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Vibration Analysis of FGM Cylindrical

Shells Under Various Boundary Conditions

R. Ansari

1

, M. Darvizeh

2

, M. Hemmatnezhad

3 In this paper, a unied analytical approach is proposed to investigate the vibrational behavior of functionally graded shells. Theoretical formulation is established based on Sanders' thin shell theory. The modal forms are assumed to have the axial dependency in the form of Fourier series whose derivatives are legitimized using Stoke's transformation. The material properties are assumed to be graded in the thickness direction according to dierent volume fraction functions such as power-law, sigmoid, double-layered and exponential distributions. A FGM cylinderical shell made up of a mixture of ceramic and metal is considered. The Inuence of some commonly used boundary conditions, the eect of changes in shell geometrical parameters and variations of volume fraction functions on the vibration characteristics are studied through comparing the results of the present theory with those of the First order Shear Deformation Theory FSDT. Furthermore, the results obtained for a number of particular cases show good agreement with those available in the open literature. The simplicity and the capability of the present method are also discussed.

INTRODUCTION

Functionally graded materials FGMs have experi-enced considerable attention in many engineering ap-plications since they were rst introduced in 1984 in Japan 1, 2. Covering a wide spectrum of functional operation principles and addressing a large variety of application elds, FGMs have been under world-wide development during recent years. They are now developed for general use as structural components in extremely high temperature environments such as rocket engine components, space plan body, nuclear reactor components, rst wall of fusion reactor, en-gine components, turbine blades, hip implant and other engineering and technological applications. A detailed discussion of their design, processing and applications can be found in 3. FGMs are also promising candidates for future intelligent composites 4. They are multifunctional composite materials, and are microscopically inhomogeneous, wherein

mechan-1. AssistantProfessor,Dept.ofMech.Eng.,GuilanUniv., Rasht,Iran.

2. Professor, Dept. of Mech. Eng., Guilan Univ., Rasht, Iran.

3. M.Sc. Student, Dept. of Mech. Eng., Guilan Univ., Rasht,Iran.

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volume fractions on the shell frequencies are studied. Naeem 12 employs a polynomial based Rayleigh-Ritz approach in order to investigate natural frequencies of FGM cylindrical shells for various boundary con-ditions. In their analysis, equations are formulated by Sanders thin-shell theory. Patel et:al: 13 analy-ses free vibration of FGM elliptical cylindrical shells using Finite Element Method FEM based on Higher order Shear Deformation Theory HSDT. Ansari and Darvizeh 14 propose a novel unied exact approach for investigating the vibrational behavior of FGM shells under arbitrary boundary conditions. In that work, theoretical formulation used were based on the rst order shear deformation theory FSDT. The present paper, which is related to the authors' previous work, deals with free vibration of FGM shells under various boundary conditions based on Sanders's shell theory. The aim of this investigation is to propose a simpler but still more accurate method than the authors' previous work capable of predicting the natural frequencies of FGM shells under various boundary conditions. The inuence of some commonly used boundary conditions as well as dierent volume fraction functions of the constituent materials on the vibration characteristics are studied.

EQUATIONSOF MOTION

Consider a cylindrical shell made of FGM with a cross-sectional view as shown in Figure 1. Its geometrical parameters are described byR, the radius of the shell middle surface, and h, the thickness of the shell. The

Figure1. An element of a FGM shell.

Sanders-type shell equations are used 15. R N xx+ N x= R I 1 u R N xx+ N + 1 R M + M xx= R I 1 v R M

xxx+ 2 M

xx+ 1 R M N = R I 1 w 1

where R is the radius of the shell, N and M are the resultant forces and moments dened thereafter andI

1 is the inertia term for FGM shell dened as:

I 1= h 2 Z h 2

zdz 2

Here h is the thickness of the shell. Natural and geometric boundary conditions at the ends of the cylindrical shell have a combination like the following: 8 : N

x= 0 or u= 0 N

x= 0 or v= 0 Q

x= 0 or

w= 0 M

x= 0 or @w @x = 0

: 9 = 3 Here: Q x= @M x

=@x+ 2=R@M x

=@ 4

STRESS RESULTANT STRAIN RELATIONS

The relationships between boundary forces and strains for a cylinderical shell are given as:

8 : N x N N x M x M M x 9 = = 2 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 A 11 A 12 0 B 11 B 12 0 A 12 A 22 0 B 12 B 22 0 0 0 A

66 0 0

B 66 B 11 B 12 0 D 11 D 12 0 B 12 B 22 0 D 12 D 22 0 0 0 B

66 0 0

D 66 3 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 8 : " x " x K x K K x 9 = 5 whereA ij B ij and D

ij are the stinesses of the FGM shell as: A ij B ij D ij =

h 2 Z h 2 Q ij1 zz 2 dz 6 hereQ

ij, denote the plane stress-reduced stinesses in the principal coordinate directions as:

Q 11=

Q 22=

Ez 1

2 Q

12=

zEz 1 z

2 Q 44= Q 55= Q 66=

Ez 21 +z

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Figure 2. Young's modulus variation associated with

dierent power law exponents for a power-law FGM shell.

Figure 3. Young's modulus variation associated with

dierent exponent indexes for a sigmoid FGM shell.

FUNCTIONALLY GRADEDSHELLS Consider the case of an FGM shell made up of a mixture of ceramic and metal. The material properties vary continuously across the thickness based on the following relations:

Ez =Em+EcmVfz Ecm=Ec Em z =m+cmVfz cm=c m

z =m+cmVfz cm=c m 8 where subscripts m and c refer to the properties of metal and ceramic respectively, and Vfz can be dened by dierent functions as follows:

For power-law FGMs:

Vfz = z h + 12

N

9 where N is the material index, which indicates the material variation prole through the shell thickness. The variation of Young's modulus against the thickness

for power-law FGM is depicted in Figure 2. As can be seen,N= 0 andN =1refer to isotropic shells made of ceramic and metal respectively.

For sigmoid FGMs:

Vfz =

1 1 2

1 2zh

N

0z h 2 1

2

1 +2zh N

h 2

z0

10

Similarly, N designates the material variation prole across the thickness, whose role in Young's modulus alteration is shown in Figure 3. Here, N = 0 refers to an isotropic shell with the average properties of its constituent materials. Whereas, N = 1 refers to a shell, half of the thickness of which is made of ceramic and the other half, of metal.

For double layered FGMs:

Vfz =

1

2zh N

0z h 2

1 +2zh N

h 2

z0

11

as can be seen from Figure 4, the variation of Young's modulus in the thickness direction for a double layered FGM is perfectly symmetric at about z = 0 as expected.

For exponential FGMs 15, 16:

Ez =Eme 1 h

lnEmEcz+h 2 vz =vme

1

hlnvmvcz+h 2 z =me

1

hlnmcz+h

2 12

The Young's modulus variation across the thickness of a FGM shell with the exponential volume fraction function is drawn in Figure 5. Further on, FGM shells are assumed to have power-law volume fraction distri-bution, Eq. 9, unless it is mentioned so elsewhere. A typical material propertyPiwhich is a function of the temperature, is given by 17:

Pi=P 0

P

1 T

1+ 1 + P

1 T+P

2 T

2+ P

3 T

3

(4)

Figure 4. Young's modulus variation associated with

dierent exponent indexes for a double layered FGM shell.

Figure 5. Young's modulus variation in the thickness

direction for an exponential FGM shell.

FIELDEQUATIONS

Utilizing Eq. 5, Eq. 1 can be expressed in terms of displacement eld and its corresponding derivatives as:

RA11uxx+

A12

R vx+wx B11wxxx +B12

R2vx wx +A

66vx+ 1

Ru

+B66

2Rvx 2wx =RI1u 14a

RA66vxx+ 1

Rux +B66

2Rvxx 2wxx +A12ux +A22

R v+w B12wxx+

B22

R2v w + 1RB12ux+

B22

R v+w D12wxx +D22

R2v w +B

66vxx+ 1

Rux

+ D66

2Rvxx 2wxx =RI1v 14b

RB11uxxx+

B12

R vxx+wxx D11wxxxx + D12

R2 vxx wxx + 2B

66vxx+ 1

Rux

+ D66

R vxx 2wxx + 1RB12ux+

B22

R v

+w D12wxx

D22

R2w v A 12ux + A22

R v+w B12wxx+

B22

R2v w =RI 1w 14c

MODAL FUNCTIONS

For a circular cylinderical shell, the displacement eld can be written in the following form for any circumfer-ential wave numbern:

ux t = uxcosnsin!t

vx t = vxsinnsin!t

wx t = wxcosnsin!t 15

Here uv and w are the modal functions

corre-sponding to axial, tangential and radial displacements, respectively. The crucial part of the present analysis involves choosing appropriate series forms for these modal functions. The series should be simple in form while preserving orthogonality properties at the same time. It is not necessary that the series satisfy any particular boundary condition since we are seeking a general solution. There are two convenient sets of the Fourier series that meet all these requirements for the modal functions along the axial direction. The rst set, designated as CSS", wherec andsstand for cos and sin respectively, is of the form:

ux =A0n+ 1 X m=1

Amncosmx=L

vx = 1 X m=1

Bmnsinmx=L

wx = 1 X m=1

(5)

while the second set, designated as SCC", can be written as:

u x = 1 X m=1

Amnsin mx=L

v x =B0n+ 1 X m=1

Bmncos mx=L

w x =C0n+ 1 X m=1

Cmncos mx=L 17

The rst set fullls the exact solution for the shell with Simply supported ends with no Axial constraint SNA-SNA, which has boundary conditions at each end of the form:

Nx= 0 v = 0 w= 0 Mx= 0: 18

It is clear that sine series always give zero values at the end points unless one species the aected terms as: v 0 =v0 w 0 =w0

v L =vL w L =wL: 19 These end values are required when Stoke's transforma-tion is used to dierentiate the displacement functransforma-tions 18-20. To maximize the generality of the formulation, a shell with Freely Supported ends with No Tangential constraint FSNT is chosen as a base problem for the set CSS. The boundary conditions for such a shell is given by:

u=Nx=Qx= @w@x = 0 x= 0L 20

None of the ten boundary conditions given by Eq. 20 are satised by the CSS set, Eq. 16, on a term-by-term basis. Therefore, Stoke's transformation see Appendix A is now used to enforce constraints to satisfy the boundary conditions. This results in a general eigenvalue problem which can be used for any possible combination of boundary condition.

GENERAL FORMULATIONS

The substitution of the set of displacement functions and their derivatives into Eqs. 14a to 14c, leads to an explicit relation forA0n and a matrix equation in whichAmnBmnandOmnare coupled together. 8

: 2 4

K11 K12 K13

K22 K23 Symm: K33 3 5

2 4

I1 0 0 0 I1 0 0 0 I1 3 5!

2 9 = 2 4

Amn

Bmn

Cmn 3 5=

2 4

F1

F2

F3 3 5 21 and

K01 I1! 2

A0n=F01 22

where Kij ij = 123K01 given in Appendix B, depends upon the material properties, the geometrical properties and the circumferential and axial mode numbers. In Eqs. 21 and 22 F1toF3 and F01 are in terms of unknown end values, dened as:

F1=f1 u0+ uL 1 m +f

2 v0+vL 1 m

+f3 w0+wL 1 m +f

4 w0+ wL 1 m

F2=f5 v0+vL 1 m +f

6 w0+wL 1 m

F3=f7 v0+vL 1 m +f

8 w0+wL 1 m

+f9 w0+ wL 1

m 23

and

F01=f10 u0+ uL 1 m +f

11 v0+vL 1 m

+f12 w0+wL 1 m +f

13 w0+ wL 1

m 24

In the above equationsf1tof18are given as:

f1=RA11

L2 f

2=

A12+

B12

R +A66+

B66 2R

n L f3=A12

L+RB11m 2

L3 n 2

RL B12 B66

f4= RB11

L3 f

5= RA66+3

B66 2 +D66

2Rm L2

f6= B66+B12+

D12

R +D66

R mn L2

f7= 2B66+B12+

D12

R +D66

R mn L2

f8= 2B12m

L2+RD 11m

3

L4+2 D

12+D66

R m

n L 2 f

9=RD11m

L4 f

10= 12RA11

L

2

f11= 12 A12+

B12

R +A66+

B66 2R f12= 12

A12

L

B12

R n

2

L +B66

R n

2

L

f13=

1 2RB11

L

3

25 and the other four quantities, u0uLwL and wL, are associated with the unspecied end forcesNxand

mo-mentsMx at the shell ends. Using Eqs. 21 and 22,

AmnBmnCmnandA0n can now be expressed explic-itly in terms of the eight unspecied boundary values

N0

xNLxM0

(6)

boundary conditions, which are both geometrical and natural in type. The geometric boundary conditions that must be imposed are associated with u and

@w @x. The natural boundary conditions that must be enforced are also associated with N

x = 0 and Q

x = 0 at both ends with Q

x dened in Eq. 4. Substituting the Fourier coecients given by Eqs. 21 and 22 into the eight constraint condition due to the geometric and natural boundary conditions, leads to the following homogeneous matrix equation.

e ij

2 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4

N 0 x N

L x M

0 x M

L x v

0 v

L w

0 w

L 3 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 5

= 0 ij= 12:::8 26

For a nontrivial solution of Eq. 26, the determinant of the coecient matrix must vanish:

je ij

j= 0 ij= 12:::8 27

resulting in a characteristic equation whose eigenvalues are the natural frequencies of the FSNT shell. The corresponding eigenvectors also determine the mode shapes. Each element of this frequency determinant is an innite series. It should be pointed out that this frequency determinant is based on the exact satisfac-tion of the boundary condisatisfac-tions, and it can not only be used for the FSNT shells, but can also be employed to achieve the characteristic equation required for shells with arbitrary end conditions. Solutions for shells with other boundary conditions lead to a smaller size determinant than for the FSNT shell.

IMPOSINGTHE BOUNDARY

CONDITIONS

To derive the appropriate characteristic equation of a specied boundary condition, the general matrix Eq. 26 must be tailored. To show how, the frequency determinant for clamped-free boundary condition is derived in this section. For this non-symmetric set of boundary conditions, we have:

u=v=w= @w @x

= 0 atx= 0 N

x= N

x= Q

x= M

x= 0

atx=L 28

To enforce the geometric boundary conditions u = 0 and @w=@x = 0 at x = 0, one must allow the corresponding natural conditions N

x and M

x to take any non-zero value, respectively. In a similar manner, to impose the natural conditions N

x = 0 Q

x = 0 at x = L, the geometrical boundary conditions vw

Figure 6. Frequency variation associated with dierent

boundary conditions for a FGM shell.

Figure 7. Frequency variation associated with dierent

power law exponents for a clamped-free FGM shell.

must also be released to have any value. Therefore without going through the direct procedure required to formulate the eigenvalue problem corresponding to this boundary condition, retaining the rows and columns in Eq. 26 associated with N

0 x

M 0 x

v L

w

L leads to the following matrix equation for a clamped-free boundary condition:

e ij

N

0 x

M 0 x

v L

w L

T

= 0 ij= 1368 29 Similarly, the characteristic equation required for any other specied boundary condition can be extracted by tailoring Eq. 26 in an appropriate way.

MATERIAL PROPERTIES OF FGM The constituent materials considered here are stainless steel and zirconia with the properties listed in Table 1 11.

RESULTSANDDISCUSSION

(7)

Figure 8. Frequency variation associated with dierent

exponent indexes for a clamped-free sigmoid FGM shell.

Figure 9. Frequency variation against the

length-to-radius ratio of a Clamped-Free FGM shell h=R= 0:002 . The shell considered here is an isotropic cylinder with clamped-free ends. Good agreement is achieved, which shows the capability of the present method in predict-ing natural frequencies of the cylindrical shells. Figure 6 illustrates the in uence of the boundary conditions on the natural frequencies of the FGM shells. The boundary conditions considered here are SNA-SNA, Clamped-Clamped C-C and Clamped-Free C-F boundary conditions. The material properties used are those given in Table 1 at room temperature with shell parameters as h=R = 0:002, L=R = 20. The results Table 1. Mechanical properties of constituent materials

for FGM shells.

Stainless Steel Zirconia

ENm 2 ENm 2

P

1 0 0 0 0

P0 201.04E9 0.3262 244.27E9 0.288 P

1 3.08E-4 -2E-4 -1.371E-3 1.13E-4 P2 -6.53E-7 3.8E-7 1.21E-6 0 P

3 0 0 -3.68E-10 0

8166 Kgm

3 5700 Kgm 3

show excellent agreement with those from FSDT. Fig-ure 7 represents the natural frequencies of the power-law FGM shell with a clamped-free boundary condition versus circumferential mode numbers for the dierent power-law exponentsN and h=R= 0:002, L=R= 20. The results obtained include pure stainless steel and pure zirconia shells corresponding toN = 0 and N = 1, respectively. It is interesting to mention that for any other value of N, the frequency curve lies within the frequencies of the two extreme values ofN, which belong to pure stainless steel and pure zirconia shells. In other words, alteration of the natural frequency of a FGM shell is easily achievable by varying the volume fraction of its constituent materials. Similar gure for a sigmoid FGM shell is also illustrated in Figure 8. As can be seen, the dependency of frequencies on power law exponents for the sigmoid FGM shell is not as much signicant as those of power-law FGM. Figure 9 shows Frequency variation against the length-to-radius ratio of a clamped-free FGM shell. The variation of natural frequencies of a SNA-SNA FGM shell against the length-to-radius ratio is also illustrated in Figure 10. It is seen that, as the shell aspect ratio increases, the natural frequencies tend to decrease. Figure 11 shows the rst mode shape of a clamped-free FGM shell as would be expected.

CONCLUSION

A general and unied exact solution procedure has been presented to investigate the vibrational behavior of FGM cylindrical shells under dierent boundary conditions. The advantage of the present method is to keep the complexity at a considerably low level yielding simplication in formulation without any loss of accuracy. Material properties are assumed to be temperature-dependent with gradient in the thickness direction of the shell. This gradient varies according to dierent volume fraction distributions including power-law, sigmoid, double-layered and exponential distributions. A FGM cylindrical shell made up of a mixture of ceramic and metal is considered. The Table 2. Comparison of natural frequencies Hz for an

isotropic cylinder with clamped-free ends L= 625:5 mm, R = 242:3 mm,h= 0:648 mm, E = 68:95 GNm

2, =

0:315 = 2714:5 kgm 3 .

n ExperimentalRef. 22 AnalyticalRef. 23 methodPresent

2 - 333.9 328.18

3 155 and 157 175.5 174.90

4 107 111.7 111.91

5 89 and 91 94.2 94.28

6 102 105.8 105.57

7 130 134.0 133.40

8 166 171.7 170.81

9 208 216.4 215.13

(8)

Figure 10. Frequency variation against the

length-to-radius ratio of a SNA-SNA FGM shell h=R= 0:002.

Figure 11. Mode shape associated with clamped-free

boundary condition for a power-law FGM shell n =

1L=R= 20h=R= 0:002.

frequency pattern of FGM shells is shown to be similar to those made from isotropic materials. Furthermore, the frequency curves associated with dierent values of the power law exponents, N, lie within the frequencies of the two extreme values of N, which belong to pure stainless steel and pure zirconia shells. This means that alteration of the natural frequency of a FGM shell is easily viable by varying the volume fraction of its constituent materials. The dependency of shell frequencies on exponent index in power-law FGMs is more signicant compared to those of sigmoid FGMs. As one travels through the end conditions of SNA-SNA to fully clamped end condition, denoted by C-C, the in uence of the boundary conditions is shown to increase the natural frequencies. This eect is more signicant for lower values of circumferential wave numbers. However, for higher values, the eect of the changes in the boundary conditions diminishes such

that the corresponding natural frequencies are found to coincide.

APPENDIX A: STOKES'

TRANSFORMATION

Consider a functionfx represented by a Fourier sine series in the open range 0 x Land by values f

0 andf

Lat the end points: fx =

1 X n=1 a

nsin nx

L

0 x L

f0 =f 0

fL =f L

Since it is not certain that the derivative f 0

x can be represented by term-by-term dierentiation of the sine series, the derivative is instead represented by an independent cosine series of the following form:

f 0

x =b 0+

1 X n=1 b

ncos nx

L

Stokes' transformation includes integrating by parts in the basic denitions of the coecients to obtain the relationship between b

n and a

nas follows: b

n= 2 L

L Z 0

f 0

xcos nx

L

dx= 2 L h

fxcos nx

L i

L 0 + 2n

L 2

L Z 0

fxsin nx

L

dx= 2 L

1n f

L f

0+ nx

L a

n Similar care must be taken when nding the correct sine series corresponding to f

00

x. Therefore, the complete set of derivative formulas for the sine series can be written as:

8 :

fx = 1 P n=1

a nsin

nx

L 0

x L

f0 =f 0

fL =f

L 8

: f

0 x =

fLf0 L

1 P n=1

2 L

ff 0

1 n

f L

g L

na n

cos

nx L

0xL

f 00

x =

L

1 X n=1 n

2 L

ff 0

1 n

f L

g L

na n

sin nx

L

0 x L

f 000 =

f 00 0

fL =f 00 L

(9)

cosine series. For example the derivatives of the axial displacementu, are given below:

ux = A0n+ 1 X m=1

AmncosmxL !

cosn 0 x L ux=

L

1 X m=1

mAmnsinmxL cosn 0 x L

ux0 =

2 2L

u0cosn

uxL =

2 2L

uLcosn

uxx=

L

2

"

u0+uL 2 +

1 X m=1

u0+uL 1

m m

2A mn

cos

mx L

i

cosn 0 x L

APPENDIX B

K11=RA11

m

L

2

+A66

n2

R K12=

A12+A66+

B12

R +B66 2R

mn

L

K13= A

12

m

L

RB

11

m

L

3

+B12 B

66

mn2

RL

K22=

RA66+ 3

B66 2 +D66

2R

m

L

2

+RA22+2B22 +D22

R

n

R

2

K33=

m L

2

2B12+RD11

m L 2+2D

12+D66

R n2 + 2B22

n R 2+ A

22

R +D22

n4

R3

K01=A66

n2

R

REFERENCES

1. Yamanouchi M., Koizumi M., Hirai T. and Shiota I., Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Functionally Gradient Materials, 1990.

2. Koizumi M., The Concept of FGM, Ceramic Trans-actions", Functionally Gradient Materials, 34, PP

3-101993.

3. Miyamoto Y., Kaysser W. A., Rabin B. H., Kawasaki A. and Ford R. G., Functionally Graded Materials: De-sign, Processing and Applications, Kulwer Academic Publishers, London, 1990.

4. Moya J.S., Layered Ceramics", Advanced Materials,

7, PP 185-91995.

5. Leissa A.W., Vibration of shells", NASA SP- 288 US Govt Printing Oce, 1973.

6. Vanderpool M. E. V. and BERT C. W., Vibration of Materially Monoclinic, Thick Wall Circular Cylindri-cal Shells", AIAA journal,19, PP 634-6411981.

7. Lan K.Y. and Loy C.T., Inuence of Boundary Conditions and Fiber Orientation and the Natural Fre-quencies of Thin Orthotropic Laminated Cylindrical Shells", Composite Structures,31, PP 21-301995.

8. Sharma C. B., Darvizeh M. and Darvizeh A., Natural Frequency Response of Vertical Cantilever Compos-ite Shells Containing Fluid", Engineering Structures,

208 , PP 732-7371998.

9. Sharma C. B., Darvizeh M. and Darvizeh A., Free Vibration Behaviour of Helically Wound Cylindrical Shells", Composite Structures,44, PP 55-621999.

10. Loy C. T., Lam K. Y. and Reddy J. N., Vibration of Functionally Graded Cylindrical Shells", International Journal of Mechanical Sciences,41, PP 309-3241999.

11. Pradhan S. C., Loy C. T., Lam K. Y. and Reddy J. N., Vibration Characteristics of Functionally Graded Cylindrical Shells Under Various Boundary Condi-tions", Applied Acoustics,61, PP 111-1292000.

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14. Ansari R., Darvizeh M., Prediction of Dynamic Behaviour of FGM Shells Under Arbitrary Boundary Conditions", Journal of Composite Structures, Ac-cepted for Publication,10, 2007.

15. Sanders J. L., An Improved First Approximation Theory for Thin Shells", NASA Report 24, 1959. 16. Chi S.H., and Chung Y.L., Mechanical Behavior of

Functionally Graded Material Plates Under Transverse Load-Part I: Analysis", International Journal of Solids and Structures,43, PP 3657-36742006.

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19. Darvizeh M., Darvizeh A., Ansari R. Sharma C.B., The Eect of Radius Variation on Buckling of Fibrous Composite Structures Subjected to Dierent Types of Loading", Iranian Journal of Science & Technology. Transaction B,27B3 , PP 535-5502003.

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21. Chung H., Free Vibration Analysis of Circular Cylin-derical Shells",JournalofSounds&Vibration,743,

PP 331-3501981.

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Cylindri-cal Shells with and without Longitudinal Stieners",

NASA TND-4705, 1968.

References

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