Conference on Autism and Developmental Disabilities

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Conference on Autism and

Developmental Disabilities

A collaboration of: Programs in Special Education and the Department of Psychology

Saturday, April 18, 2015

Student Union, 65-30 Kissena Boulevard, Queens, NY 11367

REGISTRATION: 9-9:30 am

CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS: 9:30 am – 4:00 pm

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 10:45 – 12:15 pm

Key Ingredients and Common Elements of Research--

- Based Practices for

Early Intervention

(1.5 BACB CEU)

Laura Schreibman, Ph.D.

Our increased ability to identify and diagnose children with autism at earlier and earlier ages provides us with both a huge

opportunity and a huge challenge. Our knowledge of the significant potential benefits of effective early intervention urges us to take

advantage of the early intervention window. The challenge is how do we best fill this window. While there is a substantial research

base supporting the effectiveness of behavioral interventions across the lifespan of autism, research has demonstrated that these

interventions may not be suitable for the toddler autism population now being served. This has led to two main modifications of

behavioral interventions. The first is a move towards more “naturalistic” behavioral interventions, which are more child-directed and

provided in more natural environmental contexts. The second is the integration of principles derived from developmental psychology

that affect our choice of treatment targets, learning contexts, and leaning enhancing strategies. In fact, it appears that both of these

approaches (behavioral and developmental) have evolved simultaneously in the development of early interventions. While several

individual, “branded,” interventions have been developed and enjoy substantial empirical supports, these share common, key,

elements that are crucial to effectiveness. All of these individual interventions fall under the rubric of “Naturalistic Developmental

Behavioral Interventions.” This presentation will address common elements of these treatments, issues of implementation, and

research needs for both behavioral and developmental science.

BREAKOUT SESSIONS

EARN UP TO 3.5 BACB CEUs

FAMILY-PROFESSIONAL PANEL 1:15-2:45 pm

Family – Professional Partnerships: An Opportunity and a Challenge

A panel of three will share their experiences and stories about both the challenges and the successes within the

family/professional collaboration.

Our panel will include:

o Dr. Stephen Shore, Professor of Special Education at Adelphi University, also a person with Asperger’s.

o Ms. Niki Mirabella, MSEd in Special Education, and also mom to Gina Mirabella who has

Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome.

o Ms. Susan McHugh, sister to a young man with an autism spectrum disorder.

Preregister by

April 5th for

discounted

registration!

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Conference on Autism and Developmental

Disabilities

2015 Conference Presentations

Morning Breakout Sessions 9:30-10:30 am

Using Video Models and Feedback to Train Newly Hired Direct Care Staff

Lindsay Maffei-Almodovar, MS Ed, MA, BCBA, & Peter Sturmey, PhD

The experimenter trained one newly hired direct care staff member to conduct conditioning the instructor as a secondary reinforcer, Multiple Stimulus Preference Assessment Without Replacement (MSWOR) and baseline assessments of skills using a multiple probes design across skills. Video models increased percentage of accurately performed steps for conditioning the instructor as a secondary reinforcer. The other two skills did not improve to mastery levels until the experimenter implemented a rehearsal and feedback phase of training. Training took only 165 minutes and 30 s of participant time.

Implementing Activity Schedules

Carol A. Fiorile, PhD, BCBA-D

This workshop will provide attendees a background in empirically validated procedures for implementing Activity Schedules for students with ASD. Rationale for the implementation of Activity Schedules will be discussed, as well as the steps leading up the developing the student’s independence in using a schedule. Discussion will also include different types of Activity Schedules. This workshop is designed as an introduction as to how to implement Activity Schedules for children with ASD and other severe developmental disabilities.

How to Teach Eye Gaze to Improve Social Communication in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Ivana Krstovska-Guerrero, PhD, BCBA-D

Impairment in eye gaze is one of the earliest symptoms observed in infants later diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). The eye gaze impairment negatively affects the learning process, including the development of early social-communication skills. This workshop will describe strategies to assess toddlers’ prerequisite skills for addressing social communication, teach eye gaze, and assess for generalization to early social-communication skills, such as requesting, joint attention, imitation, and affect.

What are Work-reinforcer Schedules and How do they Affect the Performance of Children with Developmental Disabilities?

Presenters: Colleen Kocher, MA, BCBA, Mirela Cengher, MA, BCBA, and Daniel M. Fienup, PhD, BCBA-D

Recent research has examined how the distribution of responses and reinforcers within a session affects a student’s performance and preference. Two basic response-reinforcer arrangements have been used. In the continuous work-reinforcer schedule, the student engages in larger response units (e.g., 10 worksheets) for a delayed, larger magnitude reinforcer (e.g., 10 M&Ms). In the discontinuous work-reinforcer schedule, the student engages in smaller response units (e.g., one worksheet), and each response unit is immediately followed by a smaller magnitude reinforcer (e.g., one M&M). This talk will review several recent studies examining these two basic schedules, with an emphasis on direct and indirect variables that can influence choice and performance. This area of research has implications for how to effectively and efficiently promote skill acquisition for children with developmental disabilities.

Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric Feeding Disorders

Laura Seiverling, PhD, BCBA-D, Christina Alaimo, MS

This presentation will review pediatric feeding disorders, including their etiology, prevalence, assessment, and evidence-based interventions. Presenters will discuss the importance of treating selective eating or food refusal, and provide strategies for addressing these types of behaviors using behavioral principles.

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Conference on Autism and Developmental

Disabilities

2015 Conference Presentations

Afternoon Breakout Sessions 3:00-4:00 pm

Children with Autism and their Siblings: Building a Lifelong Relationship

Presenters: Susan V. McHugh, B.A., Lauren A. Kryzak, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Nicole M. Neil, M.A., BCBA, Theresa Fiani, B.A.,

Daniel Fienup, PhD, BCBA-D, and Emily A. Jones, Ph.D., BCBA-D

The sibling relationship is arguably the most significant of those we enter into with our peers, and is often the longest lasting. Behavior analytic interventions that target the social repertoires of children with autism as well as those of their typically developing siblings are necessary to foster successful relationships in sibling dyads. In this discussion, various measures of sibling interaction and perception of the relationship will be examined. Among the types of interventions for siblings, we will discuss the use of direct observations and self-report measures, as well as group constructs such as support groups and training sessions for typical siblings. SIBS Club – A Program for Families of Children with Autism of Queens College will be discussed at this time as well.

Using Treatment Intensity to Optimize Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome

Presenters: Alysha Rafeeq, BA, Nicole Neil, MA, BCBA, and Emily A. Jones, PhD, BCBA-D

Determining how best to meet the needs of learners with Down syndrome requires an approach to intervention delivered at some level of intensity. How treatment intensity affects learner acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of skills can help optimize the efficiency and cost effectiveness of interventions. It may be that etiology and characteristics associated with specific etiologies impact the effects of intervention and intensity. Many children with Down syndrome display poor task persistence, which may moderate the effects of intensity. For some learners with Down syndrome, it is possible that there is an optimum moderate dosage of intervention, past which, learners engage in greater levels of escape-motivated problem behavior and there are diminishing gains in acquisition rates. In a series of preliminary studies, we manipulated different aspects of the dose of treatment intensity and measured effects on skill acquisition using single-subject experimental designs (multiple-baseline and alternating treatments). Intensity varied in terms of number of opportunities per session, session duration, and spacing of

opportunities (inter-stimulus interval). Matched responses within a skill area were randomly assigned to a level of intensity and acquisition compared. Results reveal lessons about what aspects of intensity to manipulate and how, selecting experimental designs, measuring multiple outcome measures, and the influence of learner characteristics. Through this approach we may begin to tease apart the relative contributions of different aspects of intensity on skill acquisition and determine the most effective intensity of early intervention for children with Down syndrome.

Assessing and Treating Anxiety in ASD

Presenter: Lauren Moskowitz, PhD, & Emily A. Jones, PhD, BCBA-D

Despite the increased risk for anxiety disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD), there is a lack of research on the assessment and treatment of anxiety in this population, particularly for those with an intellectual disability (ID). Further, the relationship between anxiety and problem behavior has not been systematically investigated in children with ASD. Thus, we will describe a multimethod strategy for the assessment of anxiety and problem behavior in three children with comorbid ASD and ID. Additionally, we will describe a multicomponent behavioral intervention package used to treat the anxiety and associated problem behavior. The intervention package incorporated strategies from the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) literature for neurotypical children with strategies from Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and Positive Behavior Support (PBS) for children with developmental disabilities.

Behavioral Intervention to Increase Participation in Yoga and other Leisure Activities

Presenter: Deb Gruber, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Opportunities for children with autism to engage in organized leisure activities to the level of their typical peers are limited. This is unfortunate because such activities also provide social and communication opportunities with peers. Activities involving physical fitness combine the balance for social and body awareness. Effective behavioral strategies will be reviewed to help support children with autism in organized leisure activities alongside their typical peers.

Broad Effects of a Social Communication Intervention Targeting Gaze Shift

Theresa Fiani, BA, Holly Weisberg, BA, Ivana Krstovska-Guerrero, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Emily A. Jones, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Children with autism show impairments in their gaze behavior and eye contact within the first 6 months of life. Impaired gaze behavior pervades children’s social-communicative interactions. At young ages this is seen in impairments in basic functions of social-social-communicative interactions including requesting and joint attention. Gaze shift is a component of all social communication skills. Teaching gaze shift in a small sample of social communicative contexts may result in much broader changes. We will describe research examining collateral changes to a repertoire of social communicative behavior. Generalization to different requesting and joint attention contexts as well as across other social communicative responses (i.e., imitation) and changes in children’s interactions with their mothers will be highlighted. Findings will be discussed in terms of gaze shift as a pivotal skill with future research questions posed about improving the effectiveness and efficiency of intervention, targeting other responses, and additional areas of collateral change.

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Conference on Autism and

Developmental Disabilities

A collaboration of: Programs in Special Education and the Department of Psychology

REGISTRATION FORM

To register, please print and mail this form with a check or money order, payable, to: Queens

College-Autism Conference.

Send your registration form to:

Ms. Jaclyn Arroyo

ECP Queens College

65-30 Kissena Boulevard

Queens, NY 11367

Name

Address

Phone

Affiliation

Email

Please check if you would like a kosher lunch on Saturday.

Preregistration (before April 5, 2015)

Professional

$70

Parent

$35

Student

$35

BCBA credits

$20

On Site Registration

Professional

$80

Parent

$45

Student

$45

BCBA credits

$25

**Please complete breakout session preferences

on the second page and return with your

registration form

* EARN UP

TO 3.5 BACB

CEUs

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Conference on Autism and Developmental

Disabilities

2015 Conference Presentations

9:30-10:30 am

Choice

of

one

session

Using Video Models and Feedback to Train Newly Hired Direct Care Staff (1 CEU)

Lindsay Maffei-Almodovar, MS Ed, MA, BCBA, & Peter Sturmey, PhD

Implementing Activity Schedules (1 CEU)

Carol A. Fiorile, PhD, BCBA-D

How to Teach Eye Gaze to Improve Social Communication in Toddlers with Autism Spectrum

Disorders (1 CEU)

Ivana Krstovska-Guerrero, PhD, BCBA-D

What are Work-reinforcer Schedules and How do they Affect the Performance of Children with

Developmental Disabilities? (1 CEU)

Colleen Kocher, MA, BCBA, Mirela Cengher, MA, BCBA, and Daniel M. Fienup, PhD, BCBA-D

Assessment and Treatment of Pediatric Feeding Disorders (1 CEU)

Laura Seiverling, PhD, BCBA-D, Christina Alaimo, MS

10:45-12:15pm KEYNOTE

Key Ingredients and Common Elements of Research---­‐ Based Practices for Early Intervention (1.5 CEU)

Laura Schreibman, Ph.D.

12:15–1:15 pm LUNCH

1:15–2:45 pm FAMILY-PROFESSIONAL PANEL

Family – Professional Partnerships: An Opportunity and a Challenge

A panel of three will share their experiences and stories about both the challenges and the successes within the

family/professional collaboration.

Our panel will include:

o Dr. Stephen Shore, Professor of Special Education at Adelphi University, also a person with Asperger’s

o Ms. Niki Mirabella, MSEd in Special Education, and also mom to Gina Mirabella who has

Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome.

o Ms. Susan McHugh, sister to a young man with an autism spectrum disorder.

3:00-4:00 pm

Choice

of

one

session

Children with Autism and their Siblings: Building a Lifelong Relationship (1 CEU)

Susan V. McHugh, B.A., Lauren A. Kryzak, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Nicole M. Neil, M.A., BCBA, Theresa

Fiani, B.A., Daniel Fienup, PhD, BCBA-D, and Emily A. Jones, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Using Treatment Intensity to Optimize Intervention for Children with Down Syndrome (1 CEU)

Alysha Rafeeq, BA, Nicole Neil, MA, BCBA, and Emily A. Jones, PhD, BCBA-D

Assessing and Treating Anxiety in ASD (1 CEU)

Lauren Moskowitz, PhD, & Emily A. Jones, PhD, BCBA-D

Behavioral Intervention to Increase Participation in Yoga and other Leisure Activities (1 CEU)

Deb Gruber, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Broad Effects of a Social Communication Intervention Targeting Gaze Shift (1 CEU)

Theresa Fiani, BA, Holly Weisberg, BA, Ivana Krstovska-Guerrero, PhD, BCBA-D, Emily Jones, PhD,

BCBA-D

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Conference on Autism and

Developmental Disabilities

A collaboration of: Programs in Special Education and the Department of Psychology

DIRECTIONS

Student Union

[

65-30 Kissena Boulevard

[

Queens, NY 11367-1597

Queens College is located at the corner of the Long Island Expressway and Kissena

Boulevard (Exit 24) in Queens.

Via Flushing: IRT #7 subway or LIRR to Main Street; take the Q17 or Q25-34 bus.

Via Forest Hills: IND subway to Continental Avenue; take the Q64 bus to Kissena

Boulevard and Jewel Avenue; the campus is one long block north.

VIA Jamaica: IND subway to Parsons Boulevard or LIRR to Jamaica station; form

Jamaica Avenue and 160

th

Street or Hillside avenue and Parsons Boulevard, take the

Q25-34 bus; from Hillside avenue and 169

th

or 179

th

Streets, take the Q17 bus.

Figure

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