalytic theories

(9)

World War I

• US military sought out psychologists to  develop IQ tests to classify recruits

–Alpha (verbal) and Beta (non‐verbal) could be  given in group format

given in group format –Numerous problems and biases in the tests, but  established psych testing as a major force

Psych Testing post WWI

• Huge explosion of test development –Rorschach, Miller Analogies, TAT, Wechsler‐ Bellevue

–Cattell found Psychological Corporation to sellCattell found Psychological Corporation to sell  tests to various organizations and professionals • Most occurred in large psych and/or child  guidance clinics, but some CPs began to do  private practice

Psychotherapy

• Primarily conducted by psychiatrists until mid‐ century

• There were advances in using behavioralThere were advances in using behavioral  principles to treat fears, and consultation with  teachers and parents used those principles

(10)

Training

• Most CPs by the early 1940s had only a BA,  very few had Master’s or doctoral degrees • No standardized training or guidelinesNo standardized training or guidelines • APA was still primarily academics and 

researchers, uncomfortable with applied  psychology

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :