INDIGENOUS PLANT SALES

67 

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

INDIGENOUS  PLANT  SALES

                                                                         

         

             

at  “THE  GIANTS  CUP  CAFÉ”

 

 

SEE  INSIDE  FOR:  

 

OUR  PHILOSOPHY  

 

PLANT  LIST  

 

PLANT  INFORMATION    

 

                         

 

                                                             BEFORE    

                         

 

                                                               AFTER  

 

(2)

Plant List – April 2015:

Trees:    

Bowkeria  Verticillata  (Southern  Shell-­‐flower)   Buddleja  Auriculata    (Weeping  Sagewood)  

Buddleja  Loricata  (Mountain  Sagewood)  –  bush  and  tree  varieties   Buddleja  Salvifolia      (Sagewood)  

Clausena  Anisata  (Horsewood,  Perdepis)   Doispyrus  Lycioides  (Bluebush)  

Ficus  Ingens  (Red  Leafed  Rock  Fig)   Grewia  Occidentalis  (Cross  Berry)   Greyia  Sutherlandii  (Natal  Bottlebrush)   Gymnosporia  Buxifolia  (Common  Spike  Thorn)   Halleria  Lucida  (Halleria,  Tree  Fuchsia)  

Heteromorpha  Arborescens      (Parsley  Tree)   Kiggeleria  Africana  (Wild  Peach)  

Leucosidea  Sericea  (Ntshitshi)   Olea  Europaea  Africana  (Wild  Olive)   Olinia  Emarginata  (Mountain  Hard  Pear)   Rhamnus  Prinoides  (Dogwood,  Blinkblaar)   Rhus  Dentata  (Nana  Berry)  

Trimeria  Grandifolia  (Wild  Mulberry)  

Widdringtonia  Nodiflora  (Mountain  Cypress)  

Shrubs:

Artemesia  Afra  (Wormwood)  

Chrystanthemoides  Monilifera  (Bush-­‐tick  Berry)   Euryops  Tysonii  

Geranium  Pulchrum  

Geranium  Schlechterii  (Schlechter’s  Geranuim)   Gomphostigma  Virgatum  (River  Stars)  

Jamesbrittenia  Pristisepala  

Leonotis  Leonorus      (Wild  Dagga)  orange  and  cream  varieties  

Melianthus  Dregeanus    (Red  Honey  Flower)  -­‐  subspecies  Dregeanus  and  Insignis   Papaver  Aculeatum      (Orange  Poppy)  

Phygelius  Aequalis  and  Capensis    (River  Bells)   Polygala  Virgata      (Purple  Broom)  

Sutera  Floribunda  (Kerriebos)  

Bulbs

Agapanthus  Campanulatus  subspecies  Patens  (Bell  Agapanthus)   Albuca  Fastigiata  (Large  Spreading  White  Albuca)  

Crinum  Bulbispermum  (River  Lily)   Crocosmia  Aurea      (Falling  Stars)   Crocosmia  Paniculata        (Montbreschia)   Dierama  Robustum  and  others  (Hairbells)   Eucomis  Autumnalis  (Common  Pineapple  Lily)   Galtonia  Candicans  (Common  Berg  Lily)  

Hesperantha  Coccinea    (River  Lily)  red  and  pink  varieties     Knipofia  Linearifolia    (Common  Marsh  Red  Hot  Poker)   Moraea  Huttonii  (Large  Golden  Vlei  Moraea)  

Nerine  Appendiculata  (Nerine)   Nerine  Bowdenii  (Large  Pink  Nerine)   Scilla  Natalensis  (Large  Blue  Scilla)  

Zantedeschia  Aethiopica        (White  Arum  Lily)  

(3)

Groundcovers

Diascia  Barberae/Cordata      (Twin  Spur)   Diclis  Reptans  (Dwarf  Snapdragon)   Diclis  Rotundifolia  

Jamesbrittenia  Breviflora  

Stachys  Aethiopica  (African  Stachys,  Wild  Sage)  

Creepers

Clematis  Brachiata  (Travellers’  Joy)   Senecio  Deltoideus  

Succulents

Aloe  Aristata  (Guinea  Fowl  Aloe)   Aloe  Maculata  

Bulbine  Abyssinica  (Bulbinella)     Cotyledon  Orbiculata        (Pig’s  Ears)   Crassula  Dependens  

Crassula  Sarcocaulis  

Delosperma  Lavisiae  and  others      (Vygies)   Senecio  Brevilorus   Senecio  Haygarthii   Senecio  Oxryriifolius     Senecio  Rhomboideus      

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(4)

 

 

 

INDIGENOUS  PLANT  SALES  at  “THE  GIANTS  CUP  CAFÉ”  

 

OUR  PHILOSOPHY:  

 

YOUTH:  We  believe  that  plants  are  best  transplanted  if  done  so  early  in  life.  Just  like  humans,  plants  

are  more  adaptable  when  they’re  young,  and  the  whole  transplanting  process  can  be  quite  traumatic   for  a  plant.  Therefore  we  pot  up  and  sell  our  seedlings  as  young  as  is  practical,  and  we  would  urge   you  to  get  them  planted  out  into  your  garden  sooner  rather  than  later.  

 

EMPATHY:  The  plant  you  purchase  is  a  living  thing.  You  will  get  best  results  if  you  think  of  it  as  such,  

and  empathise  with  it.  The  manner  in  which  you  transplant  it  into  your  garden  is  crucial  and  its   survival  and  whether  it  thrives  in  the  longer  term.  Reduce  stress  on  it  by  following  these  tips:  

 

i) While  it  remains  in  its  pot  before  planting  out,  keep  it  in  an  appropriate  location  where  it   gets  some  sun  but  doesn’t  get  dried  out  or  frosted  

 

ii) Pots  are  notorious  for  drying  out  rapidly,  so  keep  it  moist  without  overwatering  –  this  too   can  kill  the  plant.  

 

iii) Ensure  the  place  you  are  about  to  transplant  it  to  is  the  appropriate  place  for  that  species.   Some  plants  require  a  protected  position,  some  prefer  sun,  some  prefer  shade,  some  like   dry  well  drained  soil,  others  like  moist  boggy  areas.  Make  sure  you’ve  thought  it  out   clearly  before  planting  

 

iv) Make  a  hole  larger  than  the  volume  of  the  pot  and  put  a  little  compost  or  rich  soil  at  the   bottom  of  the  hole.  Gently  extricate  the  plant  from  the  pot  and  place  it  carefully  in  the   soil.  The  roots  are  key  –  try  to  disturb  them  as  little  as  possible!  Gently  fill  the  hole  with   soil.  Trees  do  better  with  a  larger  hole  and  more  organic  material  under  them.  

 

v) Once  planted,  cover  an  area  about  20cm  around  the  stem  with  mulch  –dead  leaves,  grass   cuttings,  old  hay,  bark,  anything  organic.  This  provides  protection  for  the  soil,  keeps   moisture  in  and  provides  nutrients  as  the  mulch  biodegrades.  You  can  even  use  pebbles  if   there  is  nothing  else  available.  Put  three  sticks  above  your  plant  –  this  is  to  act  as  a  marker   so  you  can  be  sure  you  know  where  you  planted  something  and  can  monitor  it.  Once   established  (or  dead!),  you  can  remove  the  sticks.  

 

RECYCLING:  Sani  Lodge  and  The  Giants  Cup  Café  generate  a  substantial  amount  of  waste.  We  have  

chosen  to  re-­‐use  some  of  the  plastic  waste  to  provide  pots  for  our  plants.  You  will  notice  that  our   plants  are  housed  in  polystyrene  cups,  plastic  yoghurt  or  margarine  tubs  or  cut  off  PET  drink  and   water  bottles.  If  you  return  to  The  Giants  Cup,  we  would  ask  you  to  bring  back  the  pots  if  you  no   longer  need  them  so  that  we  can  re-­‐use  them  again!  

 

Our  plant  labels  are  also  made  from  waste  plastic!                

(5)

 

Trees

:    

 

Bowkeria  Verticillata  (Southern  Shell-­‐flower)  

Buddleja  Auriculata    (Weeping  Sagewood)  

Buddleja  Loricata  (Mountain  Sagewood)  –  bush  and  tree  varieties  

Buddleja  Salvifolia      (Sagewood)  

Clausena  Anisata  (Horsewood,  Perdepis)  

Doispyrus  Lycioides  (Bluebush)  

Ficus  Ingens  (Red  Leafed  Rock  Fig)  

Grewia  Occidentalis  (Cross  Berry)  

Greyia  Sutherlandii  (Natal  Bottlebrush)  

Gymnosporia  Buxifolia  (Common  Spike  Thorn)  

Halleria  Lucida  (Halleria,  Tree  Fuchsia)  

Heteromorpha  Arborescens      (Parsley  Tree)  

Kiggeleria  Africana  (Wild  Peach)  

Leucosidea  Sericea  (Ntshitshi)  

Olea  Europaea  Africana  (Wild  Olive)  

Olinia  Emarginata  (Mountain  Hard  Pear)  

Rhamnus  Prinoides  (Dogwood,  Blinkblaar)  

Rhus  Dentata  (Nana  Berry)  

Trimeria  Grandifolia  (Wild  Mulberry)  

Widdringtonia  Nodiflora  (Mountain  Cypress)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(6)

Latin  Name:  Bowkeria  Verticillata  

 

Common  Name:  Southern  Shell-­‐flower      

Type:  Small  tree  

 

Flowers:  White  sticky  shell-­‐shaped  flowers  at  the  ends  of  branches.  Strongly  scented.    

Seed:  Seed  capsule  produced  after  flower  falls  off.    

 

Size:  Bowkeria  is  a  small  to  medium  sized  tree  in  the  Berg,  often  found  next  to  large   boulders  or  along  stream  banks.  

 

Special  garden  features:  Bowkeria  produces  very  interesting  flowers  which  makes  it  a   good  garden  tree.  It  is  evergreen  if  located  in  a  protected  spot.  

     

 

 

       

 

 

 

 

 

(7)

Latin  Name:  Buddleja  Auriculata  

 

Common  Names:  Weeping  Sagewood,      

 

Type:  Tree  –  evergreen.  Usually  found  on  forest  margins.  Leaves  are  shiny  dark  green   on  top,  pale  underneath.  

 

Flowers:  Dense  clusters  of  tiny  flowers  at  the  end  of  branches,  May  and  June.  Cream  in   colour.  Strong  smell.  Attracts  butterflies  when  in  flower.    

 

Seed:  Tiny,  powdery  seed.  The  seed  seldom  sets  as  the  flowers  are  usually  frosted   before  they  can  mature.    

 

Size:  depending  on  soils  and  position,  Buddleja  Auriculata  can  grow  into  quite  a  large   tree  or  in  poorer  circumstances,  can  remain  the  size  of  a  large  bush.    

 

Special  garden  features:  

a) A  lovely  evergreen  tree,  it  provides  good  contrast  to  the  paler  leaves  of  Buddleja  

salvifolia  and  can  have  quite  dense  foliage.  

b) Can  be  planted  pretty  much  anywhere  although  it  prefers  part  shade.    

     

 

(8)

Latin  Name:  Buddleja  Loricata  

 

Common  Names:  Mountain  Sagewood,    uMngane  (Zulu)      

 

Type:  Tree  variety  originating  in  Lesotho  –  evergreen  

  Bush  variety  common  at  high  altitude  in  the  berg  -­‐  evergreen  

 

Flowers:  Small,  dense  clusters  of  tiny  cream  coloured  flowers  at  the  end  of  branches  in   the  first  half  of  summer.  Fragrant  smell.  Attracts  butterflies  when  in  flower.    

 

Seed:  Tiny,  powdery  seed.  The  seed  attracts  flocks  of  canaries  and  other  seed  eaters.    

 

Size:  The  tree  variety,  which  has  larger,  broader  leaves  grows  into  a  small  tree  while   the  bush  variety  with  narrower  smaller  leaves  remains  a  small  bush.  

 

Special  garden  features:  

Both  varieties  have  extremely  tough,  waxy  leaves  and  are  attractive  in  a  garden  

setting.  The  bush  variety  is  useful  where  you  want  something  evergreen  and  tough,  but   not  too  large  while  the  tree  variety  offers  some  variety  to  planting  the  other  two  

buddleja  species.                                                              

 

 

 

 

(9)

Latin  Name:  Buddleja  Salvifolia  

 

Common  Names:  Sagewood,    iLoshane  (Zulu)      

 

Type:  Tree  –  evergreen-­‐ish  (tends  to  “thin  out”  in  winter,  especially  after  a  strong  Berg   wind.  

 

Flowers:  Large,  dense  clusters  of  tiny  flowers  at  the  end  of  branches,  

August/September.  Can  be  cream  or  blue  in  colour.  Beautiful  fragrant  smell.  Attracts   butterflies  when  in  flower.    

 

Seed:  Tiny,  powdery  seed.  The  seed  attracts  flocks  of  canaries  and  other  seed  eaters.    

 

Size:  depending  on  soils  and  position,  Buddleja  can  grow  into  quite  a  large  “classic”   tree  with  quite  thick  trunk,  or  in  poorer  circumstances,  can  remain  the  size  of  a  large   bush.  Most  commonly  somewhere  in  between.  

 

Special  garden  features:  

a) Pioneer  species:  Because  it  is  frost  resistant,  it  is  a  good,  fast  growing  and  once  

established,  can  be  used  to  provide  protection  for  other  species.  

b) Can  be  planted  pretty  much  anywhere.  Makes  a  good  hedge.  

 

                               

                           A  tall  scraggly  tree                                                                  Matures  into  quite  a  thick  trunk                                  Flower  clusters  at  the  end  of  branches    

                             

 Mature  trees  produce  dense  flower  clusters                          “Sagewood”  –  leaf  looks                                        Tiny  clusters  of  fragrant,  blue  flowers                                                                                                                                                                                                            like  a  sage  leaf.      

(10)

Latin  Name:  Ficus  Ingens  

 

Common  Name:  Red-­‐leafed  Rock  Fig    

Type:  Small  Scrambling  deciduous  tree  under  rock  shelters  

 

Flowers  and  Seed:  Figs  produce  fruit  which  also  serve  as  the  flower.  They  are  very   small  dull  red  figs  which  then  dry  and  contain  the  seed.    

 

Size:  in  the  Drakensberg,  these  trees  grown  only  in  very  sheltered  locations  and  tend  to   stay  fairly  small.  In  warmer  climates,  they  can  grow  into  very  large  trees.  

 

Special  garden  features:  In  our  area,  these  trees  must  be  grown  in  very  protected  

spots,  under  eaves  or  against  buildings  which  mimic  rock  overhangs  or  large  boulders.   If  frosted,  they  will  grow  back  from  the  base.  In  spring,  their  young  leaves  are  a  lovely   red  colour  giving  rise  to  the  common  name.  

             

(11)

Latin  Name:  Grewia  Occidentalis  

 

Common  Name:  Cross  Berry    

Type:  Small  tree    

 

Flowers:    Pink  star-­‐shaped  flowers,  profusely  over  the  whole  tree  in  early  to  mid   summer.  

   

Seed:  Seed  produced  in  cross  shaped  capsules  after  flowering,  hence  the  common   name  of  the  tree.    

 

Size:  Generally  a  small,  straggly  tree      

Special  garden  features:  They  are  often  found  on  the  edge  of  rock  overhangs,  in  

protected  locations  in  the  mountains.  They  prefer  protected  locations  in  gardens  in   this  area,  but  will  also  grow  out  in  the  open  if  frosts  are  not  too  severe.  They  are   largely  deciduous.  Their  beautiful  show  of  flowers  make  them  a  great  small  tree  for   the  garden.                  

(12)

 

Latin  Name:  Greyia  Sutherlandii  

 

Common  Name:  Natal  Bottlebrush    

Type:  Small  gnarled  deciduous  tree    

 

Flowers:  brilliant  red  flower  heads  at  the  ends  of  branches.  Sunbirds  love  them.  They   flower  in  spring  together  with  the  new  leaves.  

   

Seed:  Seed  produced  in  capsules  after  flowering      

Size:  Generally  small  in  the  Drakensberg.  In  warmer  climates,  they  can  grow  into  very   large  trees.  

 

Special  garden  features:  They  are  found  as  far  south  as  Lotheni  in  our  area,  but  the  

frosts  of  the  southern  berg  are  too  severe  for  them.  They  therefore  need  protected   locations  in  gardens  in  this  area.  They  grow  from  the  base  if  frosted  severely  over   winter.  The  leaves  are  large  and  roundish  and  grow  at  the  ends  of  the  branches.  They   turn  red  in  autumn.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(13)

 

Latin  Name:  Gymnosporia  Buxifolia  

 

Common  Names:  Common  Spike  Thorn    

 

Type:  Small  tree    

 

Flowers:  Massed  bunches  of  white  flowers  in  the  summer  months  with  strong  not  too   pleasant  smell.    

 

Seed:  Bunches  of  small  round  brownish  seeds.    

 

Size:  This  is  a  small  to  medium  sized  tree.  

 

Special  garden  features:  This  is  an  attractive  garden  tree  which  grows  long  spiky   thorns  as  it  matures.  It  needs  protection  from  heavy  frost,  but  at  the  same  time  also   requires  full  sun.  

   

                   

A  small  tree             The  seed  

 

     

The  leaf                    The  thorn  which  gives  the  tree  its  common  name  

     

(14)

 

Latin  Name:  Halleria  Lucida  

 

Common  Name:  Halleria,  Tree  Fuchsia      

Type:  Tree  

 

Flowers:  Tubular  orange  flowers  in  dense  clusters  under  older  branches,  especially   loved  by  sunbirds  as  they  tend  to  flower  in  autumn  and  winter  when  there  isn’t  much   else  available.  

 

Seed:  Marble  sized  round  fruits,  starting  green  and  turning  black  as  they  ripen.    

 

Size:  Halleria  can  grow  into  a  large  tree  under  the  right  conditions.  A  couple  of  good   examples  are  as  you  travel  from  Bulwer  towards  PMB  and  enter  the  village  of  

Enkelabantwana,  there  are  a  couple  of  large  Hallerias  by  homesteads  on  the  right  side   of  the  road.  In  our  local  conditions,  however,  they  tend  to  be  a  lot  smaller.  

   

Special  garden  features:  Halleria  is  a  very  attractive  tree  but  is  frost  sensitive  and  so   must  be  planted  with  care.  It  needs  a  protected  spot,  right  up  against  a  building  is   often  the  best  bet.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(15)

Latin  Name:  Heteromorpha  Arborescens  

 

Common  Names:  Parsley  Tree,  Mbangandlala  (Zulu)    

 

Type:  Tree  –  deciduous  (loses  leaves  in  winter)  

 

Flowers:  Non-­‐descript  greenish  flower  at  ends  of  branches.  Looks  like  parsley  flower,   hence  the  name  of  the  tree.  Flowers  attract  flies  and  other  insects.    

 

Seed:  Small  oval  seeds,  germinate  very  easily.    

 

Size:  Heteromorpha  can  grow  into  a  smallish  tree  of  2  –  3  metres.  

 

Special  garden  features:  Heteromorpha  is  a  very  attractive  garden  tree.  Its  trunk  is   segmented  and  the  bark  peels  off  like  a  commiphora.  It  will  add  another  dimension  to   your  garden.  It  likes  full  sun  or  part  shade  and  is  frost  resistant.    

   

                   

Seed  looks  like  parsley  seed                                                                                                                                          The  leaves    

                                                                                                   Segmented  trunk,  peely  bark                                                                                                                    Loses  it  leaves  in  winter  

   

(16)

Latin  Name:  Kiggeleria  Africana    

 

Common  Names:  Wild  Peach  

 

Type:  Small  to  medium  evergreen  tree  

 

Flowers:  Tiny  yellow  flowers,  male  and  female  on  different  trees,  early  to  mid  summer  

 

Seed:  Round  grey-­‐green  marble-­‐sized  fruits,  splitting  open  to  reveal  bright  orange   seed,  popular  with  birds  

 

Size:  Depending  on  soils  and  position,  Kiggeleria  can  grow  into  quite  a  large  tree  with   thick  trunk,  or  in  poorer  circumstances,  can  remain  the  size  of  a  large  bush.    

 

Special  garden  features:  Interesting  greyish-­‐green  leaves  make  this  an  attractive  tree  

for  the  garden.  When  young,  the  tree  has  smooth  bright  green  leaves  –  when  it   matures  the  leaves  become  hairy  and  more  greyish.  Though  quite  tough,  it  will  do   better  if  planted  in  a  location  giving  it  some  protection  from  the  most  severe  frosts,   especially  when  young.  It  is  prone  to  a  particular  species  of  caterpillar  which  eats  all   the  leaves  on  the  tree  as  it  matures.  This  does  set  the  tree  back,  but  it  generally   recovers  well.                    

 

(17)

Latin  Name:  Leucosidea  Sericea  

 

Common  Names:  Ntshitshi  (Zulu),  Ouhout  (Afrikaans)  

 

Type:  Tree  –  evergreen  

 

Flowers:  Clusters  of  small  yellow  flowers  around  a  central  stalk,  September/October  

 

Seed:  Small  clusters  of  “nutlets”  

 

Size:  depending  on  soils  and  position,  Ntshitshi  can  grow  into  quite  a  large  “classic”   tree  with  quite  thick  trunk,  or  in  poorer  circumstances,  can  remain  the  size  of  a  large   bush.  Most  commonly  somewhere  in  between  –  a  straggly  tree  with  multiple  gnarled   trunks.  

 

Special  garden  features:  

a) Pioneer  species:  Because  it  is  frost  resistant,  it  is  a  good,  medium  speed  growing  

and  once  established,  can  be  used  to  provide  protection  for  other  species.  

b) It  develops  lovely,  gnarled  trunks  (hence  its  Afrikaans  name  of  “old  wood”)  and  

gives  dense  leaf  coverage.    

                           

                           Clusters  of  small  yellow  flowers                                                                                      Gnarled  old-­‐looking  trunks      

                           

                                     A  tall  specimen            Hug  a  Ntshitshi!              A  more  common  bushy  specimen    

(18)

Latin  Name:  Olinia  Emarginata  

 

Common  Name:  Mountain  Hard  Pear    

Type:  Large  tree  found  in  the  true  forest  patches  in  the  Drakensberg  

 

Flowers:  Small  pink  flowers  at  the  ends  of  branches  in  early  summer    

Seed:  Small  pink  berries  in  profusion  at  the  end  of  branches    

Size:  Grow  into  very  large  trees  in  favourable  locations.    

 

Special  garden  features:  Olinia  must  be  given  protection  when  young,  but  become  

frost  hardy  when  mature.  They  are  slow  growing,  but  can  become  very  large  trees  and   this  must  be  considered  when  choosing  where  to  plant  them.    

                   

 

 

 

(19)

Latin  Name:  Rhamnus  prinoides  

 

Common  Name:  Dogwood,  Blinkblaar      

Type:  Small  to  medium  sized  tree  

 

Flowers:  Small,  greenish  clusters  in  mid-­‐summer    

Seed:  Small,  red  to  black  fruits  which  birds  love.    

 

Size:  The  size  of  your  Rhamnus  depends  on  the  location  in  which  you  plant  it.  Under   favourable  conditions,  it  can  grow  to  a  few  metres  tall,  otherwise  it  will  remain  small   and  straggly.  

 

Special  garden  features:  Rhamnus  is  a  tough  evergreen  tree  which  is  an  excellent   garden  feature  if  you  get  it  established.  The  dark  green,  shiny,  glossy  leaves  (hence  the   Afrikaans  common  name)  are  also  very  different  to  most  other  plants  and  so  make  a   good  contrast.          

 

 

(20)

Latin  Name:  Rhus  dentata  

 

Common  Name:  Nana  Berry      

Type:  Small  deciduous  tree  

 

Flowers:  Tiny  bunches  of  non-­‐descript  flowers  in  early  summer    

Seed:  Clusters  of  shiny  tiny  red  berries  which  the  birds  love.    

 

Size:  The  size  of  your  Rhus  depends  on  the  location  in  which  you  plant  it.  Under  

favourable  conditions,  it  can  grow  to  1  ½  -­‐  2  metres  tall,  otherwise  it  will  remain  small.    

Special  garden  features:  Rhus  dentata  has  a  very  attractive  leaf  shape,  it  is  tough  (a   real  garden  survivor)  and  the  birds  love  its  berries.  Its  leaves  also  have  lovely  late  

autumn  colours  as  it  loses  them.  All  these  features  make  it  a  desirable  garden  plant  –  it   can  be  planted  out  in  the  open  although  a  bit  of  protection  will  help  it  along  when   young.  

(21)

Shrubs:

Artemesia  Afra  (Wormwood)  

Chrystanthemoides  Monilifera  (Bush-­‐tick  Berry)  

Euryops  Tysonii  

Geranium  Pulchrum  

Geranium  Schlechterii  (Schlechter’s  Geranuim)  

Gomphostigma  Virgatum  (River  Stars)  

Jamesbrittenia  Pristisepala  

Leonotis  Leonorus      (Wild  Dagga)  orange  and  cream  varieties  

Melianthus  Dregeanus    (Red  Honey  Flower)  -­‐  subspecies  Dregeanus  and  Insignis  

Papaver  Aculeatum      (Orange  Poppy)  

Phygelius  Aequalis  and  Capensis    (River  Bells)  

Polygala  Virgata      (Purple  Broom)  

Sutera  Floribunda  (Kerriebos)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(22)

Latin  Name:  Artemesia  Afra  

 

Common  Name:  Wormwood      

Type:  Shrub  

 

Flowers:  Tiny  non-­‐descript  flowers  up  the  stalks  towards  their  tips  in  late  summer.    

Seed:  Tiny  seed  after  flowers.    

 

Size:  Artemesia  can  grow  into  a  medium  sized  shrub  to  large  shrub  over  time  and   under  the  right  conditions.    

   

Special  garden  features:  Artemesia  has  a  very  different  colour  and  texture  to  most   other  garden  plants,  and  so  makes  a  nice  contrast  in  beds.  It  is  tough  and  evergreen.  It   is  widespread  in  the  southern  berg,  but  its  origins  are  unsure  –  it  may  have  been  

brought  to  southern  Africa  by  Arab  traders  many  centuries  ago  as  it  is  used  against   malaria.  The  latest  malaria  cure  is  based  on  a  close  relative  of  this  plant.    

                                 

 

 

 

(23)

Latin  Name:  Chrysanthemoides  Monilifera  

 

Common  Name:  Bush-­‐tick  Berry      

Type:  Shrub  

 

Flowers:  Smallish  bright  yellow  daisy  like  flowers  towards  the  ends  of  branches.  They   flower  all  year  round  in  protected  locations.  

 

Seed:  Small,  berry-­‐like  fruits  in  clusters  after  flowers.  They  start  off  green,  and  turn   purplish-­‐black  as  they  ripen.    

 

Size:  Chrysanthemoides  grows  into  a  medium  sized  shrub  under  the  right  conditions.        

Special  garden  features:  Chrysanthemoides  is  an  attractive  garden  plant,  with  grey-­‐ green  leaves  which  are  different  to  the  ordinary  and  flowers  which  are  produced  

continually.  In  nature,  they  often  grow  in  really  poor,  leached  soils  where  little  else  will   grow,  and  so  can  be  used  as  such  in  gardens  too.  

 

   

   

 

 

(24)

Latin  Name:  Euryops  Tysonii  

 

Common  Name:  None    

Type:  Evergreen  shrub  

 

Flowers:  Clusters  of  brilliant  yellow  flowers  at  tips  of  stems.  Flowers  prolifically  once   established.  Flowers  in  mid-­‐summer.  Flowers  attract  insects.  

 

Seed:  Doesn’t  seem  to  produce  viable  seed  in  a  garden  setting.  

 

Size:  Matures  over  a  number  of  years  into  a  large  bush.  Can  grow  up  to  1m  tall  and   cover  an  area  of  up  to  2  square  metres.  

 

Special  garden  features:  An  attractive  shrub  for  a  garden  setting.  Tough  and  frost   resistant,  it  will  grow  in  full  sun  and  even  in  exposed  positions  in  the  garden  where   other  shrubs  would  not  thrive.    

 

     

 

(25)

Latin  Name:  Geranium  Pulchrum  

 

Common  Name:  None      

Type:  Spreading  medium  sized  shrub  

 

Flowers:  Medium  sized  pink  to  purple  flowers  on  the  ends  of  longish  flower  stalks.   Flowers  in  late  summer.  

 

Seed:  Doesn’t  seem  to  produce  viable  seed  in  a  garden  setting.    

 

Size:  Geranium  Pulchrum  over  time  can  grow  into  a  large  spreading  clump.    

Special  garden  features:  Geranium  Pulchrum  is  a  Drakensberg  endemic  and  one  of  the   trademark  flowering  plants  of  the  Sani  Pass  area  where  it  flowers  in  great  profusion.  It   is  a  tough  garden  plant,  with  attractive  greyish  leaves  and  beautiful  flowers.  Likes   moist  areas.                                                                            

(26)

Latin  Name:  Geranium  Schlechterii  

 

Common  Name:  Schlechter’s  geranium      

Type:  Small  low  shrub  

 

Flowers:  Small,  pink  flowers  on  the  ends  of  longish  flower  stalks.  Flowers  turn  white  as   they  get  older.  Flowers  all  summer.  

 

Seed:  Doesn’t  seem  to  produce  viable  seed  in  a  garden  setting.    

 

Size:  Geranium  Schlecherii  will  vary  according  to  its  location.  In  shady  conditions,  it  will   remain  quite  small,  in  sunnier  positions  it  can  grow  into  a  large  mat.  

 

Special  garden  features:  Geranium  Schlechterii  has  very  distinctive  shaped  leaves   which  are  in  themselves  quite  different  and  attractive,  and  when  it  flowers,  it  is  an   attractive  garden  plant.  Since  it  grows  quite  well  in  shady  and  semi-­‐shady  locations,  it   will  often  grow  where  not  too  much  else  will!  

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(27)

Latin  Name:  Gomphostigma  Virgatum  

 

Common  Name:  River  Stars      

Type:  Slender  shrub  

 

Flowers:  White  star-­‐like  flowers  along  and  towards  the  ends  of  stalks.  Flowers  in  mid   to  late  summer.  

 

Seed:  Doesn’t  seem  to  produce  viable  seed  in  a  garden  setting.    

 

Size:  Gomphostigma  is  a  small  straggly  shrub.    

Special  garden  features:  Gomphostigma  is  a  riverine  shrub  in  nature,  growing  among   the  rocks  in  streambeds.  It  grows  pretty  well  anywhere  in  the  garden,  is  tough  and   doesn’t  lose  its  leaves,  which  are  silvery,  attractive  and  a  contrast  to  most  other  plants.                    

 

 

 

 

 

 

(28)

Latin  Name:  Jamesbrittenia  Pristisepala  

 

Common  Name:  None      

Type:  Small  shrub  

 

Flowers:  Pink  to  purple  flowers.  Plant  produces  a  profusion  of  flowers  constantly.      

Seed:  Doesn’t  seem  to  produce  viable  seed  in  a  garden  setting.    

 

Size:  Grows  into  a  small  bush  seldom  more  than  more  than  about  30cm  high.  

 

Special  garden  features:  This  is  a  good  garden  plant,  bringing  colour  to  beds     throughout  the  summer.  Happy  in  full  sun,  in  the  wild  often  found  in  moist,  rocky     areas.  Survival  through  winter  frosts  is  not  guaranteed,  possibly  position    

determines  survival  rates.                                                                      

 

(29)

Latin  Name:  Leonotis  Leonorus  

 

Common  Name:  Wild  Dagga      

Type:  Tall  many  branched  shrub  

 

Flowers:  Bright  orange  round  whorls.  There  is  also  a  less  common  cream  coloured   variety.  Plant  produces  many  flowering  branches,  with  many  whorls  developing  from   lower  on  the  branch  to  its  tip  over  the  course  of  a  few  weeks.  Sunbirds  love  them.   Flower  from  February  until  the  first  frosts.    

 

Seed:  Lots  of  tiny  seed  is  formed  in  the  “compartments”  of  each  whorl.    

 

Size:  Normally  up  to  about  1m  tall,  but  can  get  taller  during  flowering  season  as   flowering  branches  grow  up  to  2m.  Over  time  can  grow  into  quite  a  dense  “almost   bush”.  

 

Special  garden  features:  Leonotis  is  a  must  for  any  garden.  It  is  a  late  flowerer  and   flowers  in  profusion.  It  dies  off  in  winter  above  ground,  and  starts  sprouting  again  in   early  spring.  

 

                   

 

(30)

Latin  Name:  Melianthus  Dregeanus  

 

Common  Name:  Red  Honey  Flower    

Type:  Medium  sized  evergreen  bushy  shrub  (subspecies  dregeanus)  

  Larger  evergreen  bushy  shrub  (subspecies  insignis)  

 

Flowers:  Red  flowers  grow  on  underside  of  drooping  branches.  Flowers  in  

August/September,  providing  nectar  at  an  otherwise  barren  time  of  the  year.  White   eyes  and  sunbirds  love  them.  

 

Seed:  Seed  is  a  small  black  ball  and  forms  in  “gooseberry-­‐like”  capsules.    

 

Size:  Dregeanus  grows  to  around  1.m  tall  and  can  bush  out  over  quite  a  large  area,   Insignis  can  grow  even  bigger.  

 

Special  garden  features:  An  attractive  shrub  for  a  garden  setting  as  it  is  evergreen  and   provides  food  in  late  winter  when  there  is  little  else  around.  Likes  full  sun  but  will  grow   pretty  much  anywhere!  

 

       

 

(31)

Latin  Name:  Papaver  Aculeatum  

 

Common  Name:  Orange  Poppy      

Type:  Prickly  herb  

 

Flowers:  Orange  poppy  flowers  with  yellow  centres.  Flowers  in  the  second  half  of   summer.  

 

Seed:  After  flowers  finish,  the  heads  develop  filled  with  a  large  quantity  of  tiny  black   poppy  seeds.  

 

Size:  Grows  into  a  medium  sized  clump  when  mature  with  the  flowers  growing  about   50  –  75cm  tall  out  of  the  mat  of  ground  leaves.  

 

Special  garden  features:  The  plant  starts  out  as  a  small,  thistle-­‐like  base  of  leaf.  The   leaf  grows  larger  and  larger,  and  when  ready  to  flower,  stalks  grow  out  of  the  base   with  leaves  and  ultimately  flowers  on  them.  They  are  an  excellent  garden  plant,  each   individual  can  flower  profusely  with  beautiful,  bright  orange  flowers.  They  tend  to  self-­‐ seed,  so  once  established  in  the  garden,  you’ll  have  them  permanently!  

 

   

 

     

(32)

Latin  Name:  Phygelius  Aequalis  and  Capensis  

 

Common  Name:  River  Bells    

Type:  Evergreen  shrub  

 

Flowers:  Tubular  flowers,  about  6cm  long,  at  tips  of  branches.  Phygelius  Aequalis  is   normally  a  dusky  pink  colour,  although  there  is  a  bright  yellow  variety,  the  flower  stalks   tend  to  hang  horizontal  or  down.  Phygelius  Capensis  is  a  scarlet  red  colour  and  the   flower  stalks  tend  to  be  more  upright.  Flowers  in  spurts  throughout  summer.  Sunbirds   love  them!  

 

Seed:  Doesn’t  seem  to  produce  viable  seed  in  a  garden  setting.  

 

Size:  Matures  into  a  large  bush.    

Special  garden  features:  An  excellent  garden  plant,  all  three  Phygelius  options  lend   colour  and  flower  profusely  throughout  the  season.  They  are  evergreen  although  the   foliage  thins  out  during  the  dry  season.  While  they  prefer  moist  locations  in  the  wild,   they  will  grow  pretty  much  anywhere  in  a  garden  setting.    

 

     

                                                   Pink  Phygelius  Aequalis  in  nature              Yellow  Phygelius  Aequalis  is  loved  by  sunbirds    

       

                                       Sunbirds  love  all  Phygelius  species                      Red  Phygelius  Capensis  has  a  different  flower  stalk  

   

(33)

Latin  Name:  Polygala  Virgata  

 

Common  Name:  Purple  Broom    

Type:  Tall  slender  shrub  

 

Flowers:  Large  pink  to  purple  flowers  in  long  clusters  at  the  end  of  stalks.    

Seed:  Seed  forms  within  flower  as  it  matures.  Once  the  flowers  drops  off,  the  seed  is   viable  and  ready  to  germinate.  

 

Size:  Grows  to  around  1.5m  tall,  but  stays  quite  skinny.    

Special  garden  features:  An  attractive  shrub  for  a  garden  setting.  Flowers  for  long   periods  in  spurts  throughout  the  summer.  Tends  to  die  off  in  winter.  Sometimes  comes   back  to  life  for  a  second  season,  sometimes  doesn’t.  Because  it  self-­‐seeds  so  easily,  if   you  can  get  one  to  thrive  and  flower,  you  should  have  them  in  your  garden  forever!   Duiker  love  to  browse  heavily  on  them,  especially  in  the  winter.  

                       

(34)

Latin  Name:  Sutera  Floribunda  

 

Common  Name:  Kerriebos    

Type:  Small  Shrub  

 

Flowers:  The  whole  small  bush  is  covered  with  small  white  flowers  with  yellow  middles.   The  profusion  of  flowers  through  the  summer  has  given  rise  to  its  Latin  name,  

floribunda..    

Seed:  Seed  is  tiny..    

 

Size:  Small  to  medium  size.    

Special  garden  features:  In  nature  grows  often  in  moist  protected  areas,  but  in  the  

garden  will  grow  just  about  anywhere.  May  die  off  above  ground  in  winter  after  frost,   but  comes  back  to  life  in  spring.  Its  profusion  of  flowers  makes  it  an  attractive  garden   plant.  

 

   

(35)

Bulbs

Agapanthus  Campanulatus  subspecies  Patens  (Bell  Agapanthus)  

Albuca  Fastigiata  (Large  Spreading  White  Albuca)  

Crinum  Bulbispermum  (River  Lily)  

Crocosmia  Aurea      (Falling  Stars)  

Crocosmia  Paniculata        (Montbreschia)  

Dierama  Robustum  and  others  (Hairbells)  

Eucomis  Autumnalis  (Common  Pineapple  Lily)  

Galtonia  Candicans  (Common  Berg  Lily)  

Hesperantha  Coccinea    (River  Lily)  red  and  pink  varieties    

Knipofia  Linearifolia    (Common  Marsh  Red  Hot  Poker)  

Moraea  Huttonii  (Large  Golden  Vlei  Moraea)  

Scilla  Natalensis  (Large  Blue  Scilla)  

Zantedeschia  Aethiopica        (White  Arum  Lily)  

Zantedeschia  Albomaculata      (Arrow  Leaved  or  White  Spotted  Arum  Lily)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(36)

Latin  Name:  Agapanthus  Campanulatus  subsp.  patens  

 

Common  Name:  Bell  Agapanthus    

Type:  Bulb  

 

Flowers:  A  long  stalk  grows  out  of  the  middle  of  the  plant.  A  head  of  deep  blue  flowers   open  at  the  end  of  the  long  stalk.  They  flower  in  mid-­‐summer.  

 

Seed:  Seed  is  in  sheaves  of  flat  seed  on  old  flower  head.    

 

Size:  Medium  size.    

Special  garden  features:  Dies  off  over  winter  and  reappears  each  spring.  This  local  

agapanthus  subspecies  has  a  deeper  and  more  beautiful  blue  than  other  more   common  varieties,  although  the  plant  is  a  little  smaller.  

 

   

   

(37)

Latin  Name:  Albuca  Fastigiata  

 

Common  Name:  Large  spreading  white  albuca      

Type:  Bulb  

 

Flowers:  A  head  of  smallish  white  flowers  with  yellow  in  the  centre  and  a  green  middle   strip  underneath.  Flower  in  mid-­‐  summer.  

 

Seed:  After  flowers  finish,  the  heads  develop  seeds  heads.  

 

Size:  Each  plant  grows  to  around  50  -­‐60  cm  high.    

Special  garden  features:  A  bulb  with  beautiful  flowers  will  add  to  your  garden    

   

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(38)

Latin  Name:  Crinum  Bulbispermum  

 

Common  Name:  River  Lily      

Type:  Bulb  

 

Flowers:  Pale  streaked  pink  flowers  on  a  thick  stalk  coming  out  of  middle  of  plant  in   early  to  mid-­‐summer.  

 

Seed:  After  flowers  finish,  large  seed  capsules  may  form.  The  individual  seed  itself  is  a   large,  irregular  green  lump.    

 

Size:  Each  plant  grows  to  around  50  cm  high.    

Special  garden  features:  A  bulb  with  beautiful  flowers  will  add  to  your  garden.  They   like  damp  areas  and  prefer  sunny  locations  or  partly  shady,  but  not  full  shade.          

             

 

(39)

Latin  Name:  Crocosmia  Aurea  

 

Common  Name:  Falling  Stars    

 

Type:  Bulb  –  dies  off  above  ground  in  winter  

 

Flowers:  Medium  stalk  (up  to  about  25cm)  grows  out  of  the  middle  of  the  plant  and   produces  tufts  of  orangy  red  flowers.  Flowers  January/  February.    

 

Seed:  Produces  seed  pods  of  seeds  containing  round  black  seed.  The  seed  is  not  always   produced.    

 

Size:  This  is  the  smaller  of  the  two  local  Crocosmia  species,  and  can  grow  up  to  around   75  cm  tall.  

 

Special  garden  features:  Crocosmia  Aurea  is  not  as  dominating  as  C.  Paniculata  and  its   leaves  are  not  scalloped.  Because  its  flowers  and  leaves  look  different,  it  is  good  to  have   both  species  in  different  places  in  the  garden.  It  reproduces  vegetatively  and  rapidly.  Plant   one  or  two  bulbs  today,  and  in  3  –  4  years  time  you  will  have  a  large  clump  which  can   then,  in  the  winter  months,  be  dug  up  and  replanted  elsewhere  in  the  garden.  

 

 Crocosmia  Aurea  early  in  the  season.                                                                                                  Both  species  in  flower-­‐  the  shorter  more  orangy     flowers  are  Crocosmia  Aurea  

   

(40)

Latin  Name:  Crocosmia  Paniculata  

 

Common  Name:  Montbretia    

 

Type:  Bulb  –  dies  off  above  ground  in  winter  

 

Flowers:  Long  stalk  grows  out  of  the  middle  of  the  plant  and  produces  tufts  of  deep  red   flowers.  Flowers  late  December/January.  Sunbirds  absolutely  love  them.  

 

Seed:  Small  pods  of  seeds  form  after  the  flowers  fall  off.  The  seed  is  not  always   produced.    

 

Size:  This  is  the  larger  of  the  two  local  Crocosmia  species,  and  can  grow  up  to  around   1.5m  tall.  

 

Special  garden  features:  This  is  an  excellent  species  to  have  in  the  garden.  It  produces  a   dense  stand  of  scalloped  green  leaves,  then  flowers  profusely  and  attracts  birds  and   butterflies  to  your  garden.  It  reproduces  vegetatively  and  rapidly.  Plant  one  or  two  bulbs   today,  and  in  3  –  4  years  time  you  will  have  a  large  clump  which  can  then,  in  the  winter   months,  be  dug  up  and  replanted  elsewhere  in  the  garden.  

                   

 

(41)

Latin  Name:  Dierama  Robustum  and  others  

 

Common  Name:  Hairbells      

Type:  Bulb  

 

Flowers:  Bright  pink  flowers  on  a  long  thin  stalk  coming  out  of  middle  of  plant  in  early   to  mid-­‐summer.  

 

Seed:  After  flowers  finish,  individual  seeds  are  formed  where  each  flower  was.  

 

Size:  Each  plant  grows  to  around  50  -­‐60  cm  high.    

Special  garden  features:  A  bulb  with  beautiful  flowers  will  add  to  your  garden.  Leaves   are  thin  and  grass-­‐stalk-­‐like.  There  are  a  number  of  similar  species.  

                                             

 

 

 

 

 

(42)

Latin  Name:  Eucomis  Autumnalis    

 

Common  Name:  Common  Pineapple  Lily    

Type:  Bulb  

 

Flowers:  A  short  spike  grows  out  of  the  middle  of  the  plant.  Whitish  flowers  open   successively  up  the  stalk.  The  top  has  a  “hairstyle”  and  the  whole  flower  looks  like  a   pineapple!  They  flower  in  mid-­‐summer.  

 

Seed:  Seed  is  in  “packets  up  stalk  after  flowering.    

 

Size:  Medium  size.    

Special  garden  features:  Dies  off  over  winter  and  reappears  each  spring.  The  

pineapple  shaped  flower  is  a  striking  feature  in  any  garden.                                      

 

(43)

Latin  Name:  Galtonia  Candicans    

 

Common  Name:  Common  Berg  Lily    

Type:  Bulb  

 

Flowers:  A  tall  spike  grows  out  of  the  middle  of  the  plant.  White  flowers  open   successively  up  the  stalk.  They  flower  in  mid-­‐summer.  

 

Seed:  Seed  is  in  “packets  up  stalk  after  flowering.    

 

Size:  Medium  size.    

Special  garden  features:  Dies  off  over  winter  and  reappears  each  spring.  The  bright  

white  flowers  make  a  great  contrast  in  any  garden  and  once  they’re  in,  the  only  way   you’ll  lose  them  is  to  the  porcupines  or  mole-­‐rats  who  really  enjoy  the  bulbs!  

 

     

 

(44)

Latin  Name:  Hesperantha  Coccinea  

 

Common  Name:  Scarlet  River  Lily      

Type:  Bulb  

 

Flowers:  Bright  scarlet  red  flowers.  There  is  also  a  softer  pink  variety.  Flowers  develop   on  the  end  of  stalks  which  grow  out  from  the  base  of  the  plant.  Flower  in  the  second   half  of  the  summer.    

 

Seed:  Doesn’t  seem  to  produce  viable  seed  in  a  garden  setting.      

 

Size:  Quite  short  plant.    

Special  garden  features:  Leaves  are  short  and  flat  similar  to  Crocosmia  Aurea.  In   nature  prefers  moist  river  bank  locations,  but  will  grow  in  full  sun  anywhere  in  a   garden.  Frost  resistant.  

                                               

 

(45)

Latin  Name:  Knipofia  Linearifolia  

 

Common  Name:  Common  Marsh  Red  Hot  Poker    

 

Type:  Bulb  (Rhizome)  

 

Flowers:  Long  stalk  grows  out  of  the  plant  and  produces  a  rounded  flower  head  at  the   end,  about  10  to  20cm  long.  Flowers  in  late  January/February.  Bottom  flowers  are   yellow,  working  up  to  red  at  the  tip.  Sunbirds  love  them.  

 

Seed:  Small  seeds  in  pods  along  the  stalk,  germinate  very  easily.    

 

Size:  The  plant  forms  a  clump  of  leaves  about  50cm  high.  The  flower  stalk  can  be  1.5m   long.  

 

Special  garden  features:  Knipofia  Linearifolia  is  an  excellent  garden  plant.  It  dies  off   above  ground  in  winter.  In  spring  it  shoots  out  and  produces  long  thin  green  leaves.  It   reproduces  vegetatively  as  well  as  from  seed,  meaning  that  if  you  plant  one  specimen,   within  a  few  years  you  will  have  a  dense  clump.  If  you  separate  out  the  bulbs  carefully   in  late  winter  and  transplant,  you  can  multiply  your  stock  easily.  There  are  other   Knipofia  species  which  flower  at  different  times  of  the  year  –  having  a  variety  in  your   garden  will  ensure  there’s  often  a  brilliant  splash  of  colour!  

 

                 

 

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :