Appendix A: Differences Between Microsoft Windows Server 2003 and Microsoft Windows 2000 Server

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Appendix A: Differences

Between Microsoft

Windows Server 2003

and Microsoft

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Module 1: Reviewing the Suite of TCP/IP Protocols

Overview

Introduction

The suite of TCP/IP Protocols is basically the same in Microsoft® Windows®

Server 2003 as it was in Windows 2000 Server. There are, however, some changes in the protocol suite. Suggestions for new functionality obtained in Request for Comments (RFCs) are submitted by the engineering community for review by Internet members as a whole. There are times when Microsoft includes new TCP/IP functionality in its operating system products before a standard has been finalized. An example of this is the secure dynamic updates introduced in the Windows 2000 timeframe.

Lesson: Overview of the OSI Model

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What is the OSI Model?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

The Layers of the OSI Model

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Overview of the TCP/IP Protocol Suite

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Why Do I Need to Know About TCP/IP?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is the Architecture of the TCP/IP Protocol Suite?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How Does the TCP/IP Model Relate to the OSI Model?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How an IP Packet Moves Through the Suite of TCP/IP Protocols

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

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Practice: Associating the TCP/IP Suite of Protocols with

the OSI Model

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Viewing Frames Using Network Monitor

Introduction

Network Monitor is very much the same as it was in Windows 2000 Server. However, the Windows Server 2003 version does have a few changes in the configuration screens. For example, the Save Configuration option on the

Capture menu in Windows 2000 Server is omitted in Windows Server 2003.

In addition, Identify Network Monitor Users and the link to Performance

Monitor are omitted in the Windows Server 2003 version of Network Monitor.

What Is Ping?

Introduction

The Ping utility has been updated in Windows Server 2003 to provide some IPv6 capabilities. IPv6 switches are not available in the default installation of Windows 2000 Server.

What Is Network Monitor?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How to Install Network Monitor

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How to Capture Frames

Introduction

Network Monitor is very much the same as it was in Windows 2000 Server. However, some configuration screens and procedures have changed.

Procedure to Capture Frames

In Windows 2000 Server, the user is prompted to select an interface identified by MAC address. If your computer contains two or more adapters, the user needs to open a command prompt and use the following command to display the network configuration information for the computer:

ipconfig /all

This command helps the user identify which adapter is the primary adapter because it also identifies the IP address and name of each network adapter. Because most users identify the network adapter by name, however, this introduces additional tasks needed to successfully utilize Network Monitor. When Network Monitor is opened in Windows Server 2003, the user is prompted to select an interface by name. This is a new feature of Windows Server 2003 that makes the tool easier to use.

How to Filter for Select Frames

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Examining Captured Network Traffic

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Examining Packets

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Additional Resources

See the RFCs for the TCP/IP protocols under Additional Reading on the Student Materials compact disc.

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Module 2: Assigning IP Addresses in a Multiple

Subnet Network

Overview

Introduction

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Assigning IP Addresses

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

The Components of an IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Are the Classes of IP Addresses?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Determining the Class of an IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How Dotted Decimal Notation Relates to Binary Numbers

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How to Convert Dotted Decimal Notation to Binary Format

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Converting Numbers Between Decimal and Binary

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How Subnet Masks Work

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Identifying the Components of an IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

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Guidelines for IP Addressing

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Identifying Invalid IP Addresses

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Creating a

Subnet

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is a Subnet?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How to Create a Subnet

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How Bits Are Used in a Subnet Mask

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How to Calculate the Subnet Mask

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Defining Subnet IDs

No changes in Windows Server 2003

Practice: Calculating a Subnet Mask

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson:

Using IP Routing Tables

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is a Router?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Using a Default Gateway

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The Role of Routing in the Network Infrastructure

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How the Computer Determines Whether an IP Address Is a Local or

Remote Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Determining Whether an IP Address Is a Local or Remote

Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is Static and Dynamic Routing?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How IP Uses the Routing Table

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Using the Routing Table in Windows Server 2003

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How the IP Protocol Selects a Route

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Viewing and Modifying a Routing Table

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Overcoming Limitations of the IP Addressing Scheme

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How IP Addresses Are Wasted

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Are Private and Public IP Addresses?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

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What Is VLSM?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How to Use VLSM

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is Supernetting?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Using CIDR to Implement Supernetting

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

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Module 3: Configuring a Client IP Address

Overview

Introduction

Windows Server 2003 has introduced some network configuration changes that are not available in Windows 2000 Server.

Objectives

Windows Server 2003 has a new feature that first appeared in Windows XP called Alternate Configuration. This feature is not available in Windows 2000 Server.

Lesson: Configuring a Client to Use a Static IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Static and Dynamic IP Addresses

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How to Manually Assign a Static IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Viewing Static TCP/IP Configuration

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Viewing TCP/IP Configuration Using Ipconfig

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Manually Assigning and Viewing an IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Configuring a Client to obtain an IP Address Automatically

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is DHCP?

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Obtaining an Address Using DHCP

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Viewing DHCP Assigned Settings on the Client

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Configuring a Client to Use DHCP

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Renewing an IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How to Manually Release, Renew, and Verify an IP Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Manually Releasing and Renewing an Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Using Alternate Configuration

Introduction

Alternate Configuration is a new feature of Windows Server 2003 that enables a mobile computer user to obtain correct IP address settings based upon location. This feature is not available in Windows 2000 Server.

Lesson Objectives

Windows Server 2003 has a new feature that first appeared in Windows XP called Alternate Configuration. This feature allows a user to define a manually assigned IP address or to use APIPA rather than DHCP, where the alternate network does not have access to a DHCP server. This feature is not available in Windows 2000 Server.

How Alternate Configuration Assigns IP Addresses

Introduction

Windows Server 2003 enables a user to specify more than one set of TCP/IP configuration parameters for the same network adapter.

User configured Alternate Configuration

Windows Server 2003 enables a user to specify static IP address settings or APIPA for the alternate configuration.

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How to Determine Which Alternate Configuration Method

to Use

APIPA is used to configure local networks that will not connect to the Internet. If Internet connectivity is required at the alternate network location and DHCP cannot be used, the user configured options permit a secondary set of TCP/IP parameters to be specified. This feature is not available in Windows 2000 Server.

How Alternate Configuration Works

Mobile users are sometimes faced with a network environment that requires the use of a static IP address rather than DHCP. This might be the requirement of an ISP or a network at a remote location that uses static IP addresses. Alternate configuration allows the computer to be configured to detect this network environment automatically and to assign the appropriate configuration where a DHCP server cannot be detected. This is helpful because users are often unable to troubleshoot connectivity problems without the assistance of a network administrator. This feature is not available in Windows 2000 server.

How APIPA Assigns IP Addresses

Introduction

Both Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003 default to APIPA when a DHCP server is not detected.

How APIPA Works

In Windows Server 2003, APIPA can be selected as an Alternate Configuration. Although the Alternate Configuration tab is not available in the Internet

Protocol (TCP/IP) Properties page of Windows 2000 Server, the default

functionality is the same. When a DHCP server cannot be detected, Windows 2000 Server defaults to APIPA.

Practice: Configuring Alternate Configuration

Practice

The Alternate Configuration tab is a new properties page in Internet Protocol TCP/IP Properties configuration. This configuration page is not available in Windows 2000 Server.

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Module 4: Configuring a Client for Name Resolution

Overview

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Resolving Client Names

The procedure for resolving client names is the same in both Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003.

The Name Resolution Process

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Managing the ARP Cache

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Static and Dynamic ARP Cache Entries

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How ARP Resolves IP Addresses to MAC Addresses

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Using the ARP Tool to Manage the ARP Cache

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Identifying a MAC Address

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Viewing and Modifying the ARP Cache

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Overview of NetBIOS

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

The Types of Names Computers Use

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

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What Is NetBIOS?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is a NetBIOS Name?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is NetBT?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Determining the NetBT Node Type of a Client

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is Nbtstat?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Using Static Naming Methods

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Using an Lmhosts file

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Adding an Entry to the Lmhosts File

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Guidelines for Configuring a Client to Use Lmhosts

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Using a Hosts File

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Adding an Entry to the Hosts File

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Using Dynamic Naming Methods

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

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What Is WINS?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

What Is DNS?

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

The DNS Suffix

Primary DNS Suffix

The properties sheet of the System icon in Control Panel, which can also be invoked by choosing the properties sheet of the My Computer folder, has changed in Windows Server 2003. The Network Identification tab in

Windows 2000 Server has been renamed the Computer Name tab in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Using Ipconfig to Manage the DNS Client Resolver Cache

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Practice: Configuring a Client to use a Name Server

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Summarizing the Name Resolution Process

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

How Client Names Are Resolved

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Module 5: Isolating Common Connectivity Issues

Overview

Introduction

Although the process of isolating and troubleshooting common connectivity issues remains largely unchanged from Windows 2000 Server to Windows Server 2003, this module reinforces the importance of a systematic approach to Network Troubleshooting—which is derived largely from MOF practices and processes.

Lesson: Isolating Common Connectivity Issues

The procedure for resolving client names is the same in both Windows 2000 Server and Windows Server 2003.

Why You Need to Isolate Connectivity Issues

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Before You Touch Anything

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Isolating the Issue

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Resolving the Issue

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

After the Issue Is Resolved

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Lesson: Using Utilities and Tools to Isolate Connectivity Issues

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

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Installing Windows Server 2003 Support Tools

Introduction

The name of the .msi file used for installing Support Tools in Windows Server 2003 has been changed. The Windows Server 2003 file is called Suptools.msi. The Windows 2000 file was called 2000RKST.msi. The local path on the Windows Server 2003 product compact disc remains the same: <cdrom drive>\Tools\Support\ as does the default installation path: c:\Program Files\Support Tools\.

The following table charts the differences between the two toolsets.

Windows 2000 Server Windows Server 2003

ACL Diagnostics (acldiag.exe) ACL Diagnostics (acldiag.exe)

Active Directory Administration Tool (ldp.exe)

LDP Tool (ldp.exe) Active Directory Diagnostics Tool

(dsastat.exe)

Directory Services Utility (dsastat.exe) Active Directory Object Manager

(movetree.exe)

Move Users (movetree.exe) Active Directory Replication Monitor

(replmon.exe)

Active Directory Replication Monitor (replmon.exe)

Active Directory Search Tool (search.vbs) Active Directory Search Tool (search.vbs)

Application Deployment Diagnosis (addiag.exe)

ADSI Edit Snap-in (adsiedit.msc) ADSI Edit Snap-in (adsiedit.msc)

Advanced Power Management Status (apmstat.exe)

Advanced Power Management Status (apmstat.exe)

Application Compatibility Program (apcompat.exe)

Moved to Microsoft Debugging Tools Binary File Difference Finder (bindiff.exe)

BITS Administration Utility (bitsadmin.exe)

Browser Status (browstat.exe) Browser Status (browstat.exe)

Cabinet Tool (cabarc.exe)

ClonePrincipal (clonepr.dll) ClonePrincipal (clonepr)

FRS Connection Status Report (connstat.cmd)

Dependency Walker (depends.exe) Dependency Walker (depends.exe)

Device Console Utility (devcon.exe) DFS and SYSVOL Replication Topology Analysis Tool (topchk.cmd)

Windows 2000 Resource Kit DHCP Server Locator Utility

(dhcploc.exe) Distributed File System Utility

(dfsutil.exe)

Distributed File System Utility (dfsutil.exe)

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(continued)

Windows 2000 Server Windows Server 2003

Windows 2000 Resource Kit Directory Disk Usage (diruse.exe)

Windows 2000 Resource Kit Disk Manager Diagnostics (dmdiag.exe)

DiskProbe (dskprobe.exe) DiskProbe (dskprobe.exe)

Domain Controller Diagnostic Tool (dcdiag.exe)

Domain Controller Diagnostic Tool (dcdiag.exe)

DNS Server Troubleshooting Tool (dnscmd.exe)

DNS Server Troubleshooting Tool (dnscmd.exe)

DNS Lint (dnslint.exe) Directory Services ACL Editor

(dsacls.exe)

Directory Services ACL Editor (dsacls.exe)

Dump Check (dumpchk.exe) Functionality moved to Microsoft

Debugging Tools

Windows 2000 Resource Kit Encrypting Files System Information

(efsinfo.exe)

Windows 2000 Resource Kit Extensible Performance Counter List

(exctrlst.exe) File and Directory Comparison

(windiff.exe)

Windiff File and Directory Comparison (windiff.exe)

File Version (filver.exe) File Version (filver.exe)

Fault Tolerant Disk Mounter (ftonline.exe)

FRS Health Check (health_chk.cmd) FRS inbound and Outbound Logs Summary Report Tool (iologsum.cmd)

Windows 2000 Resource Kit Get Security ID (getsid.exe)

Global Flags Editor (gflags.exe) Global Flags Editor (gflags.exe)

HTTP Configuration Utility (httpcfg.exe)

Windows 2000 Resource Kit IAS Parse Tool (iasparse.exe)

Kerberos Keytab Setup (ktpass.exe) Kerberos Keytab Setup (ktpass.exe)

Kerberos Setup (ksetup.exe) Kerberos Setup (ksetup.exe)

Windows 2000 Resource Kit Manipulate Service Principal Names for

Accounts(setspn.exe)

Memory Pool Monitor (poolmon.exe) Memory Pool Monitor (poolmon.exe)

Memory Profiling Tool (memsnap.exe) Memory Profiling Tool (memsnap.exe)

Network Monitor Capture Utility (netcap.exe)

Network Connectivity Tester (netdiag.exe)

Network Connectivity Tester (netdiag.exe)

NLTest (nltest.exe) NLTest (nltest.exe)

Windows 2000 Resource Kit NTFRS Utility (ntfrsutl.exe)

Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol Ping Utilities

Removed from Windows Server 2003

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(continued)

Windows 2000 Server Windows Server 2003

Process Resource Monitor (Pmon.exe) Moved to Windows Server 2003 Resource

Kit

Process Viewer (pviewer.exe) Process Viewer (pviewer.exe)

Registry Console Tool (reg.exe) Moved to %windir%\system32

Remote Command Line (remote.exe) Remote Command Line (remote.exe)

Remote Storage Diagnostic Utility (rsdiag.exe)

Remote Storage Diagnostic Utility (rsdiag.exe)

Remote Storage File Analysis Utility (rsdir.exe)

Remote Storage File Analysis Utility (rsdir.exe)

Replication Diagnostics Tool (repadmin.exe)

Replication Diagnostics Tool (repadmin.exe)

Security Administration Tools (SIDWalk.exe)

Security Administration Tools (SIDWalk.exe)

Security Descriptor Check Utility (sdcheck.exe)

Security Descriptor Check Utility (sdcheck.exe)

Security Migration Editor (sidewalk.msc) Security Migration Editor (sidewalk.msc)

Service Pack Check (spcheck.exe) Show Access Control Lists

(showaccs.exe)

Show Access Control Lists (showaccs.exe)

SNMP Query Tool (snmputilg.exe)

System Information (msinfo32.exe) Moved to Program Files\Common

Files\Microsoft Shared\MSInfo

Task Killing Utility (kill.exe) %windir%\system32\Taskkill.exe

Task List Viewer (tlist.exe) %windir%\system32\Tasklist.exe

Windows 2000 Domain Manager (netdom.exe)

Windows Domain Manager (netdom.exe) Windows Installer Cleanup Utility

(msicuu.exe)

Windows Installer Cleanup Utility (msicuu.exe)

Windows Installer Zapper (msizap.exe) Windows Installer Zapper (msizap.exe)

Windows Report Tool (winrep.exe)

Winsock Remote Console (wsremote.exe) Replaced by Remote Command command

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How to Use Network Diagnostics to Gather System Information

Introduction

Network Diagnostics is a new feature of Windows Server 2003 that allows a user to collect information about the configuration and operation of the computer to detect malfunctions. This feature is not available in Window 2000 Server.

Definition

Network Diagnostics tests various components of the computer to determine where a malfunction might exist. The following chart details basic categories of information displayed by Network Diagnostics:

! Internet Service

a. Mail Service b. News Service c. Web Proxy Service

! Computer Information

a. Computer System b. Operating System c. Version

! Modems and Network Adapters

a. Modems

b. Network Adapters c. Network Clients

TCP/IP Utilities

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Using Ping to Test Connectivity to a Remote Host

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Interpreting Ping Error Messages

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Other TCP/IP Utilities You Might Find Useful

Network Connections Repair

Repair is a menu option on the Network Connections menu. Right-clicking

any network connection brings up a menu that contains a Repair option. The

Repair option will perform the following tasks:

! Renew DCHP Lease ! Flush ARP cache ! Flush NetBIOS cache

! Initiate NetBIOS name refresh ! Flush DNS cache

! Register DNS name

This feature is not available in Windows 2000 Server.

Using Netsh

Introduction

The Netsh has been updated with additional options in Windows Server 2003.

Definition

Netsh has added the following new contexts:

! Diag – allows you to launch the Network Diagnostics Tool from the

command line in addition to displaying all network configuration information.

! IPSec – allows IPSec policies to be displayed and manipulated ! RPC – display RPC binding information by subnet

These contexts are not available in Windows 2000 Server.

How to Use Netsh to Configure a Network Interface Adapter

No changes in Windows Server 2003.

Figure

Updating...

References