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www.heinemann.com

Phone: 800.225.5800

California

www.heinemann.com

Phone: 800.225.5800

“ The knowledge that forms the foundation for reading and writing is

built throughout early childhood through play, language, and literacy

experiences.”

Gay Su Pinnell and Irene C. Fountas

California Preschool Learning Foundations, Vol. 1 (Foundations in

Language and Literacy) and The Continuum of Literacy Learning,

Grades PreK–8: A Guide to Teaching

by Gay Su Pinnell and Irene C. Fountas

(2)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

2

Calif

ornia

• Form clear questions to get information

• Use some specific vocabulary (book, page, title, cover, author, illustrator)

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Content

• Express opinions and explain reasoning (because . . .)

• Describe people and places in a story

• Talk about how people, places, or events are alike and different • Talk about one’s own feelings and those of others

• Ask questions (demonstrate curiosity)

Page 193, Presentation, Word Choice

• Use some words that describe (adjectives and adverbs)

A.1.2 Speak clearly enough to be understood by adults and children

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 193, Presentation, Voice

• Speak about a topic with enthusiasm • Talk smoothly with little hesitation • Talk with confidence

Page 193, Presentation, Conventions

• Enunciate words clearly

A.1.3 Use accepted language and style during communication with

adults and children

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Look at the person who is talking

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Social Interaction

• Speak in an audible voice

• Speak at an appropriate volume for indoors • Adjust volume as appropriate for different contexts

• Use polite terms such as please and thank you

• Engage in conversation during imaginary play • Engage in the turn-taking of conversation • Engage in dramatic play

Page 193, Presentation, Conventions

• Speak at an appropriate volume to be heard, but not too loud • Look at the audience (or other person) while talking • Speak at an appropriate rate to be understood

A.1.0 Language Use and Conventions

Children understand and use language to communicate with

others effectively

A.1.1 Use language to communicate with others in social situations

for a variety of basic purposes, including describing, requesting,

commenting, acknowledging, greeting, rejecting, reasoning,

predicting, problem solving, and seeking new information

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Notice and acquire understanding of new words from read-aloud context • Use new words in discussion of a text

• Follow the events of a simple plot and remember them enough to discuss or reenact a story

• Understand simple problems and talk about them • Talk about interesting information learned from a text

• Pick up important information while listening and use it in discussion • Notice and use important information from the pictures

Page 21, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Talk about what a character is like, how a character feels, or what a character might do (inference)

• Identify and repeat specific language that characters use in stories

Page 21, Thinking About the Text

• Use specific vocabulary to talk about texts: author, illustrator, cover, title, page,

problem, beginning, ending

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking About the Text

• Talk about whether or not they liked a book and say why • Talk about favorite parts of a story

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Social Interaction

• Enter a conversation appropriately

• Sustain a conversation with others (teacher, family, peers)

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Understand and use words related to familiar common experiences and topics (pets, body parts, food, clothes, transportation, classroom objects, home, family, and neighborhood)

(3)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

3

Calif

ornia

A.2.0 Vocabulary

Children develop age-appropriate vocabulary

A.2.1 Understand and use accepted words for objects, actions, and

attributes encountered in both real and symbolic contexts

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Notice and acquire understanding of new words from read-aloud context • Use new words in discussion of text

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Understand the meaning of new words after reading them in a text and talking about them

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Learn new words related to topics of inquiry in the classroom • Show interest in words

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Understand and use words related to familiar common experiences and topics (pets, body parts, food, clothes, transportation, classroom objects, home, family, and neighborhood)

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Content

• Describe people and places in a story

• Talk about how people, places, or events are alike and different

Page 193, Presentation, Word Choice

• Understand and use words related to familiar experiences and topics such as pets, body parts, food, clothes, transportation, classroom objects, home, family, and neighborhood

• Use some words that describe (adjectives and adverbs)

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 219, Word Meaning

• Notice and use new and interesting words heard in texts read aloud and in conversation

• Notice new and interesting words in poems and other shared reading texts • Use new words in conversation, in writing dictated to the teacher, and in shared/

interactive writing

Page 193, Presentation, Organization

• Show awareness of the audience when speaking • Present information or ideas in an understandable way • Speak to one topic and stay on topic

A.1.4 Use language to construct narratives that are real or fictional

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Pick up important information while listening and use it in discussion • Notice and use important information from the pictures

• Tell stories in response to pictures

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Notice and use important information from pictures to understand and remem-ber text

• Talk about characters, problems, and events in a story

Writing

Page 116, Craft, Organization, Presentation of Ideas

• Tell about experiences or topics in a way that can be written by the teacher

Page 117, Writing Process, Rehearsing/Planning, Oral Language

• Use storytelling to generate and rehearse language (that may be written later)

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Compare personal knowledge and experiences with what is heard

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Follow the topic and add to the discussion • Respond to and build on the statements of others

• Participate actively in whole-class discussion or with a partner or in a small group

Page 193, Presentation, Voice

• Tell stories in an interesting way

Page 193, Presentation, Organization

• Tell personal experiences in a logical sequence • Present information or ideas in an understandable way

Page 193, Presentation, Word Choice

• Use some language from stories when retelling them

Page 193, Presentation, Ideas and Content

• Tell stories from personal experiences • Retell stories from text

(4)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

4

Calif

ornia

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 193, Presentation, Voice

• Talk smoothly with little hesitation

Page 193, Presentation, Organization

• Tell personal experiences in a logical sequence

Page 193, Presentation, Word Choice

• Use some words that describe (adjectives and adverbs)

A. 3.2 Understand and typically use age-appropriate grammar,

including accepted word forms such as subject-verb agreement,

progressive tense, past tense, plurals, pronouns, and possessives

Writing

Page 114, Narrative, Memoir, Writing in the Genre

• Use some words orally that indicate the passage of time (then, again, after)

Page 116, Conventions, Grammar, Parts of Speech

• Use nouns and verbs in agreement most of the time when suggesting ideas for shared/interactive writing or producing language for dictation

• Use prepositional phrases when suggesting ideas for shared/interactive writing or producing language for dictation

• Use modifiers (red dress; ran fast)

Page 116, Conventions, Grammar, Tense

• Use past tense in describing past events when suggesting ideas for shared/inter-active writing or producing language for dictation

• Use present tense to describe something (I like . . .)

• Begin to use future tense (I’m going to . . .)

B.1.0 Concepts About Print

Children begin to recognize print conventions and understand that

print carries meaning

B.1.1 Display appropriate book-handling behaviors and knowledge of

print conventions

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking About the Text

• Understand the meaning of some aspects of text structure (beginning, end, next)

A.2.2 Understand and use accepted words for categories of objects

encountered in everyday life

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Notice and talk about texts that are alike in some way

Page 55, Thinking About the Text

• Recognize the same tale (traditional story) in different books

• Notice and follow texts that are organized around a special feature such as numbers, days of the week, ABCs

A.2.3 Understand and use words that describe the relations between

objects

Writing

Page 116, Craft, Organization, Presentation of Ideas

• Suggest logically related ideas in a group story or topic writing

Page 118, Writing Process, Rehearsing/Planning, Content/Topic/Theme

• Understand a group of ideas related to an area of study or inquiry

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Learn new words related to topics of inquiry in the classroom

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 219, Word Meaning

• Know the meaning of some concept words—simple colors, number words, shapes, days of the week, months of the year, holidays

• Learn the meaning of some words related to inquiry in the classroom

A.3.0 Grammar

Children develop age-appropriate grammar

A.3.1 Understand and use increasingly complex and longer sentences,

including sentences that combine phrases or concepts to

communicate ideas

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Engage in shared reading with fluency and expression

• Using phrasing, pausing, and word stress with the teacher’s support

Writing

Page 116, Conventions, Grammar, Sentence Structure

• Use simple but conventional sentence structure when suggesting ideas for

(5)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

5

Calif

ornia

B.2.0 Phonological Awareness

Children develop age-appropriate phonological awareness

B.2.1 Orally blend and delete words and syllables without the support

of pictures or objects

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Play with words or language orally (for example, nonsense words or refrains from texts read aloud)

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Show interest in words

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Show interest in words and word play

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 218, Phonological Awareness, Words

• Hear word boundaries

• Understand that words are made up of sounds

Page 218, Phonological Awareness, Syllables

• Clap the syllables of words with teacher help

Page 219, Word Structure, Syllables

• Clap words to show awareness of syllables

B.2.2 Orally blend the onsets, rimes, and phonemes of words and orally

delete the onsets of words, with the support of pictures or

objects

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Remember and use repeating language patterns

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Show interest in words

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Show interest in words and word play

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 218, Phonological Awareness, Words

• Hear word boundaries

• Understand that words are made up of sounds

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Follow the teacher’s pointer in a coordinated way while reading text with group support

• Begin to notice aspects of print to help in tracking it during shared reading • Begin to recognize some simple punctuation

Writing

Page 115, Poetic, Poetry, Understanding the Genre

• Begin to notice how space and lines are used in poems, songs, and rhymes

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 218, Early Literacy Concepts

• Use print in a variety of ways—labels, signs, stories, books • Hold and handle books correctly (turning pages front to back, etc) • Follow the print during shared reading (as cued by the pointer)

• Use left-to-right directionality and return to the left in shared reading of print and in group writing

• Understand the concept of first and last in written language

B.1.2 Understand that print is something that is read and has specific

meaning

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Use hand and body movements showing understanding that the pictures and words of a text convey meaning

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Discuss how to read a text with the teacher and other children

Writing

Page 116, Craft, Language Use

• When talking about or retelling stories for dictation or shared/interactive writing, show evidence of awareness of the language of books

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 218, Early Literacy Concepts

• Notice and talk about photographs, pictures, drawings, and familiar written

words (names, Mom)

• Note print in the environment and look for its meaning • Understand that print conveys meaning

• Distinguish between print and pictures • Read a known text in unison with others • Understand that books are sources of information

(6)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

6

Calif

ornia

Page 218, Letter Knowledge, Recognizing Letters in Words and Sentences

• Locate some known letters in print

B.3.3 Begin to recognize that letters have sounds

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 219, Letter Knowledge, Letter/Sound Relationship

• Understand that there is a relationship between letters and the sounds in words • Say words slowly as part of shared/interactive writing

Page 219, Spelling Patterns

• Recognize that there are patterns in words that you can hear and say

Page 219, High-Frequency Words

• Understand that you look at the letters in a word to read it

B.4.0 Comprehension and Analysis of Age-Appropriate Text

Children demonstrate understanding of age-appropriate text read

aloud

B.4.1 Demonstrate knowledge of details in a familiar story,

including characters, events, and ordering of events through

answering questions (e.g., recall, summarizing, predicting, and

inferencing), retelling, reenacting, or creating artwork

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Follow the events of a simple plot and remember them enough to discuss or reenact a story

• Understand simple problems and talk about them

• Retell important parts of a story using the pictures after hearing several times • Tell stories in response to pictures

Page 21, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Use background knowledge to understand setting, story problems, and charac-ters

• Acquire new content from listening to stories and informational texts • Predict what will happen next in a story

• Talk about what a character is like, how a character feels, or what a character might do (inference)

• Give reasons (either text-based or personal experience) to support thinking • Discuss motivations of characters

• Discuss the problems in a story

Page 21, Thinking About the Text

• Begin to form opinions about books and say why

Page 218, Phonological Awareness, Onsets and Rimes

• Say the onsets and rimes of words with teacher help

Page 218, Phonological Awareness, Phonemes [PA]

• Be aware that words have sounds in them • Play with the sounds of language

• Enjoy stories and poems that illustrate play with the sounds of language

• Recognize words that stand for sounds (bang, pop)

B.3.0 Alphabetics and Word/Print Recognition

Children recognize letters of the alphabet

B. 3.1 Recognize own name or other common words in print

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Connect some letters in print with their names or with words they know

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 218, Early Literacy Concepts

• Recognize one’s name

• Use letters in one’s name to represent it or communicate other messages

Page 219, High Frequency Words

• Recognize own name

Page 219, Word-Solving Actions

• Recognize and locate own name

• Make connections between own name and other words (same letters)

B.3.2 Match some uppercase and lowercase letter names to their

printed form

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Notice some letters in print

Writing About Reading

Page 79, Thinking About the Text

• Use some letter-like forms, letters, or temporary spellings to create texts that have some of the characteristics of published texts (cover, title, author, illustra-tions)

Writing

Page 116, Conventions, Capitalization

• Understand that there are upper- and lowercase versions of letters

(7)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

7

Calif

ornia

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Follow the topic and add to the discussion • Respond to and build on the statement of others • Form clear questions to get information

• Participate actively in whole-class discussion or with a partner or in a small group • Act out stories with or without props

• Engage in dramatic play

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Content

• Begin to verbalize reasons for problems, events, and actions • Begin to discuss the concept of cause and effect

• Express opinions and explain reasoning (because . . .)

• Predict future events in a story • Describe people and places in a story

• Share knowledge of story structure by describing story parts or elements such as characters

• Talk about how people, places, or events are alike or different

Page 193, Presentation, Ideas and Content

• Recite songs and short poems • Retell stories from texts

B.4.2 Demonstrate and use knowledge from informational text

in playing, labeling, describing, relating, creating artwork,

categorizing, or comparing and contrasting

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Talk about interesting information learned from a text

• Pick up interesting information while listening and use it in discussion • Notice and use important information from the pictures

Page 21, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Use background knowledge to understand the content of a text • Acquire new content from listening to stories and informational texts • Make connections between new texts and their own lives

• Use details from illustrations in discussion of a story or informational text • Give reasons (either text-based or personal experience) to support thinking • Discuss new information learned

Page 21, Thinking About the Text

• Understand when texts are based on established sequences such as numbers, days of the week, or seasons

• Share thinking about a story or topic

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Notice and use information from pictures to understand and remember text • Talk about characters, problems, and events in a story

Page 55, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Make predictions as to what will happen in a story

• Anticipate exciting places or the ending of a story in a discussion with the teacher • Express personal connections with the content of texts, characters, or events in

a story

• Infer feelings of characters in stories

Page 55, Thinking About the Text

• Recognize and talk about the beginning and the ending of a story

Writing About Reading

Page 79, Thinking Within the Text

• Use drawing (or other art media) to represent characters and actions from a story • Reenact or retell stories that have been heard

Page 79, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Draw to show how a character feels

• Label drawings to show what a character might be saying

• Dictate or use interactive writing to predict what might happen in a story • Use interactive writing and drawing to show trhe events of a story in sequence

(story map)

• Draw and sometimes label or dictate sentences about something in their lives prompted by characters or events in a story

Page 79, Thinking About the Text

• Use interactive writing or temporary spellings to represent a funny or exciting part of a story

Writing

Page 114, Narrative, Memoir, Writing in the Genre

• Tell, draw, or approximate writing about stories they have heard or read

Page 117, Writing Process, Rehearsing/Planning, Oral Language

• Retell stories in chronological order

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Show interest in listening to and talking about stories, poems, or informational texts

• Act out sentences in rhymes or stories

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Social Interaction

(8)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

8

Calif

ornia

Page 119, Writing Process, Sketching and Drawing

• Use drawing and other art media to represent ideas and information

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Show interest in listening to and talking about stories, poems, or informational texts

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Extended Discussion

• Follow the topic and add to the discussion • Respond to and build on the statement of others • Form clear questions to get information

• Participate actively in whole-class discussion or with a partner or in a small group

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Content

• Begin to discuss the concept of cause and effect

• Express opinions and explain reasoning (because . . .)

• Talk about what is already known about a topic

• Report what is known or learned about an informational text

B.5.0 Literacy Interest and Response

Children demonstrate motivation for literacy activities

B.5.1 Demonstrate enjoyment of literacy and literacy-related

activities

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Talk about interesting information learned from a text

• Join in on refrains or repeated sentences, phrases, and words after hearing a story several times

• Mimic the teacher’s expression and word stress when reenacting a text or join-ing in

Page 21, Thinking About the Text

• Share thinking about a story or topic • Identify favorite books and tell why

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Engage in shared reading with fluency and expression • Remember and use repeating language patterns • Mimic the teacher’s expression

Page 55, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Anticipate exciting places or the ending of a story in discussion with the teacher • Express personal connections with the content of texts, characters, or events in

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Notice and use information from pictures to understand and remember text

Page 55, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Express personal connections with the content of texts, characters, or events in a story

• Notice and talk about texts that are alike in some way

Page 55, Thinking About the Text

• Notice and follow texts that are organized around a special feature such as numbers, days of the week, ABC’s

Writing About Reading

Page 79, Thinking Within the Text

• Use drawing (or other art media) to represent information from a book • Find important details in illustrations

Writing

Page 114, Informational, Literary Nonfiction, Understanding the Genre

• Begin to notice how the writers of nonfiction texts show facts (labeling, making clear drawings, showing pictures)

Page 114, Informational, Literary Nonfiction, Writing in the Genre

• Make a drawing of an object or process and approximate writing or talking about it

• Make a series of drawings showing an object or process and approximate writing or talking about it

Page 115, Functional, Labels, Understanding the Genre

• Understand that a writer or illustrator can add labels to help readers understand drawings

• Understand that labels provide important information

Page 115, Functional, Lists and Procedures, Understanding the Genre

• Understand the purpose of a list

• Understand that a list of directions can help in knowing how to do something • Understand that pictures will help readers understand information or how to do

something

Page 115, Functional, Lists and Procedures, Writing in the Genre

• Add drawings to lists

Page 116, Craft, Voice

• Participate actively in shared/interactive writing about what is known or remem-bered from a text

Page 118, Writing Process, Rehearsing/Planning, Gathering Seeds/Resources/Experiment-ing with WritSeeds/Resources/Experiment-ing

• Record information in drawing and approximated writing

(9)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

9

Calif

ornia

B.5.2 Engage in routines associated with literacy activities

Interactive Read-Aloud and Literature Discussion

Page 21, Thinking Within the Text

• Talk about interesting information learned from a text • Ask questions to clarify or deepen understanding

• Join in on refrains or repeated sentences, phrases, and words after hearing a story several times

• Mimic the teacher’s expression and word stress when reenacting a text or joining in

Page 21, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Acquire new content from listening to stories and informational texts

Shared and Performance Reading

Page 55, Thinking Within the Text

• Follow the teacher’s pointer in a coordinated way while reading a text with group support

• Use expression in response to questions and exclamation marks

Writing About Reading

Page 79, Thinking Within the Text

• Reread (shared) to remember something from a story

Page 79, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Draw and sometimes label or dictate sentences about something in their lives prompted by characters or events in a story

Page 79, Thinking About the Text

• Use some letter-like forms, letters, or temporary spellings to create texts that have some of the characteristics of published texts (cover, title, author, illustra-tions)

• Use interactive writing or temporary spellings to represent a funny or exciting part of a story

Writing

Page 118, Writing Process, Rehearsing/Planning, Content/Topic/Theme

• Select topics or information for drawing and writing

Page 119, Writing Process, Viewing Self as a Writer

• Take on approximated writing independently • Have ideas in mind to tell, write, draw about

• Produce a quantity of drawing ad approximated writing within the time available (for example, one per day)

• Keep working independently rather than waiting for the teacher to help • Try out techniques they see others using

Page 55, Thinking About the Text

• Talk about whether or not they liked a book and say why • Talk about favorite parts of a story

Writing About Reading

Page 79, Thinking Within the Text

• Reenact or retell stories that have been heard • Use some vocabulary from stories

Page 79, Thinking Beyond the Text

• Draw and sometimes label or dictate sentence about something in trheir lives prompted by characters or events in a story

Page 79, Thinking About the Text

• Use interactive writing or temporary spellings to represent a funny or exciting part of a story

• Notice and remember some interesting language from a text, sometimes using it to dictate stories or talk about drawings

Writing

Page 115, Poetic, Poetry, Understanding the Genre

• Understand poetry (as well as songs and rhymes) as a pleasurable way to talk about feelings, tell stories, or tell how something looks or feels

Page 115, Poetic, Poetry, Writing in the Genre

• Actively participate in shared writing of a poem, song or rhyme • Notice and enjoy rhyme and humor

Page 115, Functional, Labels, Writing in the Genre

• Create friendly letters in approximated form (notes, cards, invitations, email)

Page 115, Functional, Friendly Letters, Writing in the Genre

• Participate actively in writing notes, letters, invitations, etc., through shared and interactive writing

Page 117, Writing Process, Rehearsing/Planning, Purpose

• Choose paper for writing

• Choose topics to draw and write about (both as individuals and in groups) • Write (or approximate writing) for a variety of purposes in particular

environ-ments (for example, restaurants, house, shops, doctor’s office)

Oral, Visual, and Technological Communication

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Listening and Understanding

• Show interest in listening to and talking about stories, poems, or informational texts

• Act out sentences in rhymes or stories

Page 192, Listening and Speaking, Social Interaction

• Engage in dramatic play

• Act out stories with or without props

Page 193, Presentation, Voice

(10)

PREKINDERGARTEN

Reading with understanding and fluency

10

Calif

ornia

Page 116, Conventions, Text Layout

• Separate print (or approximated print) from pictures

• Begin to write words, letters, or approximated letters in clusters to show the look of words

Page 117, Conventions, Spelling

• Write in scribble or random strings

• Mix in some letter-like symbols when writing in scribbles • Use known letters from name to make repeated patterns on a page

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 218, Letter Knowledge, Forming Letters

• Produce approximated writing

• Use approximated writing functionally (labels, lists, signs, names)

Page 219, Word-Solving Actions

• Make connections between own name and other words (same letters) • Use own name and other known words as a resource in approximated writing

C.1.3 Write marks or letters to represent own name

Writing

Page 117, Conventions, Spelling

• Write name conventionally (all capital letters or capital letter and lowercase)

Page 117, Writing Process, Rehearsing/Planning, Purpose

• Write name on drawing and writing

C.1.0 Writing Strategies

Children demonstrate emergent writing skills

C.1.1 Experiment with and adjust grasp and body position to control

a variety of drawing and writing tools

Writing

Page 117, Conventions, Handwriting/Word-Processing

• Hold pencil or marker with satisfactory grip

• Hold pencil or marker efficiently to begin to approximate writing or write a few letters

• Begin to understand that writers make decisions about where to start • Begin to understand that writers make decisions about the placement of pictures

and print

• Write with a preferred hand

Phonics, Spelling, and Word Study

Page 218, Letter Knowledge, Forming Letters

• Use writing tools

• Begin to use efficient and consistent motions to form letters

C.1.2 Write using scribbles (not pictures) or letter-like shapes to

represent words or ideas

Writing About Reading

Page 79 Thinking About the Text

• Use some letter-like forms, letters, or temporary spellings to create texts that have some of the characteristics of published texts (cover, title, author, illustra-tions)

Writing

Page 114, Narrative, Memoir, Writing in the Genre

• With teacher help, begin to use some features of narrative texts (drawings match-ing text, titles, page numbers, speech bubbles)

Page 114, Informational, Literary Nonfiction, Writing in the Genre

• Begin to use (with teacher help) some features of informational texts (page numbers, titles, labeled drawings)

Page 115, Functional, Labels, Writing in the Genre

• Begin to label drawings in approximated writing

• Create friendly letters in approximated form (notes, cards, invitations, email)

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– Same as regular charitable gift annuity but guarantees a future income (no more worrying about investment returns). „ Avoiding Excessive Taxation of Your Retirement Plan