LIFE CYCLE IMPACTS OF ALKALINE BATTERIES WITH A

110 

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

FOCUS

 

ON

 

END‐OF‐LIFE 

A

 STUDY CONDUCTED FOR THE 

N

ATIONAL 

E

LECTRICAL 

M

ANUFACTURERS 

A

SSOCIATION

 

 

Draft release to internal group: June 2010 

External review: Dec 2010 

External release: Feb 2011      Study Authors:  Elsa Olivetti   Jeremy Gregory  Randolph Kirchain  Massachusetts Institute of Technology   Materials Systems Lab            Phone: (617) 253‐0877  Fax: (617) 258‐7471  E‐mail: elsao@mit.edu 

 

(2)

E

XECUTIVE 

S

UMMARY 

 

Approximately 80% of portable batteries manufactured in the US are so‐called alkaline dry cells with a  global annual production exceeding 10 billion units. Today, the majority of these batteries go to landfills  at end‐of‐life. An increased focus on environmental issues related to battery disposal, along with  recently implemented battery directives in Europe and Canada and waste classification legislation in  California, has intensified discussions about end‐of‐life battery regulations globally. The logistics of  battery collection are intensive given the large quantity retired annually, their broad dispersion, and the  small size of each battery. Careful evaluation of the environmental impacts of battery recycling is critical  to determining the conditions under which recycling should occur. This work compares a baseline  scenario involving landfilling of alkaline batteries as municipal solid waste with several collection  schemes for battery recycling through pyrometallurgical material recovery. Network models and life  cycle  assessment methods enable  the evaluation of various end‐of‐life  collection and treatment  scenarios for alkaline batteries.  

The study employs life‐cycle assessment techniques in accordance with the ISO 14040 standard. This  approach is applied to each end‐of‐life scenario to provide a comprehensive means of accounting for  environmental impacts. The scope of the analyses includes raw material extraction and refining, battery  manufacturing, end‐of‐life disposition, and transportation.  Secondary life cycle inventory datasets from  the ecoinvent 2.2 data set were employed when primary data were not available. Metrics evaluated  include Cumulative Energy Demand (CED), Global Warming Potential (GWP), and Ecosystem Quality,  Human Health, and Resources indicators (the latter three are damage categories from the Ecoindicator  99 methodology). Because of the country‐specific grid mixes used in the recycling scenarios, the amount  of radioactive waste is also presented as a metric of interest in for the recycling scenarios. 

To summarize the full life cycle implications of alkaline batteries, the production of raw materials  dominates the life cycle with the transport of those raw materials to manufacturing having a minimal  environmental impact as shown in the figures below using the proxy environmental impact metric, CED.   A few materials dominate this materials production impact, with manganese dioxide, zinc, and steel  having the highest impacts.  

   

(3)

  LIFE CYCLE IMPACT USING CED FOR 1 KG SALES‐WEIGHTED AVERAGE ALKALINE BATTERIES INCLUDING  PACKAGING (~30 BATTERIES)    PRODUCTION IMPACT (LEFT GRAPH) AND MATERIALS IMPACT (RIGHT GRAPH) USING CED FOR 1 KG SALES‐ WEIGHTED AVERAGE ALKALINE BATTERIES INCLUDING PACKAGING (~30 BATTERIES)  There are complex and uncertain potential impacts associated with placing primary alkaline batteries in  landfills at end‐of‐life and recycling may reduce those impacts, but may cause additional burdens that  outweigh benefits. The primary factors that drive the environmental impact of alkaline battery recycling,  compared to the baseline landfill scenario, include the recycling technology used, the amount of  materials recovered, and the state of the recovered materials.  Study findings indicate recovering more  than zinc for metal value (replacing virgin material) is important for reducing environmental impact and  technologies involving high temperature are energy intensive. The principal drivers of end‐of‐life  environmental performance of batteries vary depending on the metrics of impact assessment.  Findings  indicate metrics around energy and carbon are strongly dependent on recovery technologies, metrics  for ecosystem quality depend on landfill scenario assumptions as well as the materials benefits  associated with recycling. For the latter, if one assumes little to no landfill leachate resulting from  batteries (in other words, batteries remain intact in the landfill or leachate is collected and not of  concern over the time horizon considered), the main benefit from recycling stems from the recovery of  zinc, manganese and steel. The same is true for metrics around human health. Several conclusions  related to the transportation of the batteries to their end‐of‐life disposition step are also of interest. For  the recycling scenario where batteries are dropped off by individual consumers at a retail or municipal 

(4)

facility, the assumed allocation of the trip (dedicated versus non‐dedicated) drives the burden. In  addition, the fact that there are just three facilities modeled for North America that are able to take  alkaline batteries for recycling drives the large transportation burden associated with taking batteries  from an intermediary consolidation facility to the recycling facility. This study modeled several scenarios  for collection and recycling of batteries that resulted in an overall net environmental burden as  compared to landfilling as well as several that resulted in an overall environmental benefit.   When  considering metrics related to energy or global warming potential, the recycling scenarios appear more  environmentally burdensome whereas for metrics of human health and ecosystem quality, the recycling  scenarios appear more environmentally beneficial. This study does not intend to explicitly compare the  technologies; rather this work investigates the specific sites and contexts under which the technologies  operate.  For the collection burden associated with battery recycling, the greatest burden was associated with the  scenario wherein individual consumers dropped batteries off at municipal locations, such as transfer  stations. The crucial assumptions were around the degree of dedication for this leg of the journey, and  literature indicated a higher likelihood of a dedicated trip for municipal drop‐off along with greater  distances traveled than the retail drop‐off. Municipal drop‐off was on average 3‐4 MJ and 0.2 kg CO2  eq/kg of batteries disposed greater than retail drop‐off (1.3x10‐7 DALY, 0.015 pdf*m2yr, and 0.25 MJ  surplus /kg surplus for the other metrics).  Curbside pickup (both MSW and Recycle co‐collection) for the  recycling scenarios was determined to be lower in impact than both of the drop‐off scenarios. 

For the materials recovery burden at the end‐of‐life, the overall conclusions indicated that the burden or  benefit of recycling depends on the scenario assumed in recycling. The materials recovery credit  associated  with  zinc  often  drives  the  environmental  benefit  of  all  the  recycling  scenarios,  so  investigating how this material acts within the metals market would offer further insight to its benefit.  Five overall scenarios were examined with their specific transportation, fuel mix and materials recovery  contexts. Scenario A, involving a metal fuming furnace in the Northwest, employed coal and a  hydropower electrical grid to recover zinc for metal value with steel and manganese dioxides reporting  to slag which is sold to cement market. It exhibits an environmental benefit as compared to the baseline  MSW landfilling scenario for metrics of ecosystem quality for both municipal and retail drop‐off. This  scenario results in a more significant environmental burden than landfilling as measured by CED, GWP,  human health, and resources using any modeled collection method.  

Scenario B, located in the Midwest used natural gas and coal, to recover zinc and steel to metal value  with some metal value from manganese dioxides and the remainder reporting to slag which is sold to  cement market. This scenario exhibits an environmental benefit or neutrality as compared to the  baseline MSW landfilling scenario for metrics of ecosystem quality and human health for both municipal  and retail drop‐off.   However, this scenario results in a more significant environmental burden than  landfilling as measured by CED, GWP, and resources using any modeled collection method. 

Scenario C recovered steel to metal value and zinc and manganese dioxides sold for micronutrient  replacement using a lower temperature process powered by natural gas and a Canadian electrical grid.  It exhibits an environmental neutrality or slight benefit as compared to the baseline MSW landfilling  scenario for metrics of human health and ecosystem quality. For CED, ecosystem quality, and resources 

(5)

the value of this scenario is generally environmentally burdensome.   Therefore, for the scenarios  currently used in the US, the impact oscillates between environmentally beneficial and environmentally  burdensome depending on the indicator metric investigated and the transportation scenario used.     There were two scenarios investigated that are not currently used in the US. The first of these scenarios  is modeled after using the EAF infrastructure in the US where zinc and steel (with volume of manganese)  are recovered for metal value and exhibit an environmental benefit compared to a baseline landfilling  scenario for all metrics used in this study except for an apparent neutrality in the case of CED and in  municipal drop‐off for ecosystem quality. Because of the copper poisoning to steel production, this  scenario is limited by capacity (although based on the number of batteries recovered, this value would  not be exceeded). EAF facilities would require permitting for this scenario to be possible for EOL battery  processing in California. This scenario is sensitive to zinc recovery as shown in the scenario analysis. The  sensitivity analyses indicate that for the metrics of CED and GWP the burden for recycling with less than  32‐40% zinc recovery exceeds the impact of landfilling.    

The final scenario, not currently used in the US, recovers zinc, steel and manganese for metal value  based on European recycling facilities incorporating low carbon intensity electrical grids from France and  Switzerland. The transportation scenario assumes transport by road and ship to the EU. The results  indicate for the majority of cases, there is an environmental benefit to this scenario, except for CED and  GWP where it is environmentally burdensome, and for resources where the transportation scenario  (retail versus municipal drop‐off) dictates whether it is a burden or benefit.  

When all the examined recycling scenarios are assumed to use the US electrical fuel mix as an electricity  source and an average, equivalent transportation burden, Scenario D may demonstrate environmental  benefit of recycling compared to landfilling while Scenario A, C and E are more environmentally  burdensome and the environmental benefit of Scenario B is metric dependent. For ecosystem quality all  the scenarios are environmentally beneficial except for C. 

Incineration, as part of MSW management, performs similarly to the hypothetical EAF scenario, except  that it  is  burdensome due to  reduced materials recovery and increased transportation burden.  Incineration may be preferable to landfilling because of the potential for material recovery. 

(6)

C

ONTENTS 

Executive Summary ... 2  Chapter 1: Introduction ... 7  Chapter 2: Introduction to life cycle assessment... 9  Chapter 3: Overall Goal and scope definition ... 13  Section 1: Whole Life Cycle Assessment ... 15  Chapter 4: Alkaline battery life cycle assessment ... 15  Methodology ... 15  Scope ... 15  Data sources and assumptions ... 16  ecoinvent data gaps ... 20  Data Quality/Source Matrix ... 20  Results ... 21  Section 2: Alkaline Battery end of life focus ... 29  Chapter 5: End‐of‐Life investigations ... 29  Goal, Scope and Methodology ... 29  Spent Battery Chemistry ... 30  Logistics assumptions ... 31  Baseline and Curbside Pickup scenarios ... 31  Consumer Drop‐off scenarios (municipal/retail) ... 33  Previous work ‐ logistics ... 35  Landfilling and Incineration Toxicity issues ... 36  Incineration ... 37  Landfilling ... 40  Recycling technologies ... 42  Scenario A ... 43  Scenario B ... 44  Scenario C... 44  Scenario D modeled after recycling with steel in an EAF ... 44  Scenario E modeled after aggregating European recyclers ... 45 

(7)

Chapter 6: End of life scenario analysis results... 48  Incineration scenario ... 63  Chapter 7: Parameter Analysis... 64  Conclusions ... 72  Recommendations for actions to reduce the environmental impact ... 76  Life cycle impact ... 76  End of life impact ... 76  Future Work ... 76  References ... 78  Appendix A: NEMA survey questionnaire ... 81  Appendix B: Detail around LCI ... 84  Appendix C: Numeric results of Chapter 6 ... 93  Appendix D: Figures for 100% Primary offset for zinc and steel. ... 95  Appendix E: External Reviews ... 102  Reviewer 1 ... 102  Reviewer 2 ... 104  Reviewer 3 ... 108   

C

HAPTER 

1:

 

I

NTRODUCTION 

End‐of‐life issues for consumer non‐durables has become increasingly subject to the critical eye of  individuals, local government and producers. Most products follow a linear lifecycle, beginning as raw  materials in the earth, passing through refining, manufacturing, and use, and finally returning to the  earth in a landfill. While this linear lifecycle has been the norm for many products in the US, increasing  focus on environmental issues has drawn attention to the apparent wastefulness of a linear lifecycle. To  address this, adding loops to the linear lifecycle, often in the form of reuse, remanufacturing, and  recycling, has been proposed. However, these loops, and in particular the recycling loop, are not without  debate, as the economic and environmental impacts of such loops are often uncertain. 

In the case of alkaline batteries, the economic and environmental impacts of recycling are particularly  interesting. In the US, the large quantity of alkaline batteries that are retired each year, the broad  dispersion of those batteries, and the small size of each individual battery, makes the logistics of battery  collection particularly challenging. The material composition of alkaline batteries adds another layer of  complexity to the recycling dilemma, as there are disparate views about whether materials found in  alkaline batteries are harmful when landfilled.  Although alkaline batteries pass all U.S. EPA hazardous 

(8)

waste criteria and are therefore not deemed to be hazardous in the U.S., the state of California has  deemed them harmful, and some consumers are under the impression that alkaline batteries contain  harmful materials1. Given these  and other issues,  careful evaluation of both  the economic  and  environmental impacts of alkaline battery collection and recycling is critical prior to deciding whether or  not alkaline battery recycling should take place and, if so, under what conditions. In the US, clearly  understanding such impacts is particularly relevant, as an increased focus on environmental issues,  along with a recently implemented end‐of‐life battery directive in Europe and regulatory interpretation  in California impacting alkalines, has intensified the discussions about end‐of‐life battery regulations in  the US. 

As background to the legislation that impacts batteries in the US, the situation in California presents one  perspective. Most batteries are considered hazardous waste in California when they are discarded  including batteries of all sizes, both rechargeable and single use. Therefore alkaline batteries, as of  February 8, 2006, must be recycled, or taken to a household hazardous waste disposal facility, a  universal waste handler, or an authorized recycling facility. Large and small quantity handlers are  required to ship their universal waste to another handler, a universal waste transfer station, a recycling  facility, or a disposal facility. Several other states in the US have legislated a restriction on disposal in  landfills of particular rechargeable chemistries such as nickel cadmium, but these do not cover alkaline  single use batteries and as of this report writing no other state has legislation banning alkaline batteries  from landfills. Canada and the EU mandate collection of alkaline batteries.  

This study evaluates the environmental impacts of different end‐of‐life strategies, such as disposal and  recycling for alkaline batteries in the United States.  The analysis is divided into two sections. The first  section of the analysis encompasses the entire life cycle of the battery, accounting for impacts from  production in a manufacturing facility to use and eventual end‐of‐life treatment.   The focus of the  second section of the study is more detail on the end‐of‐life treatment. The scope and approach are  outlined in more detail below and in the two sections of the document. The geographic scope of the  study includes batteries manufactured and disposed of in the United States. The results of the analysis  were generated in accordance with the ISO 14040 standard for life cycle assessments (LCAs).   

For the second section of the study, defining multiple scenarios enabled investigation of the implications  of several end‐of‐life treatments for battery recycling. These consist first of a baseline scenario including  municipal solid waste (MSW) pickup of batteries with regular household waste accompanied by disposal  in a “typical” landfill. This baseline was contrasted with a series of recycling scenarios that included  multiple collection schemes and recycling technologies. The collection schemes included curbside with  MSW, curbside with municipal recycling, and drop off to both municipal and retail locations. Incineration  of batteries with regular household waste will also be commented on throughout this document;  however it is not a major focus because of the dominance of landfilling in the US, as shown in Figure 1.  

1

There is no mercury added to US OEM-produced alkaline batteries, but may be present in trace quantities from other sources such as batteries produced before mercury was not added, imported or counterfeit batteries.

(9)

  FIGURE 1. MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT FROM 1960 TO 2007. REPRODUCED FROM [1]  The analysis aimed to quantify the total vehicle miles traveled (VMT) by the batteries as a function of  collection scheme through a series of network models and to measure the burdens and benefits of  treatment at end of life through life cycle assessment techniques. The results describe the impact and  the sensitivity of the analysis to several components including the effect of collection scheme, the effect  of regional variation in VMT, and the energy needed to treat at end‐of‐life. Through these scenario  analyses, this work explores some of the condition (or conditions) under which recycling demonstrates  environmental benefit compared to landfilling.  This document begins with a brief introduction to the LCA methodology, followed by the goal and scope  definition of the overall study.  The first section describes the scope, methodologies and results of the  full LCA for alkaline batteries, and then an investigation into the end‐of‐life alternatives is shown in the  second section along with a discussion of the sensitivity of the results to several key assumptions.  The  document concludes with a summary of the study results and recommendations for actions that may be  taken to reduce the environmental impact associated with the products.   

C

HAPTER 

2:

 

I

NTRODUCTION TO LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT 

Life cycle assessment is an approach to analyzing the environmental impact of a product or industrial  system throughout its entire life cycle, from cradle to grave.  The life cycle under consideration generally  encompasses all stages of a product’s life, including raw material production, product manufacture, use,  and end‐of‐life disposal or recovery, as depicted in Figure 2. The arrow in Figure 2 demonstrates the  transport that takes place between each phase in the life cycle. The comprehensiveness of LCA is one of  its strengths; it includes many details that are not part of more focused environmental impact analyses.  

(10)

However, the complexity and level of detail necessitate a strict adherence to a consistent methodology.   A brief overview of the LCA methodology is presented here; more thorough references are available for  additional details [2, 3].  Materials Production Manufacture and Assembly Use Recovery / Recycling   FIGURE 2. PHASES IN A PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE.  The International Organization for Standardization has developed a standard methodology for life cycle  assessment as part of its ISO 14000 environmental management series.  The LCA standard, ISO 14040  [4], outlines four main steps in an LCA: goal and scope definition, inventory analysis, impact assessment,  and interpretation of results.  These steps are shown in Figure 3, and explained below. 

Goal & Scope Definition Inventory Analysis Impact Analysis In te rpre ta tio n   FIGURE 3. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY (ADAPTED FROM THE ISO 14040 STANDARD). Goal and scope definition articulates the objectives, functional unit under consideration, and 

regional and temporal boundaries of the assessment. 

Inventory  analysis  entails  the  quantification  of  energy,  water,  and  material  resource  requirements and emissions to air, land, and water for all unit processes within the life cycle, as  depicted in Figure 4. 

Impact assessment evaluates the human and ecological effects of the resource consumption and  emissions to the environment associated with the life cycle. 

(11)

Interpretation includes an evaluation of the impact assessment results within the context of the  limitations, uncertainty, and assumptions in the inventory data and the scope.    FIGURE 4. INVENTORY ANALYSIS: INFLOWS AND OUTFLOWS OF A UNIT PROCESS.    The accumulation of the life cycle inventory step transforms a detailed list of all the inputs and outputs  of the process to and from the technosphere into inputs from and outputs to nature, therefore  containing only resources and emissions.. The impact assessment step is particularly challenging  because  of  the  difficulty  associated  with  aggregating  and  valuing  numerous  types  of  resource  consumption and emissions to the environment.  There is uncertainty in the modeling used to produce  midpoint and endpoint indicators. There are metrics that include a single attribute such as energy or  global warming potential, but there are also metrics that try to capture multiple impacts. The impact  assessment methods (and proxy metrics) that were used in this study are described below.2 

Single Issue metrics: 

• Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) includes all direct and indirect energy consumption  associated with a defined set of unit processes.  It does not directly account for the impact  of non‐energetic raw material consumption or emissions to the environment.   Values for  CED are measured in terms of energy (e.g., joules). Note: CED is a proxy metric and not a  formal impact assessment method. This method considers energy from multiple sources,  including renewable and non‐renewable. For the CED results, all energy  sources are  presented as both renewable and non‐renewable are used. This number is broken down by  source where it is of interest.  [5] 

 

• Global Warming Potential (GWP) incorporates the impact of gaseous emissions according to  their potential to contribute to global warming based on values published in 2007 by the  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.   The impacts for all gaseous emissions are  evaluated relative to carbon dioxide.   Impact assessment values for GWP are measured in  terms of an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide (e.g., kg CO2 equivalent) [5].  

Multi impact metric: 

2

For the recycling technologies, the amount of nuclear waste generated is also presented as a result because of the grid mixes used for some of the technologies.

(12)

• Ecoindicator 99 (EI) is a damage‐oriented method that calculates environmental impact in  three categories: damage to human health, ecosystem quality, and damage to resources.   The characterization of damage by inventory items is based on scientific methods (e.g.,  effects of toxic materials in drinking water on human health) and these damage categories  serve as endpoints in ISO 14040. Damage to human health is in units of disability adjusted  life years  (DALY),  implying that  different  disability caused  by diseases  are weighted.  Ecosystem quality is reported in units of potentially disappeared fraction of plant species  (PDF*m2yr). The final category is Resources, which includes assessment of minerals and  fossil fuels in units of MJ surplus, or the additional energy requirement to compensate for  future ore grade. Damage is then normalized by average European impacts. The egalitarian  perspective was used for this study. The valuation of the relative importance of various  environmental impact categories is determined by survey responses from an expert panel;  these responses determine the relative weighting of all of the impacts.  These steps enable  all of the impacts to be aggregated into a single value which has the units of “points”, where  1000 points represents the average environmental impact of a European in one year. This  European weighting may present a limitation given the US geographic scope of this analysis;  however, this impact assessment method is used primarily for its damage categories rather  than the single combined metric for this study. Also, because this study examines various  options for end of life and is therefore classified as comparative assertion, weighting results  are not used for communication. A few different approaches exist, however for the  purposes of this study, the damage category impacts are reported including human health, 

ecosystem quality and resources [6]. 

These methods were used for this work because they provide separate lenses with which to evaluate  environmental burden. Global warming potential is of interest to the audience because of the focus on  greenhouse gases in some pending legislation. Because of the potential ecosystem quality and human  health concerns associated with batteries in landfills, the EI 99 method was also chosen. It can be  challenging  to  have  a  “feel”  for  reasonable  values  calculated  by  life  cycle  impact  assessment  methodologies as such values often represent abstract concepts or non‐physical quantities.   Indeed,  such values are most useful when presented in the context of a comparison so that relative quantities  may be evaluated.   Several products and processes have been evaluated using the methodologies for  LCAs detailed above, and the results appear in Table 1.  These values provide some basis of comparison  for the results presented in this study. 

(13)

TABLE 1. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT VALUES FROM FOUR LCAS.  VALUES CALCULATED USING THE  ECOINVENT 2.2 DATABASE. 

Product or Process  CED 

(MJ)   GWP  (kg CO2 eq)   Human Health  (DALY)   Ecosystem  quality  (PDF*m2yr)  Resources  (MJ  surplus)  Production of 25 g PET  beverage bottle   (20 fl oz/590 ml)  2  0.07  6.8 x 10‐8  0.005  0.15  Production of 14 g  aluminum beverage can (12  fl oz/350 ml)  3  0.2  2.6 x 10‐7  0.007  0.17  100 km fuel consumption in  a European passenger car  305  18  2 x 10 ‐5  21  Coffee pot: 5 years  5400  220  2 x 10‐4 30  190    Now that the concept of life cycle assessment has been briefly outlined, the next section will define the  goal and scope of the work undertaken in this study. 

C

HAPTER 

3:

 

O

VERALL 

G

OAL AND SCOPE DEFINITION 

This life cycle assessment is divided into two sections. The goal of the first section, described in Chapter  4, was to determine the life cycle impact of an industry average alkaline battery, based on input from  four battery manufacturers.  The whole life cycle of the battery is established as a first goal of the study  to provide a context for these end‐of‐life impacts.  The second section, described in the remainder of  the report (Chapter 5 & 6) focuses just on the end of life treatment for alkaline batteries. The goal of this  second part of the study is to compare different disposal and recycling scenarios for alkaline batteries to  weigh the environmental burdens and benefits of each specific situation for battery disposition at end of  life.  More detail around scope for the second section will be established at the beginning of Chapter 5.  The intended audience of the study is NEMA, local and state government agencies including waste  management entities, as well as the general environmental community through journal publication. The  geographic region of interest for product sales and use is the United States and portions of Canada.   System boundaries are defined in accordance with the ecoinvent life cycle inventory database3 unless  otherwise specified to include all life‐cycle steps from material extraction to end‐of‐life (this database  presents some limitations because of its EU focus, given the US geographic scope of this study).  For the  first section of the study the cut‐off for EOL materials to recycling is applied. 

(14)

Transport Transport TransportRaw  Material 1 Raw  Material 2 Raw  Material X Transport Retailers Manufac‐ turing

Use End‐of‐Life Production

Production

Packaging

Materials Production Not includedstudy  in  Distribution 

Center

  FIGURE 5. PHASES WITHIN THE PRODUCT LIFE CYCLE. 

The terminology for the phases within the product life cycle is defined in Figure 5.  At the highest level,  the life cycle is broken into three phases: production, use, and end‐of‐life.   The production phase is  further broken into manufacturing (i.e., battery manufacturing), packaging, and distribution.   The  environmental impacts of distribution centers and retailers are ignored in this analysis, but the  transportation to them is included.   Finally, the manufacturing phase is further broken down into the  production of raw materials (i.e. acquisition and refining of raw materials) and the actual manufacturing  of the battery.  Transportation of raw materials from suppliers to the manufacturing facility is included  in materials production. For the purposes of this study the use phase contributes no environmental  impact because the investigation focuses only on primary alkaline batteries. For primary batteries the  beneficial work they do for the consumer in use derives from the chemical potential of the materials  contained within the device. As stated previously, the end‐of‐life (EoL) phase provides the primary area  of interest for this particular investigation in the second section of the study. Regardless of the scenario  under investigation at EoL the batteries go through some intermediate transportation and consolidation  phase and are then taken to a particular disposal facility. The EoL boundaries and scenarios will be fully  outlined after the full life cycle results are presented. The functional unit used in this analysis is 1 kg  weighted average alkaline batteries, equivalent to 30 batteries; this quantity was chosen as most  relevant to a consumer. This weighted average is the sales weighted average of the batteries sizes sold  in the US (as described in detail in Chapter 4). For the full life cycle assessment described in chapter 4,  impacts are shown of 1 kg of these weighted average batteries including packaging and for the end‐of‐ life analysis the functional unit is the treatment of 1 kg of batteries.

  

The data for the study will be gathered through the battery manufacturers participating, the potential  battery  recyclers,  literature,  modelling  efforts  and  interviews  with  collection  system  providers.  Therefore the data are of varying quality and are required to be transparent to the research team for  interpretation. Specifics on the temporal, geographic and representativeness of these data are provided  within the chapters below. The critical review process for this study will be done by three external  reviewers sequentially from three different institutions in academia and state government. Those  reviews can be found in the appendices. The interpretation of this study involves identifying the 

(15)

significant issues found from the inventory and analysis steps, evaluating the completeness of the work  and providing a description of the gaps and recommendations. As mentioned above, the specific impact  assessment methods used in this study were: cumulative energy demand, global warming potential and  the three damage categories of Ecoindicator 99. Value choices are made by selecting just these five  metrics to present in the results. Future work should look at other characterization approaches.  

S

ECTION 

1:

 

W

HOLE 

L

IFE 

C

YCLE 

A

SSESSMENT 

C

HAPTER 

4:

 

A

LKALINE BATTERY LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT 

This section describes the full life cycle analysis for the primary alkaline battery to provide the relevant  scale of end‐of‐life compared to the rest of the life cycle.   This full alkaline battery LCA is not directly  applicable to the second study goal but provides important context. There are other reasons to focus on  end‐of‐life besides its impact on the whole battery life cycle. The set of parameters outlined in the  upcoming tables are used for all analyses in this section.   

M

ETHODOLOGY

 

For the alkaline battery life cycle assessment, each phase of the life cycle is identified.  Following this,  materials and energy are quantified and environmental impacts are calculated for each phase.   This  section describes the methodology in detail by identifying the scope of the analysis for the alkaline  battery and then describing the sources of data – including necessary assumptions. The data used in this  analysis was gathered through a survey of the firms participating in the study and then averaged by a  statistician within NEMA. The survey used is provided in Appendix A. 

S

COPE 

As described in Figure 5, the life cycle consists of production, use, and a standard end‐of‐life treatment.   The production phase for the alkaline battery consists of producing the raw materials, transporting the  raw materials to the manufacturing facility, manufacturing the battery, transporting the battery to the  packaging facility, packaging the battery, transporting the packaged battery to distribution facilities  throughout the United States, and finally transporting the packaged batteries to retail facilities.   It is  assumed that no environmental impact is associated with the use phase of the alkaline battery because  it is single use and any emissions to air, land or soil in this use of a battery in a product would be  attributed to that product.   The end of life treatment for this first section is just taken as standard  landfill and incineration without any materials recovery. More detail around end of life is investigated in  the second section of the study. For the allocation of recycling materials at end of life (for example in  the manufacturing process), the cut off approach is used, so no credit or burden is assigned to the  portion of material recycled in that process at end of life. While a scenario analysis on this could be  performed, the overall impact of the recycled scrap after manufacturing provides a small amount of the  overall impact. The same is true for the recycled packaging at end of life.  

A single alkaline battery is actually represented as the weighted average of each size of battery (AA,  AAA, C, D and 9V) based on percentage sales in 2007 as shown in Table 2. This weighted average is used 

(16)

to determine the weight of the battery, the bill of materials, the amount of packaging and the weighted  distance traveled in each transport step. Finally, the baseline end‐of‐life scenario assumed for the  alkaline battery consists of landfilling and incineration (87% landfill and 13% incineration) [7].   TABLE 2. ALKALINE BATTERY SALES BROKEN DOWN BY SIZE FOR 2007    2007 Sales  Weight of  battery (g)  AA  60%  23  AAA  24%  11  4%  71  8%  147  9V  4%  45 

D

ATA SOURCES AND ASSUMPTIONS 

This section describes the data gathered and processed for implementation. It should be noted that the  data shown here do not represent a company‐specific battery bill of materials or manufacturing process  but instead are an aggregation of data from four separate OEMs. First, the bill of materials is established  for a single weighted‐average alkaline battery. The mass of a single weighted average alkaline battery  (WAAB) is 33 grams. The six top components by mass and each component’s mass within the battery  calculated from the weighted mass percentages of battery constituents and these 33 grams are shown  in Table 3. The chemistry of each of the sizes of alkaline battery (AA, AAA, C, D and 9V) are assumed to  be the same (although the weight percentage of materials for the 9V is slightly different). Line 2 contains  35wt% aqueous potassium hydroxide for the electrolyte.  

Table 3 also shows the supplier locations for each material (by country) and the one‐way distance  traveled from that supplier to the manufacturing facility by truck and boat (backhaul distances were  ignored).   A few supplier locations for each material were provided and the distances reported in the  table are the average of each country listed.   For overseas shipments, specific ports‐of‐call were  assumed when they were not specified.  There was no information provided about manufacturing scrap,  so the partial bill of materials shown below is the actual amount of material in the weighted battery.  However, a few exceptions to this include 1) it was difficult to determine the amount of water present in  the electrolyte as received (described below) and 2) the remaining mass was divided by the “other  materials” (brass, plastics [incl. PVC], paper, and galvanized steel) [8].  

(17)

TABLE 3. TOP TEN COMPONENTS BY MASS WITHIN THE BILL OF MATERIALS FOR A SINGLE WAAB. 

No.  Material  Mass 

(g)  Supplier Locations Nominal Distance from  Supplier  Truck (km)  Boat (km) Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide  13 Japan, South Africa, US 1600  11000 Potassium hydroxide (35wt%   aqueous KOH)  3.7 US 1000  ‐  Graphite  1.2 Brazil, Canada,  Switzerland  1130  5900 Nickel‐Plated Steel  6.0 Japan, Netherlands, US 1600  7700 Zinc  5.8 Canada, Japan, US 1450  9000 Brass  1.0 ‐ ‐  Not specified  Galvanized steel  0.52 Nylon  0.51 Paper  0.51 10  PVC  0.51   Total weighted battery  33     Also included as an input in the analysis but not shown in the bill of materials are the excess materials  needed in production that ends up as scrap (as reported consisting primarily of steel).  Information on  the additional material, water and energy inputs and waste outputs (including the scrap materials) from  the manufacturing facility were also provided, through the survey, in units of input or output per million  weighted average batteries (based on production within the facility). The values for these inputs and  outputs from manufacturing are shown in Table 4, allocated by unit to a single WAAB. The inputs to the  facility were electricity, natural gas and light fuel oil as well as water. Outputs from the facility were also  provided, including the waste for recycling steel, waste to landfill, water treatment, and air emissions in  the form of volatile organic compounds.  

It is common industry practice that the water used in production is to dilute the as‐received 50%  potassium hydroxide to the concentration used in the final electrolyte (35%). This water is included in  the bill of materials. The incoming water used in production that is not accounted for in the bill of  materials in Table 3 is accounted for as an input to the facility and output of wastewater leaving the site. 

(18)

TABLE 4. INPUTS AND OUTPUTS FROM THE BATTERY MANUFACTURING FACILITY ALLOCATED TO A  SINGLE WAAB. Inputs  Amount per  Battery  Units  Water  32  g  Electricity  0.02  kWh  Natural Gas, burned in industrial furnace  25  kJ  Fuel Oil, burned in industrial furnace  9.3  kJ        Outputs  Amount per  Battery  Units  VOC  0.02  g  Waste (for recycling)  1.1  g  Waste (for disposal)  0.52  g  Waste Water  32  g    *The number for VOC’s in this inventory is observed to be high, but this was as reported from the  company survey described above. This turns out to be a minimal contribution to the results. 

The next phase of the life cycle is packaging of the battery. Packaging occurs at a facility 460 km from  manufacturing (weighted distance by sales). The materials used to package the batteries in “blister  packs” of 2 or 4 (depending on the size), as shown in Table 5, are polyvinyl chloride, paperboard and  corrugated cardboard for shipping.   Approximately 6% of the final mass of the packaged battery is  attributed to these packaging materials.  

TABLE 5. MATERIALS USED IN THE PACKAGING OF A SINGLE WAAB. 

No.  Material  Amount per 

Battery  Units  Polyvinyl Chloride  0.4 g  Corrugated board  1 g  Paper board  0.8 g   

The inputs and outputs from the overall operation of the packaging facility are provided in Table 6  allocated to a single WAAB.   TABLE 6. INPUTS AND OUTPUTS FROM THE PACKAGING FACILITY ALLOCATED FOR A SINGLE WAAB.  Inputs  Amount per  Battery  Units  Water  1.7  g  Electricity  5.5  Wh  Natural Gas, burned in industrial furnace  6.1  kJ  Outputs  Amount per  Battery  Units  Waste Water  1.7  g   

(19)

After the batteries are packaged they are shipped to the distribution centers. The nominal distance for  transport from packaging to the distribution centers (based again on the weighted average of sales) is  630 km. In addition, 1100 km is used as a weighted average distance from the distribution centers to the  retailer.  Table 7 provides a summary of each segment of transport from manufacturing to distribution.  The mass of the battery up until the packaging facility is 33 g; after packaging, the mass of the battery  and packaging is approximately 35 g in total.    TABLE 7. TRANSPORTATION FOR ALKALINE BATTERY FROM MANUFACTURING TO PACKAGING AND FINALLY  DISTRIBUTION. 

From  To  Nominal 

Distance (km) 

Method 

Manufacturing  Packaging  460 Truck 

Packaging  Distribution Center  630 Truck 

Distribution Center  Retailer  1100 Truck 

 

As mentioned previously, there is no additional environmental impact from the use phase of the alkaline  battery since no energy is added beyond the production of the cell detailed above. The final phase in the  life cycle is the end‐of‐life treatment of the battery. This analysis assumed that 13% of alkaline batteries  are incinerated at end‐of‐life as that is the percent of total generation of MSW that is combusted in the  US [7]. The remaining percentage of alkaline batteries is landfilled; both scenarios assumed to involve  100 km of MSW vehicle transport. A generic landfilling and incineration scenario is used for this baseline  case, just to understand the order of magnitude comparison between production and EoL.  Table 8 summarizes the baseline end‐of‐life scenario described above for the battery.    TABLE 8. END OF LIFE DESCRIPTION FOR THE ALKALINE BATTERY.  Transport  Distance (km)  Disposal Truck  100      Waste Scenario  Percent  Landfill  87%  Incineration  13%    Table 9 summarizes the end‐of‐life scenario for the battery packaging, which involves recycling of 30% of  the cardboard packaging and the disposal of the remaining packaging through landfill and incineration.   Because of the assumption of cut off allocation at end of life no burden or benefit is associated with the  quantity of recycled packaging material; a reduced end of life burden is assumed. 

(20)

TABLE 9. END OF LIFE DESCRIPTION FOR THE ALKALINE BATTERY PACKAGING.  Transport  Distance (km)  Recycle Truck  400  Disposal Truck  100      Material Recycled  Percent   Cardboard   30%      Waste Scenario  Percent  Landfill  87%  Incineration  13%   

ECOINVENT DATA GAPS 

The source of data for implementation of this portion of the analysis is the ecoinvent 2.2  database. A  few major assumptions were necessary for implementation and they are mentioned here, especially in  the case when an inventory is not available for a particular item in the bill of materials. The first major  limitation of ecoinvent is its European focus, while the geographic scope of this study was the US.   One gap in the ecoinvent database was an inventory for manganese dioxide, the major component in  the alkaline bill of materials (~40 wt% or 13 g in a WAAB).   Previous studies, for example the Defra‐ commissioned report mentioned earlier, have substituted the manganese inventory for manganese  dioxide, altering the mass stoichiometrically [9].   Substituting an inventory for titanium dioxide for  manganese dioxide is another possible approach, as both materials can be produced using similar  processes.  Manganese dioxide is produced through a series of steps, including roasting of manganese  ore, dissolution of the roasted manganese in acid, filtration of impurities, and the electrowinning of the  final product.  The inventory for manganese(III) oxide developed for lithium ion batteries (Mn2O3) was  used as a proxy. The steel inventory used includes 40% steel from an electric arc furnace and the  remainder converted pig iron from a blast furnace. The zinc inventory includes 30% from combined zinc  production. The full outline of the inventories used is provided in Appendix B.  

A 16‐32‐tonne truck is assumed to perform all land transport, while all boat transport is performed by  transoceanic freight ship, both from the ecoinvent database. 

D

ATA 

Q

UALITY

/S

OURCE 

M

ATRIX

 

Where primary data was not available secondary sources were used, including published reports,  specifications, and the ecoinvent LCI database.  The quality of the data has been assessed on the  following criteria: 

•  Source‐‐primary or secondary 

(21)

•  Representativeness—how closely the data collected represents the supply chain of the system,  including geographic and operational considerations 

Stage  Data Source  Temporal Representativeness

Alkaline Battery  Materials  Primary data regarding types of  material and quantities.  Secondary data (ecoinvent) for  upstream extraction and  processing  Primary data from 2009,  based on ecoinvent  processes (global mix used  when available), Zinc and  steel inventories are EU  focused  Limits on data based on  global focus of  ecoinvent inventories  Battery Primary   Packaging  Primary data regarding types of  material, and quantities.  Secondary data (ecoinvent) for  upstream extraction and  processing  Primary data from 2009,  other based on ecoinvent  processes   Limits on data based on  European focus of  ecoinvent data  Battery  Manufacturing  Facility  Primary data on energy  consumption quantities and waste  produced.  Secondary data (ecoinvent) for  inventory, electricity grid mix for  US used.  Primary data from 2009,  other based on ecoinvent  processes   Limits on data based on  EU focus of some  inventories, however  electricity mix US‐ based  Packaging Facility   Primary data regarding energy  consumption quantities and waste  produced.  Secondary data (ecoinvent) for  inventory  Primary data from 2009,  other based on ecoinvent  processes  Limits on data based on  EU focus of some  inventories, however  electricity mix US‐ based  Transportation  Primary data regarding  transportation distances   Secondary data (ecoinvent) for  inventory  Primary data from 2009,  other based on ecoinvent  processes  Limits on data based on  European focus of  ecoinvent data  50% load factor truck  likely overestimate of  burden as trucks are  likely more full.  Use  No environmental burden associated with use as the chemical energy stored in the battery  through use of manganese dioxide and zinc  Disposal (for this  section)  Secondary data (ecoinvent) for  disposal scenarios.  Data does not well represent the geographic scope   

R

ESULTS

 

The following section describes the results from the full life cycle analysis for 1 kg WAAB including their  packaging where the end of life fate is 87% landfill, 13% incineration w/o steel recovery as this is  investigated in more detail in the second section of this work. Results describe the impact assessments  from the life cycle inventory using Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) in MJ, Global Warming Potential  (GWP) in grams of CO2 equivalent, and Eco‐Indicator (EI) midpoints for Human health (in DALY), 

(22)

Ecosystem quality (in PDF*m2yr) and Resources (MJ Surplus). The methods differ in focus, as CED  emphasizes total energy consumption, GWP stresses global warming contributing gases, and EI may  highlight perceived human health risks (Human health indicator) or ecosystem toxicity (Ecosystem  quality). Furthermore, the final EI damage category, Resources, comments on perceived resource  scarcity of a particular material or the upstream impacts associated with that material. In some cases  only the results of one impact assessment method are presented. The beginning of this analysis explores  the “hot spots” for impact within the life cycle of an alkaline battery, resolving where the biggest  impacts are.  The full Eco‐Indicator 99 breakdown is provided at the end of this section.  Figure 6 shows the relative contribution of each phase on the full life cycle impact and plots the values in  for CED and   Figure 7 shows the relative contribution of each phase for GWP.     FIGURE 6. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT USING CED FOR 1 KG WAAB INCLUDING PACKAGING(~30 BATTERIES)       FIGURE 7. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT USING GWP FOR 1 KG WAAB INCLUDING PACKAGING (~30 BATTERIES)  

(23)

Table 10 shows the life cycle impact of 1 kg WAAB using all three LCIA methodologies, CED, GWP and  the three damage categories of EI 99.  Table 10, Figure 6, and   Figure 7  show that the production phase dominates the life cycle impact.    TABLE 10. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT OF 1 KG WAAB, INCLUDING PACKAGING USING THREE LCIA ASSESSMENT  METHODS (THE DAMAGE CATEGORIES OF EI 99 ARE SHOWN, HUMAN HEALTH, ECOSYSTEM QUALITY AND  RESOURCES).  Life Cycle  Phase   CED  (MJ/1 kg  WAAB)   GWP  (kg CO 2 eq./1  kg WAAB)  Human Health  (DALY/1 kg  WAAB)   Ecosystem Quality  (PDF*m2yr/1 kg  WAAB)  Resources   (MJ surplus/1 kg  WAAB)  Production   66  3.8  1.1x10‐5  1.5  4.7  End‐of‐Life   2.5  0.6  9.7x10‐7  0.62  0.18  TOTAL   68  4.3  1.2x10‐5   2.1  4.9  % EoL  contribution  4%  13%  8%  29%  4%    Table 1 is also repeated below in Table 11 but with the impact of one WAAB and 1 kg WAABs included to  provide some perspective for the impacts shown in these results (both include packaging).  TABLE 11. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT VALUES AS SHOWN IN TABLE 1 WITH THE ADDITION OF ONE  WEIGHTED‐AVERAGE ALKALINE AND 1 KG WEIGHTED AVERAGE ALKALINE BATTERIES. 

Product or Process  CED 

(MJ)   GWP  (kg CO2 eq)   Human  Health  (DALY)   Ecosystem  Quality  (PDF*m2yr)  Resources  (MJ  surplus)  Production of 25 g PET beverage  bottle (20 fl oz/590 ml)  2  0.07  6.8 x 10 ‐8  0.005  0.15  1 weighted‐average battery (33 g)  2  0.14  4 x 10‐7  0.07  0.16  Production of 14 g aluminum  beverage can (12 fl oz/350 ml)  3  0.2  2.6 x 10 ‐7  0.007  0.17  1 kg weighted‐average batteries  68  4.3  1.2 x 10‐5  2.1  4.9  100 km fuel consumption in a  European passenger car  305  18  2 x 10 ‐5  21  Coffee pot: 5 years  5400  220  2 x 10‐4 30  190   

GWP, Human Health and Ecosystem Quality have a higher relative contribution from the end‐of‐life  scenario than CED and Resources resulting from the generic landfilling and incineration processes. These  will be examined in much more detail in the subsequent analysis. 

(24)

Because the production phase dominates the life cycle, drilling further down into the production phase  reveals the drivers of impact within that phase. Table 12 shows the values of this breakdown for 1 kg of  WAAB. Figure 8 shows the absolute values using CED plotted side by side.  

TABLE 12. BREAKDOWN OF PRODUCTION IMPACTS FOR 1 KG OF WA ALKALINE BATTERIES USING FIVE  INDICATORS (DOES NOT INCLUDE END‐OF‐LIFE, WHICH WAS PRESENTED IN TABLE 11) 

Life Cycle Phase  

CED  (MJ/1 kg  WAAB)  GWP  (kg CO eq./1 kg  WAAB) Human Health  (DALY/1 kg  WAAB)  Ecosystem Quality  (PDF*m2yr/1 kg  WAAB)  Resources   (MJ surplus/1 kg  WAAB)  Materials  Production   43   2.5  9.3x10 ‐5   1.4  3.4  Manufacturing   10  0.6  5.6x10‐7   0.022   0.55  Transport  6.9  0.42  5.1x10‐7  0.037  0.51  Packaging materials   5.6   0.22  2.2x10‐7  0.04  0.24  TOTAL   66   3.7  9.4x10‐5  1.5  4.7      FIGURE 8. BREAKDOWN OF PRODUCTION IMPACTS FOR 1 KG WAAB USING CED. 

There are a few differences between the indicators used, which will be discussed later in this section.  However, all three indicators show that the impacts of materials production dominate production 

(25)

The results so far have combined the transport of raw materials from the suppliers to the manufacturing  facility with the production of the raw materials themselves in the category ‘materials production’. The  manufacturing of the raw materials dominates this impact, as transportation is a very small percentage  of the burden.  

Figure 9 shows the ranking of materials within materials production for CED. This ranking changes  depending on which indicator is used as shown in Table 13 (while the uncertainty in the results makes it  difficult to differentiate between the materials in the last several places in the table, the first few  materials are much different in impact even with the attendant uncertainty). In CED and GWP, and  Resources manganese dioxide has the largest impact; in EI, the zinc has the largest impact. This reflects  the perceived toxicity of zinc by this metric. Figure 9 demonstrates how quickly the impact falls off after  the first three materials.  The bulk of the burden is thus focused on three materials: manganese dioxide,  zinc ingot, and steel.      FIGURE 9. MATERIALS PRODUCTION IMPACTS FOR 1 KG WAAB USING CED   (THESE VALUES INCLUDE THE TRANSPORT OF RAW MATERIALS TO THE MANUFACTURING FACILITY).   

(26)

TABLE 13. RANKING OF ENVIRONMENTAL BURDEN FOR MATERIALS FOR FIVE IMPACT METHODS  CED  (MJ/1kg WAAB)  GWP  (kg CO2 eq/1kg  WAAB)  Human Health  (DALY/1kg  WAAB)  Ecosystem Quality  (PDF*m2yr/1kg  WAAB)  Resources   (MJ surplus/1kg  WAAB)  Mass in 1kg  WAAB (g) 

MnO2: 17  MnO2: 1.1  Brass: 3.4x10‐6  Zinc: 0.9  MnO2: 1.1  MnO2: 390 

Zinc: 9.8  Zinc: 0.52  Zinc: 2.7x10‐6  Brass: 0.25  Steel: 0.76  Steel*: 190 

Steel: 7.5  Steel: 0.46  MnO2: 1.2x10‐6  Steel: 0.12  Brass: 0.6  Zinc**: 170 

Nylon: 1.8  Nylon: 0.11  Steel: 1.0x10‐7  MnO2: 0.071  Zinc: 0.5  KOH***: 110 

KOH: 1.8  KOH: 0.094  Nickel: 8.3x10‐7  Nickel: 0.036  Nickel: 0.17  Graphite: 36 

Brass: 1.3  Brass: 0.04  KOH: 1.0x10‐7 Paper: 0.02 Nylon: 0.13  Brass: 31

PVC: 1  Nickel: 0.047  Nylon: 7.6x10‐8 KOH: 0.006 KOH: 0.1  Paper:15

Paper: 1  PVC: 0.033  Paper: 2.5x10‐8 Nylon: 0.0018 PVC: 0.062  Nylon: 15

Nickel: 0.8  Paper: 0.014  PVC: 2.0x10‐8 Graphite: 0.001 Paper: 0.014  PVC: 15

Graphite: 0.2  Graphite: 0.011  Graphite: 1.7x10‐8 PVC: 0.0008 Graphite: 0.01  Nickel: 3.6

*Includes  steel  in  can  and  galvanized  steel;**Just  zinc  in  electrode  and  galvanized  steel,  not  brass;***KOH including water 

 

This analysis shows that for CED, GWP, and resources, the greatest environmental impact of alkaline  batteries comes from the materials production of manganese dioxide. For all three of these metrics,  approximately 1/3 of the total environmental impact from production comes from a single material.   This general trend mirrors the highest materials by mass within the battery. However, for the case of the  human health and ecosystem quality indicator, zinc has the highest environmental burden, reflecting  the relative toxicity of zinc in human health and the ecosystem as described by this method. Brass also  comes to the forefront for similar reasons in human health and ecosystem quality indicator. Neither of  these components is highest by mass, but because of their relative perceived toxicity, they come to the  top of the list for ecosystem quality or toxicity. In the ecoinvent inventory process zinc emissions to air  in the primary production process (from mining and processing) dominates the environmental impact  associated with both human health and ecosystem quality, accounting for ~90% of the burden of zinc.   Finally, it is useful to examine the burden of the manufacturing facility in a bit more detail. Table 14 and  Figure 10 demonstrate the relative impact of electricity, natural gas, diesel, water and waste in the  battery manufacturing facility.  

(27)

TABLE 14. RELATIVE CONTRIBUTIONS OF IMPACTS OF THE MANUFACTURING FACILITY FOR 1 KG WAAB.  Manufacturing Facility   CED  (MJ/1 kg  WAAB)  GWP  (kg CO eq./1 kg  WAAB) Human  Health  (DALY/1 kg  WAAB)  Ecosystem Quality  (PDF*m2yr/1 kg  WAAB)  Resources   (MJ surplus/1 kg  WAAB)  Electricity  8.9   0.53   5.3x10‐7    2.1x10‐2    0.45  Natural Gas  0.9  0.051  1.6x10‐8  4.1x10‐4  0.071  Diesel  0.36  0.024   1.1x10‐8   1.4x10‐3   0.028  Water  0.018   7.7x10‐4  1.0x10‐9   6.6x10‐5   7x10‐4  Waste   0.0086   4.8x10‐4  1.1x10‐9  6.3x10‐5  5.5x10‐4  TOTAL   10   0.6   5.5x10‐7   2.3x10‐2   0.5      FIGURE 10. BREAKDOWN OF THE IMPACTS OF MANUFACTURING FOR 1 KG WAAB USING CED.   

From Figure 10 it is clear that the electricity use within has the greatest effect on the environmental  burden of the manufacturing facility. Another element of note in Figure 10 is the negative value (or  credit) associated with the waste and recycling burden (indicated by the black bar below the y‐axis). This  credit is associated with the steel recycling within the manufacturing facility. 

As described above there is no environmental burden from the use phase of an alkaline battery. The  impact of the end‐of‐life scenario consisting of 87% landfilling and 13% incineration was a small portion  of the overall impact as described in Table 10. The EOL scenario will be further investigated in the  remainder of this report. 

(28)

As a final set of summarizing analyses for this full life cycle assessment, two more details around the  Eco‐Indicator 99 metric are presented. Table 15 outlines the specific results of each characterization for  a 1 kg WAAB weighted alkaline battery. 

TABLE 15. A) PRODUCTION VERSUS END‐OF‐LIFE IMPACTS AND B) WITHIN RAW MATERIALS, PRODUCTION,  TRANSPORTATION AND PACKAGING FOR EACH CHARACTERIZATION WITHIN ECO‐INVENT FOR 1 KG WAAB. 

Impact  Units  Production End‐of‐Life

Carcinogens 

DALY/1 kg  WAAB 

5.9E‐06 6.9E‐07 

Respiratory organics  3.4E‐09 8.4E‐10 

Respiratory inorganics  3.9E‐06 1.7E‐07 

Climate change  7.9E‐07 1.1E‐07 

Radiation  2.2E‐08 3.0E‐10 

Ozone layer  2.6E‐10 2.5E‐11 

Ecotoxicity  PDF*m2yr/ 1 kg WAAB  1.3 0.61  Acidification/Eutrophication  0.1 0.006  Land use  0.1 0.003  Minerals  MJ surplus/ 1 kg WAAB  1.1 0.001  Fossil fuel use  3.5 0.180 

Impact  Units  Materials Prod. Manufacturing Transportation  Packaging

Carcinogens 

DALY/1 kg  WAAB 

5.7E‐06 1.3E‐07 3.5E‐08  5.5E‐08

Respiratory organics  2.1E‐09 5.2E‐10 5.7E‐10  2.4E‐10

Respiratory inorganics  3.1E‐06 2.9E‐07 3.8E‐07  1.3E‐07

Climate change  5.2E‐07 1.3E‐07 8.8E‐08  5.7E‐08

Radiation  1.7E‐08 3.3E‐09 7.8E‐10  1.2E‐09

Ozone layer  1.6E‐10 2.5E‐11 6.9E‐11  1.2E‐11

Ecotoxicity  PDF*m2yr/ 1 kg WAAB  1.3 8.6E‐03 1.3E‐02  0.005 Acidification/Eutrophication  0.1 0.0094 1.8E‐02  0.0042 Land use  0.1 0.0047 6.6E‐03  0.033 Minerals  MJ surplus/ 1 kg WAAB  1.1 0.0033 6.1E‐03  0.0028 Fossil fuel use  2.3 0.55 5.0E‐01  0.25  

To summarize the full life cycle implications of alkaline batteries, the production of raw materials  dominates the life cycle with the transport of those raw materials to manufacturing having a minimal  environmental impact.   A few materials dominate this materials production impact, with manganese  dioxide, zinc, and steel having the highest relative impacts.  To return to the data quality assessment for  this phase of the analysis, despite the ubiquity of European data based on ecoinvent, the relative impact  of  materials  and  elements  of  manufacturing  are  assumed  to  be  reliable.  Furthermore,  within  manufacturing the electricity burden dominated which was modeled after a US grid, therefore also more  relevant geographically. Therefore the data gaps, in particular around geography, are not expected to  have an effect on the dominant elements of the alkaline battery life cycle.  

Figure

Updating...

References

Updating...

Related subjects :