Welcoming Ministry. TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK. The Welcoming Ministry Team. training session, handouts and resources

93 

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

The Welcoming Ministry Team

(2)

The Welcoming Ministry Training Manual and Planning Handbook is a compilation of adapted, revised and updated portions of Living Our Promise: Trainer’s Toolbox, Beyond 30 Seconds: Developing a Welcoming Congregation, “The Welcoming and Media Planner: A Guide for use with the advertising and welcoming ministries of your church,” and “The 2001–09 Welcoming Training Manual for National and Local Trainers.”

Photographs appearing in this resource are courtesy of United Methodist News Service or obtained through free online photo-sharing services and used with permission according to the terms and agreements therein.

This resource is the official training manual and planning handbook for developing a Welcoming Ministry in local United Methodist churches and supersedes the aforementioned publications. For updates and more information about materials mentioned or used in this resource, visit training. umcom.org.

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. All rights reserved. Permission is given to copy portions of this resource for United Methodist local church use only. All other duplications or uses must secure permission from United Methodist Communications. Item No. CT10-WELTM.

Communications Ministry Group PO Box 320 | 810 12th Avenue, South

Nashville, TN 37202-0320 (888) 278-4862 training@umcom.org

(3)

Table of Contents: The Welcoming Ministry Team

Note: Only the pages associated with this training session are included on this table of contents.

Overview

Introduction

Our Theological Foundation A Few Working Definitions

Welcoming As Ministry

Responsibilities of the Welcoming Ministry Coordinator Responsibilities of the Welcoming Ministry Team Welcoming Ministry Team Planning Session

Training Sessions

General Guidelines for Training Leading through Change

Handouts

Conducting Listening Groups Sample Questionnaire Mystery Guest Audit

Welcoming Ministry Planning Sheet Comfort Checklist

Change Exercises Preparing for Change Welcoming Tips

Resources

Worship Liturgies Field Assignment Ideas

Communications Planning Sheet

Evaluating Your Church’s Printed Materials Bibliography 10 13 16 18 23 25 26 38 43 222 224 226 230 236 238 240 282 286 294 302 304 306

(4)
(5)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

10

|

Introduction

Since 2001, churches all over the country have taken to heart the denomination’s promise of “Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.” Welcoming resources and training have given churches new hope, new ideas and new challenges. Pastors have preached on the subject. Church councils have adopted vision statements reflecting the desire to live up to these words. Individual members have examined their hearts and minds to assess whether they can claim the promise as their own. During this time, careful analysis, soul searching and feedback from newcomers have challenged some of our churches and affirmed others.

Perhaps your church has experienced such changes. You’ve held training activities and small groups. You’ve preached the messages, played the videos and implemented the ideas. You’ve seen the lives of current members and newcomers changed, yet you’ve sensed complacency. Your team may be suffering welcoming burnout. The results of your efforts might not be as outstanding as you’d hoped. You see old behavior creeping back into the congregation and wonder, “What’s next?”

We hope this Welcoming Ministry Training Manual and

Planning Handbook will help. Building upon the ideas and

exercises of key resources, this guide offers suggestions for sustaining a congregation’s welcoming, inviting and discipling efforts. It incorporates all the training United Methodist Communications has done nationally since 2001 into one resource. It provides new ways of looking at existing materials and offers new suggestions for helping your entire congregation

Since 2001,

we’ve been helping

the people of

The United Methodist

Church to live

our promise of

“Open hearts. Open

minds. Open doors.”

(6)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

11

embrace Welcoming Ministry fully. Our goal is to help your church live the promise of “Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.”

Here’s a starting point: Think of welcoming as you would physical fitness. We all have some potential to be fit, but different people have different challenges in realizing that potential. Some are clumsier than others. Some have little motivation or limited willpower. Some have physical limitations and challenges. Some see no need to change. Even when someone overcomes these challenges, other hurdles can arise along the way. Plateaus occur when nothing seems to be improving. Reaching a target or goal can lead to slackening a regimen and starting to slip into previous habits. In these cases, simple tweaks can make a difference. A slight change in diet improves blood pressure. A targeted exercise tones an atrophied muscle. Just as it takes constant effort to maintain physical health and fitness, so it is with welcoming. A slight change in attitude improves openness.

A slight change in

attitude improves

openness.

(7)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

12

|

Targeted training strengthens a welcoming conversation or enhances an invitation to participate in some spiritual activity. Remember, like health and fitness is for individuals, welcoming is a lifelong journey for the whole church community. This resource offers ideas for building Welcoming Ministry training into some common situations in the life of your church. It can help you adapt ideas you’ve learned through training events and personal study in ways that fit into the existing structures and meetings of your congregation. Each session should take an hour or two with some options for expanding to multiple sessions and all-day workshops or retreats. With a few simple tweaks and new ideas, you may find your church re-energized (or set afire for the first time) about welcoming, inviting and discipling.

Welcome to the journey.

Welcoming is a

lifelong journey

for the whole

church community.

(8)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

13

Our Theological Foundation

Our spiritual forebears, John Wesley, Jacob Albright and Philip William Otterbein, shared a passion for evangelism. They worked and prayed for people to open their souls to God’s grace, to be reconciled to God and one another and to become disciples in a community of believers. The process was understood as a symphony in three movements.

The first notes were proclamation and invitation. The second movement crescendoed to the new believer’s acceptance of God’s forgiveness and repentance. It resolved in the third movement: lifelong dedication to spiritual growth, compassionate outreach and disciplined living.

The earliest members of Wesleyan, Evangelical and United Brethren movements were known for the energy and innovation with which they invited people to Christ and welcomed them to their circle. They took every opportunity and used every means at their disposal to proclaim God’s love.

In our souls,

there is a desire and

upwelling of energy

that urges us to seek

more from life and

to develop meaningful

and trustworthy

relationships with

others and with God.

(9)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

14

|

They spoke to the heart in practical ways, using the popular media of the day: print, song and preaching. They steadfastly refused to let their words be confined to the sanctuary and classroom. So God’s Word was shared with the masses in the streets of England, the British Isles, the colonies in America and eventually around the world.

Today, The United Methodist Church faithfully carries our traditions to the 21st century. It emphasizes the first movement of the symphony of grace. Like the hymns and field preaching of 18th century England, the messages are designed to go beyond the people already in our congregations to invite all people to respond.

On behalf of the people of The United Methodist Church, we offer this invitation: “Our hearts, our minds and our doors are always open.” It is an invitation to discover that United Methodists are an open, hospitable community of people. It is a promise that United Methodist congregations will welcome everyone to a rich experience of faith and work together to growing in spiritual well-being.

The message emerges from a core human experience—a sense of emptiness in day-to-day existence—shared in some way by everyone. For some, it is a feeling that our activities are meaningless or our jobs purposeless. Others express a fierce sense of self-sufficiency and independence that masks a deeper uncertainty. Some experience a sense of distance from people—a lack of intimacy in even the closest human relationships. Others feel trapped in emotional distress, unrelenting pain or crushing defeat. However this feeling manifests itself, it expresses a

The mission of

The United Methodist

Church is to make

disciples of Jesus Christ

for the transformation

of the world.

(10)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

15

basic reality: Humankind is frustrated and estranged from one another and from God. To this common life experience, we offer hope and invitation.

In our souls, there is a desire and upwelling of energy that urges us to seek more from life and to develop meaningful and trustworthy relationships with others and with God. This power and drive comes as a gift, unexpected and unmerited. It is an eternal presence—a grace and a power—available to everyone whether we are alert to its presence or not. It is a sheer gift from a loving God. It is the dimension of God’s love that John Wesley called “prevenient grace.”

That power is available to all people, everywhere. It invites us to search for understanding of life; it urges us to reach out to others and find community. It pushes us beyond our narrow self-interest to compassion and service to others.

In a welcoming culture,

people are accepted for

who they are and are

supported in

(11)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

16

|

A Few Working Definitions

Before we dive too deeply into developing, expanding and maintaining a dynamic Welcoming Ministry for your congregation, let’s make sure we are all working from the same set of definitions and understandings of terms we will be using in this resource.

First, we will be talking about visitors. Visitors are people who attend a worship service or event at a church but are not likely to be regularly connected to the congregation (they live out of town, they have another church home, etc.). Remember, welcoming is not about growing your church, so visitors deserve special attention even if you never see them again.

A second term we want to define is guests. Guests are people who attend worship or another event, perhaps at the personal invitation of someone from the church, who may reasonably be expected to return and get involved in the congregation. Those treated as “honored guests” are likely to return.

Thirdly, we will be referring to newcomers. Newcomers are people who are relatively new to a congregation—not yet members, no longer first-time guests—interested in connecting with the church and its members. Newcomers are trying to find a way into the life and ministries of your church, so it’s important to remove barriers and serve their needs.

Newcomers are trying

to find a way into the

life and ministries of

your church.

(12)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

17

Finally, we will use the term unchurched or seeker. By unchurched or seeker, we mean anyone who has not attended a church activity, other than a wedding or a funeral, in the past six months. By this definition, unchurched people or seekers may be those who have previous involvement with church but now have little or no connection to a congregation.

Welcoming is not

about growing your

church.

(13)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

18

|

Welcoming as Ministry

How does your church welcome people? Is the welcome little more than the initial encounter, or does the lifestyle of your church bring new people into Christian community, disciple them and send them out?

Welcoming has everything to do with how we make people feel. Are they comfortable—physically, psychologically and spiritually, from the appearance of the facility to the ease of finding the appropriate place; to being greeted and accepted yet not smothered; to feeling the joy and anticipation of the congregation and the experience of God’s grace; to a worship service that makes sense; to a sense of opportunities for personal and spiritual growth?

Remember a time when you have been a stranger and what made you feel cared for and accepted. Recalling those situations each time you meet someone new will make you sensitive. Welcoming starts with being attuned to the needs and hopes of people. When someone new walks through the door of a church, the first question is cultural: “Is there anyone here like me?”

The answer of the welcoming congregation is, “There are many like you. We welcome you no matter who you are.”

The second question is more personal: “Is there anyone here who is interested in me?” If the answer is no because the congregation is not prepared to receive the guest hospitably, then the newcomer will look elsewhere—or may not look again.

Welcoming has

everything to do

with how we make

people feel.

(14)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

19

But when a congregation is involved in a welcoming ministry, the answer is “Yes, we are interested in you. Our hearts, our minds and our doors are always open to you.” The message is clear.

The pitfall for many churches is that we think we are friendly because we are friendly to each other. In developing a welcoming ministry, we must begin to see ourselves as others do.

Creating a welcoming and hospitable climate begins at the curb and continues into the heart of the congregation. The ministry of welcoming is not the responsibility of a few people or a committee. It is the responsibility of the entire church family. In a welcoming and hospitable church, the following “bare minimums” are firmly in place.

1. Greeters have the special ability to make everyone feel welcome and appreciated. They are the front line for welcoming God’s guests. They ask, “How can I serve you?” 2. Ushers are your hosts. They make sure guests and

members are seated comfortably and to their liking and needs.

3. The congregation engages people they don’t know in conversation, even if those people are members. It’s as simple as, “Hi, my name is —————. I don’t think we’ve met. What’s your name?”

The pitfall for many

churches is that we

think we are friendly

because we are friendly

to each other.

(15)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

20

|

4. The pastor and core leadership team creates a worship atmosphere that exudes the excitement of having a personal relationship with Jesus Christ. They make it a point to greet members and newcomers after the service.

What to Expect

A Welcoming Ministry is a vital missional initiative to share the Good News of God’s redeeming love for all people, inviting them into one of our worshipping congregations. Our denomination’s promise, “Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.” is designed to attract newcomers, but to do so with your help. As you embark on this journey, here is what you can expect:

• You will be required to participate by personally asking friends, family and neighbors to join you in the life of your congregation, and a Welcoming Ministry will reinforce what you tell them about your church.

• Equally important, your congregation must fulfill the promise and indeed welcome anyone who walks through the doors of your church with open hearts and minds. • You will be challenged to take the next step and create a

discipleship system for newcomers.

Everything in this resource is aimed at helping you use communication to createa a Welcoming Ministry that will fulfill our denomination’s mission to make disciples of Christ for the transformation of the world.

A Welcoming Ministry

is a vital missional

initiative to share

the Good News of

God’s redeeming

love for all people.

(16)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

21

Communication encompasses everything we do and say— or don’t do or say—and even how we look. That’s why this resource contains sections on welcoming and inviting, as well as discipleship. This resource will help you and your congregation: • Look at yourselves in light of what God has in mind for you

and where you are;

• Create an environment in which visitors, guests,

newcomers and seekers are comfortable and members are ministers of hospitality;

• Learn how and why to invite, welcome and disciple people. Because you are reading this resource, you must be interested in building and revitalizing your church. You may be laity or clergy. In some cases you may be a member of a team selected to look into developing a Welcoming Ministry. Keeping that in mind, ideas in this resource will help you take four critical steps: 1. See potential for welcoming and inviting new members. 2. Get others on board.

3. Provide support for inviting and receiving visitors, guests, newcomers and seekers.

4. Implement a Welcoming Ministry that engages the entire congregation inside and outside the church.

The materials in this resource are not intended to be a substitute for responsive ministry, but rather tools to help ignite outreach ministry by creating a welcoming lifestyle, or culture, in your

Communication

encompasses everything

we do and say–or

don’t do or say–and

even how we look.

(17)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

22

|

church. In a welcoming culture, people new to the congregation are accepted for who they are and are supported in sharing their gifts.

The key is commitment. The real start to developing your church’s Welcoming Ministry is being committed to helping everyone grow in their abilities and willingness to reach out to others.

Because first impressions are lasting ones, people make up their minds about your church within the first ten minutes of contact. Long before the preacher preaches, people most often will have decided if they plan to return. Here are two key tips for developing and sustaining a Welcoming Ministry in your congregation:

Circle of 10: Greet anyone, member or guest, who comes

within ten feet of you. Make a special effort to greet the people you don’t already know within your Circle of 10.

Rule of 3: Try not to talk to other members for the first three

minutes after the service. Talk only to those you don’t know and to people that you know are guests. It takes guests about three minutes to exit the church after worship so it’s important to make sure someone has made contact with them before they leave.

In a welcoming culture,

people new to the

congregation are

accepted for who they

are and are supported

in sharing their gifts.

(18)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

23

Responsibilities of the Welcoming Ministry

Coordinator

The primary tasks of the Welcoming Ministry Coordinator are to:

1. Establish a welcoming team with any or all of the following: greeters, ushers, administrative council chairperson, lay leader, nursery worker, trustee(s) and custodian; members of committees on evangelism,

membership care, outreach, shepherding, United Methodist Men, United Methodist Women, and United Methodist Youth; this includes representatives of each age group: senior, adult, young adult and youth.

2. Guide the work of the welcoming team during the year, plan agendas and preside at meetings.

3. Represent the welcoming ministry team to the church council.

4. Participate in training opportunities to expand and hone skills as a leader for welcoming ministry in your congregation.

5. Organize, coordinate and lead—or identify leaders to provide—training opportunities in your congregation to develop a welcoming ministry and lifestyle among the members.

Because first

impressions are lasting

ones, people make up

their minds about your

church within the first

ten minutes of contact.

(19)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

24

|

Training

The welcoming coordinator is not a job mandated by The Book of Discipline of The United Methodist Church. Therefore, there are no detailed district workshops for this ministry. However, in addition to the training offered in this resource, your Annual Conference and United Methodist Communications offer many training options. Contact your annual conference office of communications or visit training.umcom.org for more information.

We invite and

encourage you to be

ministers of welcoming,

hospitality and

invitation.

(20)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

25

Responsibilities of the Welcoming Ministry

Team

The primary responsibilities of the Welcoming Ministry team include:

1. Work closely with the evangelism (or similar) committee and their invitational and visitation programs, keeping up to date on people who have been visited in advance of attending church.

2. Address the needs and concerns of members, visitors, guests, newcomers and seekers so they are nurtured and given the opportunity and encouragement to grow in their spiritual lives.

3. Develop and maintain a welcoming environment within the local church where members and newcomers can have enhanced worship experiences, feel a sense of belonging in the body of Christ, easily find their way around

the church, be instructed on what it is to be a United Methodist, and be assimilated into the life of the church. 4. Plan newcomer get-togethers.

5. Participate in and support the work of the church council. 6. Participate in training experiences when they are available.

What are the personal

gifts I bring to a

ministry of welcoming

and hospitality?

(21)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

26

|

Welcoming Ministry Team Planning Session

A 2–4 Hour Planning Session

Once the church has a welcoming coordinator and/or chairperson and team assembled, gather to explore Welcoming Ministry for your congregation. You may choose to conduct this planning session in one or more phases depending upon your needs and time frame.

Preparing to Lead this Session

Listed here is a suggested outline to assist you in structuring the training session. Obviously, the material can be reinterpreted and adapted so you sound natural and feel at ease presenting it. The provided “scripts” can either be used verbatim or paraphrased to communicate the intended message. Feel free to adapt this suggested plan to meet your time frame, church’s needs and participants’ interests, knowledge, skills and attitudes.

1. Review the “General Guidelines for Training” on pages 38–42 as you prepare to lead this training session. 2. Pray for guidance.

3. Review the training materials for this session to locate all the items you will need and determine whether you want others to help you facilitate the training. Supplement this training plan with other ideas and information you believe would work well with your congregation.

If we’re developing a

lifestyle of welcoming,

then a few people

on a hospitality

committee can’t do it.

(22)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

27

4. Involve other members of your Welcoming Ministry team. Ask them to facilitate discussions and breakout groups, present some of the material, and help with other tasks related to the training session, such as technical support for showing videos, etc.

5. Involve as many facilitators as possible. You want to demonstrate that this is an intentional effort for the entire congregation and involves everyone. In addition, you will need greeters and minglers before the session begins. 6. Read the scripture passage and consult Bible study

materials to prepare discussion comments.

7. Preview any videos associated with this session and note what points you want to make if participants don’t mention them first.

8. Prepare handouts for all participants and team members who will help with the training session.

No doubt, the most important element of this session is eliciting participation from those who attend it. Consider your role as that of a facilitator rather than a teacher, and you can all learn together how to make the most of the Welcoming Ministry in your church.

What You Will Need for this Session

• Copies of the “Conducting Listening Groups” for each participant (see page 222–223).

We are trying to lead

the church into a

welcoming lifestyle,

not just a

(23)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

28

|

• Copies of the “Sample Questionnaire” for each participant (see pages 224–225).

• Copies of the “Mystery Guest Audit” for each participant (see pages 226–229).

• Copies of the “Welcoming Ministry Planning Sheet” for each participant (see pages 230–235).

• Copies of the “Field Assignment Ideas” for each participant (see pages 294–301)

Setting the Context (20 minutes)

Read Matthew 25:35 and invite the team to share their responses to these questions:

• How did you first hear about this church? • Who invited you to attend?

• What was your first experience walking into the church building? What was helpful and what was confusing to you? Record responses on newsprint or Post-It Notes and display around the room.

Questions to Guide the Welcoming Team (20 minutes)

Use these questions (selecting those that are most relevant) to guide a discussion about developing or enhancing a Welcoming Ministry for your congregation. Your responses will help you think about the people of your community (including your congregation) and how your congregation’s ministry of welcoming might serve them best. You may want to discuss these questions with others in your congregation, community and other denominations.

How did you first hear

about this church?

(24)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

29

1. What three concerns and what three hopes do people in our church have about their community and their faith? 2. How do these relate to living as Christian disciples and

good neighbors?

3. What three experiences might help people understand more about how the Bible and the Christian faith can be resources for daily living?

4. How could the quality of life be improved for at least one specific group of people in our community?

5. What existing or new welcoming ministries should our congregation sponsor for these people?

As you explore these questions, ask a few people to take notes so you can refer back to the responses as you build your Welcoming Ministry Plan.

Getting Everyone on Board (20 minutes)

Continue the discussion with this question: “Does our church want to welcome strangers?” Then, list some of the obstacles or challenges to becoming more welcoming. Record responses for reference later.

Say, “This is a central question, just as it is when we consider having guests in our own homes. The church may not be ready, but would it be willing to welcome strangers? Our first task may

How could the quality

of life be improved for

at least one specific

group of people in our

community?

(25)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

30

|

be to help the congregation to consider if it wants to reach out and grow.”

Discuss ways to help the congregation move toward wanting to become more welcoming and list some ideas for moving in this direction. Use these points to help frame your plan of action to assist the congregation in becoming more welcoming, include some time frame for accomplishing these and be as detailed as possible so you can build a good plan of action.

The congregation will need the following to get on board: • An understanding of what the “Open hearts. Open minds.

Open doors.” promise is and what it can mean to them. • An understanding of how to bring visitors, guests,

newcomers and seekers into the life of the church and whether or how they can participate.

• A strong desire to help people know Christ. • A desire and willingness to participate.

• Support and recognition for that participation. • A clear assessment of the current congregation.

Does our church want

(26)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

31

Get the Congregation Involved (20 minutes)

As a welcoming church, the congregation recognizes Christ in everyone and responds to this awareness. We share what we have in order to build up others and to be open to what they have to share with us. When we think about welcoming as more than glad-handing, we begin to befriend people and help them discover who they are and to appreciate their unique experiences and gifts. Eventually, people realize ways they can use their gifts to serve in mission and ministry.

To develop a strategy for getting the whole congregation on board with being welcoming and inviting, begin by understanding the attitudes of the people in your church who are going to make this effort the most successful. Explore with your Welcoming Ministry team ways to determine your congregation’s readiness, feelings and attitudes toward a welcoming lifestyle.

Consider having “listening groups” to help your congregation talk about their feelings toward inviting and welcoming new people (see “Conducting Listening Groups” on pages 222–223). If you choose to conduct listening groups, start making plans and assignments for accomplishing this goal.

Another way to conduct this type of research is by a written questionnaire (see “Sample Questionnaire” on pages 224–225). If you choose to distribute questionnaires to members, determine the best delivery method and set a time frame for distribution, collection and analysis. Decide who on the Welcoming Ministry team will be responsible for this activity.

As a welcoming church,

the congregation

recognizes Christ in

everyone and responds

to this awareness.

(27)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

32

|

In addition to listening groups and questionnaires, consider using a “Mystery Guest Audit” to gain authentic, outsider perspectives on your congregation, its members and facilities (see “Mystery Guest Audit” on pages 226–229). If you choose to conduct “Mystery Guest” audits, decide whom to enlist, when these will take place and how you will receive the feedback. Encourage team members to broaden their understanding of welcoming by engaging in research through field assignments (see “Field Assignment Ideas” on pages 294–301) and reporting their experiences to the team.

This research will help you identify the general climate for welcoming, potential resources and areas needing improvement to help your congregation achieve its goals for creating a Welcoming Ministry and lifestyle. It is best to know your strengths and weaknesses up front so you can develop an effective strategy.

Create a Welcoming Ministry Plan (60 minutes)

Note: You may wish to schedule this last section for later when you have the results of the listening groups, questionnaires and/or “Mystery Guest” audits.

As a part of getting the whole congregation involved and creating a strategy and plan for your church’s Welcoming Ministry, you will want to review the results of any listening groups and questionnaires you have conducted. With your Welcoming Ministry team, consider these questions:

How are members

interested in becoming

more welcoming?

(28)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

33

1. What did your listening groups or questionnaires reveal? 2. How are members interested in becoming more

welcoming?

3. What information or training do they need to participate fully in the Welcoming Ministry of your church?

4. How will you make sure everyone knows about your Welcoming Ministry plans and what part they can play? 5. What did the Mystery Guest Audit reveal? How will you

share the results?

These are the kinds of questions you will consider as you decide what direction to take with the congregation and develop your plan to achieve a welcoming lifestyle. Use the “Welcoming Ministry Planning Sheet” (see pages 230–235) to formulate your plan. This plan will guide you as you inform, inspire and engage your congregation to respond to a call for action to become a welcoming and inviting church.

Share your Welcoming Ministry Plan (60 minutes)

If your church has a financial campaign, do you talk about it from the pulpit? Do you offer dinners or put articles in the bulletin and in the newsletter? Do you place banners and posters around the church? Do you send letters? Do you establish person-to-person contact? Or set up small meetings in homes? What works in your church?

How will you make

sure everyone knows

about your Welcoming

Ministry plans and

what part they can

play?

(29)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

34

|

Your Welcoming Ministry will require the same kind of internal avenues to share your plan and to help people get on board. Over an initial two-month period, move toward personal information sharing and interaction, because making all of this work requires hands-on involvement by everyone in the congregation. Following are some essential steps, which you can customize to appeal to your own congregation.

• Consider sending a letter to every member of the church, including children old enough to read, that explains the Welcoming Ministry and plans for the future and is signed by a key lay leader and the pastor. (Have one of the teachers phrase the letter appropriately for youngsters.) • Follow up with the same or similar explanations during the

Sunday service and in the newsletter and bulletin for at least one month. Remember: People may need to see a message five to seven times before they respond.

• Give a concrete vision of how the church could reach out to people. Use what members said in the research, as well. Share your own vision for the future to help everyone understand.

• Once people know what and why, begin classes on how. Use all your communications vehicles to promote the classes, especially personal invitations by the Welcoming Ministry team members. Use the training sessions in this resource as a guideline for your classes. You may also wish to share through small groups (face-to-face or online)

Give a concrete vision

of how the church

could reach out

to people.

(30)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

35

or printed material. Even if you choose not to share the background information through education sessions, be sure that key leaders have read and understand the implications of the information.

The more you can make this information interactive and personal to all members, the better the chances of them having an “Aha” moment when they understand and want to create a welcoming culture in your church. In this way, you can generate excitement about what’s coming for the church!

Generate excitement

about what’s coming

for the church!

(31)
(32)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

38

|

General Guidelines for Training

While you will be focusing on one particular training session, be sure to review all the resources in this training manual and planning handbook, as well as the accompanying DVD, for additional materials and videos to enhance your Welcoming Ministry planning and training experiences. Consider these helpful reminders as you prepare for each training session.

Suggested Materials and Equipment

1. Laptop computer for showing PowerPoint slides and video clips.

2. A DVD player. Optional if using the DVD player on a laptop computer for other visuals.

3. A TV monitor or LCD projector (2000+ lumens) and projection screen large enough for everyone to see clearly. The size of the group will determine the size of the screen needed. A general rule is two people per one inch of screen size (measured diagonally). Therefore, approximately 12 people can comfortably view a 24-inch screen. For large training sessions, consider multiple television screens or use a video projector and large screen. When using an LCD projector, be sure that you have inputs for both computer and DVD player (if the DVD player is separate from the computer). You will want to output the audio to a sound system instead of to the projector.

Make the room as

cheery as possible.

(33)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

39

4. A few Bibles in different versions and translations often stimulates interesting discussion.

5. Writing and presentation materials: markers, newsprint pad or flip chart, scratch paper, crayons, pens/pencils, Post-It Notes, easel (for newsprint pad or flip chart) and tape.

6. Name tags and handouts for all participants.

Room Setup

• Depending upon the number of people in the session, arrange chairs and tables either classroom style (for a large group) or in a horseshoe (for a small group). • Hang “Welcome!” banners around the room (ones you

either make or purchase).

• Have “Welcome, we’re glad you’re here!” signs directing people to the room.

• Make the room as cheery as possible.

• Have music playing in the room as people enter.

• Model welcoming behavior by having at least one person at each door welcoming guests and instructing them what to do, where to sit, etc. Keep in mind that your group will be asking the same questions that others will be asking when they visit your church: “What’s going to happen to me here? Is there anyone here like me?”

Model welcoming

behavior by having at

least one person at

each door to welcome

guests.

(34)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

40

|

• Use the “Comfort Checklist” (see pages 236–237) to evaluate the environment for each training. You will want to make your members as comfortable as possible. • Make sure the trainers or facilitators connect with each

person in the room. Model everything you will be training others to do.

• Consider using an icebreaker activity while waiting for everyone to arrive. A common one is “personal bingo,” in which everyone has a prepared handout with attributes listed in squares (“Has at least three indoor pets,” “Has hazel eyes,” etc.). Participants go around the room seeking out people with those attributes and having them sign that square. The game’s goal is usually to get all the squares signed; however, the real objective is to get people to interact.

Preparation for the Sessions

1. Decide the details of the session:

• Where it will be, when you will have it.

• What people will participate on the training team and as trainees.

• How long you want the session to be.

• Whether you’ll do the session multiple times to involve more people, etc.

2. Determine whether you want to serve refreshments and who will be responsible for those arrangements.

Personally invite those

people you especially

want to be part

of the session.

(35)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

41

3. Personally invite those people you especially want to be part of the session. Send reminders (postcards, emails, etc.), especially for training sessions involving teams and church leaders.

4. For sessions open to the entire congregation, publicize the training in church publications, announcements, etc. In this way, you may gather people who might be interested but are not on your list of people to personally invite.

5. Pray for the training session to be successful. Set a goal for the desired number of participants, and pray about it. A few days ahead of the training, get the sign-up list and pray for each person by name.

6. Look through the material in advance, at least several days ahead of time, so you can locate all the items you will need. Supplement these outlines with other ideas and information you believe would work well with your congregation.

7. Involve other team members in leading the training. Ask them to read Scripture, be role play partners for training participants, help present some of the material, etc. Be sure to contact people ahead of time to ask them to help.

8. Preview the videos before the training, and note what points you want to make if participants don’t mention

Pray for the training

session to be successful.

(36)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

42

|

them first. Cue the video clip(s) so you don’t have to search for the right segment during the session. 9. Read the Bible passages and consult Bible study

materials to prepare discussion comments.

10. Prepare handouts for all participants, with a few extras ready in case people attend but haven’t registered in advance.

Remember to use your creativity and adapt the ideas to your local context. Above all, remember that your efforts help to fulfill our promise of “Open hearts. Open minds. Open doors.”

Suggested Guidelines for Group Discussion

Engaging participants through discussion where ideas and experiences can be shared is a key component of your training sessions. Listed here are suggested best practices to get the most from discussions.

• Focus on discussing the points, not criticizing the person • Allow people to finish their thoughts without interruption. • Watch for the movements of the Spirit in conversation—

God is waiting to lead us in a new direction. • Listen, listen, listen.

• What’s said in the group stays in the group—no outside chatter or gossip.

• Everybody participates; nobody dominates.

Remember to use your

creativity and adapt

the ideas to your

local context.

(37)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

43

Leading through Change

A 90-Minute Introductory Training Session

This training session will prepare your Welcoming Ministry team and church leaders for leading change in the congregation. During this session, participants will identify some issues of loss that accompany change as they learn to be transition coordinators for your church.

The goals of this session are to:

• Consider the way the congregation will react to the changes required to develop a more welcoming and inviting lifestyle.

• Confront your own resistance to change as you prepare to help the church do the same.

• Start envisioning a new way of behaving to welcome and invite people into your church.

• Work on an action plan for change in your congregation. The training is designed for the Welcoming Ministry team and leadership team/church council of your congregation. All pastors and key staff must also be part of this session for any transition process to be successful. Consider using the training with those teams responsible for communications and membership, such as your evangelism, outreach, witness, member care, and communications work areas. Presenting the information in a

Confront your own

resistance to change

as you prepare to

help the church

do the same.

(38)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

44

|

combined session with all these ministries will help coordinate communication for congregational change.

Preparing to Lead this Session

Listed here is a suggested outline to assist you in structuring the training session. Obviously, the material can be reinterpreted and adapted so you sound natural and feel at ease presenting it. The provided “scripts” can either be used verbatim or paraphrased to communicate the intended message. Feel free to adapt this suggested plan to meet your time frame, church’s needs and participants’ interests, knowledge, skills and attitudes.

1. Review the “General Guidelines for Training” on pages 38–42 as you prepare to lead this training session. 2. Pray for guidance.

3. Review the training materials for this session to locate all the items you will need and determine whether you want others to help you facilitate the training. Supplement this training plan with other ideas and information you believe would work well with your congregation.

4. Involve other members of your Welcoming Ministry team. Ask them to facilitate discussions and breakout groups, present some of the material, and help with other tasks related to the training session, such as technical support for showing videos, etc.

People have the

misconception that

being friendly to others

they know is the same

as being friendly to

strangers.

(39)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

45

5. Involve as many facilitators as possible. You want to demonstrate that this is an intentional effort for the entire congregation and involves everyone. In addition, you will need greeters and minglers before the session begins. 6. Read the scripture passage and consult Bible study

materials to prepare discussion comments.

7. Preview any videos associated with this session and note what points you want to make if participants don’t mention them first.

8. Prepare handouts for all participants and team members who will help with the training session.

No doubt, the most important element of this session is eliciting participation from those who attend it. Consider your role as that of a facilitator rather than a teacher, and you can all learn together how to make the most of the Welcoming Ministry in your church.

What You Will Need for this Session

• Copies of the “Change Exercises” for each participant (see pages 238–239).

• Copies of the “Preparing for Change” handout for each participant (see pages 240–241).

• Video : “Real Church TV.” • Video: “Out of the Ashes.”

Long before the pastor

preaches, people most

often will have decided

if they plan to return.

(40)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

46

|

Getting Started (20 minutes)

Welcome everyone to the training session and briefly introduce yourself. Invite others to share their names, etc., with the entire group (if less than 20 people) or to a few of their neighbors (if more than 20 people).

Read Romans 2:29.

Mention the context—Paul’s comments about circumcision and being a true Jew. Consult a commentary for more thoughts to share with participants.

Have participants discuss in pairs what it means to seek praise from God and not people, why that’s so difficult for many people, and why it has bearing on leaders who seek to bring transformation to a church.

Monitor discussion. Allow plenty of time for sharing, knowing that some pairs might be more talkative than others. When it seems everyone is finished, ask pairs to share some of their observations or key points of discussion with the rest of the group. Mention these ideas if nobody else does:

• Successful transition can’t be imposed from outside—it has to come from within.

• True change of heart (or attitude) comes from the Holy Spirit.

Sometimes when we

have been in a church,

we get used to what

is around and become

“blind” to the real

surroundings.

(41)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

47

• Leaders need to be mindful of pleasing God when people start criticizing the changes being made.

Thank everyone for participating in the discussion and reflection. Share a brief overview of the training session and offer an opening prayer or invite one of the participants to pray as you begin the session.

Setting the Context (25 minutes)

Introduce the concepts of change and transition.

Ask the participants what one thing they would like to see change in the congregation that they believe would lead to a more welcoming and inviting church?”

Mention the stepping stones to attaining the vision.

1. Believe passionately that we are doing the right thing. 2. Understand what that right thing is.

3. Pray for guidance and for intercession.

4. Begin doing it because we believe passionately that it can be done!

Distribute the “Change Exercises” handout (see pages 238– 239). Facilitate discussion of the questions on the handout and

True change of heart

(or attitude) comes

from the Holy Spirit.

(42)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

48

|

affirm the new realities of your community and congregation as evidence of a need to make changes.

Define change and transition.

• Change is situational: something new happens. (As

examples, mention a new pastor, removal of the cross from the altar, and new expectations of members.)

• Transition is the psychological process people go through to come to terms with the new situation. Transition begins by letting go of something.

• Example: We’re asking our congregation to let go of just being friendly to each other, and instead authentically welcome newcomers and members all the time, every time.

• In transitional times, people resist the process of letting go, not necessarily the change itself.

Facilitate questions about what participants don’t want to change.

1. What would you hate to see change? 2. Why?

3. What are you afraid of if it did change?

Transition begins by

(43)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

49

4. What would need to happen for you to either initiate the change or for you to be okay with the change?

Challenge the leaders to become transition coordinators for the congregation.

• Transition coordinators are the people with passion, understanding and vision.

• Transition coordinators need to keep the reasons for change (and the expectations to change) in front of the congregation all the time.

• Transition coordinators need to model the behavior and enthusiasm for change.

• Transition coordinators must identify what the

congregation will be losing and help members deal with those losses by listening to anger and fear, but not losing sight of the vision and the new reality.

• Transition coordinators need to define how the new reality will look.

Managing Transitions (30 minutes)

The period between endings and new beginnings is called the neutral zone, and it takes time to make this transition. In the book of Exodus, we see how it took forty years in the wilderness

The period between

endings and new

beginnings is called the

neutral zone.

(44)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

50

|

(neutral zone) for Moses and the Hebrew people to move past Egypt and enter the promised land.

• For Moses, the neutral zone involved wandering in the desert after leaving Egypt and before reaching the Promised Land.

• It was the 40 years in the neutral zone/wilderness that got Egypt out of his people.

Expect to spend some time in the neutral zone, but use that time to:

• Ask for ideas. Since people support what they help create, gather their input.

• Give members a sense of achievement and of movement by celebrating small successes and changes.

• Give positive feedback to individuals when you’ve seen them be more welcoming or bring someone to church through an invitation.

• Encourage the congregation by reminding them that inviting and welcoming take time and welcoming efforts have a cumulative effect.

New beginnings cannot be forced, only encouraged, supported, and reinforced.

Give members a

sense of achievement

and of movement

by celebrating small

successes and changes.

(45)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

51

Much of this material about change has been adapted from a book entitled Managing Transitions, Making the Most of Change by William Bridges (Perseus Publishing, 2003). Bridges encourages readers to think of change in four pieces: Purpose, Picture, Plan, Part to Play. To this, we have added a fifth “P” for personal preparation, which includes prayer.

Using the “Preparing for Change” handout (see pages 240–241) and the suggestions below, help the members to anticipate and plan for change.

• The Purpose must be personal and individual. We need to be personal to convey it.

• A Picture must paint the changes in terms that capture the imagination.

• The Plan of action should include when training and activities or events will be held as well as how all of these things will be communicated, etc.

• A Part to Play—because until people have one, they will not make a new beginning. Remember, people support what they help create.

• Personal Preparation that includes prayer, meditation, developing our leadership skills, and giving the congregation tools to deal with change.

Think of change in

four pieces: Purpose,

Picture, Plan, Part to

Play.

—Williams Bridges from Managing Transitions

(46)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

52

|

Closing (15 minutes)

Thank everyone for their ideas and participation. Receive last questions/comments.

Remind them that this is just the beginning of a long-term commitment toward making the transition to a whole new church lifestyle.

Show “Out of the Ashes” to remind them why these changes are so vital—they can change someone’s life forever.

Close with this prayer or another of your choice:

Thank you, God, for being the ultimate transition coordinator. We know that all positive change flows from your power. Please empower us with the Holy Spirit as we seek to foster changes in the life of our congregation. We ask in the name of Jesus, the Christ. Amen.

This is just the

beginning of a

long-term commitment

toward a whole new

church lifestyle.

(47)
(48)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

222

|

Listening groups can provide safe space for people to share thoughts about a particular subject. Participants voice opinions and, more important, hear what others have to say. To conduct a listening group, identify people who can act as facilitators for conversations pertaining to opening the doors of the church to new people. These leaders must have the trust of those participating in the listening groups, be able to ask questions, listen to the answers, restate and clarify the responses if necessary and record the responses. Although you may consider using a tape recorder, this could be intimidating to some members of the group.

No more than 10 people are recommended for each listening group. The listening sessions could take up to 90 minutes. Set a time limit, and do not exceed it.

As you think about forming the groups, consider the personal dynamics that might inhibit everyone from participating, and plan accordingly. A listening group should help stimulate conversation, and people will give opinions and expand upon them as members of the group talk.

Have the facilitators start by explaining why this type of research is being conducted. Remember that every church’s motivation for conducting listening groups may be different. Tailor your explanation to your goals or objectives for starting or expanding a Welcoming Ministry in your congregation.

Consider asking these questions to stimulate conversation: • What do you like about attending this church?

• Why do you think other people in the neighborhood, who don’t go to any church, choose not to come here?

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(49)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

223

• Who are those people?

• Talk about the first time you came to this church. Why did you come? What made it worth coming back to this church?

• If new people in the neighborhood came to church, how would you help them feel welcome?

• When you see someone in church you haven’t seen before, what do you do?

• How do you think we could get more people to participate with this church?

• Why do you think it’s difficult for people to invite friends and other acquaintances to church?

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(50)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

224

|

Dear Church Member:

Our congregation is preparing to start or expand a Welcoming Ministry so we can do an even better job of reaching out to people in our community and when visitors, guests and newcomers (as well as members) come to our church. Please take a few minutes to fill out this questionnaire and mail or bring it back to the church within the next few days. We will be using your feedback to shape our plans. Thank you!

1. What do you like about attending this church?

2. Why do you think other people in the neighborhood, who don’t go to any church, choose not to come here?

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(51)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

225

3. What could our church do to help people in the neighborhood to feel more welcome by here?

4. How do you think we could get more people to attend and participate in our church?

5. Why do you think it’s difficult for people to invite friends and other acquaintances to church?

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(52)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

226

|

Instructions:

Look for mystery guests who would represent at least two different age groups and cultural backgrounds. For the most value, have one of your friends from another church find the mystery guests and make all the arrangements. That way, no one in your church knows who they are.

How to Benefit Most from Mystery Guests.

1. Explain to your mystery guests that the people of the church want to be more welcoming and hospitable to strangers, but they first need to know in what ways they must change. 2. Give each mystery guest a copy of one of the audit sheets on the next pages, and provide a

self-addressed stamped envelope for them to return the audits.

3. Instruct them to fill out the audit at home, not during the church service.

4. Ask the mystery guests to visit the church sometime within the next month just as if they were regular visitors.

5. Consider giving a gift certificate in appreciation for mystery guests’ time. At a minimum, send thank-you notes and, of course, invite them back to the church to check up on the progress the welcoming ministry is making.

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(53)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

227

What to do with the results of the Mystery Guest Audit?

1. In addition to receiving the written response of your Mystery Guest, ask this person to be present at your welcoming ministry team meeting to provide clarification.

2. Begin to build a short list of things you can do immediately to respond to the findings of the Mystery Guest Audit.

3. Set goals and priorities, as well as make assignments or solicit volunteers, to address the longer-term findings of the Audit.

4. Where possible, enlist the support of the entire congregation as a part of the radical hospitality and welcoming lifestyle you want to develop among all the members of your congregation.

Audit forms you can duplicate and distribute are provided on the next pages.

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(54)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

228

|

Use this form to help another church identify its welcoming and hospitality strengths and limitations. Where possible and appropriate, give an example or explanation of your response.

Yes No

􀁒 􀁒 Was it easy to fi nd the church and convenient to park? 􀁒 􀁒 Was it clear where to go once you got there?

􀁒 􀁒 Did you fi nd the grounds in good repair? 􀁒 􀁒 Were you greeted when you went in?

􀁒 􀁒 Did the tone of the greeting make you feel welcome?

􀁒 􀁒 Did you fi nd the bulletin board displays timely and interesting? 􀁒 􀁒 Was the worship space pleasing to your eye?

􀁒 􀁒 Was there music playing as you entered? 􀁒 􀁒 Was your seat comfortable?

􀁒 􀁒 Was there enough light?

􀁒 􀁒 Was the temperature comfortable?

􀁒 􀁒 Did you feel welcome to participate in all aspects of the worship service? 􀁒 􀁒 Were a hymnal and a Bible available?

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(55)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

229

Yes No

􀁒 􀁒 Was it easy to follow the order of worship? 􀁒 􀁒 Was the sermon meaningful to you? 􀁒 􀁒 Were the restrooms clean and odor free? 􀁒 􀁒 Were you greeted after the service?

􀁒 􀁒 Did you request contact from someone with the church?

􀁒 􀁒 Did you receive any communications from the church the following week? 1. How would you describe the “mood” of the worship space?

2. Was the sound level too soft, just right or too loud?

3. Did you find the members friendly, disinterested or unfriendly? 4. If you visited the nursery, what was your impression?

5. What was your overall impression of the church? 6. Would you return? Why or why not?

© 2010 United Methodist Communications. Permission is granted to reprint and distribute for use within The United Methodist Church.

(56)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

230

|

What do we hope to accomplish with Welcoming Ministry? State the congregation’s goal here. ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

For each of the following tasks and ideas, identify who, when, and how.

Getting Started Task 1: Who: ___________________________________________________________________ When: __________________________________________________________________ How: ___________________________________________________________________ Task 2: Who: ___________________________________________________________________ When: __________________________________________________________________ How: ___________________________________________________________________ Task 3: Who: ___________________________________________________________________ When: __________________________________________________________________ How: ___________________________________________________________________

Welcoming Ministry Planning Sheet

(57)

Welcoming Ministry

TRAINING MANUAL and PLANNING HANDBOOK

|

231

Involving Church Leadership

Step 1: Who: ___________________________________________________________________ When: __________________________________________________________________ How: ___________________________________________________________________ Step 2: Who: ___________________________________________________________________ When: __________________________________________________________________ How: ___________________________________________________________________ Step 3: Who: ___________________________________________________________________ When: __________________________________________________________________ How: ___________________________________________________________________ Ideas: _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________

Welcoming Ministry Planning Sheet (continued)

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :