Chair, Department of Criminal Justice SUBJECT: Proposed Graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice Education DATE: April 1, 2014

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MEMORANDUM

TO: Educational Policies and Planning Committee FROM: Dr. William P. Bloss

Chair, Department of Criminal Justice

SUBJECT: Proposed Graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice Education DATE: April 1, 2014

The Department of Criminal Justice, College of Human Ecology, proposes to establish a new Graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice Education. It would enable interested students to obtain a post-baccalaureate credential which will qualify them for a college-level instructor position. Thus, the two-prong aim of the certificate is to first insure that the student has a sufficient competency in foundational and contemporary subject matter in the discipline; and second, prepare the student to effectively deliver criminal justice instructional material.

An evaluation of applicant statements of purpose and Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) retention data showed that a subgroup of students entered the MSCJ graduate program for the sole purpose of completing 18 semester hours of graduate coursework to become credentialed to teach criminal justice at the college level. Hence, these students withdrew from the MSCJ program once the 18 semester hours were completed, which has an adverse impact on retention and graduation rates in the program. After analyzing these data and conversing with students interested in

obtaining the credential, it became apparent that the MSCJ program should provide students with a certificate opportunity to meet the demand without compelling them to become admitted into the 36 semester hour Master’s degree program. Since none of the UNC constituent institutions offers this certificate option, we seek to fill that void by creating an avenue for interested students to obtain a credential necessary to teach criminal justice courses in some higher education institutions.

Together, the core and elective courses provide the subject matter content and instructional delivery familiarity needed. The required core courses (9 semester hours) will insure mastery of essential criminal justice content and acquaint the student with instructional best practices. The remaining 9 semester hours of elective courses, as approved by the advisor, enables the student to tailor his/her coursework to individual interests and needs. With the exception of the new course, JUST 6002 Seminar in Criminal Justice Education, all courses needed to satisfy the certificate

requirement are available in the current MSCJ course inventory. Since to obtain the credential all of the graduate coursework must be in the teaching field (i.e., criminal justice), other units or

disciplines would not be participating in the certificate program.

MEMORANDUM TO: Graduate Curriculum Committee

FROM: Dr. William P. Bloss

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SUBJECT: Application for New Certificate: Certificate in Criminal Justice Education

DATE: February 19, 2014

The Department of Criminal Justice, College of Human Ecology, proposes to establish a new Graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice Education.

Educational Objectives

The objective of the graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice Education is to enable interested students to obtain a post-baccalaureate credential which will qualify them for a College-level instructor position. Thus, the two-prong aim of the Certificate is to first insure that the student has a sufficient competency in foundational and contemporary subject matter in the discipline; and second, prepare the student to effectively deliver criminal justice instructional material.

Meeting the Educational Objectives

As noted below, the 18 s.h. Certificate provides the graduate coursework necessary to satisfy the credentialing requirements for college-level instructors. And the core and elective courses provide the subject matter content and instructional delivery familiarity needed. The required core courses (9 s.h.) will insure mastery of essential criminal justice content and acquaint the student with instructional best practices. The remaining 9 s.h. of elective courses, as approved by the advisor, enables the student to tailor his/her coursework to individual interests and needs.

Need for the Certificate

An evaluation of applicant statements of purpose and Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) retention data showed that a subgroup of students entered the MSCJ graduate program for the sole purpose of completing 18 s.h. of graduate coursework to become credentialed to teach criminal justice in a community college. Hence, these students withdrew from the MSCJ program once the 18 s.h. were completed, which has an adverse impact on retention and graduation rates in the program. After analyzing these data and conversing with students interested in obtaining the credential, it became apparent that the MSCJ program needed to provide students with a Certificate opportunity to meet the demand without compelling them to become admitted into the Master’s degree program.

Admission standards

To be admitted into the graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice Education applicants must:

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overall undergraduate grade point average of 2.7 on a 4.0 scale; 3. Submit official transcripts for all colleges/universities attended;

4. Submit a Statement of Purpose/Intent that describes a) the applicant’s relevant educational background and work experience; b) short-and long-term goals; and c) specific interests in the graduate Certificate in Criminal Justice Education program (500-750 words, single spaced, typewritten); and

5. Submit three letters of reference.

Certificate in Criminal Justice Education requirements: 18 s.h.

CORE (9 s.h.)

JUST 6000 Criminal Justice Principles

Systemic nature of current crime control efforts in criminal justice system.

JUST 6002 Seminar in Criminal Justice Education

Effective delivery of instruction of foundational and contemporary criminal justice issues.

JUST 6201 Seminar in Criminal Behavior

Theories and systems of criminological thought. Analysis of conceptual foundations of contemporary institutions and policies, formulation of crime prevention strategies, and development of responses to practical problems which arise in delivery of criminal justice.

ELECTIVES (9 s.h. of JUST courses)

• JUST 6001 - Seminar in Research Methods and Statistical Interpretation • JUST 6006 - Seminar in Corrections

• JUST 6012 - Seminar in Law Enforcement • JUST 6202 - Advanced Criminology • JUST 6211 - Statistics in Criminal Justice

• JUST 6300 - Principles of Criminal Justice Administration and Management • JUST 6400 - Contemporary Issues in Juvenile Justice

• JUST 6500 - Seminar in Criminal Justice Courts • JUST 6501 - Civil Liability in Criminal Justice • JUST 6502 - Criminal Justice and Terrorism • JUST 6601 - Special Topics

• JUST 6602 - Directed Study in Criminal Justice • JUST 6700 - Diversity Issues in Criminal Justice • JUST 6800 - Program Evaluation (Applied) • JUST 6991 - Professional Paper

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Certificate course delivery

Courses required for the Certificate in Criminal Justice Education may be delivered face-to-face, hybrid, or online depending on student needs.

Certificate award estimates

Estimate the number of certificates to be awarded in the first five years

Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Year 5

2 4-5 6 8 10

Evaluating Certificate effectiveness

As with all programs offered by the Department, the Certificate application, admission, retention, completion, and time of completion data will be regularly collected and analyzed. Instructional efficacy will be evaluated using SPOTS, course material portfolios, teaching observations (peer and/or Unit administrator), and review of online delivery content.

Furthermore, the Certificate will join other departmental degree programs which are all subject to periodic review to insure course and content currency, discipline relevance, and fulfillment of educational objectives. After evaluating these data, a quality enhancement plan will be developed to modify the program and improve student performance, course content, or instruction as indicated.

Graduate faculty

Dr. James Anderson Professor

Dr. William Bloss Professor and Chair Dr. Heidi Bonner Assistant Professor Dr. Abdullah Cihan Assistant Professor Dr. Patrick Cundiff Assistant Professor Dr. Mark Jones Professor

Dr. John Kerbs Associate Professor Dr. Megan Magers Assistant Professor Dr. John Sorensen Professor

Dr. Michele Stacey Assistant Professor

Program Coordinator (C.V. attached)

Dr. Jon Sorensen Graduate Program Director Department of Criminal Justice Office: Rivers, 238

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Licensure

No professional licensure is applicable to the Certificate

Classification of Instructional Program CIP 430103

Weeks to completion

The minimum time period to complete the Certificate would be 30 weeks (fall and spring) at 9 s.h. per semester.

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References

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