Wiley Simply Office 2010 RETAiL EBook pdf

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SIMPLY

OFFICE 2010

by Kate Shoup

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ISBN: 978-0-470-71129-3

A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library.

Printed in Italy by Printer Trento First published under the title Office 2010 Simplified,

ISBN 978-0-470-57194-1 by Wiley Publishing, Inc. 10475 Crosspoint Boulevard, Indianapolis, IN 46256

Copyright © 2010 by Wiley Publishing, Inc., Indianapolis, Indiana

This edition first published 2010.

Copyright © 2010 for the EMEA adaptation: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Registered office

John Wiley & Sons Ltd, The Atrium, Southern Gate, Chichester, West Sussex, PO19 8SQ, United Kingdom

For details of our global editorial offices, for customer services and for information about how to apply for permission to reuse the copyright material in this book please see our website at www.wiley.com.

The right of the author to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988.

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, except as permitted by the UK Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, without the prior permission of the publisher.

Microsoft product screenshots reprinted with permission from Microsoft Corporation.

Wiley also publishes its books in a variety of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic books.

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Composition Services:

Layout: Andrea Hornberger Indexer: Potomac Indexing, LLC Series Designer: Patrick Cunningham

Publisher’s Acknowledgements

Editorial and Production

VP Consumer and Technology Publishing Director: Michelle Leete

Associate Director – Book Content Management: Martin Tribe

Associate Publisher: Chris Webb

Executive Commissioning Editor: Birgit Gruber Publishing Assistant: Ellie Scott

Production Manager: Amie Jackowski Tibble Project Editor: Juliet Booker

Development Editor: Shena Deuchars

Marketing:

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About the Author

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Bold

Bold type represents the names of commands and options that you interact with. Bold type also indicates text and numbers that you must type into a dialog box or window.

Italics

Italic words introduce a new term and are followed by a definition.

Numbered Steps

You must perform the instructions in numbered steps in order to successfully complete a section and achieve the final results.

Bulleted Steps

These steps point out various optional features. You do not have to perform these steps; they simply give additional information about a feature. Steps without bullets tell you what the program does in response to your following a numbered step. For example, if you click a menu command, a dialog box may appear or a window may open. The step text may also tell you what the final result is when you follow a set of numbered steps.

Notes

Notes give additional information. They may describe special conditions that may occur during an operation. They may warn you of a situation that you want to avoid – for example, the loss of data. A note may also cross reference a related area of the book. A cross reference may guide you to another chapter or another section within the current chapter.

Icons and buttons

Icons and buttons are graphical representations within the text. They show you exactly what you need to click to perform a step.

You can easily identify the tips or warnings in any section by looking for the Tip and Warning icons. Tips offer additional information, including tips, hints, and tricks. You can use the tip information to go beyond what you have learned in the steps. Warnings tell you about solutions to common problems and general pitfalls to avoid.

Do you look at the pictures in a book or magazine before anything else? Would you rather be shown instead of read about how to do something? Then this book is for you. Opening Simply Office 2010 allows you to read less and learn more about the Windows operating system.

Who Needs This Book

This book is for a reader who has never used this particular technology or application. It is also for more computer literate individuals who want to expand their knowledge of the different features that Windows has to offer.

Using the Mouse

This book uses the following conventions to describe the actions you perform when using the mouse:

Click

Press your left mouse button once. You generally click your mouse on something to select something on the screen.

Double-click

Press your left mouse button twice. Double-clicking something on the computer screen generally opens whatever item you have double-clicked.

Right-click

Press your right mouse button. When you right-click anything on the computer screen, the program displays a shortcut menu containing commands specific to the selected item.

Click and Drag, and Release the Mouse Move your mouse pointer and hover it over an item on the screen. Press and hold down the left mouse button. Now, move the mouse to where you want to place the item and then release the button. You use this method to move an item from one area of the computer screen to another.

The Conventions in This Book

A number of typographic and layout styles have been used throughout Simply Office 2010 to distinguish different types of information.

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Table of Contents

I

OFFICE FEATURES

2

Chapter 1: Office Basics

4 Start and Exit Office Applications

6 Navigate the Program Windows

8 Work with the Ribbon

10 Customise the Quick Access Toolbar

12 Get Help with Office

Chapter 2: Working with Files

14 Create a New File

16 Save a File

18 Open a File

20 Print a File

22 Select Data

24 Cut, Copy and Paste Data

Chapter 3: Office Graphics Tools

26 Insert a Picture or Clip Art

28 Resize and Move Objects

30 Rotate and Flip Objects

32 Crop a Picture

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Chapter 4: Adding Text

38 Change Word’s Views

40 Type and Edit Text

42 Insert Symbols and Special Characters

Chapter 5: Formatting Text

44 Change the Font, Size and Colour

46 Align Text

47 Set Line Spacing

48 Indent Text

50 Set Tabs

52 Set Margins

54 Copy Formatting

55 Clear Formatting

56 Format with Styles

58 Apply a Template

Chapter 6: Adding Extra Touches

60 Create Columns

62 Insert a Table

64 Use Headers, Footers and Footnotes

66 Insert Page Numbers and Page Breaks

68 Create an Index

70 Create a Table of Contents

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Chapter 8: Building Spreadsheets

82 Enter Cell Data

84 Select Cells

86 Faster Data Entry with AutoFill

88 Change the Font and Size

89 Change Number Formats

90 Apply Conditional Formatting

92 Add Columns and Rows

94 Freeze a Column or Row

95 Name a Range

96 Delete Data or Cells

Chapter 9: Worksheet Basics

98 Add a Worksheet

99 Name a Worksheet

100 Change Page Setup Options

102 Move and Copy Worksheets

103 Delete a Worksheet

104 Find and Replace Data

106 Sort Data

108 Filter Data

III

EXCEL

80

Chapter 7: Reviewing Documents

72 Find and Replace Text

74 Check Spelling and Grammar

76 Work with AutoCorrect

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Chapter 10: Working with Formulas and Functions

110 Create a Formula

112 Apply Absolute and Relative Cell References

114 Understanding Functions

116 Apply a Function

118 Total Cells with AutoSum

119 Audit a Worksheet for Errors

120 Create a Chart

Chapter 11: Creating a Presentation

124 Create a Photo Album Presentation

126 Create a Presentation with a Template 127 Build a Blank Presentation

128 Change PowerPoint Views 130 Insert Slides

131 Change the Slide Layout

Chapter 12: Populating Presentation Slides

132 Add and Edit Slide Text

134 Change the Font, Size and Colour 138 Set Line Spacing

139 Add a Text Box to a Slide 140 Add Other Objects to a Slide 142 Move a Slide Object

143 Resize a Slide Object

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Chapter 14: Database Basics

152 Create a Database Based on a Template 154 Create a Blank Database

156 Create a New Table 158 Change Table Views

160 Add or Move a Field in a Table 161 Delete or Hide a Field in a Table 162 Create a Form

164 Change Form Views

165 Move or Delete a Field in a Form

Chapter 15: Adding, Finding and Querying Data

166 Add a Record to a Table 168 Add a Record to a Form 170 Navigate Records in a Form 171 Search for a Record in a Form 172 Sort Records

174 Filter Records

176 Use Conditional Formatting 178 Perform a Simple Query 180 Create a Report

V

ACCESS

150

Chapter 13: Assembling and Presenting a Slide Show

144 Reorganise Slides

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VI

OUTLOOK

184

Chapter 16: Organising with Outlook

186 View Outlook Components

188 Schedule an Appointment

190 Schedule an Event

192 Create a New Contact

194 Create a New Task

Chapter 17: E-mailing with Outlook

196 Compose and Send a Message

198 Send a File Attachment

199 Read an Incoming Message

200 Reply To or Forward a Message

202 Add a Sender to Your Outlook Contacts

203 Delete a Message

204 View Conversations

206 Screen Junk E-mail

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CONTENTS

4 Chapter 1

Office Basics

14 Chapter 2

Working with Files

26 Chapter 3

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I

OFFICE FEATURES

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4

START AND EXIT OFFICE APPLICATIONS

Before you can begin working with a Microsoft Office application, also called a program, you must open the application.

There are a few ways to start an application. One is to launch it from the Start menu, as described in this task. Another is to double-click the program’s shortcut icon on the desktop. When you finish your work, you can close the program. If applicable, you can save your work before exiting a program completely.

Start an Office Application 11 Click Start.

22 Click AllPrograms.

Note: The All Programs menu option changes to a Back menu option.

33 Click Microsoft Office.

44 Click the name of the program that you want to open.

AA The program that you selected opens in a new window.

Note: See the next section to learn how to identify different areas of the program window.

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Exit an Office Application 11 Click the Close button ( ).

AA You can also click the File tab and then click Exit.

If you have not yet saved your work, the program prompts you to do so before exiting.

22 Click Save.

The program window closes.

B

B If you click Don’t Save, the program closes without saving your data.

C

C If you click Cancel, the program window remains open.

Create a Shortcut Icon for an Office Application

11 Right-click a blank area of the desktop and click New and then

Shortcut.

The Create Shortcut dialog box appears.

22 Click Browse, navigate to the Office program, click the filename and click OK.

33 Click Next.

44 Type a name for the shortcut.

55 Click Finish.

The new shortcut icon appears on the desktop.

C C

B 2

A

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AA Title Bar

Displays the name of the open file and the Office program.

BB Quick Access Toolbar

Displays quick access buttons to the Save, Undo and Redo commands.

CC File Tab Menu

Displays a menu of file commands, such as New and Open.

DD Ribbon

Displays groups of related commands in tabs. Each tab offers buttons for performing common tasks.

E

E Status Bar

Displays information about the current worksheet or file.

F

F Program Window Controls

Displays buttons to minimise the program window, restore the window to full size and close the window.

All Office programs share a common appearance and many of the same features. These features include a Ribbon, which appears instead of the menus and toolbars found in

previous versions of Microsoft Office; a Quick Launch toolbar, which features a customisable set of frequently used commands; and scroll bars, which you can use to navigate an open file in a program window. When you learn how to navigate one Office program, you can use the same skills to navigate the others. If you are new to Office, you should take a moment to familiarise yourself with the suite’s various on-screen elements.

NAVIGATE THE PROGRAM WINDOWS

A A

E

C B

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AA Formula Bar

This appears only in Excel. Use this bar to type and edit formulas and perform calculations on your worksheet data.

BB Work Area

The area where you add and work with data in a program. Depending on the Office program, the work area may be a document, a worksheet or a slide.

CC Document Window

Controls

Use these buttons to minimise or restore the current document within the program window.

DD Zoom Controls

Use this feature to zoom your view of a document.

EE Scroll Bars

Use the vertical and horizontal scroll bars to scroll through the item shown in the work area.

C C

B

D A

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22 Click a button to activate a command or feature.

AA Buttons with arrows display additional commands.

B

B With some groups of

commands, you can click the corner group button ( ) to display a dialog box of additional settings.

When you position the mouse pointer over Live Preview options on the Ribbon, you see the results in the document before applying the command.

Use the Ribbon 11 Click a tab.

The tab organises related tasks and commands into logical groups.

Instead of the menus and toolbars found in earlier versions of Office, Office 2010 features the Ribbon, which offers an intuitive way to locate and execute commands.

The Ribbon is grouped into tabs, each containing groups of related commands. For example, the Home tab in Microsoft Word contains commands for changing the font, setting text alignment, indenting text and so on. Some tabs appear only when needed, such as when you are working with a table or picture in a document.

The Ribbon is maximised by default, but you can minimise it to view more of your program window.

WORK WITH THE RIBBON

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22 Double-click the tab name again to maximise the Ribbon.

Minimise the Ribbon 11 Double-click a tab name. The Ribbon is minimised.

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2 Keep the Ribbon Minimised

11 Right-click a tab on the Ribbon.

22 Click Minimize the Ribbon. The program’s Ribbon is

minimised at the top of the screen.

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11 Click the Customize Quick

Access Toolbar button ( ).

22 Click More Commands.

AA You can click any of the common commands to add them to the toolbar.

B

B You can click Show Below

the Ribbon if you want to display the toolbar below the Ribbon.

The Options dialog box opens with the options to customise the Quick Access Toolbarshown.

33 Click the Choose commands

from .

44 Click a command group.

The Quick Access toolbar, which appears on-screen regardless of what tab is currently shown in the Ribbon, offers quick access to the Save, Undo and Redo commands. You can customise this toolbar to include other commands, such as the Quick Print command or another command you use often. Alternatively, you might customise the toolbar to omit commands that appear by default.

By default, the Quick Access toolbar appears in the top left corner of the program window, above the Ribbon. You can choose to display the toolbar below the Ribbon instead.

CUSTOMISE THE QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR

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To remove a button from the Quick Access toolbar, open the Options dialog box, click the command name in the list box on the right, click the Remove button and click OK. The button no longer appears on the toolbar.

DD The new command appears

on the Quick Access toolbar. 55 Click the command that you want

to add to the toolbar.

66 Click the Add button.

C

C Office adds the command.

You can repeat Steps 3 to 6 to move additional buttons to the toolbar.

77 Click OK.

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D D

You can add commands to the toolbar directly from the Ribbon. Simply click the tab containing the command that you want to add, right-click the command and then click Add

to Quick Access Toolbar. The

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The Help window opens.

22 Type a word or phrase that you want to learn more about.

33 Click the Search button.

You can also press to start the search.

Note: You must be connected to the Internet to access Microsoft’s online help files.

11 Click the Help button ( ).

You can use Office Help to assist you when you run into a problem or need more information about how to complete a particular task.

The Help window offers tools that enable you to search for topics that you want to learn more about. For example, if you want to learn how to print an Office document, you can type Print in the Help window to locate articles on that topic. Alternatively, you can browse for articles by category. If you are connected to the Internet, you can access Microsoft’s online help files for even more comprehensive information.

GET HELP WITH OFFICE

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You can access the help files that are installed with Office if you are offline. However, the online resources offer you more help topics, as well as links to demos and other help tools.

The Help window displays the article, enabling you to read more about the topic.

AA You can use the Back

and Forward buttons

( and ) to move back

and forth between help topics.

B

B You can click the Print button ( ) to print the information.

55 Click to close the window. The results window displays a list

of possible matches.

44 Click a link to learn more about a topic.

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14

CREATE A NEW FILE

To work with data in Office 2010, you must create a file in which to store it. If the file you want to create is a Word document, an Excel workbook, an Access database, a PowerPoint presentation or a Publisher publication, you create a new file using the Getting Started screen. You are given the option of creating a blank file or basing the file on an existing template. To create a new item in Outlook, whether it is an e-mail message, a calendar appointment, a contact or a task item, you use the Ribbon.

Create a New Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access or Publisher File

11 Click the File tab.

22 Click New.

The New screen appears.

33 Click the type of file that you want to create.

44 Click Create. The new file opens.

Note: Another way to create a new file is to press + . Office creates a new file using the default settings.

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To create a new file from a template, simply click the desired template in the New screen.

If you are connected to the Internet, you can access more Office templates. Simply click a template category under Office.com Templates in the New screen to display a list of available templates in the selected category; double-click one to download the template and apply it to a new file.

Create a New Outlook Item 11 In the lower left corner of the

Outlook window, click the type of item you want to create – Mail, Calendar, Contact or Task.

22 Click the New type button, where type is the type of item. For example, if you are creating a Mail item, the button is labelled “New E-mail”. If you are creating a Calendar item, the button is labelled “New Appointment”, “New Meeting” and so on. The new item opens.

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The document’s Info screen appears.

22 Click Save or Save As.

11 Click the File tab.

AA For subsequent saves, you can

click the Save button ( ) on

the Quick Access toolbar to quickly save the file.

If you want to be able to refer to the data in a file at some later time, you must save the file. You should also frequently save any file you are working on to save losing data if a power failure or computer crash occurs.

When you save a file, you can give it a unique filename and store it in the folder or drive of your choice. You can also change the file type. You can then open the saved file at a later time. (See the next section for help opening Office files.)

SAVE A FILE

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You can save files in a format compatible with previous versions of Office or with other programs. Click the Save as

Type in the Save As dialog box and choose the desired format from the list that appears. Alternatively, with the file open, click the File tab, click

Share, click Change File Type

and choose the desired file type from the options that appear.

The Save As dialog box appears.

Note: Another way to save a file is to press + . If this is the first time the file has been saved, Office launches the Save As dialog box.

33 In the Navigation pane, click the library in which you want to save the file (here, Documents).

44 In the file list, navigate to the folder in which you want to save the file.

55 Type a name for the file in the

File name field.

66 Click Save.

B

B The Office program saves the file and the new filename appears on the program window’s title bar.

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AA If the file you want to open is listed under Recent

Documents, click it.

22 Click Open.

11 Click the File tab.

In addition to creating new files, you can open files that you have created and saved previously in order to continue adding data or to edit existing data.

Regardless of whether you store a file in a folder on your computer’s hard drive or on a CD, you can easily access files using the Open dialog box. If you are not sure where you saved a file, you can use the Open dialog box’s Search function to locate it.

When you are finished using a file, you should close it. Closing unnecessary files and programs frees up processing power on your computer.

OPEN A FILE

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To close a file, click the File tab and click Close in the screen that appears. Office closes the file, leaving the program window open. To close the open file and the program window, click the button in the upper right corner of the program window.

The Open dialog box appears.

Note: Another way to launch the Open dialog box is to press + .

33 In the Navigation pane, click the library in which the file you want to open has been saved (here, Documents).

44 In the file list, locate and click the folder in which the file you want to open has been saved.

55 Click Open.

66 Click the name of the file that you want to open.

77 Click Open.

The file opens in the program window.

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22 Click Print.

The Print screen appears.

Note: Another way to open the Print screen is to press + .

AA You can specify the number of copies to print using the Copies spin box.

B

B You can choose a printer from the Printer drop-down list.

C

C You can choose to print a selection from the file or specific pages using the Settings list.

11 Click the File tab.

If a printer is connected to your computer, you can print your Office files. For example, you might distribute printouts of a file as handouts in a meeting.

When you print a file, you have two options. You can send a file directly to the printer using the default settings or you can open the Office application’s Print screen to change these settings. For example, you might opt to print just a portion of the file, print using a different printer, print multiple copies of a file, collate the printouts and so on. (Printer settings vary slightly among Office programs.)

PRINT A FILE

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If you do not need to change any of the print settings, you can simply click the Quick

Print button ( ) on the Quick Access toolbar. If the Quick Print button does not appear on your Quick Access toolbar, you can add it (see Chapter 1).

You can add a Print Preview button to the Quick Access toolbar; clicking that button opens the Print screen.

The Office program sends the file to the printer for printing.

DD You can access additional print options under Settings.

E

E View a preview of the printed file here.

33 Click Print. DD

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22 Drag the cursor across the text that you want to select.

Word selects any characters that you drag across. You can use this technique to select characters, words, sentences and paragraphs. To deselect selected text, simply click anywhere outside the text or press any arrow key on your keyboard.

Note: This technique also works for selecting images in your Office files. You can also select an image simply by clicking it.

Click and Drag to Select Data 11 Click to one side of the word or

character that you want to select.

Before you can perform different operations on data, such as deleting it, changing its font or alignment, applying a border around it, formatting it as a list or copying and pasting it elsewhere in a file or into a different file altogether, you must select the data. Selected data appears highlighted.

Depending on what program you are using, Office offers several different techniques for selecting data. For example, in Word, PowerPoint and Publisher, you can use your mouse or your keyboard to select a single character, a word, a sentence, a paragraph or all the data in the file.

SELECT DATA

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You can also use keyboard shortcuts to select text in a file. To select a single word, press + + or

+ + . To select a paragraph from the cursor down or up, press + + or + + . To select all of the text from the cursor onward, press + + . To select all of the text above the current cursor location, press + + . To select all the text in the file, press

+ .

Select Text with a Mouse 11 Double-click the word that you

want to select.

You can triple-click a paragraph to select it.

Note: To select data in Excel, click the cell that contains the data. To select a range of cells, click in the upper left corner of the range and drag down and to the right. To select cells that are not part of a continuous series, press as you click each cell.

Select Text from the Margin

Note: This technique works only in Word.

11 Click in the left margin.

Word selects the entire line of text next to where you clicked. You can double-click inside the

left margin to select a paragraph. You can triple-click inside the left

margin to select all the text in the document.

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Drag and Drop Data

11 Select the data that you want to cut or copy.

22 Click and drag the data to a new location.

The changes to .

To copy the data as you drag it, you can press and hold .

You can use the Cut, Copy and Paste commands to move or copy data. For example, you might cut or copy a picture from a Word document and paste it elsewhere in the same Word document, in another Word document or in a PowerPoint slide or a Publisher file. When you cut data, it is removed from its original location; when you copy data, Office makes a duplicate of the selected data, leaving it in its original location. In addition to using the Cut, Copy and Paste commands to move and copy data, you can also use drag and drop.

CUT, COPY AND PASTE DATA

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data in place.

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The Office Clipboard holds up to 24 items. You can paste them in whatever order you choose or you can paste them all at the same time. To display the task pane, click the corner group button ( ) in the Clipboard group on the Ribbon’s Home tab.

Cut and Copy Data

11 Select the data that you want to cut or copy.

22 Click the Home tab.

33 Click the Cut button ( ) to move data or the Copy button ( ) to copy data.

Note: You can also press + to cut data or + to copy data.

The data is stored in the Windows Clipboard.

44 Click the point where you want to insert the cut or copied data. You can also open another file

into which you can paste the data.

55 On the Home tab, click the

Paste button.

Note: You can also press + to paste data.

AA The data appears in the new location.

Note: You can click the Paste Options smart tag ( ) that appears when you paste, cut, or copy data to view various paste-related options.

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You can display different views of a file or view multiple files at once. Open two or more files. Click the View tab and click Arrange All. Click the View Side by Side button ( ) to see the open files side by side. Click the Synchronous

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INSERT A PICTURE OR CLIP ART

You can add interest to your Office files by inserting clip art or other images into them. Clip art is simply artwork or other types of media. Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Publisher and Outlook install with the Office clip art collection.

After you insert an image, you can resize, reposition, rotate and flip it. You can also perform other types of edits on the image, such as cropping, image correction, colour correction and more. Office 2010 also includes several tools, sometimes called filters, for applying artistic effects to images you insert in files.

11 Click the area where you want to add an image.

Note: You can move the image to a different location after inserting it onto the page.

22 Click the Insert tab.

33 In the Illustrations group, click

Picture.

Alternatively, you can click Clip Art to open the Clip Art task pane.

The Insert Picture dialog box appears.

44 Navigate to the folder or drive containing the image file that you want to use.

AA To browse for a particular file type, you can click the and choose a file format.

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To remove a picture or clip art that you no longer want, you can click the picture and press

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55 Click the file you want to add.

66 Click Insert.

Note: Image files, also called objects, come in a variety of file formats, including GIF, JPEG and PNG.

The picture is added to the file and the Picture tools appear on the Format tab.

You may need to resize or reposition the picture to fit the space.

Note: See the “Resize and Move Objects” section to learn more.

Search for Clip Art

11 In the Clip Art task pane, type a keyword or phrase in the Search for field.

AA To specify what type of item you need – illustration, photograph, video or audio – click the Results should be

and click the type of item.

B

B You can search for clip art on the Office Web site by clicking to select the Include Office. com content check box.

22 Click Go.

The Clip Art task pane displays any matches for the keyword or phrase that you typed.

33 To insert a clip art image, click it.

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You can compress images that you add to an Office file to make the file smaller. Click the image, click the Format tab on the Ribbon, and click the

Compress Pictures button

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When you release the mouse button, the object is resized.

Resize an Object

11 Click the object that you want to resize.

22 Click a selection handle.

33 Drag inward or outward to resize the object.

Note: To maintain an object’s height-to-width ratio when resizing, drag one of the corner handles.

Clip art and other types of images, such as smart art and word art, are called objects. When you insert an object, such as an image, into an Office file, you may find that you need to make it larger or smaller in order to achieve the desired effect. Fortunately, doing so is easy. When you select an object in an Office file, handles appear around that object; you can use these handles to make the object larger or smaller. You can also move objects that you place in a file.

RESIZE AND MOVE OBJECTS

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Wrap Text Around an Object 11 Click the object.

22 Click the Text Wrapping

button in the Format tab.

33 Choose a wrap style.

When you release the mouse button, the object moves to the new location.

Note: You can also move an object by cutting it from its current location and pasting it in the desired spot. For help, refer to the section “Cut, Copy and Paste Data” in Chapter 2.

Move an Object

11 Click the object that you want to move.

22 Drag the object to a new location on the worksheet.

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B

B When you release the mouse,

the object rotates.

Note: You can also use the Rotate button ( ) on the Format tab on the Ribbon to rotate an object 90 degrees left or right.

Rotate an Object

11 Click the object that you want to rotate.

AA A rotation handle appears on the selected object.

22 Click and drag the handle to rotate the object.

After you insert an object such as a piece of clip art or a photo from your hard drive into a Word document, an Excel worksheet, a PowerPoint slide or a Publisher brochure, you may find that the object appears upside down or inverted. To rectify this, you can rotate or flip the object. For example, you might flip a clip art image to face another direction or rotate an arrow object to point elsewhere on the page. Alternatively, you might rotate or flip an object that you place in an Office 2010 file simply to change the appearance of that object.

ROTATE AND FLIP OBJECTS

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To constrain the rotation to 15-degree increments, press and hold while using the rotation handle to rotate the object. Rotate the object in 90-degree increments by clicking the Rotate button ( ) on the Format tab and choosing Rotate Right 90° or Rotate Left 90°.

The object flips.

Flip an Object

11 Click the object that you want to flip.

The Format tab opens and displays the Picture tools.

22 Click the Rotate button ( ).

33 Click Flip Vertical or Flip

Horizontal.

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B

B Crop handles surround the image.

11 Click the image that you want to edit.

AA The Format tab opens and

displays the Picture tools.

22 Click the Crop button.

In addition to resizing an Office object, such as a clip art image or a photo you have stored on your computer’s hard drive, you can use the Crop tool to crop it. When you crop an object, you remove vertical and/or horizontal edges from the object. For example, you might use the Crop tool to create a better fit, to omit a portion of the image or to focus the viewer on an important area of the image. The Crop tool is located on the Format tab on the Ribbon, which appears when you click the object you want to crop.

CROP A PICTURE

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44 Click outside the image to finalise the crop operation.

Note: See the “Resize and Move Objects” section, earlier in this chapter, to learn how to resize an image.

33 Click and drag a crop handle to crop out an area of the image. When you release the mouse button, the image is cropped.

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Crop Objects into Predefined Shapes

11 Click the object you want to crop.

22 Click the Format tab.

33 Click the Crop

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Click the picture that you want to edit. The Format tab appears on the Ribbon with the Picture tools shown.

Make Image Corrections 11 In the Adjust group, click the

Corrections button.

AA Office highlights the image’s current correction settings.

B

B As you drag over each setting in the menu, the picture displays what the setting looks like when you apply it.

22 Click a correction setting.

The new setting is applied to the picture.

Make Colour Adjustments 11 In the Adjust group, click the

Color button.

22 Click a colour setting.

The new setting is applied to the picture.

Suppose the image object you have inserted into your Office 2010 file is less than perfect. Perhaps it is slightly blurry, lacks contrast or the colour seems off. Fortunately, Office 2010 offers tools that enable you to make corrections to clip art and images even after they have been inserted into your file. For example, you can sharpen and soften images, as well as adjust their brightness and contrast. You can also adjust colours using the Office 2010 Color Saturation, Color Tone and Recolor tools.

Office 2010 includes several tools, sometimes referred to as filters, for applying artistic effects to images and clip art. For example, you can apply an artistic effect to make an image appear as though it was rendered in marker pen, pencil, chalk or paint.

CHANGE A PICTURE

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Apply Artistic Effects

11 In the Adjust group, click the

Artistic Effects button.

AA Office highlights the image’s current effect.

B

B As you drag over each effect in the menu, the picture displays what the effect looks like.

22 Click an artistic effect.

The new setting is applied to the picture.

Apply a Picture Effect

11 In the Picture Styles group, click

the Picture Effects button.

22 Click an effect category.

Note: As you drag over each effect in the menu, the picture displays what the effect looks like when you apply it.

33 Click an effect style.

The new setting is applied to the picture.

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CONTENTS

38 Chapter 4

Adding Text

44 Chapter 5

Formatting Text

60 Chapter 6

Adding Extra Touches

72 Chapter 7

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CHAPTER

II

WORD

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CHANGE WORD’S VIEWS

Microsoft Word offers you several ways to control how you view your document. For example, the Zoom tool enables you to control the magnification of your document. You can change the zoom setting by using the Zoom slider or the Zoom buttons.

You can also choose from five different views: Print Layout, which displays margins, headers and footers; Outline, which shows the document’s outline levels; Web Layout, which displays a Web page preview of your document; Full Screen Reading, which optimises your

document for easier reading; and Draft, which omits certain elements such as headers and footers.

Use the Zoom Tool

11 Drag the Zoom slider on the Zoom bar.

AA You can also click a magnification button to zoom in or out.

Word applies the magnification to the document.

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Use the scroll bars to move up and down a document page. Alternatively, press the arrow keys on your keyboard to move up, down, left and right in the document. You can also press

and to move to the preceding or next page in the document.

Word displays the new view.

AA In this example, Draft view displays the text without graphics or other elements.

B

B You can also switch views using the View buttons at the bottom of the program window.

Switch Layout Views

11 Click the View tab on the Ribbon.

22 Click a layout view button.

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If your document’s structure incorporates headings,

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Type Text

11 Start typing your text.

Word automatically wraps the text to the next line for you.

AA The insertion point, or cursor, marks the location where text appears.

22 Press to start a new paragraph.

B

B You can press to quickly

create an indent for a line of text.

Edit Text

11 Click in the document where you want to fix a mistake.

AA Press to delete

characters to the left of the cursor.

B

B Press to delete characters

to the right of the cursor.

You can also delete selected text.

Note: If you make a spelling mistake, Word either corrects the mistake or underlines it in red.

When you launch Microsoft Word, a blank document appears, ready for you to start typing. If you repeatedly type the same text in your documents, for example, your company name, you can add this text to Word’s Quick Parts Gallery; then, the next time you need to add the text to a document, you can select it from the gallery instead of retyping it.

TYPE AND EDIT TEXT

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Add a Quick Parts Entry

11 Select the text that you want to add to the Quick Parts Gallery.

22 Click the Insert tab on the Ribbon and then the Quick Parts button.

33 Click Save Selection to Quick

Part Gallery.

The Create New Building Block dialog box appears.

44 Type a name for the entry or use the default name.

You can also assign a gallery, a category and a description for the entry.

55 Click OK.

Insert a Quick Part Entry

11 Click in the text where you want to insert a Quick Part.

22 Click the Insert tab on the Ribbon and then the Quick

Parts button.

33 Click the entry that you want to insert.

Word inserts the entry into the document.

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By default, Word is set to Insert mode: when you start typing, any existing text moves over to accommodate the new text. You can press to switch to Overtype mode, in which new text overwrites existing text. To insert a preset Quick Part,

click the Insert tab on the Ribbon, click the Quick Parts button and click Building

Blocks Organizer. Locate the

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22 Click the Insert tab.

33 Click the Symbol button.

44 If the symbol you want to insert appears in the Symbol palette, click it. Otherwise, click More

Symbols.

Insert a Symbol

11 Click where you want to insert a symbol.

From time to time, you might need to insert a special symbol or character into your Word document, such as a mathematical symbol, that is not on your keyboard. You can use the Symbol palette to access a wide range of symbols, including mathematical and Greek symbols, architectural symbols and more. You can also use the Symbol dialog box to insert special characters such as em dashes, copyright symbols and so on.

INSERT SYMBOLS AND SPECIAL CHARACTERS

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The Symbol dialog box appears.

55 Click the character that you want to insert.

AA You can click the Font and click another font to change the symbols that appear in the Symbols tab.

66 Click Insert.

B

B Word adds the character to

the current cursor location in the document.

The dialog box remains open so that you can add more characters to your text.

77 When finished, click Close. Insert a Special Character

11 Click the Symbol button.

22 Choose More Symbols to open the Symbol dialog box.

33 Click the Special Characters

tab.

44 Locate and click the character you want to add and then click

Insert.

55 Click Close to close the dialog box.

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44

CHANGE THE FONT, SIZE AND COLOUR

By default, when you type text in a Word 2010 document, the program uses 11-point Calibri font. You can change the text font, size and colour to alter the appearance of text in a document. For example, you might change the font, size, and colour of your document’s title text to emphasise it. You can also change the font that Word 2010 applies by default.

Change the Font

11 Select the text that you want to format.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the Font .

44 Click a font.

Word applies the font to the text.

Change the Size

11 Select the text that you want to format.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the Font Size .

44 Click a size.

Word applies the font size to the text, in this case, 48 points.

Note: If you click the Grow Font ( ) and

Shrink Font ( ) buttons on the Home tab, Word increases or decreases the font size.

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To change the default font and size, display the Font dialog box. Click the font options that you want to set as defaults. Click the Set As Default button. In the new dialog box, specify whether the change should apply to this document only or to all documents created with the current template.

Change the Colour

11 Select the text that you want to format.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the next to the Font

Color button ( ).

44 Click a colour.

Word applies the colour to the text.

Use the Font Dialog Box

11 Select the text that you want to format.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the corner group button ( ) in the Font group.

The Font dialog box appears.

44 Click the font, style, size, colour, underline style or effect that you want to apply.

55 Click OK.

Word applies the font change.

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11 Select the text that you want to format.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click an alignment button.

Click the Align Left button ( ) to left-align text.

Click the Center button ( ) to centre text.

Click the Align Right button ( ) to right-align text.

Click the Justify button ( ) to justify text between the left and right margins.

AA Word applies the alignment to the text.

This example centres the text on the document page.

You can use Word’s alignment commands to change how text and objects are positioned horizontally on a page. By default, Word left-aligns text and objects. You can also choose to centre text and objects on a page (using the Center command), align text and objects to the right side of the page (using the Right Align command) or justify text and objects so that they line up at both the left and right margins of the page (using the Justify command). You can change the alignment of all the text and objects in your document or change the alignment of individual paragraphs and objects.

ALIGN TEXT

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11 Select the text that you want to format.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the Line Spacing

button ( ).

44 Click a line spacing option.

AA Word immediately applies the new spacing.

This example applies 2.0 line spacing.

55 To control the spacing that surrounds a paragraph, click the corner group button ( ) in the Paragraph group.

The Paragraph dialog box opens.

66 Use the Before spin box to specify how much space should appear before the paragraph.

77 Use the After spin box to specify how much space should appear after the paragraph.

88 Click OK.

You can adjust the amount of spacing that appears between lines of text in your paragraphs. For example, you might set 2.5 spacing to allow for handwritten edits in your printed document or set 1.5 spacing to make paragraphs easier to read. By default, Word assigns 1.15 spacing for all new documents that you create.

You can also control how much space appears before and after each paragraph in your document. For example, you might opt to single-space the text within a paragraph but add space before and after the paragraph to set it apart from the paragraphs that precede and follow it.

SET LINE SPACING

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Set Quick Indents

11 Click anywhere in the paragraph you want to indent.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click an indent button. You can click the Decrease

Indent button ( ) to decrease

the indentation.

You can click the Increase

Indent button ( ) to increase

the indentation.

AA Word applies the indent change.

You can use indents as another way to control the horizontal positioning of text in a

document. Indents are simply margins that affect individual lines or paragraphs. You might use an indent to distinguish a particular paragraph on a page – for example, a long quote.

Word offers several tools for setting indents. For example, the Home tab on the Ribbon contains buttons for quickly increasing and decreasing indents by a predefined amount. You can make more precise changes to indent settings in the Paragraph dialog box. Finally, you can use the Word ruler to set indents.

INDENT TEXT

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You can quickly set an indent using the Word ruler. To do so, simply drag the indent marker ( ) on the ruler to the desired location. If the ruler is not visible, position your mouse pointer over the top of the work area and pause; the ruler appears. (You can also click

44 Type a specific indentation in the

Left or Right indent text boxes.

AA You can also click to set an indent measurement.

B

B To set a specific kind of indent, you can click the Special and then click an indent.

C

C The Preview area shows a sample of the indent.

55 Click OK.

Word applies the indent to the text.

Set Precise Indents

11 Click anywhere in the paragraph you want to indent.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the corner group button ( ) in the Paragraph group. The Paragraph dialog box appears.

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Set Quick Tabs

11 Position your mouse pointer over the top edge of the work area and pause to display the ruler.

AA You can also click the View tab and click Ruler to turn on the ruler.

22 Click the Tabmarker area to cycle through to the type of tab marker that you want to set. sets a left-aligned tab. sets a centre-aligned tab. sets a right-aligned tab. sets a decimal tab. sets a bar tab.

33 Click in the ruler where you want to insert the tab.

44 Click at the end of the text after which you want to add a tab.

55 Press .

66 Type the text that should appear in the next column.

You can use tabs to create vertically aligned columns of text in your Word document. To insert a tab, simply press the key on your keyboard; the cursor moves to the next tab stop on the page.

By default, Word creates tab stops every 0.5 inches across the page and left-aligns the text on each tab stop. You can set your own tab stops using the ruler or the Tabs dialog box. You can also use the Tabs dialog box to change the tab alignment and specify an exact measurement between tab stops.

SET TABS

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To remove a tab stop from the ruler, drag it off the ruler. To remove a tab stop in the Tabs dialog box, select it and then click Clear. To clear every tab stop that you saved in the Tabs dialog box, click Clear All.

The Tabs dialog box appears.

44 Click in the Tab stop position

text box and type a new tab stop measurement.

55 Click to select a tab alignment.

AA You can also select a tab leader character.

66 Click Set.

Word saves the new tab stop.

77 Click OK.

Word exits the dialog box and you can use the new tab stops. Set Precise Tabs

11 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

22 Click the corner group button ( ) in the Paragraph group. The Paragraph dialog box appears.

33 Click Tabs on the Indents and Spacing tab.

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Word applies the new settings. Set Margins Using Page Layout Tools

11 Click the Page Layout tab on the Ribbon.

22 Click the Margins button.

33 Click a margin setting.

By default, Word assigns a 1-inch margin all the way around the page in every new

document that you create. You can change these margin settings, however. For example, you can set wider margins to fit more text on a page or set smaller margins to fit less text on a page. You can apply your changes to the current document only or set them as the new default setting, to be applied to all new Word documents you create.

SET MARGINS

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If you consistently use the same margin settings, you can choose those settings as the default for every new document that you create in Word. To do so, make the desired changes to the Margins tab of the Page Setup dialog box and then click Set

As Default.

Set a Custom Margin

11 Click the Page Layout tab on the Ribbon.

22 Click the Margins button.

33 Click Custom Margins.

The Page Setup dialog box opens, with the Margins tab shown.

44 Type a specific margin in the Top,

Bottom, Left and Right boxes.

AA You can also click to set a margin measurement.

55 Choose a page orientation.

66 Preview the margin settings in the Preview section.

77 Click the Apply to and specify whether the margins should apply to the whole document or from this point in the document forward.

88 Click OK.

Word immediately adjusts the margins in the document.

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44 Click and drag over the text to which you want to apply the same formatting.

Word immediately copies the formatting to the new text.

Note: To copy the same formatting multiple times, you can double-click the Format Painter button ( ).

You can press to cancel the Format Painter feature at any time.

11 Select the text that contains the formatting that you want to copy.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the Format Painter

button ( ).

Suppose you have applied a variety of formatting options to a paragraph to create a certain look – for example, you changed the font, the size, the colour and the alignment. If you want to re-create the same look elsewhere in the document, you do not have to repeat the same steps as when you applied the original formatting. Instead, you can use Word’s Format Painter feature to “paint” the formatting to the other text in one swift action. With the Format Painter feature, copying formatting is as easy as clicking a button.

COPY FORMATTING

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Word immediately removes the formatting and restores the default settings.

11 Select the text containing the formatting that you want to remove.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the Clear Formatting

button ( ).

Sometimes, you may find that you have applied too much formatting to your text, making it difficult to read. Or perhaps you simply applied the wrong formatting to your text. In that case, instead of undoing all your formatting changes by hand, you can use Word’s Clear Formatting command to remove any formatting you have applied to the document text. When you apply the Clear Formatting command, Word removes all formatting applied to the text and restores the default settings.

CLEAR FORMATTING

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The Create New Style from Formatting dialog box appears.

55 Type a name for the style.

66 Click OK.

Word adds the style to the list of Quick Styles.

Create a New Quick Style

11 Format the text as desired and then select the text.

22 Click the Home tab on the Ribbon.

33 Click the More button ( ) in the Styles group.

44 Click Save Selection as a New

Quick Style.

Suppose you are writing a corporate report that requires specific formatting for every heading. Instead of assigning multiple formatting settings over and over again, you can create a style with the required formatting settings and apply it whenever you need it. A style is a set of text-formatting characteristics. These characteristics might include the text font, size, colour, alignment, spacing and more.

In addition to creating your own styles for use in your documents, you can apply any of Word’s preset styles. These include styles for headings, normal text, quotes and more.

FORMAT WITH STYLES

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Figure

table to your document to display a list of items or a roster of classes. Tables contain

table to

your document to display a list of items or a roster of classes. Tables contain p.74
table, along with any data that
table, along with any data that p.169
table on which the form is based, or its data.

table on

which the form is based, or its data. p.177
table in Datasheet view, click

table in

Datasheet view, click p.179
 To edit a record, open the table.
To edit a record, open the table. p.179
table to the query and choose

table to

the query and choose p.191
table fields, 160

table fields,

160 p.220
table fields, 161

table fields,

161 p.221

References