Protective Factors in education for Gender and sexual minority youth

14 

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Loading....

Full text

(1)

Protective Factors in education

for Gender and sexual minority

(2)

1.

definitions

(3)

Gender -

Cultural

Sex -

Biological

Gender Orientation

-

Individual’s

identity

Individual

(Butler, O’Donovan & Shaw, 2010)

Gender Orientation

(4)

Sexual Orientation

Sexual and emotional attachment based on their

gender

Homosexual

Attracted to the

same gender

Heterosexual

Attracted to the

opposite gender

(5)

2.

Risk factors

Negative factors that increase the likelihood

of negative life events.

These disproportionately affect

the GSM youth community

(6)

Risk factors

Victimization

(Williams, Connolly, Pepler, & Craig, 2005)

Family Rejection

(Diamond G.M, Diamond G.S, Levy, Closs, Ladipo, & Siqueland, 2013)

Depression

(Hall, 2018)

Suicide Ideation

(Peter & Taylor, 2014)

(7)

3.

Protective factors

Positive factors that lower the likelihood of negative life

events in the GSM youth community

(8)

Individual - Therapy practices

CBT

Cognitive Behavioral

Therapy

Affirmative

Theory

Education on

oppression

Identifying

Stressors

ASSET

Affirmative

Supportive Safe and

Empowering Talk

Self Esteem

Social

Connectedness

Proactive coping

ABFT

Attachment Based

Family Therapy

Sexual

Minorities

Working with

both parents

and children to

reduce family

rejection

(Austin & Craig, 2015)

(Craig, Austin & McInroy, 2014)

(9)

Education

Programs

School support

groups

Report reduced

Victimization

Suicide

attempts

Increased

perceived safety

Safety/School

Climate

Urban low

income schools

more safe for

GSM youth

Supportive school

climate

Reduced

victimization

and

depression

Social Relationships

Positive

instructor

relationships

Romantic

relationships

Black sexual

minorities

Not bisexual

youth

(Espelage, Valido, Hatchel, Ingram, Huang, & Torgal, 2019)

(Goodenow, Szalacha, & Westheimer, 2006)

(Woodford & Kulick, 2015)

(10)

4.

(11)

Impact of teacher training

Teacher training

in GSM topics

Increased safety

and well being

for GSM students

GSM inclusivity

in curriculum

and policy

(Meadows, 2018) (Taylor, Meyer, Peter,

Ristock, Short, & Campbell, 2016)

(12)

Conclusion

Need more research on protective factors

Research on therapy practices targeting needs of group

More efforts towards safety for GSM youth

More teacher training on LGBTQ issues

Enables more comfort for teaching inclusivity practices

More training for medical professionals (nurses)

Very few medical institutions offer courses on GSM health

topics

Building self esteem helps GSM youth engage in safer sexual

(13)

Gender Minority Youth. Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work, 12(6), 567–578. Butler, C., O’Donovan, A., & Shaw, E. (2010). Sex, sexuality and therapeutic practice: A

manual for therapists and trainers. (C. Butler, A. O’Donovan, & E. Shaw, Eds.). New York, NY: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Craig, S. L., Austin, A., & McInroy, L. B. (2014). School-based groups to support

multiethnic sexual minority youth resiliency: Preliminary effectiveness. Child & Adolescent Social Work Journal, 31(1), 87–106. Cranston, K. (1991). HIV education for gay, lesbian, and bisexual youth: Personal risk, personal

power, and the community of conscience. Journal of Homosexuality, 22(3–4), 247–259. Diamond, G. M., Diamond, G. S., Levy, S., Closs, C., Ladipo, T., & Siqueland, L. (2013).

“Attachment-based family therapy for suicidal lesbian, gay, and bisexual adolescents: A treatment development study and open trial with preliminary findings”: Correction to Diamond et al (2011). Psychotherapy, 50(4), 596.

Espelage, D. L., Valido, A., Hatchel, T., Ingram, K. M., Huang, Y., & Torgal, C. (2019). A

literature review of protective factors associated with homophobic bullying and its consequences among children & adolescents.

Aggression and Violent Behavior, 45, 98–110.

Goodenow, C., Szalacha, L., & Westheimer, K. (2006). School support groups, other school

factors, and the safety of sexual minority adolescents. Psychology in the Schools, 43(5), 573–589. Hall, W. J. (2018). Psychosocial Risk and Protective Factors for Depression Among Lesbian,

Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Youth: A Systematic Review. Journal of Homosexuality, 65(3), 263–316. Meadows, E. (2018). Sexual Health Equity in Schools: Inclusive Sexuality and Relationship

Education for Gender and Sexual Minority Students. American Journal of Sexuality Education, 13(3), 297–309.

Peter, T., & Taylor, C. (2014). Buried above Ground: A University-Based Study of

Risk/Protective Factors for Suicidality among Sexual Minority Youth in Canada. Journal of LGBT Youth, 11(2), 125–149. Russell, S, T. & Fish, J. N. (2016). Mental Health in Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender

(14)

Taylor, C. G., Meyer, E. J., Peter, T., Ristock, J., Short, D., & Campbell, C. (2016). Gaps

between Beliefs, Perceptions, and Practices: The Every Teacher Project on LGBTQ-Inclusive Education in Canadian Schools. Journal of LGBT Youth, 13(1–2), 112–140.

Whitton, S. W., Dyar, C., Newcomb, M. E., & Mustanski, B. (2018). Romantic involvement: A

protective factor for psychological health in racially-diverse young sexual minorities. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 127(3), 265–275.

Williams, T., Connolly, J., Pepler, D., & Craig, W. (2005). Peer Victimization, Social Support,

and Psychosocial Adjustment of Sexual Minority Adolescents. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 34(5), 471–482. Woodford, M. R., & Kulick, A. (2015). Academic and Social Integration on Campus Among

Sexual Minority Students: The Impacts of Psychological and Experiential Campus Climate. American Journal of Community Psychology, 55(1/2), 13–24.

Figure

Updating...

Related subjects :