The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail: The Stories of the Landscape

22  Download (0)

Full text

(1)

Community Assistantship Program

. . .a program of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA)

The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail:

The Stories of the Landscape

Prepared in partnership with The Center for Changing Landscapes

and

The Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership and

The Middle-Snake-Tamarac Rivers Watershed District Prepared by Erin Garnaas-Holmes Research Assistant University of Minnesota 2014

CAP Report # 194

This report is available on the CURA website: http://www.cura.umn.edu/publications/search

(2)

The Community Assistantship Program (CAP) is a cross-college, cross-campus University of Minnesota initiative coordinated by the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA). Funds for CAP were generously provided by the McKnight Foundation and the Blandin Foundation. This is a publication of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA), which connects the resources of the University of Minnesota with the interests and needs of urban communities and the region for the benefit of all. CURA pursues its urban and regional mission by facilitating and supporting connections between state and local governments, neighborhoods, and

nonprofit organizations, and relevant resources at the University, including faculty and students from appropriate campuses, colleges, centers or departments. The content of this report is the responsibility of the author and is not necessarily endorsed by the Kris Nelson Community-Based Research Program, CURA or the University of Minnesota

© 2014 by The Regents of the University of Minnesota.

This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-­­ NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA. Any reproduction, distribution, or derivative use of this work under this license must be accompanied by the following attribution: “© The Regents of the University of

Minnesota. Reproduced with permission of the University of Minnesota’s Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA).” Any derivative use must also be licensed under the same terms. For permissions beyond the scope of this license, contact the CURA editor.

This publication may be available in alternate formats upon request. Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA)

University of Minnesota 330 HHH Center 301—19th Avenue South

Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 Phone: (612) 625-1551 E-mail: cura@umn.edu Web site: http://www.cura.umn.edu

The University of Minnesota is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status,

(3)

Community Assistantship Program

... a program of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA)

The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail

The Stories of the Landscape

Prepared in partnership with The Center for Changing Landscapes

and

The Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership and

The Middle-Snake-Tamarac Rivers Watershed District

Prepared by Erin Garnaas-Holmes Research Assistant University of Minnesota 2013 CAP Report#

This report is available on the CURA website: http://www.cura.umn.edu/publications/search

(4)

1he Community Assistantship Program (CAP) is a cross-college, cross-campus University of Minnesota initiative coordinated by the Ce11ter for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA). Funds for CAP were generously provided by the 1\tlcKnight Foundation and the Blandin Foundation.

This is a publication of the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA), which connects the resources of the University of Minnesota with the interests and needs of urban communities and the region for the benefit of all. CURA pursues its urban and regional mission by facilitating and supporting connections between state and local governments, neighborhoods, and nonprofit organizations, and relevant resources at the University, including

faculty and students from appropriate campuses, colleges, centers or departments. 1he content of this report is the responsibility of the author and is nol necessarily endorsed by the Kris Nelson Commwzity- Based Research Program, CURA or the University of Minnesota

© 2013 by The Regents of the University of Minnesota.

Tlzis work is licensed under the Creative Cornmolls Attribution--- NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 U11ported License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 444 Castro Street, Suite 900, Mountain View, California, 94041, USA. Any reproduction, distribution, or derivative use of this work under this license must be accompanied by the following attribution: "©

The Regents of the University of Minnesota. Reproduced with permission of the University of Minnesota's Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA)." Any derivative use must also be licensed under the same terms. For permissions beyond the scope of this license, contact the CURA editor.

This publication may be available in alternate formats upon request.

Center for Urban and Regional Affairs (CURA) University of Minnesota 330 HHH Center 301-19th Avenue South

Minneapolis, i'vfinnesota 55455 Phone: (612) 625-1551 E-mail: cura@umn.edu Web site:

http:! /www. c ura. umn. edu

The University of lvfinnesota is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to its programs, facilities, and employment without regard to race, color, creed, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, disability, public assistance status, veteran status, or sexual orientation.

The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail

Introduction

The following report serves as a record of research and design work done during the fall of 2013 by the

Center for Changing Landscapes and graduate student research assistant Erin Garnaas-Holmes to assist in the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail project. This project is part of a much broader community effort in northwestern Minnesota that seeks to both enhance economic development in the region by bringing more visitors to the area and also inform local residents of the power of their landscape.

The ecological biome of the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland is unique and rare in the United States, and the region attracts high concentrations of diverse migrating birds. Recent watershed management projects have formed large swaths of attractive habitat for both migratory and year-round birds. Meanwhile, at a time when the local economy is starting to grow, a tourist attraction like a birding trail could bring valuable

business to local communities. According to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service, $38.4 billion

was spent on wildlife watching activities in 20011. About 48 million Americans observed birds in 2006,

and as the population ages that number is predicted to increase. Birding is a year-round activity and has "considerable expenditures" associated with it, including lodging, food and supplies2•

The establishment of a birding trail is not only a way to attract new visitors to a region, but it also can be a way for current residents to enjoy their own landscape. Birding trail infrastructure can serve locals as much as visitors, and it can also present opportunities to celebrate the stories and legacies of the region. Birds, like all wildlife and plants, are part of a larger ecosystem that is connected to human history and our current ways of living. By drawing attention to where, how and why wildlife lives where it does, a birding trail can also illuminate how people relate to their landscape and their communities.

Erin's contract with the University of Minnesota's Center for Changing Landscapes and Northwest Regional Sustainable Development Partnership was facilitated through the Center for Urban and Regional Affairs Community Assistance Program and the Middle-Snake-Tamarac Rivers Watershed District.

1 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2001. National and State Economic Impacts of Wildlife Watching: Addendum to the 2001 Na­ tional Survey of Fishing, Hunting and Wildlife-Associated Recreation.

(5)
(6)

-/' . \

I •

J

Tallgrass Aspen Parkland

Birding Trail Map

LEGEND

r

--

Watershed lmpoundment Project

-

National Wildlife Refuge/State Park

State Wildlife Management Area

-

City

Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Biome

Miles 9 18 27 36

The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland

The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland biome is one of Minnesota's four ecological biomes and is home to a wide variety of birds. Hundreds of migratory species also pass over the Parkland each year, some of which can only be seen in this part of the country. This region of Northwest Minnesota is also rich in history, dating back not only hundreds of years to the time of European settlers but also millennia, to the time of glaciers. The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail provides an opportunity for visitors and local residents to discover evidence of ancient geological forces, learn about the history of people and the land, and capture exciting views of wildlife in this powerful landscape.

Recent watershed management

projects have created large areas of attractive habitat for both migratory and year-round birds, making this region an even more exciting place for birding and wildlife viewing. Read ahead to learn more about how this landscape has been formed over time and what kind of experiences the Tallgrass Aspen

Parkland Birding Trail has to offer.

Birdwatchers on the wildlife drive at the Agassiz Valley Project east of Warren, MN. © H. Hughes

(7)

The Story of the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland

The Legacy of Glacial Lake Agassiz

The Tallgrass Aspen Parkland is the smallest of Minnesota's biomes. but perhaps one of the most unique. Northwestern Minnesota is the only place this biome can be found in the entire United States. It is an ecotone, or a transition zone. between the prairie to the west and the forests to the east. The story of

the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland starts millennia ago with the movement of glaciers and the draining of the massive Glacial Lake Agassiz.

PRAIRIE

PAR KLAN OS

Minnesota Biomes

These maps show several ice advances and their associated end moraines that affected Minnesota in the Late Wisconsonian Age. Ice advances are arranged from oldest (top left) to youngest (bottom right). (Morey and Dahlberg, 23-24).

As the Laurentide Ice Sheet-a massive, mile-high glacier-began to recede by slowly melting away, its drainage patterns formed many of the landscapes we are familiar with in Minnesota today. An ice dam at its southern tip pooled glacial waters to create the Glacial Lake Agassiz, an enormous lake bigger than all of the Great Lakes combined, extending north to the current Hudson Bay. The southern tip of Glacial Lake Agassiz reached into present-day Minnesota and North Dakota.

Laurentide Ice Sheet

-14.000 to 75,000 Years Ago

Glacier Recedes and Melts

-14.000YearsAeo

Glacial Lake Agassiz Forms -11000 Years Al!o

As the lake retreated, its edge created a series of beaches, ridges of sand that still exist today. Sediment and nutrients settled to the bottom of the lake.

Glaclal Lake Agassiz recedes over time

Over thousands of years, the lake began to drain away into other water bodies, creating a huge glacial river. As it drained north it left a vast. flat landscape with the small rivet that is now the Red River valley.

Over time, prairies and stands of aspen grew in the rich soils left behind by Glacial Lake Agassiz. Wetlands and prairie potholes, formed by the receding lake, dotted the landscape. Streams meandered through the landscape down to the river valley.

When snow melted in the spring and April showers fell, the river flooded over large portions of the flat landscape.

As European Americans settled the

landscape, they took advantage of the fertile soil in the former lake bed. The gravelly soils of the beach ridges proved less suitable for farming.

The Red River still overflows in the spring, but now it floods farmlands, homes and towns.

(8)

The Nature of Flooding

As Minnesota was settled along with other parts of

the United States and Canada after the Revolutionary War, the Public Land Survey was a tool that the government used to define tracts of land that could eventually be sold for private use. Each "section" of the PLS was intended to be enough land, about the size of a city block, for one farmer to sustain his or her family. A township was made up of 36 of these sections (shown in white on the image to the right). This grid of townships was laid over the geography

of Minnesota (without much heed to geological

or hydrological characteristics. like watershed boundaries).

As farmers began to manipulate the landscape

they formed it into the most efficient conditions for growing the food that sustains our nation. Agricultural efficiency drove landowner-s decisions and problems created by regional hydrological patterns were less extreme as they are today. In order to grow more food, wetlands were filled and lands that were too wet were drained through tile systems. A series of ditches were dug to quickly channel water from farmland downstream to the Red River. The drain tile and ditch

The Public Land Survey created the grid of townships and roads shown in white on this image. Watershed boundaries are shown in black.

system effectively replaced small stream systems and

wetlands, causing water to flow faster towards the river than in pre-settlement times, increasing the peak flow rate of the river after a rain storm event.

The drain tile and ditch system sends water from farmland downstream as efficiently as possible in order to support the growing of food crops that do not tolerate wet conditions.

11111

.. � ... .

TIME

Post-settlement water flow rate after a storm peaks higher and faster than a pre-settlement rate.

_

CANADA

UNITED

-

STA

-

._..._

.... __ •

MARVIN LAKE

�_:!!!£"ER FOWL REFUGE

I

Regional Flooding Patterns

,

\

"\,,

"

·LEGEND

lt!F�

rW�

�L..

N

x. 1

-

100-Year Floodplain

1 7 •

-

500-Year Floodplain

EL I

,...J.:;:;-+--"---+..;..::i.;::r1:.::.19t-Jff .

-

Watershed Management Project

-r-�--J..---3:::-___J IBDF

-

City

Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Biome

(9)

The Watershed Management Areas

FLOOD SCENE AT WARREN, MINN.

M.J.1�1-itlt..T. Ptv

Flooding of Warren in 1896. ©Marshall County

Historical Society.

Flooding of farmland. The farmstead is protected by a

ring dike. © MSTRWO.

Flooding has always been a part of life in the Red River Valley. The city of Warren documented extreme flooding events in 1896 and as recently as 1996 and 1997. Watershed Districts are government agencies tasked with managing water resources with the drainage areas of rivers and streams. They work along with other organizations and agencies to protect residents from the hazards of flooding. One way that Watershed Districts have approached the challenge of managing flood hazards in a region where the topography is very flat is to create large impoundment areas where flood water can be held during spring and summer and released to recharge streams and rivers later in the year. Several watershed districts in the region have

HOW AN

implemented this strategy in add it ion to other projects like stream

bed restoration. By creating a series of these management areas, the ultimate goal of the watershed districts will

IMPOUNDMENT WORKS:

be to reduce flooding in the river valley and to protect communities and landowners.

Snowmelt, Streams and Rainstorms

/ Capture of

Water Storage and

Stream Recharge

These diagrams show how rainfall and snowmelt slowly fill the impoundment area. allowing the water to be released at a controlled rate and preventing overflowing of water bodies downstream.

12

A series of "borrow pits" within the Agassiz Valley

Water Management Area taken from an airplane.

©Kevin Bunde.

Some impoundments contain augmentation pools that drain slowly during the summer. "augmenting"

the rivers the might otherwise dry up.

©Center for Changing Landscapes.

Water levels in the impoundments are regulated by control gates like this one.

©Center for Changing Landscapes.

Impoundments are drawn down in the fall. leaving them ready to impound the spring melt and high water flows.

(10)

Changing Habitat

Migratory birds take many different routes as they travel north and south across North and South America throughout the seasons. Minnesota lies within the path of main flyways.

Red-necked Grebe

Podiceps grisegena

G

�V'mer v1s1tor

Red-necked grebes tre&d on inland lakes. ponds and re$etv0lrs. and are often tolerant of h um.a.n visitors.

Red-necked grebes create floating nests made of plant material for their young, These neats can be found in open water or anchored to logs o r in shal low areas.

An unintended consequence, but a benefit, of the watershed management projects is that they have begun to attract impressive amounts of birds. By temporarily holding water at different

elevations throughout the seasons, the impoundments serve a similar function as ecological habitat that temporal wetlands and ponds once did in Minnesota.

Northwestern Minnesota is located along several migratory bird flyways, including the Mississippi Flyway and the Central Flyway.

This means that millions of birds fly over the region each year as they migrate north or south with the changing seasons. As birds fly over the landscape, they look for places to rest, find food, or to breed. The water management areas provide vast areas for many migrating species.

Even though only a few of the water management areas feature native plant species primarily, they do provide habitat value for native bird species, and non-native species as well. The deep water borrow pits of the impoundments, holes in the landscape dug to hold water, provide pond homes for waterfowl like swans, grebes, and ducks. The wetlands provide marshy grassland homes for birds like American Bitterns. Shorebirds like Greater Yellowlegs can be seen on the levee and upland species like Sharp-tailed Grouse, sparrows and birds of prey can also be spotted nearby.

lmpoundment Habitat

---

---'.::indhil1 Crane

(jrns ca11ade11sis

®-""'"'"

Sandhill cranes &ptnd their &Ummers in ctntral and l'IOfthetn Minnesota, attracted to open fiekts. prairies and wetlands. Sandhill aanes can form nry large Hocks of tl'lousands o.f birds, often travelir-. very high in ltte sky.

...._ --

--- ...

Sharo..'."J ailed Grouse

T_r111pm111�hus pha,ia11el/11s

o..,��t

Shar�tailed grouse,

once abundant throughout Minnesota.

now Ii\� in open gtass Md brus.h areas in northwestern and

east�ntral Minnesota.

Male sha�ailed grouse attraci

females through a cour tship dance en the same flat and grassy dancing ground each year. called a lek.females lay eggs nearby in grass crshnrbs.

(11)

Wildlife of the Tall grass Aspen

Parkland

Although much of the landscape has changed dramatically from its form hundreds of years ago, there are many opportunities along the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail to find wildlife and native species, including many parks, wildlife refuges and natural areas. Moose, elk, foxes and birds can be found in reserves like

uman-lnnuenced Habitat

16

the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge or Lake Bronson State Park.

Sometimes wildlife can even be seen along roads, ditches, windbreak plantings or in fields of crops. Snowy Owls, Great-Horned Owls and Golden Eagles can be seen perched on power lines and fence posts in the winter. Kingbirds, blackbirds, swans and Sandhill Cranes can be spotted on roadsides and in fields of crops.

Visitor Infrastructure

The Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge & Prairie Learning Center in Iowa is an example or the kind or visitor's center that reflects the character or the landscape and that could be a center of visitor information and activity along the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Trail.

Visitor Center

In order to accommodate future visitors along the Birding Trail, a

.J.

central LEED certified Visitor Center will be designed and constructed

J

T

on the beach ridge at the Agassiz Valley Water Management Area.

Information Kiosks

Some of the first pieces of visitor infrastructure to be constructed could be informational kiosks that inform readers about the stories of the landscape, the birds and wildlife they may see, maps of the region and entire Trail, and information about specific locations. These kiosks could be designed so that they also function as a Chimney Swift tower.

Chimney Swift Tower Concept

Toilets

Toilets will need to be constructed in some areas where facilities are far or few between. One option for restroom infrastructure is to use composting toilets made from sustainable materials that use less chemicals than standard toilets, and that can be constructed to reflect a desired aesthetic.

(12)

Appendix

tn

-Cl)

c

Information Panels

ca

fl.

lmpoundment-Specific Panel 19

Glacial History and Flooding 20

c

Wildlife of the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland 21

0

lmpoundment Area Maps

·-Agassiz Valley 22 ....,

Angus-Oslo 23

ca

Brandt and Euclid East 24

E

Brandt-Angus 25 ..

Nereson 26

0

Norland and Norland West 27 'Imm

Parnell 28

c

Radium 29

-Ross 30

Springbrook 31

Regional Analysis Maps 32

Site Visit Photos 36

36"

T ALLGRASS ASPEN PARKLAND BIRDING TRAIL

Agassiz Valley Water Management Area

Tran Maps - - • '* p

+

;., ;:.-�-�"'*"' _ ... -... - --CJ,,_ __ Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Birding Tran Agassiz Valley Water Management Area

�tw drNu> ntµr t!ta..-c'oir.odlargo �o"Olttr WO 'lb.1;:11 :>rbothrn �rtl!Ofy nd)"O(ll'f<:ur't'jtJrcL n.ai ngth

I •

Impoundments

..:.

--�,-..

:

-

-w...al W4fu�ltl'l.I �i\.:b upttrdtll lll'l.l 11"81i1it.1w«ur11111u•pnvot arua:. lt..tl :htt� 'lllAlyWoltlf Ma11ayum•lt Al-iu uidtll (UJ,;U11(11,J luuciny � """ R1.ld Rrvvl 111 not1ftryt.�•�)·; ����ntA•u1•.arodu-,�tut'ap1>,.., oot�in MiC�tto;o-1·:-r�tw><'bym""6r19 ""°"" ar'<lrtt1,,.;-l'?l"'s W:<lt<:>r•.�D· �oet· arog<'IYU'nl'f"OA � '9Slaskf:dw. man. wat8f soun•"°'·wt!hr l'hed1�Af&aSOSspoc: ''""and reams.ft-eyN(¥.k,-1 t'':>dl«Ol'O.ll'IZ ,, andagen;:19sroprccea reSidef">tS lrom the haza; d i0I !lood+r.og Voe v.ay tna: W «:I �n htrl-e aWoaChld t'!eehal eng� Cl managing lood t'auirdi •f' a .-er)' 113.t tegion lke the Talg ss

Aspea Pm:an:t to croa� 1m�n• areas w"IOB ll»d ....aoor ca.n jG held n pcni '\d releaS.00 � re<:hatge SVNms 1ri fWt I SeVIEM'al � d1s:1:ncu 1n 1hie

f9'0IOOhWi:!IR'diernMt6Clltllss.11a1 y ajd ootoot!Mlfprc cu kesteamOOd � 1at l:S"t'1"83t '1S«lOSOI se o r.tar ne Tia:egoalwlbetL) I '. I Vy J r I�

(13)

20

T ALLGRASS ASPEN p ARKLAND BIRDING TRAIL

The Story of the Landscape

Glaclal History Floodlng ____ ... ________ ,... ..._..._" ... "-�--... .,..._ .. ...,.. ---�·..._.. ..,... � At the Bottom of a Glacial Lake A (1"9 11'< fe ci'CI t• '(:lil)CfKlte<:l3 MftOI d beach""- r dfl'I'• °' 1nrd thoi1 11o1.• 000(.l ocby So<limont a<'td r '°""cgo·ltod '" '�'* hort<'ll'11 ot lhn �n

0¥!>1 lhoiJ$.Pn I ot tht I ko l:JO<f� to diai.., aNaf into othe water bodto9S creatng a.,. 9!a:ia mer As IC draned II 11 to,vai.« lk\i IC'u I -.l!IJJl.I w1 I lhe

1'!'\Cll -...;.tit ion<:>.••t"'CIRodRrYGtv.)11 f

Ovef)lnf) P' 'tMard andsolaspenorew • nc:h "odi kt1 bdwld t)) Gl3cnl Le Agassiz V\'E-t mds. and p-ane potholes to<med by the $1 II Ir jfl(j .. r«:edU"g ake dOC»d the

vJ &I J1Sfl tM �-npci doWf\ to tM fPIOf v,]j"°'>' When &nOW melle<l in lhe wnno and Apr

ho.,.. "' I th• � tlood.,rl ,... la,r 10

porttons :if the t t ' n� ;a1>4t

At Eu 1 A11iu11 ri• <=llW 1h1t

�- lhey look &CtvMtOqe of tho fort ll<Oli Ml thct 1?fnwf lak1> bod Tho gr:l\'elty sols :i' the bMc r<IQ;K pm...ed

SU bkt !01I1rnW'19

I he 1<0C RMW si o.oe tlows 1n Iha sp'1nQ

b 1 f't:M' 1 llooOS l, 1rr ;d$ hOmos. md """

A History of Flooding

The�Le1'0�c1....ou-.11-.c101 .., _ _,, ... <(I tuod� ,.i..., ... """""• .... ,_ ... �

w��, •• .,_,..,bl&C>t

A M11I" A � l. :llb.f( !I

T ALLGRASS ASPEN p ARKLAND BIRDING TRAIL

Wildlife of the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland

Birds '-!� 'W jsiakt �I� ... "IOIY\andlOUlnlkOMNorthillnO "°""'°"'"""_,,,. __ �'"'*'It)-A Sample of Species Native Wiidiife

A Stop Along the Flyway

lh.!l�att ntlf�:tmOl lbOll.oifib.Ryt� 11trh0""1gwa�ot

poc :imeiuser..easi •fi«;tooae<do8tall'lltlrt.Btll' t:en-fl(lfa!wetWl0 'OOfUYlw!o;t�M�nloc:i'coci-'Ont?ww.alriwg;,t)1yt tty,,_.-, wJ•�ll • "-l'"'°'� Plf1v"'"t-"'the c;...-1 l-ail�Thd ri..,...,

I �Ofbffd�l\'O'o'&f:tlet$1.()!leact'l�8S'.hefmjrSU1north0'$0.ll.hWrUlthedlSC!f'C� o\!�f)O."°'the�� lf'#/tookf(JI f'LK<1$� !'"I l11d fOOll_Of totnocl fho)Wll I 1flillll8l"I* l ll!flatpO't• •• ilf'llolnf(tl l'Nlll'JI '*'"'C"*'"

[1o&fi -'{'JI n,a19., tnew;t<'l <n8flf1Wl'11'9f18re<M�•11enitrwpan1spec1�r1mari1, tflE!)'dOPfO'i'!OthSllCat..,lkieto'Oilt�btrO

�m><ln01 r 11 �-.A .. lhoDI�.,., trt11.Jc)r1()1Wpts01the ll():nd'1*'1ShO�nlMl anc2Sci'lpo11CtO"lOkl�Dffll'(weO

llOl'tdlonetfaw \•_ tu.tr.i.e� .. dl""-W�¥d0l_,., �hew,i:lo <b1>10o1.Jeotnd1Yly"�tone3fof..,.d3.l ... -.rnerltdfl6'1tnr1 �

S"IOt"..,.!dl 1�o�torY�canai.s-•cntl'Mtk<>.••lCI iptand1'f!IK'IMM<<J�l•p•;MitdGn.xr.r.• •r�ne'.<W$111"J l>l'"chol �·� ll

&NHlfttfl(ltl'""".I 'tfl)'

---·

---·

---

---

==----Natural Areas of the Tallgrass Aspen Parkland

Al c �...ci.;Jtt'e ndsc.lp(thds,hang&ddram tic.arylr t n�1tdsoC p0,'.l'lt1u remany\.lppcrt..r.:lH:ilongheT rass�nPari.JandBidirg

Tr I f "Id foand ,.,_ "O'Sf*C-lflo 1 :Judngmv'l)'parlo.t v.I �f"W"�ll(lh,rf(llo."lroo$ M� o.k k•<'-$ ndbild'>G(l.I tMfovixl ,_.,,,,_ �•the�6 r.Nol\t-onal

W'4dlllo �1.190 "' Lako 81 n Sla!o Pa-tc

Scmetimes wid de can <M;on be SMn a ong 1c.ads d!tC ie& w1ndbrBC1� pla.nllnQS « 1n f 'd$ Cf etop >nowv Owl$. C.1eat·H01"'9d Owls and Golden Ea,106 can be MM porcti•d oi1 pow 1 :10$ and kn a l)O"( .., lhow1n!Qf K�ds.. � �w.:aosand SJ.ndh 1Cft\!'I05C8n bospoc:IOdcnroaQs1COS/lnj.n hofdsol<".top

----·'"'"�11r.e;�:a¥11411

"'

f

(14)

ca

Cl)

.. 21oth St NW •

to

••··

Ag

<13

siz Beac

Ri

ge

I

I I I

:

Proposed Visitor I Center I

m

I I I

Aspen

I Audubon I Stand I ' Sanctuary I ' #I ' ' t ' I I I I I ' I I �---J -CONS UCTED WEnAN ' .,,, N 0) I Si ::r I ;i.. J � "'

I � I 1 I ' I I ' I ... ' I ' ' ... -" - .. , .. ... .. .. ,,_ J '

... � ... ... ,. ,/ -' ' - I

Agassiz Valley Water Management Area

LEGEND

. - - ,

1 __ .J Watershed lmpoundment Project

-

Augmentation Pool

Prairie

,____,..

•••••

Proposed Trail

m

Point of Interest

l!!!!!!!li

iiil!!!!!!!liii!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!

iiii

iiii

iiiiiil

!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!!!!!!

!!!!!i

1 Mi I e

N

A

160th St NW

t---l

150th St NW

r---�23r----_.;..----

-..!

!..__

______

.JJ

Angus-Oslo Water Management Area LEGEND r - - '

1 __ .J Watershed lmpoundment Project

-

Augmentation Pool

m

View/Access Point

1/2 Mile

N

(15)

12othStS

Brandt and Euclid East Water Management Areas

LEGEND . - - ,

1 __ ..J Watershed lmpoundment Project

-

Augmentation Pool

-

Transition Zone

m

View/Access Point

N

1 Mile

A

Brandt-Angus Wat er Management Area LEGEND r - - '

1 __ ..J Watershed lmpoundment Project

-

Augmentation Pool

m

View Point

N

A

1 Mile

(16)

TO

@]

1

117 180thStree I I I I I Nereson Impoundment

r---J�

____

_jLEGEND

r - - , Watershed lmpoundment Project I - - .J

-

Augmentation Pool

m

View/Access Point N 1!!!!5iil!!!!!liiil!!!!!!!!!!!!!!liiiiiiiiiiiiil!!!!!!!!!3!!M!!!!li I es

A

---+-310

\_

---... __ _

nd mpoundment 9

.

.

.

.

.

..

·· ··· ··· ··· ···•·

..

.

.

...

.,....-

--t

---1--

---'

Norland Water Mangement Areas

LEGEND

r - - , Watershed lmpoundment Project

I - - .J

Augmentation Pool

View/Access Point

N

(17)

'-...

TO

l.

®

• 17

L

\

28 Parnell Water Management Area LEGEND r - - 1

1 __ .J Watershed lmpoundment Project

-

Augmentation Pool

m

View/Access Point

1/2 Mile

N

A

.. . ••••••••• t ••••· ••• • :t . • .•. . . z

J

(

/

I

TO

f

lil

I

Radium Water Management Area LEGEND r - - 1

1 __ .J Watershed lmpoundment Project

-

Augmentation Pool

m

View/Access Point

N

1Mile

A

(18)

27 308 115 3

--1---l1

1

4,...�:---1

119 .· • . .· .. ·

---.,.---'2r---t---..W.---.J

.. .. .. · .. ... ·· .. .. ···· �____. _

_G

r---

Ross Impoundment

LEGEND

- - , Watershed lmpoundment Project

- - .J

-

Augmentation Pool

m

View/Access Point N

!!!!!!liiiil!!!!!liiiil!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!liiiiiiiiiiiil!!!!!!!!!!!3!!M!!!!

i

I es

A

1

®

23 KITTSdN

cry.,

MARSHAt.t CTY.

-�

H

'

---1

�----�-' ...__.-L-,.,

-r---12

4

5

J

Springbrook Stream Restoration Project

LEGEND

r_,,,--

r - - , Watershed lmpoundment Project

I - - .J

� --.

-

Augmentation Pool

m

View/Access Point

N

(19)

fl)

Q.

ca

:?!

fl)

·-fl)

>a

-ca

c

c

-ca

c

0

·-'OJ)

Cl)

a::

32

TALLGRASS ASPEN PARKLAND BIRDING TRAIL

CANADA

UNIT D STATES

Roseau County

Polk Coif nty

Tallgrass Aspen Parkland Province

Tallgrass Aspen

Parklands

LJ

County Boundary

-

Watershed District Project Site

-

Municipality

Pennington County

Red Lak County

25 miles N A ��===========

CENTER FOR CHANGING LANDSCAPES UNIVERSfTY or �INNESOTA

TALLGRASS ASPEN PARKLAND BIRDING TRAIL

Land Cover and Prairie Conservation Areas 25miles N

=========:A Cropland or Grassland

-

Wooded Area

-

OpenWater

D

Prairie Consel'va1ion Area

-

Wa1ershed Dis<ric1 ProjecL Siies

CENTER FOR CHANGING LANDSCAPES l:NJVERSIITOf MIN!"CSOTA

(20)

TALLGRASS ASPEN PARKLAND BIRDING TRAIL

Alluvium Jee Cootact

-

Lacustrirte

-

Outlels Oulwash Peat

-

Supraglacial Drifl Complex Till Plain • 25miles N A �.��===============

---CENTER FOR CHANGING LANDSCAPES

TALLGRASS ASPEN PARKLAND BIRDING TRAIL

L

Pre settlement Vegetation Aspen-Birch (tr�nding tQ Conifers)

Aspen· Birch (trending to Hardwoods) Aspen-Oak ! . .and

Uig Wood�� Hardw� Bru.'ih Pnirie

Conifer Bogs and Swamp

J1u;k Pine Unne1'1S :mcl Opc::.ni1\gs Lakes (open waler)

Mixed Mard·w<.><>d and Pim�

Mixed White Pine and ·Red Pine Oak Or.-:nings and J\a_rrens Open Muskeg Pin� Flau Prairle :Rivt?r 6Qttom Undefined. Wet Prairie Whhe Pine 25 miles N A �=== :==============:::

CENTER FOR CHANGING LANDSCAPES

(21)
(22)

Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects :