OD Co-Management: Revolutionize Your Practice with Winning Partnerships

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(1)

OD Co-Management:

Revolutionize Your Practice

with Winning Partnerships

Stanley B. Teplick, MD

Adjunct Professor of Ophthalmology

Pacific University College of Optometry

(2)

A new breed of techno-savvy patients demanding

state of the art vision correction technology will drive

providers to develop new and creative relationships.

A New Paradigm

(3)

Refractive Procedure Growth

0

100,000

200,000

300,000

400,000

500,000

600,000

700,000

800,000

900,000

1,000,000

(4)

And Stagnation

2001

2004

2006

2007

2009

800,000

procedures

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

(5)

Demand is still high

Withstood the test of time

Afford > afraid

But Penetration of LASIK is Still Low…

(6)

Consumer Adoption

Innovators Early Early Late Laggards

Adopters Majority Majority

Cell Phone

PC

LVC

Google

Glass

Kale

Tablets

(7)

LASIK Demographics ARE Changing

Gen Y

Gen X

Young Boomers

0

5

10

15

20

25

18-29

30-35

36-40

42-45

46-50

51+

(8)

Changing Demographics

Boomers 50-65

Gen X 35-50

Gen Y 18-35

Musical Influence Beatles

Alt

Pop

Drug of Choice

Pot

ETOH

OTC, Rx, OPMC

Education

College/Trade

Grad School

Less

Technology

Challenged

Computer

Mobile

Art

Classic

Graphic

Body

Procedure

Premium IOL

LASIK Monovision Femto/WFG

Marketing

Reverse Mortgage

Urinary Retention

(or its opposite)

Anti-Aging

ED

#1 Target

(9)

High tech atmosphere

Refreshments, WiFi, Cell Phone in Office

Web/email/text contact and scheduling

Sensible financial options

State of the art equipment

Concierge type service, no waiting

Integrated care among providers

(10)

A New Paradigm

Old Model

Comanagement

New Model

Integrated Eye Care

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

Purchaed istockphoto LP used in RF4516

(11)

“Why Can’t We Just Work Together…”

R. King, OD

(12)

Ancient turf wars

Inherent bigotries

Total separation of practices

Lack of communication

Professional pride

Clubbiness

Historical Note

(13)

See patient--keep patient

See patient--refer back to OD

Refer OD difficult contact lens fits

Build a strong relationship with ODs

Co-manage cataracts with Medicare modifiers

Terminate primary care/dedicate to surgery

Support Optometry as primary care provider

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Access to surgical patients

Access to new technologies

Protection from managed-care and Medicare cuts

Competitive advantage

What Does Ophthalmology Want?

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Access to primary care patients

Education

Quality surgical results

Co-management

Equity opportunities

Parity with ophthalmology

(16)

Factors driving towards integration

Lower surgical volumes, lower insurance reimbursement,

competition, desired access to Optometric patient base

Factors driving away from integration

Increased pressure from professional groups and medical boards

Competition for managed care panels

Promotion of ‘Comprehensive Ophthalmologist’

Fear of ‘Optometric surgeon’

Evolving Factors

(17)

Justifiable circumstance

Surgeon unavailable

Patient cannot travel

Not to be a routine management style

Not an inducement to refer

Patient must be informed of arrangement

(18)

Must be clinically appropriate and in the patient’s best

interest

MD must confirm OD is legally entitled and trained for the

care

Patient must have access to the surgeon

Fees must reflect fair market value for services performed

Joint Position of AAO and ASCRS

(19)

“The Oregon BME expects operating Ophthalmologists

to be responsible for the total perioperative care of

patients on whom they perform surgery… this

responsibility cannot be transferred to Doctors of

Optometry.”

(20)

Nine Pearls for Today’s

Integrated Eye Care Network

Integrated Care Pearls

(21)
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MD collects OD fees

OD collects MD fees

An LLC or PC collects all fees

Set and collect your own fees

Fee reduction to reflect co-management

Avoid financial schemes

Fees should reflect value of service

#8

– Develop Ethical Fee Structures

(23)
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Optometrist understands exactly what their patient will

experience at the LASIK center

Share results and statistics

Alert to new technology and broadened range of treatment

Ensure understanding of common associated issues such as

dry eyes, pupil size, astigmatism

Access to all pre and post op forms including written

informed consent

#6

– Ensure Consistent Informed Consent

(25)

Factors opposing

Surgeon is the “cutter”

Institutional entry into specialized medicine

Direct to consumer advertising

LASIK World

Clear Choice Dental Implants

Spinal Surgery Centers

Cancer Centers of America

Factors supporting… only you (and your patients)

(26)

#4

– Provide Continuing Education

(27)

Include OD portal on your website

Link to OD websites

‘Like’ OD practice page

‘Friend’ OD personal page

Connect with OD practice on Linkedin

Create Text message campaigns

Place QR code promotions in the OD office

Encourage use of smartphone apps

(28)

Text Message Campaigns

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

(29)
(30)

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

Personal images

(31)
(32)

Smartphone Apps

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

(33)
(34)

Smartphone Apps

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

(35)

Word of Mouth

Broadcast Media

Mailings

Website

Text Message/QR

Codes

Mobile Apps

Online Review

Sites

Cycle of Marketing

(36)

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

#2

– Understand and Utilize Online Review Sites

(37)

#1

Develop/Enjoy

(38)

A New Paradigm

©2014 Abbott Medical Optics Inc.

It’s up to us as practitioners to pioneer and evolve

relationships which enhance patient care and optimize results,

respecting the quality of care we each deliver.

(39)

Stanley B. Teplick, MD

teplick@europa.com

Adjunct Professor of Ophthalmology

Pacific University College of

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