Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana

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Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana

INTRODUCTION TO THE AIMS TEACHING MODULE (ATM)

Rationale . . . .2

Organization and Management . . . .2

Features . . . .3

INTRODUCING

Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana

Jump Right In . . . .5

Themes . . . .6

Overview . . . .6

Objectives . . . .6

PREPARATION FOR VIEWING

Introduction to the Program . . . .6

Introduction to Vocabulary . . . .6

Discussion Ideas . . . .6

Focus . . . .6

AFTER VIEWING THE PROGRAM

Suggested Activities . . . .7

Vocabulary . . . .9

Checking Comprehension . . . .10

True or False . . . .11

Questions for Thought: Short Essay . . . .12

What Would You Say? . . . .13

Staying Drug Free . . . .14

Word Search . . . .15

Test . . . .16

ADDITIONAL AIMS MULTIMEDIA PROGRAMS . . . .18

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Congratulations!

You have chosen a learning program that will actively motivate your students and provide you with easily accessible and easily manageable instructional guidelines and tools designed to make your teaching role efficient and rewarding.

The AIMS Teaching Module (ATM) provides you with a video program correlated to your classroom curriculum, instructions and guidelines for use, plus a comprehensive teaching program containing a wide range of activities and ideas for interaction between all content areas. Our authors, educators, and consultants have written and reviewed the AIMS Teaching Modules to align with the Educate America Act: Goals 2000. This ATM, with its clear definition of manageability, both in the classroom and beyond, allows you to tailor specific activities to meet all of your classroom needs.

AIMS Teaching Module written by

© Copyright 2002 AIMS Multimedia

All Rights Reserved. No part of this work may be reproduced or transmitted without written permission of AIMS Multimedia with these exceptions: Persons or schools purchasing this

AIMS Teaching Modulemay reproduce consumable ATM pages, identified in Section 4, for student or classroom use.

AIMS Multimedia is a leading producer and distributor of educational programs serving schools and libraries since 1957. AIMS draws upon the most up-to-date knowledge, existing and emerging technologies, and all of the instructional and pedagogical resources available to develop and distribute educational programs in videocassette and CD-ROM.

Persons or schools interested in obtaining additional copies of this AIMS Teaching Module, please contact:

AIMS Multimedia at:

Toll Free: 1-800-367-2467 Fax: 818-341-6700 Web: www.aimsmultimedia.com Email: info@aimsmultimedia.com

RATIONALE

In today’s classrooms, educational pedagogy is often founded on Benjamin S. Bloom’s “Six Levels of Cognitive Complexity.” The practical application of Bloom’s Taxonomy is to evaluate students’ thinking skills on these levels, from the simple to the complex: 1. Knowledge (rote memory skills),

2. Comprehension (the ability to relate or retell),

3. Application (the ability to apply knowledge outside its origin), 4. Analysis (relating and differentiating parts of a whole), 5. Synthesis (relating parts to a whole)

6. Evaluation (making a judgment or formulating an opinion). The AIMS Teaching Module is designed to facilitate these intellectual capabilities, and to integrate classroom experiences and assimilation of learning with the students’ life experiences, realities, and expectations. AIMS’ learner verification studies prove that our AIMS Teaching Modules help students to absorb, retain, and to demonstrate ability to use new knowledge in their world. Our educational materials are written and designed for today’s classroom, which incorporates a wide range of intellectual, cultural, physical, and emotional diversities.

ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

To facilitate ease in classroom manageability, the AIMS Teaching Module is organized in three sections:

I. Introducing this ATM

will give you the specific information you need to integrate the program into your classroom curriculum.

II. Preparation for Viewing

provides suggestions and strategies for motivation, language preparedness, readiness, and focus prior to viewing the program with your students.

III. After Viewing the Program

provides suggestions for additional activities plus an assortment of consumable assessment and extended activities, designed to broaden comprehension of the topic and to make connections to other curriculum content areas.

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FEATURES

INTRODUCING THE ATM

Your AIMS Teaching Module is designed to accompany a video program written and produced by some of the world’s most credible and creative writers and producers of educational programming. To facilitate diversity and flexibility in your classroom and to provide assessment tools, your AIMS Teaching Module features these components:

Themes

This section tells how the AIMS Teaching Module is correlated to the curriculum. Themes offers suggestions for interaction with other curriculum content areas, enabling teachers to use the teaching module to incorporate the topic into a variety of learning areas.

Overview

The Overview provides a synopsis of content covered in the video program. Its purpose is to give you a summary of the subject matter and to enhance your introductory preparation.

Objectives

The ATM learning objectives provide guidelines for teachers to assess what learners can be expected to gain from each program. After completion of the AIMS Teaching Module, your students will be able to demonstrate dynamic and applied comprehension of”” the topic.

Preparation for Viewing

In preparation for viewing the video program, the AIMS Teaching Module offers activity and/or discussion ideas that you may use in any order or combination.

Introduction To The Program

Introduction to the Program is designed to enable students to recall or relate prior knowledge about the topic and to prepare them for what they are about to learn.

Introduction To Vocabulary

Introduction to Vocabulary is a review of language used in the program: words, phrases, and usage. This vocabulary introduction is designed to ensure that all learners, including limited English proficiency learners, will have full understanding of the language usage in the content of the program.

Discussion Ideas

Discussion Ideas are designed to help you assess students’ prior knowledge about the topic and to give students a preview of what they will learn. Active discussion stimulates interest in a subject and can motivate even the most reluctant learner. Listening, as well as speaking, is active participation. Encourage your students to participate at the rate they feel comfortable. Model sharing personal experiences when applicable, and model listening to students’ ideas and opinions.

Focus

Help learners set a purpose for watching the program with Focus, designed to give students a focal point for comprehension continuity.

Jump Right In

Jump Right In provides abbreviated instructions for quick management of the program.

After Viewing the Program

After your students have viewed the program, you may introduce any or all of these activities to interact with other curriculum content areas, provide reinforcement, assess comprehension skills, or provide hands-on and in-depth extended study of the topic.

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SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

The Suggested Activities offer ideas for activities you can direct in the classroom or have your students complete independently, in pairs, or in small work groups after they have viewed the program. To accommodate your range of classroom needs, the activities are organized into skills categories. Their labels will tell you how to identify each activity and help you correlate it into your classroom curriculum. To help you schedule your classroom lesson time, the AIMS hourglass gives you an estimate of the time each activity should require. Some of the activities fall into these categories:

Meeting Individual Needs

These activities are designed to aid in classroom continuity. Reluctant learners and learners acquiring English will benefit from these activities geared to enhance comprehension of language in order to fully grasp content meaning.

Curriculum Connections

Many of the suggested activities are intended to integrate the content of the ATM program into other content areas of the classroom curriculum. These cross-connections turn the classroom teaching experience into a whole learning experience.

Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking activities are designed to stimulate learners’ own opinions and ideas. These activities require students to use the thinking process to discern fact from opinion, consider their own problems and formulate possible solutions, draw conclusions, discuss cause and effect, or combine what they already know with what they have learned to make inferences.

Cultural Diversity

Each AIMS Teaching Module has an activity called Cultural Awareness, Cultural Diversity, or Cultural Exchange that encourages students to share their backgrounds, cultures, heritage, or knowledge of other countries, customs, and language.

Hands On

These are experimental or tactile activities that relate directly to the material taught in the program. Your students will have opportunities to make discoveries and formulate ideas on their own, based on what they learn in this unit.

Writing

Every AIMS Teaching Module will contain an activity designed for students to use the writing process to express their ideas about what they have learned. The writing activity may also help them to make the connection between what they are learning in this unit and how it applies to other content areas.

In The Newsroom

Each AIMS Teaching Module contains a newsroom activity designed to help students make the relationship between what they learn in the classroom and how it applies in their world. The purpose of In The Newsroom is to actively involve each class member in a whole learning experience. Each student will have an opportunity to perform all of the tasks involved in production: writing, researching, producing, directing, and interviewing as they create their own classroom news program.

Extended Activities

These activities provide opportunities for students to work separately or together to conduct further research, explore answers to their own questions, or apply what they have learned to other media or content areas.

Link to the World

These activities offer ideas for connecting learners’ classroom activities to their community and the rest of the world.

Culminating Activity

To wrap up the unit, AIMS Teaching Modules offer suggestions for ways to reinforce what students have learned and how they can use their new knowledge to enhance their worldview.

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ADDITIONAL ATM FEATURES

Vocabulary

Every ATM contains an activity that reinforces the meaning and usage of the vocabulary words introduced in the program content. Students will read or find the definition of each vocabulary word, then use the word in a written sentence.

Checking Comprehension

Checking Comprehension is designed to help you evaluate how well your students understand, retain, and recall the information presented in the AIMS Teaching Module. Depending on your students’ needs, you may direct this activity to the whole group yourself, or you may want to have students work on the activity page independently, in pairs, or in small groups. Students can verify their written answers through discussion or by viewing the video a second time. If you choose, you can reproduce the answers from your Answer Key or write the answer choices in a Word Bank for students to use. Students can use this completed activity as a study guide to prepare for the test.

Reproducible Activities

The AIMS Teaching Module provides a selection of reproducible activities, designed to specifically reinforce the content of this learning unit. Whenever applicable, they are arranged in order from low to high difficulty level, to allow a seamless facilitation of the learning process. You may choose to have students take these activities home or to work on them in the classroom independently, in pairs or in small groups.

Checking Vocabulary

The checking Vocabulary activity provides the opportunity for students to assess their knowledge of new vocabulary with this word game or puzzle. The format of this vocabulary activity allows students to use the

Test

The AIMS Teaching Module Test permits you to assess students’ understanding of what they have learned. The test is formatted in one of several standard test formats to give your students a range of experiences in test-taking techniques. Be sure to read, or remind students to read, the directions carefully and to read each answer choice before making a selection. Use the Answer Key to check their answers.

Additional AIMS Multimedia Programs

After you have completed this AIMS Teaching Module you may be interested in more of the programs that AIMS offers. This list includes several related AIMS programs.

Answer Key

Reproduces tests and work pages with answers marked.

JUMP RIGHT IN

Preparation

• Read Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana Themes, Overview,and

Objectives to become familiar with program content and expectations.

• Use Preparation for Viewing

suggestions to introduce the topic to students.

Viewing

• Set up viewing monitor so that all students have a clear view.

• Depending on your classroom size and learning range, you may choose to have students view Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana together or in small groups.

• Some students may benefit from

After Viewing

• Select Suggested Activities that integrate into your classroom curriculum. If applicable, gather materials or resources.

• Choose the best way for students to work on each activity. Some activities work best for the whole group. Other activities are designed for students to work independently, in pairs, or in small groups. Whenever possible, encourage students to share their work with the rest of the group.

• Duplicate the appropriate number of Vocabulary, Checking Comprehension, and consumable activity pages for your students.

• You may choose to have students take consumable activities home, or complete them in the classroom, independently, or in groups.

• Administer the Test to assess students’ comprehension of what they have learned, and to provide them with practice in test-taking procedures. • Use the Culminating Activity as a forum

for students to display, summarize, extend, or share what they have learned with each other, the rest of the school, or a local community organization.

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Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana

Themes

As its major theme, Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana explores the harmful developmental, social, physiological, and behavioral effects of marijuana on teen users. The program also dispels the myth that marijuana is a benign drug, explains the devastating long-term effects of usage, and dis-cusses the difficulty of recovery. With both scientific and anecdotal evidence, the program helps viewers understand the insidious nature of marijuana and the negative consequences of using it.

Overview

According to the National Institute of Drug Abuse, marijuana is the most fre-quently used illegal drug in the United States. Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana examines the reasons and realities behind its use. The reasons teens may begin using marijuana range from peer pressure, current cigarette and alcohol use, or family influence, to simple experimentation and the pop cul-ture mystique surrounding the drug. However, as the program reveals, usage can have devastating, life-long mental, physical, and social effects, not to men-tion legal repercussions. Evidence is provided that, as a “gateway drug”, marijuana use often leads to experi-mentation with, and addiction to, other drugs such as cocaine. Recovery is a difficult process, involving healing on the physical, emotional, social, and spiritual levels. The findings of science are illustrated by a former adult user’s personal account describing the conse-quences of marijuana addiction and the benefits of recovery.

Objectives

• To describe why teens engage in marijuana use

• To identify and discuss the social and developmental effects of mari-juana use

• To identify and discuss the physio-logical effects of marijuana use • To identify and discuss the

behav-ioral effects of marijuana use • To explain how marijuana can lead

to other drugs and deeper addic-tion

• To examine the addiction recovery process

Introduction to the Program

Research shows that nearly 50% of teenagers try marijuana before they graduate from high school. Nearly 69 million people over the age of 12 have tried it at least once. There is an erosion in anti-drug perceptions and knowledge among today’s young people, accom-panied by an upward pattern of mari-juana use. This program is designed to give young people the information they need to help them make healthier deci-sions and responsible drug-related choices. By discussing the real-life con-sequences of using marijuana, the pro-gram seeks to alert teens to the dangers of drug use and the negative impact it can have on their lives.

Introduction to Vocabulary

Before starting the program, write the following words and phrases on the board. Ask the class to discuss the meaning of each word, and review the terms that are unfamiliar to students.

addiction, amotivational syndrome, benign (drug), dependency, euphoria, gateway drug, marijuana, mind-alter-ing drug, short-term memory

Discussion Ideas

Ask students one or more of the follow-ing questions to prompt a discussion about marijuana: Do you consider mar-ijuana a harmful drug? Why? What, if any, negative effects does it have on a user? Do you think that marijuana is a “gateway” drug? Why do you think some people start using marijuana? What long-term consequences do you think a drug user might experience?

Focus

Marijuana is often viewed as a benign drug, no worse than cigarettes or alco-hol. As they view the program, encour-age students to think about the risks of marijuana use and the impact its use would have on their individual lives, daily activities, relationships, success in school and sports, and long-term life goals.

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SUGGESTED ACTIVITIES

Writing

Ask students to locate a magazine or newspaper article dealing with teenage marijuana use. The library and the internet are two excellent resources. They may choose an article that describes personal stories, one that contains statistics and factual information, or a combination of the two. Ask each stu-dent to summarize their story in a written paper. Encourage stustu-dents to contribute their own ideas and opinions to the paper. The papers may be presented to the class, with a question-and-answer session after each article.

Meeting Individual Needs

Based on what they have learned, ask students to write an explanation of how each word or phrase listed below relates to marijuana use. Encourage them to use a dictionary if they are unsure of the meanings. Have students share their answers aloud, and allow time for discussion.

addiction cigarettes experimentation memory loss motivation peer pressure

personal relationships self-esteem

Critical Thinking

There is a growing controversy over the legalization of medicinal marijuana. Advocates claim that patients suffering with AIDS, cancer, glaucoma, and multiple sclerosis benefit from smoking marijuana. Those opposing legalization believe that any marijuana use is highly damaging to individual users and to society as a whole.

Assign students into two groups, one to research the advantages of legalizing marijuana for medicinal use, and the other to research the disadvantages. Using the information that has been collected, have volunteers form two teams to debate the issue. You may wish to involve the class in designing the struc-ture for the debate. Allow time at the end of the debate for the class to vote on the winner.

Link to the World

There are many reasons why some young teens start smoking marijuana. Most young people smoke marijuana because their friends or brothers and sisters use it and pressure them to try it. Some young people use it because they see older people in the family using it. Others may think it’s cool to use mar-ijuana, or feel they need it and other drugs to help them escape from problems at home, at school, or with friends.

Discuss the impact of individual marijuana use on the family, school, and community. Then ask each student to complete the following statement: “I choose not to use marijuana because...” Give the class a few minutes to brainstorm some responses. Encourage them to choose their strongest responses. Continue the class discussion, allowing students to share their responses.

Extended

45 Minutes

75 Minutes

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Hands On

Ask students to create their own anti-drug posters directed at marijuana use. Divide them into cooper-ative groups of two or three people. Have each group think of a theme or slogan to serve as the focus of the poster. They may choose to do this by taking a vote on different ideas. Encourage each group to work democratically. Students who are good at research may want to collect statistics for the poster. Those who are creative may want to design the layout, draw or paint illustrations, take photographs, or add artistic lettering.

Display the posters on a special wall in the classroom. Discuss with the class which posters are most effective and why. You may wish to further display the posters elsewhere in the school or, if the school budget permits, have the most effective poster reproduced for use throughout the school.

Connection to Civics

The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 classified marijuana along with heroin and LSD as a

Schedule 1 drug, i.e., having the relatively highest abuse potential and no accepted medical use. This resulted in the passage of strict laws and mandatory sentences for possession of marijuana. Ask stu-dents to research the legal penalties for drug possession and drug use in their state. They may wish to contact local law enforcement offices for information. Ask them to research the specific penalties for marijuana use.

For discussion: How would students feel if they were arrested for marijuana possession? How might the arrest affect their family or friends? What effect might an arrest have on the rest of their lives? What would it feel like to have a drug arrest on their permanent record?

Culminating Activity

Allow time for students to think about the information presented in the program and learned from class activities. Have each student write or share what, if any, change has taken place in their attitudes or beliefs about marijuana. What would students say if a friend asked them to use marijuana?

30 Minutes

Extended

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Name VOCABULARY

The following terms are from Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana. Fill in the number of each

term next to its closest definition.

1. addiction

2. amotivational syndrome 3. euphoria

4. euphoric recall 5. gateway drug 6. high

7. marijuana 8. peer pressure 9. self-esteem

10. short-term memory loss

______ a mind-altering drug that comes from a mixture of dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers of the hemp plant

______ a drug whose use leads to the use of even stronger, more dangerous substances

______ a physical or psychological need to use a drug despite its harmful effects

______ inability to recall recent information or events

______ a set of behaviors in which a person lacks motivation, energy, and the ability to concentrate

______ the influence of the social group on an individual

______ memories or delusions about drug use and addictive behavior as being “good” or a positive experience; this leads to an urge to repeat the behavior

______ belief in or positive opinion about oneself

______ the initial feeling of dizziness, euphoria, relaxation, or floating that occurs after use of a drug such as marijuana

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Name CHECKING COMPREHENSION

Answer the following questions in the space provided. Use a separate sheet of paper if necessary.

1. Why do many people believe that marijuana is a benign drug?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. List three reasons why someone might begin to use marijuana.

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

3. What is the most noticeable effect that marijuana use has on the brain?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

4. What are the symptoms of amotivational syndrome? (List at least four)

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

5. Why is marijuana considered a gateway drug?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

6. How does the use of marijuana affect a person’s social and emotional development?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

7. What specific negative effect can marijuana use have on men?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

8. What can happen if you fail a work-related drug test?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

9. Why is drug use so damaging to a person’s self-esteem?

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

10. What is euphoric recall, and how does it make recovery from addiction difficult?

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Name TRUE OR FALSE

Place a T next to statements that are true, and an F next to statements that are false.

1. ______ A teen who smokes cigarettes and drinks alcohol is less likely to try marijuana.

2. ______ The chemical THC is responsible for the feeling of euphoria marijuana users experience.

3. ______ The use of marijuana may cause infertility in both men and women.

4. ______ There are no long-term negative effects of using marijuana.

5. ______ Because of marijuana’s effect on short-term memory, students who use the drug find it difficult to concentrate and

learn.

6. ______ When people fail drug tests, they often feel angry and victimized, instead of taking responsibility for their actions.

7. ______ Euphoric recall makes recovery from marijuana addiction an easy process.

8. ______ In the addictive cycle of drug use, the user builds up tolerance to the drug, and must use stronger and stronger

doses of the drug to get the same high.

9. ______ Recovery from marijuana addiction is easy, and simply involves stopping the use of the drug.

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Name QUESTIONS FOR THOUGHT - SHORT ESSAY

Based on what you have learned from the program Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana, answer

the following questions. Use a separate piece of paper if necessary. Answers should be in short essay form.

Be sure to offer examples to support your answers.

1. How does peer-pressure play a part in the decision to try drugs such as marijuana? How can you avoid giving in to peer pres-sure?

2. When evaluating the effects of marijuana use, the program tells us not to compare these effects to those of other drugs. The program advises us to simply identify and evaluate the effects by themselves. Why is this important when discussing drugs and drug use?

3. Why is amotivational syndrome such a serious side-effect of using marijuana?

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Name WHAT WOULD YOU SAY?

Using marijuana is often a peer pressure situation. Staying true to yourself takes courage and thought. How

would you respond to each pressure statement below? Be prepared to share your thoughts.

1. Marijuana’s no big deal. Everybody uses it.

2. Everyone at the party’s going to be smoking pot.

3. Come on. Just try it. It’s fun. Trust me.

4. It’s not like marijuana is addicting. What are you worried about?

5. Look, I’m your friend. I wouldn’t ask you to try anything dangerous.

6. Don’t worry about getting busted for drugs. You’re a juvenile. What can they do?

7. All that stuff they tell us about marijuana is a lie.

8. You want to be cool, don’t you?

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Name STAYING DRUG FREE

When we say “no” to drugs, we say “yes” to positive goals and experiences in life. Working with a partner,

identify at least five advantages to staying drug free. Use the spaces below to write your reasons to stay

away from marijuana and other drugs.

Reason 1:

Reason 2:

Reason 3:

Reason 4:

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Name WORD SEARCH

The following words can be found in the maze below. The letters may be arranged horizontally, vertically,

diagonally, or backwards.

M Q V A T Y R S W G N R G X D E D P D H G K Q C A W E P C F M P J D E V T L Y T B C N H S O F Y I M U H B W E B O X E K R T H C V A P Q R W S V P M N Y S V T R W R H B A C E Y I M M R D I Z H B I O Y Z R X C Y N E Y V L D N E J R D Y K A Z K E N E J T H D N U I L J L R S P Q W X K L F P I A C B S N D R J T G R P Z K Q G N W C X R A M O T I V A T I O N A L W U Z W X P G D V N K M X Q Z R G Q R X Y C N E D N E P E D T S S R N R T H Z D K L T B K C

WORD BANK

addictive amotivational

benign chemicals dependency

drugs euphoric gateway marijuana

memory peers recovery

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Name TEST

Circle the letter of the correct answer for each question.

1. Teens who smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol: a) seldom use other drugs.

b) are less likely to try marijuana. c) are more likely to try marijuana.

d) are less likely to become addicted to marijuana or other drugs.

2. The use of marijuana:

a) retards social and emotional development.

b) impairs thought processes and short-term memory. c) can lower the testosterone levels in males.

d) A and B e) A, B, and C

3. One of the key symptoms of amotivational syndrome is: a) use of harder drugs such as cocaine or heroin.

b) loss of energy, motivation, and the ability to concentrate. c) feelings of anger, guilt, or shame.

d) increased energy, and the desire to set and achieve new goals.

4. When drug users fail a drug test, they will usually: a) take full responsibility for their actions. b) seek treatment for their addiction immediately. c) feel angry and victimized by the laws.

d) cut back on their drug use.

5. Euphoric recall:

a) is a powerful memory or delusion that an addictive drug made things better. b) leads to cravings for the drug to which a person is addicted.

c) makes recovery from addiction difficult. d) all of the above

e) A and C

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Name TEST (CONTINUED)

7. What are some reasons that teens might begin using marijuana? (List at least three)

8. List five symptoms of amotivational syndrome caused by marijuana use.

9. How does marijuana use affect the brain?

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ADDITIONAL AIMS MULTIMEDIA PROGRAMS

You and your students might also enjoy these other AIMS Multimedia programs:

2635-EN-VID: In-Dependence: Teens and Tobacco 2634-EN-VID: Building Up for a Fall: Teens and Steroids 2256-EN-VID: The Teen Files: The Truth About Drinking 2517-EN-VID: The Teen Files: The Truth About Drugs 9298-EN-VID: The Teen Files: Smoking Truth or Dare 2295-EN-VID: L-Evated: The Blunt Truth

8512-EN-VID: Smoking and Human Physiology 9855-EN-VID: Tobacco and Human Physiology 9832-EN-VID: Marijuana and Human Physiology

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ANSWER KEY for page 9

VOCABULARY

The following terms are from Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana. Fill in the number of each

term next to its closest definition.

1. addiction

2. amotivational syndrome 3. euphoria

4. euphoric recall 5. gateway drug 6. high

7. marijuana 8. peer pressure 9. self-esteem

10. short-term memory loss

______ a mind-altering drug that comes from a mixture of dried, shredded leaves, stems, seeds, and flowers of the hemp plant

______ a drug whose use leads to the use of even stronger, more dangerous substances

______ a physical or psychological need to use a drug despite its harmful effects

______ inability to recall recent information or events

______ a set of behaviors in which a person lacks motivation, energy, and the ability to concentrate

______ the influence of the social group on an individual

______ memories or delusions about drug use and addictive behavior as being “good” or a positive experience; this leads to an urge to repeat the behavior

______ belief in or positive opinion about oneself

______ the initial feeling of dizziness, euphoria, relaxation, or floating that occurs after use of a drug such as marijuana

______ an exaggerated sense of well-being or happiness 7

3 6 9 4

8 2 10

1 5

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ANSWER KEY for page 10

CHECKING COMPREHENSION

Answer the following questions in the space provided. Use a separate sheet of paper if necessary.

1. Why do many people believe that marijuana is a benign drug? Reasons may include the fact that its effects are subtle, not dra-matic, and relatively mild compared to other drugs; the user doesn’t die with 1st use; users don’t suffer DTs or commit violent acts while

under the influence.

2. List three reasons why someone might begin to use marijuana. Reasons may include the easy availability of marijuana; the allure or mystique of using; the fun or risk of using; peer pressure; the belief that the user will feel better; desire to be cool or belong to a group; predisposition to drug use; prior use of cigarettes or alcohol; family influence; marijuana is seen as a benign drug.

3. What is the most noticeable effect that marijuana use has on the brain? Short-term memory loss

4. What are the symptoms of amotivational syndrome? (List at least four) Symptoms may include change in habits; drop in grades; laziness; lack of motivation or direction; social changes; sleep disturbances; mood swings; deterioration of personal hygiene; strange patterns of eating.

5. Why is marijuana considered a gateway drug? Marijuana use may lead to experimentation with and addiction to stronger drugs such as cocaine or heroin.

6. How does the use of marijuana affect a person’s social and emotional development? Use impairs or retards social and emo-tional development.

7. What specific negative effect can marijuana use have on men? Testosterone levels can drop, causing decreased sex drive and infertility.

8. What can happen if you fail a work-related drug test? You may lose a job or a job opportunity, end up feeling angry or victimized, experience a loss of self-esteem, and/or be forced to pay a legal fine.

9. Why is drug use so damaging to a person’s self-esteem? Eventually the user realizes that he or she is no longer in control of the drug; the drug is in control of the user.

10. What is euphoric recall, and how does it make recovery from addiction difficult? Euphoric recall is the false memory or delusion that the drug made the user feel better. As the addict is trying to break the addiction, this memory results in obses-sion with or cravings for the drug and those good feelings.

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ANSWER KEY for page 11

TRUE OR FALSE

Place a T next to statements that are true, and an F next to statements that are false.

1. ______ A teen who smokes cigarettes and drinks alcohol is less likely to try marijuana.

2. ______ The chemical THC is responsible for the feeling of euphoria marijuana users experience.

3. ______ The use of marijuana may cause infertility in both men and women.

4. ______ There are no long-term negative effects of using marijuana.

5. ______ Because of marijuana’s effect on short-term memory, students who use the drug find it difficult to concentrate and

learn.

6. ______ When people fail drug tests, they often feel angry and victimized, instead of taking responsibility for their actions.

7. ______ Euphoric recall makes recovery from marijuana addiction an easy process.

8. ______ In the addictive cycle of drug use, the user builds up tolerance to the drug, and must use stronger and stronger

doses of the drug to get the same high.

9. ______ Recovery from marijuana addiction is easy, and simply involves stopping the use of the drug.

10. ______ Marijuana users are unlikely to try other drugs. F

T

T F

T

T F

T

F

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ANSWER KEY for page 12

QUESTIONS FOR THOUGHT - SHORT ESSAY

Based on what you have learned from the program Do You Believe in Magic? Teens and Marijuana, answer

the following questions. Use a separate piece of paper if necessary. Answers should be in short essay form.

Be sure to offer examples to support your answers.

1. How does peer-pressure play a part in the decision to try drugs such as marijuana? How can you avoid giving in to peer pres-sure?

2. When evaluating the effects of marijuana use, the program tells us not to compare these effects to those of other drugs. The program advises us to simply identify and evaluate the effects by themselves. Why is this important when discussing drugs and drug use?

3. Why is amotivational syndrome such a serious side-effect of using marijuana?

4. What are the four stages or levels of healing in the recovery from addiction? Why is each important to recovery? STUDENT ANSWERS WILL VARY. ACCEPT ANY WHICH DEMONSTRATE UNDERSTANDING OF THE TOPIC.

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ANSWER KEY for page 13

WHAT WOULD YOU SAY?

Using marijuana is often a peer pressure situation. Staying true to yourself takes courage and thought. How

would you respond to each pressure statement below? Be prepared to share your thoughts.

1. Marijuana’s no big deal. Everybody uses it.

2. Everyone at the party’s going to be smoking pot.

3. Come on. Just try it. It’s fun. Trust me.

4. It’s not like marijuana is addicting. What are you worried about?

5. Look, I’m your friend. I wouldn’t ask you to try anything dangerous.

6. Don’t worry about getting busted for drugs. You’re a juvenile. What can they do?

7. All that stuff they tell us about marijuana is a lie.

8. You want to be cool, don’t you?

9. What have you got to lose?

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ANSWER KEY for page 14

STAYING DRUG FREE

When we say “no” to drugs, we say “yes” to positive goals and experiences in life. Working with a partner,

identify at least five advantages to staying drug free. Use the spaces below to write your reasons to stay

away from marijuana and other drugs.

Reason 1:

Reason 2:

Reason 3:

Reason 4:

Reason 5:

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ANSWER KEY for page 15

WORD SEARCH

The following words can be found in the maze below. The letters may be arranged horizontally, vertically,

diagonally, or backwards.

M Q V A T Y R S W G N R G X D E D P D H G K Q C A W E P C F M P J D E V T L Y T B C N H S O F Y I M U H B W E B O X E K R T H C V A P Q R W S V P M N Y S V T R W R H B A C E Y I M M R D I Z H B I O Y Z R X C Y N E Y V L D N E J R D Y K A Z K E N E J T H D N U I L J L R S P Q W X K L F P I A C B S N D R J T G R P Z K Q G N W C X R A M O T I V A T I O N A L W U Z W X P G D V N K M X Q Z R G Q R X Y C N E D N E P E D T S S R N R T H Z D K L T B K C

WORD BANK

addictive amotivational

benign chemicals dependency

drugs euphoric gateway marijuana

memory peers recovery

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ANSWER KEY for page 16

TEST

Circle the letter of the correct answer for each question.

1. Teens who smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol: a) seldom use other drugs.

b) are less likely to try marijuana. c) are more likely to try marijuana.

d) are less likely to become addicted to marijuana or other drugs.

2. The use of marijuana:

a) retards social and emotional development.

b) impairs thought processes and short-term memory. c) can lower the testosterone levels in males.

d) A and B e) A, B, and C

3. One of the key symptoms of amotivational syndrome is: a) use of harder drugs such as cocaine or heroin.

b) loss of energy, motivation, and the ability to concentrate. c) feelings of anger, guilt, or shame.

d) increased energy, and the desire to set and achieve new goals.

4. When drug users fail a drug test, they will usually: a) take full responsibility for their actions. b) seek treatment for their addiction immediately. c) feel angry and victimized by the laws.

d) cut back on their drug use.

5. Euphoric recall:

a) is a powerful memory or delusion that an addictive drug made things better. b) leads to cravings for the drug to which a person is addicted.

c) makes recovery from addiction difficult. d) all of the above

e) A and C

6. Why is marijuana considered a gateway drug?

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ANSWER KEY for page 17

TEST (CONTINUED)

7. What are some reasons that teens might begin using marijuana? (List at least three)

8. List five symptoms of amotivational syndrome caused by marijuana use.

9. How does marijuana use affect the brain?

10. What are the 4 levels or stages of healing when recovering from addiction? Define or give and example of each.

Answers will vary. (Reasons may include the easy availability of marijuana; the allure or mystique of using; the fun or risk of using; peer pressure; the belief that the user will feel better; desire to be cool or belong to a group; predisposition to drug use; prior use of cigarettes or alcohol; family influence; perception that marijuana is a benign drug.)

Answers will vary. (Symptoms may include change in habits; drop in grades; laziness; lack of motivation or direction; social changes; sleep disturbances; mood swings; deterioration of personal hygiene; strange patterns of eating.)

The effects on the brain include short-term memory loss, inability to learn, difficulty in concentrating, decrease in energy and motivation levels.

Examples of each stage will vary, but definitions may include the following: Physical healing involves getting the drug out of your system, resisting the cravings caused by euphoric recall, and regaining general health. Emotional healing involves dealing with feelings of anger, shame, guilt, and sadness. Social healing involves giving up friends who are still users, building new relationships, repairing friendships, and rebuilding self-esteem. Spiritual healing involves coming to terms with who we are in the world and understanding our place in it.

Figure

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References

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