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April 18, 2002 MEMORANDUM

TO: James W. Holsinger, Jr., M.D.

Chair, Academic Council for the Medical Center FROM: Emery A. Wilson, M.D.

Dean and Associate Vice President for Clinical Services

RE: New Graduate Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science Proposal The Faculty Council of the College of Medicine has approved and submits for your consideration and approval the following new certificate proposal:

Graduate Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science

Description: To allow this program to award an official graduate certificate. Graduate courses for the certificate program are already in place and offered by the Department of Behavioral Science.

Justification: To make students’ transcripts show not only their course work but that they were awarded certificate status.

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April 18, 2002 MEMORANDUM

TO: Deans, Department Chairs and Members of the University Senate FROM: Emery A. Wilson, M.D.

Dean and Associate Vice President for Clinical Services

RE: New Graduate Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science Proposal The Faculty Council of the College of Medicine has approved and submits for your consideration and approval the following new certificate proposal:

Graduate Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science

Description: To allow this program to award an official graduate certificate. Graduate courses for the certificate program are already in place and offered by the Department of Behavioral Science.

Justification: To make students’ transcripts show not only their course work but that they were awarded certificate status.

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February 21, 2001

Emery A. Wilson, M.D. Dean, College of Medicine University of Kentucky Lexington, KY 40506 Dear Dean Wilson:

Attached is a proposal to make official a Graduate Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science. The Behavioral Science Department has had a long-standing commitment to graduate education at the University of Kentucky with NIH/NIMH training grant funding since 1960. Unofficially, the Department has supported the health communications, health psychology, medical anthropology and medical sociology concentrations offered in variety of other degree-granting departments including: Anthropology,

Communications, Educational and Counseling Psychology, Psychology, and Sociology. The proposed certificate requires students successfully complete four hours in two required courses, an orientation course (BSC 620) and a methods course (BSC 745) as well as nine hours in three electives (9 hours) and at least one hour in an independent research course (BSC 790). As the graduate courses for this certificate program are already in place and offered by the Department of Behavioral Science, no new courses need be proposed to implement this proposal. In making the present concentration an official certificate, students' transcripts will show not only their course work but also the awarding of the certificate status.

Thank you for considering our proposal. A signature page with the signature of Dr. Leukefeld, an original hard copy and an electronic copy of the proposal are all attached. Sincerely,

Mitzi M.S. Johnson Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies MMSJ:cjc

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Department of Behavioral Science

Proposal for a Graduate Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science

Overview

As a basic science department of the College of Medicine, the Department of Behavioral Science has a three-fold mission in the areas of research, teaching, and service. First, the Department conducts research in various areas of medical behavioral science, thereby enhancing understanding of many aspects of human behavior in their relevance to health and disease. Second, the Department provides instruction to medical students on

concepts from the behavioral sciences that are critical for the provision of excellent patient care and for functioning in the rapidly evolving health care system. The educational mission also includes an extensive commitment to working with graduate students and postdoctoral fellows from various disciplines who are seeking research training in medical behavioral science. Basic behavioral science instruction is also delivered to selected health professional programs, particularly, Dentistry, Nursing, Physical Therapy, and Pharmacy. Finally, faculty provide service for the institution, society and professional organizations by volunteering their efforts. The Department’s commitment to graduate education will be illustrated further below.

No graduate degree is offered independently by the Department of Behavioral Science. However, the department is quite active in graduate education. It cooperates with the doctoral programs in Gerontology, Anthropology, Educational and Counseling Psychology, Psychology, Sociology, Communications, Nursing, Nutritional Science, Kinesiology and Health Promotion, and Geography to offer health/medical behavioral specializations in the students’ basic disciplines. Sixty-eight graduate students have chosen such a specialization in the past five years.

In the 2000-2001 academic year, 21 students were being financially supported by the Department. These funds are derived from the department’s NIMH, NIDA, and DOD training programs, from departmental research grants, from the vice-chancellor’s fellowship pool, and from graduate school fellowships. The majority of these students have traineeships, fellowships, or are research or teaching assistants.

The majority of program graduates find employment in academic departments of their basic disciplines. In those positions, they emphasize teaching and research in

health/medical aspects of the discipline. It is also common for these individuals to establish research and teaching connections with nearby medical centers. Other graduates select postdoctoral positions, though this remains a less frequent route. The Department has helped guide 68 students to their Ph.D. degrees and 16 to their M.A. degrees in the past five years.

The NIMH, NIDA, and DOD training program grants support six postdoctoral fellows annually. These fellows typically are drawn from the behavioral science disciplines and

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are seeking further research training in the medical behavioral area. Occasionally, health professionals seeking further behavioral science and medical behavioral research

experience accept fellowships; the latter have been individuals with doctorates in nursing science. In one instance, the department accepted a postdoctoral fellow who was

supported by a Lyman T. Johnson Minority Postdoctoral Fellowship.

In the past five years, fourteen postdoctoral students have been supported by the NIMH, NIDA, and the DOD training programs, ten were women and two were minorities. In addition, there has been one postdoctoral scholar supported by a research grant, and one postdoctoral fellow by research grant salary savings.

Graduate Certificate Associates or Affiliates

The Department of Behavioral Science currently has in its budget 13 tenure-track faculty lines, two of which are now vacant. Three additional faculty have primary, tenure-track appointments in the department, but are budget elsewhere. In addition, the department has two emeritus faculty, Drs. Haley and Straus, as well as 12 joint appointees, 4 adjunct and three voluntary faculty. All primary, tenure-track faculty have graduate faculty status and are listed on Table 1 with their topical research interests. Of the two most important required courses: 1) responsibility for the orientation course is rotated among 12 primary faculty; 2) responsibility for the methods course is usually taken by those with specific expertise (Michael Andrykowski – ethics; Mitzi Johnson – quasi-experimental and survey design; Thomas Kelly – experimental design; Craig Rush – biobehavioral pharmacology methods; Nancy Schoenberg – qualitative methods).

Graduate Certificate Director

Since the original awarding of the NIMH training grant 40 years ago, the Department has had a Director of Graduate Studies appointed by the Chairman of the Department and as recognized by the Graduate School. The Director recommended for the proposed certificate curriculum would be the same person appointed as the Director of Graduate Studies appointed by the Department Chairman and the Dean of the Graduate School. Currently, Dr. Mitzi Johnson holds this position

Admission Requirements

To be accepted into the Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science, a student must first be admitted to the University of Kentucky Graduate School as a doctoral student in a

doctoral program (usually in a social or behavioral science department) and complete the Certificate application form. Postbaccalaureate (non-degree) and master's-only students are not eligible for admission.

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Certificate Curriculum

The Department of Behavioral Science proposes to offer a Graduate Certificate in

Medical Behavioral Science designed for students who are enrolled in a doctoral program in a basic academic field. This program typically will admit doctoral students from programs in Anthropology, Communications, Educational and Counseling Psychology, Geography, Gerontology, Health and Physical Education, Nursing, Nutritional Science, Psychology, and Sociology. These students often come to the University of Kentucky to work with our faculty and to obtain training in Medical Anthropology, Medical

Sociology, Health Psychology, and Health Communications which are subspecialty fields within each of these disciplines.

The Certificate is designed to provide students with:

An orientation to a multidisciplinary approach incorporating the basic theories and methods from their disciplines with other social and behavioral sciences with identification of areas of convergence and interrelation in content, theories, and methods.

An orientation to health and medical settings, including an enculturation to the attitudes, values, professional interrelationships, and educational objectives of health personnel and organizations, and the nature of behavioral science research in these areas.

Research training designed to equip each student with basic skills and approaches to research design, data acquisition, data analysis, and manuscript and research grant preparation in medical behavioral science through collaboration with ongoing research projects.

The Requirements for completion of the Graduate Certificate in Medical Behavioral Science are:

1. Successful completion of a minimum of thirteen credit hours of graduate course work in Behavioral Science course with a GPA of 3.00 or better,

specifically: a required three-credit course in research methods in medical

behavioral science (BSC 745: Research Methods in Medical Behavioral Science), a required one-credit course that is designed to orient students to the medical setting (BSC 620: Orientation to Medical Behavioral Science), and nine hours of electives (see listing in Table 2) approved by the Director of Graduate Studies of which at least three credit hours must be from a course outside of the student’s basic discipline.

2. Participation in personalized, supervised research activities with a faculty member from the department including experimental, survey, and case study

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methods applied to research questions related to health and mental health earning credit in BSC 790: Research in Medical Behavioral Science.

A student must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the set of courses required for the graduate certificate in order to be awarded the certificate.

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Table 1: Graduate Faculty in BSC Serving as Certificate Associates or Affiliates

Name Degree/Date Topical Research Interest

PRIMARY APPOINTMENTS

Michael Andrykowski

Professor

Ph.D./1984 Psychosocial oncology, quality of life assessment, research design, research ethics.

Lee X. Blonder

Associate Professor

Ph.D./1986 Behavioral consequences of stroke, neurocognition. Cynthia M. Cole

Associate Professor

Ph.D./1989 Rural health, and medical practice. Carol L. Elam

Associate Professor

Ed.D./1990 Medical Education

Eugene B. Gallagher Professor

Ph.D./1958 Technological medicine and health care in developing societies, medical education. Thomas F. Garrity

Professor

Ph.D./1971 Loss and grief, behavioral determinants of and coping with cardiovascular disease.

Joseph E. Gaugler

Assistant Professor

Ph.D./1999 Family caregiving for elderly, long-term care, formal-informal care patterns, longitudinal methodology.

Mitzi M.S. Johnson Associate Professor

Ph.D./1986 Decision making and health care in later years, medical education.

Thomas H. Kelly Professor

Ph.D./1983 Experimental analysis of human behavior, behavioral pharmacology.

Carl G. Leukefeld Professor

D.S.W./1975 Treatments, outcomes, HIV prevention, criminal justice sanctions, health services, and rural populations.

Phyllis J.P. Nash Professor

Ed.D./1985 Medical Education

Craig R. Rush

Associate Professor

Ph.D./1992 Biobehavioral pharmacology and drug abuse, experimental analysis of human behavior, research design ethics.

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Nancy E. Schoenberg Associate Professor

Ph.D./1994 Chronic disease management; health services delivery; women, minorities, and rural elders.

Timothy A. Smith Professor

Ph.D./1963 Dental fear and anxiety, pain, measuring dental anxiety, educational technology

H. Jean C. Wiese

Associate Professor

Ph.D./1971 Communication in medical settings, cross-cultural health change.

John F. Wilson Professor

Ph.D./1977 Pain control, stress reduction, coping, medical education.

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Name Degree/Date Topical Research Interest JOINT APPOINTMENTS

Mary K. Anglin, Assistant Professor Ph.D./1990 Anthropology Norma J. Christman, Associate Professor Ph.D./1980 Nursing Deborah L. Crooks, Assistant Professor Ph.D./1992 Anthropology Sandra L. D’Angelo, Assistant Professor Ph.D./1989 Pediatrics

Lynne A. Hall, Professor Dr.P.H./1983 Nursing

Graham D. Rowles, Professor Ph.D./1976 Gerontology

Frederick A. Schmitt, Associate Professor

Ph.D./1982 Neurology

Gary Shannon, Professor Ph.D./1970 Geography

John van Willigen, Professor Ph.D./1971 Anthropology

Doris Y. Wilkinson, Professor Ph.D./1968 Sociology

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Table 2: GRADUATE COURSES FOR THE PROPOSED CERTIFICATE CURRICULUM

Required

BSC 620 Orientation to Medical Behavioral Science, 1 cr Rotation of Faculty

BSC 745 Research Methods in Medical Behavioral Science, 3 cr Craig R. Rush Electi

ves

BSC 626 Survey of Health Psychology, 3 cr (PSY 626) .

John F. Wilson BSC 766 Concepts in Medical Sociology , 3 cr (SOC 766) Eugene B. Gallagher BSC 770 Psychosocial Issues in Health and Aging, 3 cr Mitzi M.S. Johnson BSC 772 Topical Seminar in Medical Behavioral Science, 1-3 cr

Advanced study of selected topics of current importance in medical behavioral science.

Faculty

BSC 773 Psychosocial Oncology, 3 cr Michael Andrykowski

BSC 775 Human Response to Stress, 3 cr John F. Wilson BSC 776 Seminar in Dependency Behavior, 3 cr (ANT/PSY/

SOC 776)

Thomas H. Kelly BSC 777 Seminar in Mental Illness Concepts, Research

and Policy, 3 cr (SOC 777)

Eugene B. Gallagher

BSC 778 Behavioral Factors in Selected Diseases, 3 cr H. Jean C. Wiese BSC 779 Behavioral Factors in Death and Dying, 3 cr Thomas F. Garrity BSC 782 Women's Health and Aging, 3 cr (GRN 782) Nancy E. Schoenberg BSC 785 Comparative Health Care Systems, 3 cr (GRN 782) Eugene B. Gallagher

Pending Psychology in Aging Joseph E. Gaugler

BSC 790 Research in Medical Behavioral Science, 1-6 cr Faculty

Substitutions for Elective courses may be permitted with the approval of the Director of Graduate Studies.

References

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