Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing. Student Manual

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Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing

Student Manual

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Table of Contents

Preface ... iv

Chapter I: Curriculum Overview of the Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Program ... 1

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Vision/Mission/Philosophy Statement ... 2

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Curricular Themes, Modes of Inquiry, and Curriculum Conceptual Organization ... 3

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Theoretical Model for Community-Based Nursing Education ... 4

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Program Outcomes ... 5

Praxis in the Curriculum ... 6

Preceptorship Model of Clinical Teaching (NURS 475 Integrated Experiential Learning IV) ... 6

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Clinical Reasoning Model ... 10

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Clinical Reasoning Model Definition and Terms ... 11

Chapter II: Curriculum Plans Curriculum Plan for Pre-licensure BSN Program ... 15

Curriculum Plan for RN to BSN Program ... 18

Chapter III: Organizational Structure and Student Membership on Committees Organizational Structure ... 20

Student Representation on Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Committees/Councils ... 21

Admissions, Progressions, Honors, and Graduation Committee ... 21

Curriculum Committee ... 23

Faculty Development Committee ... 25

Quality Improvement Committee ... 26

Search Committees ... 27

Clinical Advisory Council ... 27

Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council ... 27

Student Government (Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus) ... 28

Portland Campus Organizations/Clubs ... 28

Peer Resource Network... 28

Nursing Student Application for CNA Certification ... 30

Healthcare Events ... 30

Cultural Events... 31

Professional Conferences ... 31

Chapter IV: Student Recognition and Awards Competitive Scholarships ... 32

School of Nursing Graduating Senior Awards ... 32

Senior Honors in Nursing Award ... 32

RN to BSN Senior Honors in Nursing Award ... 33

Award for Professional Excellence ... 33

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Table of Contents

Recognition for Honors and Awards ... 34

Chapter V: Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Policies and Procedures Admission to the Nursing Major in the BSN Pre-Licensure Nursing Program ... 35

Linfield College Intercampus Migrating Students ... 36

Application and Admission Procedure for Students Desiring to Transfer from Other Nursing Programs ... 36

Admission for Registered Nurse (RN to BSN) Students ... 37

Progression in the Nursing Major ... 38

Withdrawal from the Nursing Major ... 40

Withdrawal from Linfield College-Impact on Nursing Courses ... 41

Readmission to the Nursing Major ... 41

Leave of Absence ... 41

Student Health Passport ... 42

Clinical Site Specific Requirements ... 42

Criminal Background Check... 43

Documented Disability Statement ... 43

Testing Accommodations for Students in Special Circumstances ... 43

Independent Study/Tutorials ... 44

Policy on Alcohol and Other Drug Use ... 44

Guide to the Use of Social Media ... 44

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Online Course Expectations ... 46

Student Evaluation Policy ... 47

Student Evaluation of Nursing Courses in the Curriculum ... 47

Student Evaluation of Classroom and Clinical Instruction ... 47

Student Evaluation of Clinical Agencies ... 47

Student Evaluation of Clinical Teaching Associates (Preceptors) ... 47

Student Evaluation of Experiential Learning Center (Nursing Lab) Experiences and High Fidelity Simulation ... 48

Grading Policy for All Required Nursing Courses in the Curriculum ... 48

Clinical Nursing Skills Performance Evaluation Policy Statement ... 49

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Student Technical Skills Preparation ... 51

Accident Reporting Procedure on Campus While Engaging in College Activity or Clinical... 53

Preparation for the NCLEX-RN Licensure Examination ... 54

Process for Student Inclusion in NCLEX-RN Preparation Plan ... 55

NCLEX-RN Examination Application Process ... 56

Pain Management Requirement for Registered Nurses in Oregon ... 57

Insurance ... 58

Assigned Papers ... 58

Clinical Requirements ... 58

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Experiential Learning Center Standards for the Learning Community ... 60

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Table of Contents Chapter VI: Linfield College Policies and Procedures

Linfield Curriculum (LC) Assessment... 65

Academic Integrity... 65

Procedure for Violation of Academic Integrity ... 66

Academic Integrity Violation Appeal ... 66

Academic Grievance Procedure ... 66

Statement on Student Behavior ... 67

Student Code of Conduct ... 67

Discriminatory Harassment ... 69

Academic Alerts and Support Resources ... 69

Academic Advising ... 70

Academic Advisor/Advisee Relationship and Responsibilities ... 71

Inclement Weather Policy: Closure or Late Opening ... 72

Disaster Plan ... 73

Incomplete Grade in Nursing Courses ... 73

Infection Prevention Policy ... 74

Automatic External Defibrillator (AED) ... 74

Healthcare Needs ... 74

Absence from Class ... 74

Illegal Uploading and Downloading of Copyrighted Works ... 75

Linfield College Portland Campus Guidelines for Posting... 75

Food and Beverages in Labs ... 76

Animal Policy ... 76

Classroom Configuration ... 77

Linfield Portland Campus Parking Summary ... 77

Chapter VII: New Student Orientation New BSN Student Orientation Goals and Learning Outcomes ... 80 Chapter VIII: Appendices

Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Pain Management Content

in the Nursing Curriculum ... A-1 Occupational Safety and Health Division (OR-OSHA) Blood Borne

Pathogens Exposure Control Plan ... B-1 Process for Student Communication if Unsuccessful in Passing a Nursing Course... C-1 Process for Student Communication of Academic Integrity Grievance ... C-2 Process for Pre-Licensure BSN Student Communication of Academic Grievance ... C-3 Process for RN to BSN Student Communication of Academic Grievance ... C-4

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Preface

Linfield College is an equal opportunity employer in faculty and staff recruitment and hiring. The School of Nursing does not discriminate on the basis of age, gender, sexual orientation, race, color, religion, marital status, national origin or disability in its educational programs,

admissions, activities, or employment policies. Reasonable accommodation will be made for students with disabilities.

Linfield College is regionally accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and

Universities. The Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing program is fully accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education and the Oregon State Board of Nursing until June 30, 2024.

The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), which is the accrediting branch of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), granted the baccalaureate degree program of Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing accreditation for ten years, the maximum term possible. At its April 22, 2014 meeting, the CCNE Board of Commissioners determined that the nursing program met all accreditation standards and made no

recommendations regarding any program elements. (See, The American Association of Colleges of Nursing website: www.aacn.nche.edu.)

On February 20, 2014 the Oregon State Board of Nursing (OSBN) granted Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing full approval for the maximum term possible and awarded the School several commendations. (See, Oregon State Board of Nursing website:

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Chapter I: Curriculum

Overview of the Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Program

The Vision, Mission and Philosophy of the School of Nursing are derived from the College Mission Statement and provide a foundation upon which the curriculum is structured. The curriculum is designed to be applicable to both pre-licensure students with no previous preparation in nursing and the returning registered nurse seeking a baccalaureate degree. The School of Nursing provides a quality education derived from a liberal arts foundation and nursing theory and research, supplemented by content from other disciplines. The School prepares graduates to act as providers of direct and indirect care, designers/coordinators/ managers of care and members of the nursing profession to meet the health needs of

multidimensional individuals and families, groups, communities, and populations in a diverse and multicultural society. Analytical, critical, and creative thinking, as well as intuitive processes are developed as a basis for independent and collaborative decision making in the application of clinical judgment, which includes the nursing process. The curriculum is designed to expose the student to a variety of factors that contribute to the development of a professional worldview. Among these factors are an awareness of the historical and legal context of nursing, diverse professional and cultural values, social issues, and ethical concepts. Experiences are selected to motivate students toward understanding the needs of others, assuming the roles of client educator and advocate, making creative and constructive contributions to society, and lifelong learning.

Scholarly activity is promoted to prepare students for graduate study in nursing. Graduates are expected to be accountable for their own practice of nursing and delegated nursing care, as well as provide leadership in implementing changes necessary to meet the health needs of a complex and evolving society.

The organization and internal consistency of the curriculum are demonstrated in the “Linfield College Mission Statement”, “Vision/Mission/Philosophy Statement of the School of Nursing”, “Curricular Themes, Modes of Inquiry and Curriculum Conceptual Organization”, and “Program Outcomes”. The “Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Theoretical Model for

Community-Based Nursing Education” provides a visual organizational structure for the curriculum.

The nursing program uses the following professional nursing standards and guidelines:  AACN The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice,

which can be found at the following website: http://www.aacn.nche.edu/Education/bacessn.htm.

 ANA Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements that describes the ethical obligations and duties of professional nurses and nursing students. It can be found at the following website: http://nursingworld.org/codeofethics.

 ANA Standards of Practice  OSBN Nurse Practice Act

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Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Vision/Mission/Philosophy

Statement

Approved: 04/06/09

Vision: Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing educates professional nurses for health stewardship of the complex global society.

Mission: The mission of Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing is to create an inclusive community of learning grounded in the liberal arts values of social justice and life-long learning. The program prepares caring nurses who are committed to the profession and responsive to the needs of the global community in an ever-changing healthcare environment. Evidence based practice and research guide student learning within a culture that promotes professional excellence and scholarship.

Philosophy: We believe that healthcare is a fundamental right that takes place within and among diverse and intersecting communities. Our diverse and inclusive learning environment fosters a commitment to social justice. Respect for multiple perspectives guides students and faculty to provide effective intercultural care, contribute to local and global efforts to eliminate health disparities, and advocate for vulnerable populations. Understanding that health and illness result from complex interrelated factors, nurses assume a leadership role in creating healthy communities by promoting health and healing, preventing disease, and influencing healthcare policy. Nurses develop collaborative partnerships with clients, healthcare providers, and other stakeholders to achieve healthcare goals in a variety of settings.

Consistent with the foundational education principles of Linfield College, the School of Nursing promotes integrated learning, global and multicultural awareness, and experiential learning that foster reflective practice essential for professional nurses in the 21st century. We believe that learner centered education is best achieved within a supportive community that values individual learning styles and builds on previous knowledge and practical experience. Our curriculum is designed to facilitate the development of theory acquisition, clinical skill development, and socialization into the profession of nursing. The Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Theoretical Model for Community-Based Nursing Education provides a visual organizational structure for the curriculum.

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Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Curricular Themes, Modes of

Inquiry, and Curriculum Conceptual Organization

Curricular Themes: Communication Community Diversity Ethics Health Stewardship Modes of Inquiry:

Evidence Based Practice/Scholarship Reflective Practice

Praxis

Curriculum Conceptual Organization

Each semester is organized around a central theme: • 100 and 200 levels: Liberal Arts Support Courses • 300 level

Semester 1: Foundations for Community-Based Nursing Practice Semester 2: Chronic Health

• 400 level

Semester 3: Acute Health

Semester 4: Stewardship of Health

Curricular themes and modes of inquiry weave through all the courses becoming more complex and building on previous knowledge and skills. A cohesive clinical experience each semester builds on skills and knowledge and integrates the theory included in concurrently taught courses. Progressive learning from semester 1 to semester 4:

• Basic clinical skills to complex/invasive to synthesis • More supervision to more independence

• Increasing complexity among and within curricular themes • Increasing facility with the modes of inquiry

• Increasing engagement and competence with implementing the clinical reasoning model • Increasing progression towards program outcomes

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Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Theoretical Model for

Community-Based Nursing Education

Approved: 05/18/09

The Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Theoretical Model for Community-Based Nursing Education provides a visual organizational structure for the curriculum. The model reflects the dynamic relationship between global and local communities and the community of learning. Central to this community of learning is a focus on learner centered education, which engages students in the practice of health promotion, illness prevention and treatment and reflects the value of social justice. The curriculum is grounded in a liberal arts education that includes integrative learning, inclusive excellence, and experiential learning. The curricular themes of communication, community, diversity, ethics, health, and stewardship provide a foundation for the program’s design and are developed throughout the program. Professional education includes nursing knowledge (what the student needs to know), clinical skills (what the student needs to do) and socialization into nursing practice (the student’s “being” as a

professional nurse). The ways in which the student engages in a process of inquiry include evidence based practice, praxis, and reflective practice.

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Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Program Outcomes

Approved: 04/06/09

Last Revised: 04/15/13

The graduate of Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing:

1. Builds a professional practice informed by the mission of Linfield College and the vision, mission, and philosophy of the School of Nursing as well as the standards and values of the nursing profession.

2. Applies sound clinical reasoning, reflective practice, and evidence-based practice in the provision of holistic nursing care.

3. Communicates effectively and collaboratively in a professional practice.

4. Uses a range of information and clinical technologies to achieve health care outcomes for clients.

5. Provides effective nursing care that incorporates diverse values, cultures, perspectives and health practices.

6. Engages in ethical reasoning and actions that demonstrate caring and commitment to social justice in the delivery of healthcare to clients in the community.

7. Applies principles of stewardship and leadership skills to support quality and safety within complex organizational systems.

8. Integrates knowledge of healthcare policy, populations, finance and regulatory

environments that influence system level change within professional nursing practice. 9. Incorporates a liberal arts based understanding of local and global healthcare issues to health promotion, risk reduction, disease and illness prevention, and disease and health care management.

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Praxis in the Curriculum

Praxis as a concept has been adopted by the Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing because it is consistent with the teaching-learning philosophy of the curriculum. Praxis refers to a

relationship between theory and practice in which students create/construct knowledge and meaning from their experiences. Within a praxis framework, students assess a situation, understand it through reflection and discussion, and make sound judgments that lead to justifiable actions. Students are able to:

 perceive situations within their larger context  make generalizations from their experiences

 take action as a responsible professional to modify/develop all levels of practice

In weekly praxis seminars, faculty and students involved in clinical courses engage in dialogue focused on integrating clinical experiences with theoretical content.

Preceptorship Model of Clinical Teaching (NURS 475

Integrated Experiential

Learning IV

)

The preceptorship model of clinical teaching is used in NURS 475 Integrated Experiential

Learning IV. The roles of the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor), student, and faculty are as follows:

Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) Role

1. Provides faculty and the student with a copy of the Clinical Teaching Associate’ s (Preceptor’s) work schedule to assist in scheduling the student’s clinical days. 2. Coordinates the student’s orientation to the facility, including staff roles and client

expectations.

3. Ensures the student is identified as a student while in the clinical area and is not regarded as staff for the clinical site.

4. Fosters the student’s integration into the workplace culture and the health care team by involving the student in meetings related to client care and other appropriate professional matters.

5. Arranges for a substitute Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) when absent.

6. Facilitates learner centered education through collaborative identification of the student’s learning needs, open communication, informing the student about learning resources, and mutual assessment of the student’s learning outcomes.

7. Serves as a role model for the student, demonstrating professional values and behaviors such as caring, integrity, effective interpersonal communication, critical thinking, and conflict management.

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10. Discusses, facilitates and supervises student learning activities and outcomes.

11. Monitors the student’s provision of nursing care to ensure client safety, and provides a safe learning environment for the student.

12. Recommends appropriate clients for the student to provide nursing care, and assists with accessing agency information.

13. Provides instruction to the student concerning the realities of the professional world of nursing practice.

14. Stimulates development of the student’s clinical judgment and critical thinking ability through reflective practice and the application of evidence based practice.

15. Provides regular constructive feedback to the student regarding progress toward meeting clinical outcomes.

16. Collaborates with faculty to determine the student’s readiness to perform skills independently.

17. Consults with faculty regularly regarding the student’s progress toward meeting the clinical outcomes, including suggestions, problems, and concerns.

18. Completes a written clinical performance evaluation of the student assessing the attainment of clinical outcomes (as requested).

Student Role

1. Negotiates with the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) and faculty to schedule clinical days.

2. Participates in orientation per agency policy/ Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) instructions, and complies with agency policies, standards, procedures, rules and regulations.

3. Notifies Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) and faculty of absences per course syllabus and negotiates makeup hours.

4. Provides written learning outcomes to the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) and faculty, and discusses strategies for meeting clinical outcomes.

5. Demonstrates motivation, initiative, and a willingness to learn in the clinical setting. 6. Assumes responsibility for learning by asking pertinent questions and being prepared for

clinical experiences.

7. Demonstrates stewardship by acting with integrity in an accountable and responsible way to ensure professional nursing care is provided to clients.

8. Keeps faculty informed about clinical experiences, including any concerns regarding the student’s role, client or student safety, or standards of conduct, performance and ethics. 9. Requests appropriate assistance when doing a new skill or if uncertain about how to

perform a skill.

10. Only provides nursing care to the level taught and determined competent by the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) and faculty.

11. When administering medications, the student reviews information about the drugs and knows the contraindications, actions, interactions, side effects, and age specific

considerations of the drugs. The student knows why the clients are receiving the medications, and performs any indicated assessment.

12. Assesses own progress toward meeting clinical outcomes, and communicates learning needs to faculty and the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor).

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13. Is open to constructive criticism from faculty and the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor), and uses feedback to improve nursing practice.

14. Meets clinical outcomes as stated in the course syllabus.

15. Completes a written clinical performance self-evaluation assessing the attainment of clinical outcomes.

Faculty Role

1. Notifies the student of the Clinical Teaching Associate’s (Preceptor’s) name and phone number, and facilitates scheduling of the student’s clinical days.

2. Orients the student to the course; including clinical outcomes and requirements of the course, as well as role expectations of the student, faculty, and the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor).

3. Orients the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) to the nursing curriculum; the course, including clinical outcomes, requirements of the course, and evaluation methods; and role expectations of the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor), faculty and the student. 4. Ensures the student has completed the School of Nursing Health Passport requirements

and additional clinical site requirements.

5. Complies with agency policies, standards, procedures, rules and regulations.

6. If the student is employed by the clinical agency, faculty coaches the student about the differences between the student’s role as employee and as student. Faculty ensures that the student wears the student name badge. The Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) must not have any line of authority to the student related to the student’s employment. 7. Communicates weekly with the student on an individual basis or in group praxis seminars

to monitor progress toward meeting clinical outcomes.

8. Demonstrates commitment to the partnership between faculty and the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) in facilitating the student’s application of theoretical knowledge to practice and socialization into nursing practice.

9. Ongoing communication with the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) in the clinical area or by telephone/email contact for information about student progress in meeting clinical outcomes, and to provide guidance to the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) with regard to teaching and evaluating the student.

10. Provides constructive feedback to Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) to facilitate development of the Clinical Teaching Associate’s (Preceptor’s) teaching and evaluation skills with students.

11. Available by telephone/email to the student and the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) for problem solving or other relevant matters during all clinical hours. 12. Assists the student and the Clinical Teaching Associate (Preceptor) with the evaluation

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References

Altmann, T. (2006). Preceptor selection, orientation, and evaluation in baccalaureate nursing education. International Journal of Nursing Scholarship, 3 (1), 1-16.

Boyer, S. (2008). Competence and innovation in preceptor development: Updating our program. Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 24 (2), E1-E6.

Luhanga, F., Yonge, O., & Myrick, F. (2008). Failure to assign failing grades: Issues with grading the unsafe student. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 5 (1), article 8, 1-14.

Myrick, F., & Yonge, O. (2002). Preceptor behaviors integral to the promotion of student critical thinking. Journal for Nurses in Staff Development, 18 (3), 127-133.

Myrick, F., & Yonge, O. (2002). Preceptor questioning and student critical thinking. Journal of Professional Nursing, 18 (3), 176-181.

Seldomridge, L., & Walsh, C. (2006). Evaluating student performance in undergraduate preceptorships. Journal of Nursing Education, 45 (5), 169-176.

Yonge, O., Billay, D., Myrick, F., & Luhanga, F. (2007). Preceptorship and mentorship: Not merely a matter of semantics. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 4 (1), article 19, 1-13.

Yonge, O., Ferguson, L., Myrick, F., & Haase, M. (2003). Faculty preparation for the preceptorship experience: The forgotten link. Nurse Educator, 28 (5), 210-211.

Yonge, O., Hagler, P., Cox, C., & Drefs, S. (2008). Listening to preceptors. Journal of Nurses in Staff Development, 24 (1), 21-26.

Yonge, O., Myrick, F., & Haase, M. (2002). Student nurse stress in the preceptor experience.

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Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Clinical Reasoning Model

Nursing faculty adopted a Clinical Reasoning Model to help students think systematically about their clients and their clients’ stories, as well as the issues clients share.

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Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing Clinical Reasoning Model

Definition and Terms

Approved: 05/21/12 Client Story

In this section, the student should jot down the relevant facts of the story. This is the opportunity to describe the uniqueness of the person; it will include some details of the medical condition and the nursing care needs that can be determined from an analysis of that condition. It should give the reader a vivid picture of the client and his/her current situation.

This is the starting point for the clinical reasoning process. It gathers the subjective and

objective data that will be used in all the other steps. Data are collected from a variety of sources besides from the client, such as client records, lab reports, x-rays or nursing notes. In calling it a story it humanizes the process beyond “data collection” and emphasizes that the client is a unique human being.

Filters (age, gender, family, culture, beliefs, medical diagnosis, environment,

illness/health trajectory): The filters are specific known areas that impact how a student thinks about the client story. By filtering the story through these different aspects the student begins to group the data into categories or by criteria that helps to streamline the student’s thinking about that client. For example, if the client story is a person with a broken femur, the student begins to think about that client situation differently if the client is a 2-year old, 8-year old, 25-year old or an 85-year old person with a broken femur. The student may think about child abuse in the case of a 2-year old with a

fractured femur, a motor vehicle/bicycle accident as the cause for a broken femur in an 8-year old, or a fall in the 85-8-year old with a fractured femur. Another example would be that the client is someone who is a diabetic. What the student thinks about the needs of the client may be different if the client is a newly diagnosed diabetic or an DM Type 2 that is not being managed well on oral agents and now needs insulin or someone with an insulin pump.

Reasoning

Here is where the student simplifies the complex client story into primary issues. The student needs to cluster the data in the client story into meaningful groups or patterns. The student does not list each individual piece of data. The idea of clustering data is to help the student see the big picture of the data and how the data relate to one another in a group and how that group of

information relates to another group of data.

Using nursing diagnostic statements for each cluster of data helps to focus on the nursing needs of the client and will later drive the outcome and actions the student takes to help clients. The student is encouraged to use a NANDA format when formulating the nursing diagnostic statements. The NANDA format includes: (1) problem statement; (2) what the problem is related to; and (3) the evidence that leads to determine the problem.

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Clinical Reasoning Web: This is a visual way to represent the issues specific to the client. It is a pictorial representation of the functional relationships among the clusters of data. Start with the clusters and then show the relationship between the clusters with arrows. As the student draws the lines, the student reflects to himself/herself the primary issue with the highest priority for care. Determine the top three primary issues

confronting the client and note them utilizing a nursing diagnosis format.

It is often helpful to place the client in the center of the Clinical Reasoning Web. This picture will help guide the student to think about different aspects of the whole client in a health context. It may be easier to put the medical diagnosis in the middle with the client as that is usually the initial focus for coming into contact with client.

Primary Issues: The number one primary issue is the issue that if and when solved will affect many of the other issues confronting the client. It should be stated in a nursing diagnostic statement in the NANDA format. Most nurses do not only focus on the number one primary issue but think about several issues simultaneously.

Client State

Present State: These are succinct statements that outline the major evidence that contributes to the primary issue of the client. For each statement of evidence in the present state there needs to be a corresponding expected outcome statement.

Expected Outcome Statement: For each primary present state, there should be an outcome statement. The outcome statement needs to be stated positively and in measurable terms. This is to be the end result of the student’s nursing care. Where do the student and the client want the client to be if the student’s interventions are

successful? Examples include:

1. Body temperature will decline at least one degree within the next eight hours (note specific date and time).

2. Client will verbalize increased satisfaction with rest and sleep pattern within one week (note specific date).

3. Client will report increase in energy level within next three days (note specific date).

4. Intake will equal output within the next twenty-four hours (note specific date and time).

5. No evidence of postural hypotension during ambulation.

6. Client will report pain at two out of a scale of ten which is the client’s acceptable level.

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9. Client will drink at least 1500 ml of fluid over the next eight hours (note specific date).

Testing: A test is the process of juxtaposing the present state and the expected outcome state. During testing the nurse determines how well this gap between present state and outcome state has been filled. This is the application of comparative analysis. The evidence you gather is the test. A test must be something that provides a measure. At times a test may also be the intervention. For example: Daily weights and calorie count fit the definition of a test and also intervention. An intervention is a planned activity done by a nurse to achieve an expected and predictable outcome. So a calorie count is something we might choose to do as an intervention for our client. The resulting value of the calorie count is the test because it provides the evidence that filled the gap between present state and outcome state.

Actions

An intervention is a planned activity conducted by the student to achieve an expected and predictable outcome. This is the selection of interventions and actions that move the client from the present state to the outcome state. This must be client specific and should not be stated in general terms. For example, provide distraction is an intervention, but the specific intervention is to have a family member assist the client off the unit for a wheelchair ride to the hospital coffee shop.

Nursing Actions: Are autonomous interventions that the student implements in his/her practice that are knowledge based, evidence based, and theory focused.

Collaborative Actions: Are interventions that the student initiates in conjunction with an advanced health care provider (physician, nurse practitioner or physician’s assistant) in response to specific client needs.

Risk For: Are specific conditions that clients are at high risk for occurrence based on the client story and other data. Therefore, the student implements plans of action to monitor for the risk concern or to decrease the likelihood the condition will occur for this client. Judgment

The student evaluates the client’s progress towards the expected outcome(s) in this step of the clinical reasoning mode. The student asks himself/herself a series of questions:

 Is the outcome met, partially met or not met?

 Is the change in the client an improvement or is the client better?  Is the client worse?

 Is the client the same as before the interventions?

 Is the client improving quickly enough for this situation?  Are these the correct interventions for this problem?

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 Who do I need to notify of the change in the client status?  Do I need to seek additional help? If so, who and when?

 If the outcome has been met or the client is improving, when do I need to enter this thought process about this client again?

Reflection

Reflection occurs on several different levels of thinking. The student should be a reflective practitioner. Therefore, the student hones the ability to reflect or compare what is currently happening with the client and what should be happening based on similar clients the student has cared for. This type of reflective thinking allows the student to change his/her conceptual thinking and clinical reasoning about a client in the moment that results in a different action and is called reflection-in-action. It takes much skill and experience for the student to reflect-in-action. To build a high level of reflective thinking to a competent or expert level, a nurse

practices reflective thinking by reflection-on-action. Using the evaluation questions in the above judgment section, the student purposively thinks about or reflects on the client’s expected

outcomes. If at any point in time the expected outcome is not being me or not being met quickly enough, the student re-enters the client story to see what has changed in the story, what data might have been missed in the story or think about the client differently.

Later Reflection: Is a time to reflect and think back on this specific case and begin to cluster it into the student’s personal library of clients that appear similar to this one:  What did you learn from this case?

 What did you miss in this case?

 What was similar or different from the similar case?

This type of reflection will expand the student’s growth and knowledge base of signs and symptoms as he/she experiences more and more clinical encounters. The student will add to his/her bank of interventions as the student applies theoretical knowledge to actual client situations and as the student interacts with expert nurses.

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Chapter II: Curriculum Plans

All admitted nursing students will be assigned to a specific curriculum plan based on prior academic work completed and available space. Start terms include summer, fall and spring. Pre-licensure nursing students working on their first degree may be admitted either in the fall or spring to the pre-licensure curriculum plan. Pre-licensure nursing students with a prior bachelor degree may be admitted in the summer to the accelerated curriculum plan, or the fall or spring semester. RN to BSN students may be admitted in the summer, fall or spring to a four semester curriculum plan (or up to five semesters part-time). All of the curriculum plans are detailed in the following pages.

Students are encouraged to take advantage of elective courses, and to study abroad at least once before they graduate. The semester abroad option provides a cross-cultural experience as part of the general education requirements. January Term Travel courses also offer study abroad

opportunities during a four-week session. RN to BSN students have the opportunity to

participate in an international service learning experience during the final experiential course of the program.

Linfield College foundational education principles, the Linfield Curriculum (general education requirements), paracurriculum courses (requirement), January term international travel courses, are described in the Linfield College Catalog.

Curriculum Plan for Pre-licensure BSN Program

Admission Requirements: Students admitted to this plan must have the following prerequisites completed with a minimum grade of “C” in each course and a minimum BSN prerequisite GPA of 3.00 as verified by official transcripts.

CHEM 210 and CHEM 211 General Chemistry I and II OR BIOL 210 and BIOL 211 Principles of Biology BIOL 212 Human Anatomy and BIOL 213 Human Physiology

BIOL 275 Introduction to Microbiology OR BIOL 361 General Microbiology HPPA 280 Nutrition

PSYC 155 Human Lifespan Development MATH 140 Statistics

INQS 125 Inquiry Seminar*

*Students migrating from McMinnville need to successfully complete INQS 125, a minimum grade of C is not required.

Prerequisites may be completed at any regionally accredited college or university. Transfer course selection guides are on the School of Nursing website.

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Curriculum Plan

Students will take courses according to the following curriculum plan.

Pre-licensure BSN Program of Study

Semester I - Foundations for Community Based Nursing Education Credits

 NURS 305: Foundations of Community-Based Nursing Practice

 NURS 315: Professional Communication in Healthcare

 NURS 320: Evidence-Based Nursing

 NURS 335: Integrated Experiential Learning I

4 3 3 4

Semester II – Chronic Health Credits

 NURS 355: Nursing Care of Clients and Families Across the Lifespan Living

with Chronic Conditions

 NURS 365: Clinical Pathophysiology and Pharmacology for Nursing Practice

 NURS 395: Nursing in Mental Health and Illness Across the Lifespan

 NURS 375: Integrated Experiential Learning II

3 3 3 5

Semester III – Acute Health Credits

 NURS 425: Transitions in Health and Illness

 NURS 455: Nursing Care of Clients and Families Across the Lifespan with

Acute Conditions

 NURS 435: Integrated Experiential Learning III

3 4 6

Semester IV- Stewardship of Health Credits

 NURS 460: Population-Based Nursing

 NURS 470: Nursing Leadership

 NURS 475: Integrated Experiential Learning IV

3 3 7

Total Credits 54

Students enrolling in the nursing program in either fall or spring may choose to take courses in summer or during January term in order to complete Linfield Curriculum requirements. For students entering the major in either fall or spring there are no required nursing courses offered in the summer or during January term.

Accelerated Pre-licensure Nursing Students entering the Nursing Major in Summer as second degree students will take courses according to the above curriculum plan for all Pre-licensure BSN students, however courses taken in the summer will be accelerated into an 11 week format. Summary of Theory and Clinical Hours in Pre-licensure BSN Program

Total credit hours theory and clinical: 54 Total credit hours theory: 29

Total credit hours clinical: 25

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Graduation Requirements

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree:  125 semester credits.

 Cumulative and major GPA of 2.500.

 Residency. No fewer than 30 credits must be from Linfield College. For a second baccalaureate degree, 35 additional credits in residence. This requirement will be met upon completion of the 54 hours of nursing courses.

 Math proficiency. Met by statistics, a prerequisite for entry into the program.  Paracurriculum courses. A minimum of 3 credits, one of which must be a physical

activity course, must be earned at Linfield College or by transfer from another institution. Paracurriculum courses are not required for second degree students.

 Linfield Curriculum. Students with Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer Degree are required to complete two Linfield Curriculum courses and an upper division course. Linfield Curriculum (general education requirements) are not required for students earning a second bachelor’s degree. Prerequisite courses for the nursing major fulfill some, but not all, of these requirements.Two courses in the Nursing Major help to meet the Linfield Curriculum Requirements.

o Quantitative Reasoning (QR), satisfied by NURS 320.

o Writing Intensive requirement satisfied by INQS and Writing Intensive Course in the Major NURS 470.

o See the Linfield College Course Catalog for details.

 All major requirements. Pass all courses in the nursing major with a grade of C or higher: NURS 305, 315, 320, 335, 355, 365, 375, 395, 425, 435, 455, 460, 470, 475. (54 semester credits).

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Curriculum Plan for RN to BSN Program

Admission Requirements

Registered Nurse students admitted to this plan must have an unencumbered RN license from any US state where the student is living and where clinical rotations in courses will be

completed. Provisional acceptance in the RN to BSN program will be considered pending successful completion of the NCLEX-RN exam prior to beginning course work. Registered Nurse students must have the following prerequisites completed with a minimum grade of “C” in each course and a minimum BSN prerequisite GPA of 2.75 as verified by official transcripts by the Fall start date. Prerequisites may be completed at any regionally accredited college or university.

An unencumbered RN license

Natural or Life Sciences (minimum of 12 semester or 18 quarter credits)

Social or Behavioral Sciences (minimum of 3 semester credits or 4 quarter credits) College Writing (minimum of 3 semester or 5 quarter credits)

Statistics (minimum of 3 semester or 4 quarter credits) Nutrition

Computer Applications

Prerequisites may be completed at any regionally accredited college or university. Curriculum Plan

Registered Nurse students will take online courses according to the following curriculum plan.

RN to BSN Program of Study

Semester I Credits

 NURS 308: RN to BSN Transition to Professional Practice* 6

Semester II Credits

 NURS 310: RN to BSN Professional Communication in Healthcare

 NURS 321: RN to BSN Evidence-Based Nursing

3 3

Semester III Credits

 NURS 462: RN to BSN Population Based Nursing

 NURS 472: RN to BSN Nursing Leadership

3 3

Semester IV Credits

 NURS 476: RN to BSN Integrated Experiential Learning 6

*At the successful completion of NURS 308 with a grade of C or higher, students are awarded 31 Prior Learning Credits for completion of NURS 335, 355, 365, 375, 395, 425 and 435.

31

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Summary of Theory and Clinical Hours in RN to BSN Program Total credit hours theory and clinical:... 24

Total credit hours theory: ... 18 Total credit hours clinical: ... 06

Total clinical hours: 252 (6 credits x 3 hours x 14 weeks) Graduation Requirements

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree:  125 semester credits.

 Cumulative and major GPA of 2.500.

 Residency. No fewer than 30 credits must be from Linfield College if earning first bachelor’s degree and 35 credits if earning a second bachelor’s degree.

 Math proficiency. Met by statistics, a prerequisite for entry into the program.

 Linfield Curriculum (general education requirements). Not required if earning a second bachelor’s degree. Students with Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer Degree are required to complete two Linfield Curriculum Courses and an upper division course. See, the Linfield College Course Catalog for details. Prerequisite courses for the nursing major fulfill some, but not all, of these requirements.

o Inquiry Seminary (INQS) or two writing courses, 4 semester credits o Creative Studies (CS), 3 semester credits

o Individuals, Systems and Societies (IS), 3 semester credits o Natural World (NW), 3 semester credits

o Quantitative Reasoning (QR), 3 semester credits o Ultimate Questions (UQ), 3 semester credits o Vital Past (VP), 3 semester credits

o Global Pluralism (GP), 3 semester credits o U.S. Pluralism (US), 3 semester credits o Upper Division Course, 3 semester credits

o Writing Intensive requirement satisfied by two writing courses and NURS 321 All major requirements. Pass all courses in the nursing major with a grade of C or higher: NURS 308, 310, 321, 462, 472, 476 (24 semester credits).

The final RN to BSN course, NURS 476, is an integrated experiential learning course (IEL). Students complete a variety of course activities including a service learning experience in their local community. Service Learning is an activity or service that responds to a need identified in the community that is uniquely suited to the mission of Linfield College and to the community-based philosophy of the nursing curriculum. This approach to leadership in the community that explores non-traditional sites and diverse experiences provides valuable preparation for health promotion, cultural awareness, and leadership in the global community. RN to BSN students have the opportunity to participate in Service Learning experience in the global community by engaging in an international healthcare experience.

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Chapter III: Organizational Structure and Student

Membership on Committees

Organizational Structure

The Dean of Nursing is the chief academic officer of Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing, and provides vision and leadership while representing the interests of the School of Nursing. The Associate Dean of Nursing collaborates with the Dean of Nursing in the administration of the School of Nursing. The Experiential Learning Center (ELC) Director is responsible for the operation of the Experiential Learning Center (nursing labs), with the assistance of the Experiential Learning Center Coordinators. The High Fidelity Simulation Coordinators manage the high fidelity simulation program with the technical assistance of the Simulation Operations Manager and the Senior Laboratory Coordinator under the direction of the ELC Director. The Clinical Facilities Administrator is responsible for coordination of clinical facilities. The Coordinator of Clinical Education is responsible to assuring clinical experiences allow students to meet the program learning outcomes.

The Administrative Assistants of the School of Nursing assist students in locating and communicating with instructors. Faculty members are the student’s primary resource for learning activities and should be the first point of contact. In online courses, students should check with instructors about preferences for communication and their timeline for response. Semester Coordinators facilitate curriculum integrity. Integrated Experiential Learning

Coordinators orient, supervise and evaluate Nurse Educator Associates’ (clinical adjunct faculty) teaching in Integrated Experiential Learning courses. The Dean of Nursing assures the

orientation, supervision and evaluation of Nurse Educator Associates (classroom adjunct faculty) through delegation of appropriate faculty.

Nurse Educator Associates (adjunct faculty) are hired semester by semester to meet staffing needs and are fully qualified faculty. They will inform students how to communicate with them.

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Student Representation on Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing

Committees/Councils

Two nursing student representatives to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing meetings are selected by the Associated Students of Linfield College – Portland Campus (student

government). These representatives can give input but are not eligible to vote.

Each School of Nursing standing committee has two nursing student representatives selected by Associated Students of Linfield College – Portland Campus (student government). Student representatives on committees have both voice and vote. A description of these committees as well as the Clinical Advisory Council, Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council and Search Committees follows:

Admissions, Progressions, Honors, and Graduation Committee

Area of Focus

Admission, progression, honors, and graduation

Purpose

To recommend policies and standards; and review factors relating to the recruitment, advising, selection, admission, advanced placement, retention, dismissal, progression, readmission, transfer, honors, and graduation of nursing students.

The Committee:

1. Recommends to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing changes in the standards for College admission. If approved by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing, the Chairperson of the committee with the approval of the Dean of Nursing, directs the proposal to the College Student Policies Committee.

2. Recommends to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing changes in policies and standards related to recruitment, advising, selection, admission, advanced placement, retention, dismissal, progression, readmission, transfer, honors, and graduation of nursing students. Directs proposals concerning recruitment, advising, selection, admission, advanced placement, retention, dismissal, progression, readmission, and transfer to the College Student Policies Committee; and proposals concerning honors and graduation to the College Curriculum Committee.

3. Acts on petitions for admission, readmission, retention or progression in the nursing major as appropriate under existing policies.

4. Instructs the registration officer to deny registration in nursing courses for which the student has not met prerequisites.

5. If needed, clarifies for faculty policies affecting student recruitment, advising, selection, admission, advanced placement, retention, dismissal, progression, readmission, transfer, honors, and graduation.

6. Reviews statistics provided by the registration officer on the number of students entering, graduating, length of time in the program, withdrawals and at risk students to determine the ability of students to meet course, level and program outcomes.

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7. Reviews effectiveness of recruitment and student support services in recruiting and retaining a diverse student population and achieving the School of Nursing vision, mission, philosophy, and program outcomes.

8. Solicits nominations from the nursing faculty members for senior student awards. 9. Reviews essays for departmental competitive scholarships and determines awards. 10. Implements that portion of the Evaluation Plan pertaining to the specified responsibilities

of the Admissions, Progressions, Honors, and Graduation Committee.

Membership (3 faculty; 2 students; 5 ex officio without vote): Three nursing faculty, one of whom teaches in the RN to BSN program, elected by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing to two-year terms. Two nursing students selected by Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus (student government). The Dean of Nursing, Associate Dean of Nursing, Director of Enrollment Services, Associate Registrar, and Academic Records Specialist for the Portland Campus serve as ex officio members.

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Curriculum Committee

Area of Focus

Curriculum

Purpose

To develop and implement curricular policies as directed by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing.

The Committee:

1. Seeks input from the College Curriculum Committee, Clinical Advisory Council, and Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council concerning the nursing curriculum, as well as current trends and needs in nursing education.

2. Reviews the School of Nursing vision, mission, philosophy, and program outcomes for congruence with the College mission, professional nursing standards and guidelines, the needs and expectations of the community, faculty beliefs, and current trends and needs in nursing education.

3. Reviews congruence of School of Nursing course and level outcomes with program outcomes and School of Nursing vision, mission, and philosophy.

4. Evaluates effectiveness of the curriculum design, sequencing, and scheduling in achieving program outcomes.

5. Evaluates proposals for curricular changes relating to the nursing major and support courses to the major in terms of compatibility with the School of Nursing vision, mission, philosophy, and program outcomes.

6. Recommends curricular revisions to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing for action. If approved by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing, the Chairperson of the committee, with the approval of the Dean of Nursing, directs the proposal to the College Curriculum Committee.

7. Recommends to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing measures to strengthen the curriculum based on evaluation and research findings.

8. Reviews the effectiveness of nursing courses in meeting course, level and program outcomes and integrating critical nursing practice concepts as well as essential methods of inquiry. Forwards recommendations to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing for action.

9. Reviews new course proposals and course revisions submitted by Nursing Faculty to determine need and contribution to achievement of program outcomes, forwarding recommendations to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing for action. If approved by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing, the Chairperson of the Committee, with the approval of the Dean of Nursing, directs the proposals to the College Curriculum Committee.

10. Examines the effectiveness of course assessment methods in evaluating course outcomes. 11. Maintains continuity in education delivery to ensure achievement of level outcomes. 12. Examines internal and external assessment sources to evaluate the curriculum.

13. Implements that portion of the Evaluation Plan pertaining to the specified responsibilities of the Curriculum Committee.

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Membership (6 faculty; 2 students; 3 ex officio without vote): Four nursing faculty, who are Semester Coordinators, assigned on a yearly basis by the Dean of Nursing. Two nursing faculty, one of whom teaches in the RN to BSN program, elected by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing to two-year terms. Two nursing students selected by Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus (student government). The Dean of Nursing, Associate Dean of Nursing, and Experiential Learning Center Director serve as ex officio members.

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Faculty Development Committee

Area of Focus

Professional development.

Purpose

To facilitate faculty development. The Committee:

1. Prepares a monthly program of faculty development and yearly retreat based on nursing faculty members’ needs and interests, as well as input from the Dean of Nursing. 2. Prepares faculty development programs for Nurse Educator Associates (clinical adjunct

faculty) in conjunction with the Nurse Educator Associate (Adjunct Faculty) Liaison. 3. Nominates one member of the committee to oversee the New Faculty Learning

Community, which includes the faculty mentoring program designed to assist new faculty.

4. Assesses faculty development needs and the effectiveness of programs in meeting identified needs.

5. Provides representation to the Northwest Nursing Education Institute.

6. In conjunction with the Dean of Nursing, provides orientation of new faculty to the curriculum and learner centered education.

7. Collaborates with the Faculty Development Subcommittee of the College Faculty Personnel Committee to implement College professional development programs. 8. Updates the Praxis Orientation in the Nursing Faculty Manual.

9. Implements that portion of the evaluation plan pertaining to the specified responsibilities of the Faculty Development Committee.

Membership (3 faculty; 2 students; 2 ex officio without vote): Three nursing faculty, one of whom is tenured, elected by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing to two-year terms. Two nursing students selected by Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus (student government). The Dean of Nursing and Associate Dean of Nursing serve as ex officio

members.

Please Note: The Faculty Development Committee is not meeting during the 2016-2017 academic year.

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Quality Improvement Committee

Area of Focus

Quality improvement.

Purpose

To monitor the quality of the nursing program, and promote improvement of the teaching-learning process and facilities on campus and in the community.

The Committee:

1. Oversees yearly review and implementation of the Evaluation Plan for the School of Nursing.

2. Notifies appropriate individuals and/or committees of evaluation deadlines.

3. Recommends changes in the Evaluation Plan to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing.

4. Collects and analyzes assessment data as requested by the School of Nursing, reporting findings to the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing.

5. Maintains files of collected and analyzed assessment data.

6. Assesses the adequacy of library and educational media resources as well as other instructional resources including the use of information technology.

7. Monitors the adequacy of clinical sites and clinical teaching associates (preceptors) in consultation with the Clinical Facilities Administrator and the Faculty.

8. Reviews yearly the School of Nursing Governing Policies, and recommends to the Nursing Faculty Assembly amendments to the policies. If approved by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing, the Chairperson of the Committee, with the approval of the Dean of Nursing, refers the amendments to the College Faculty Executive Council to review for consistency with the Linfield College Faculty Handbook.

9. Implements that portion of the Evaluation Plan pertaining to the specified responsibilities of the Quality Improvement Committee.

Membership (5 faculty, 2 students, 3 ex officio without vote): Five nursing faculty elected by the Faculty Assembly of the School of Nursing to two-year terms. Two nursing students selected by Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus (student government). The Dean of Nursing, Associate Dean of Nursing, and Clinical Facilities Administrator serve as ex officio

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Search Committees

Search Committees for tenure track full-time faculty, Visiting Assistant Professor, and Clinical Associate positions are convened as needed. The purpose of Search Committees is to advertise, interview, assess professional presentations, and recommend candidates for these positions to the Dean of Nursing, Vice President for Academic Affairs/Dean of Faculty, and the College

President. Nursing student representatives are active members of the search process. They provide input and are eligible to vote. The nursing department selects two nursing students to serve on Search Committees based on recommendations from the Associate Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus (student government).

Clinical Advisory Council

The purpose of the Clinical Advisory Council is for nurses from the community to provide counsel to the School of Nursing concerning the nursing curriculum, the changing health care system, community health care needs and expectations of Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing graduates. Two nursing student representatives to the Clinical Advisory Council are selected by Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus (student government).

Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council

The purpose of the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council is to provide the School of Nursing with guidance and expertise on culturally relevant curriculum issues, as well as the recruitment and retention of students, staff, and faculty of diverse backgrounds, especially areas

underrepresented in nursing and healthcare. The primary responsibility of community members on the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council is to serve as ambassadors to the Portland-metro community in their current community in roles and provide feedback regarding the School of Nursing’s diversity efforts. Two nursing student representatives to the Diversity and Inclusion Advisory Council are selected by Associated Students of Linfield College- Portland Campus (student government).

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Student Government (Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland

Campus)

The Associated Students of Linfield College-Portland Campus (ASLC-PC) is the student government organization that provides student advocacy and coordinates social, cultural, and education events. The student government extends an invitation to pre-licensure BSN nursing students and RN to BSN students to be student representatives on nursing committees and to participate in student clubs.

Portland Campus Organizations/Clubs

Nursing students are encouraged to participate in Portland Campus organizations/clubs such as:  Breathe Club

 Country Western Dance Club  Fusion PDX

 Holistic Health Club

 Linfield Public Health Association

 Linfield Student Nurses Association (a chapter of the National Student Nurses Association)

 Multicultural Student Nurses  Nursemen Club

 Nursing Students for Reproductive Health  Nursing Students Without Borders

 Oncology Club  Outside Club

 Students who are Parents Also  Veterans Club

 Wildcatheters

Peer Resource Network

Peer Resource Network Mission Statement

The Peer Resource Network of Linfield-Good Samaritan School of Nursing connects a

community of past, present, and future nursing students in an effort to instill confidence and ease transitions by providing support, guidance, and inspiration while fostering the core values of nursing.

Mentor Responsibilities

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2. Mentor must contact their mentee at least twice a month during the first two months, then once a month until December. The mentor does not have to continue contact if the mentee requests no further help. Required contact is in place to:

1) encourage mentees who are shy about making contact; and 2) to help a student nurse be a proactive mentor to the new student. The mentor and mentee can establish contact times and methods that will work for both.

3. Ensure mentee that all communications will be kept confidential. Exceptions include circumstances involving academic dishonesty, harm to self, or harm to others.

4. Respond to mentee emails within 48 hours.

5. Become familiar with resources that are included in the student handbook. If a mentee needs additional support, guidance or has questions beyond the mentor’s level of comfort, the mentor should know where to point the mentee for a proper solution. For example, this may include questions about financial aid, or questions regarding counseling services.

6. Respect boundaries of the mentee.

7. Mentors are not academic tutors. Mentors are not required to read mentee’s papers, hold study sessions for mentee’s class, or quiz mentees for tests. Mentors are just here to answer questions and provide insight into how mentors have handled different aspects of nursing school.

8. Mentor positions will be recognized by the school and can be added to resumes. 9. Evaluate mentor/mentee relationship for productivity. Both mentor and mentee have

the right to choose a different mentee/mentor.

10. Mentors may choose to stop mentoring at any time, including at graduation. Mentoring term is 11 months from start date. Graduating mentors who do not wish to continue the relationship after graduation should inform the mentee well in advance of official graduation day. The mentee will be provided a new mentor.

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Nursing Student Application for CNA Certification

1. Nursing students are eligible for CNA-1 certification by the Oregon State Board of Nursing after successful completion of all courses in Semesters 1 and 2 in the curriculum. 2. In accordance with FERPA regulations, student completion of required courses cannot be

verified to Oregon State Board of Nursing without a signed release from the student. 3. Students desiring CNA-1 certification must complete the application process as outlined

on the Oregon State Board of Nursing website.

4. Students submit the student nurse application with the completed fingerprint documents, the fees, and a copy of their official transcript.

5. In accordance with the nurse practice act (Division 62) and as an enrollee of an approved nursing education program, verification of the required coursework for certification may be obtained by requesting an official transcript from the Director of Enrollment Services’ office.

Healthcare Events

Student Life supports educational events, such as:

Breast Cancer Awareness HIV/AIDs Awareness Day

Holistic Health Community Fair National Alliance for Mental Illness (NAMI) National Nurses Day, American Nurses (ANA) Nurse Lobby Day

Nursing Career Fair Salem Lobby Day

Trans Health Day Wellness Program

Environmental Health Day Body Composition Workshop

Relaxation Day Personal Safety Workshop

Oregon State Board of Nursing, Ethics Panel Sheltering and Disaster Health

Both students and faculty act as healthcare advocates by volunteering to participate in a variety of community events such as:

AIDS Walk Alzheimer’s Association Memory Walk

Blood Drive Blood Pressure Clinic

Flu Immunization Clinics Susan G. Komen’s Race for the Cure National Alliance for Mental Illness Walk Out of Darkness (Suicide Prevention) Walk Linfield Student Nurses Association Bone

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Cultural Events

Student Life supports multicultural events, such as:

African Film Festival and Dinner Viva Neustria Culture Latina (Aztec dancers)

Greek Festival Die de los Metros Altar Building

Cultural Food Fair Hawaiian BBQ

LUAU at the McMinnville Campus MEChA Latino Potluck

MLK Day of Service Cultural Connections

Muslim Education Trust Field Trip with McMinnville Campus

St. Patty’s Bake-Off

Professional Conferences

Nursing students are encouraged to attend professional conferences, such as: Developing Cultural Competency in Nursing

Regional Conference

National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) Convention

National Student Nurses Association (NSNA) Mid-Year convention

Oregon Nursing Student Association Annual Convention

Portland Reproductive Health Conference The American Psychiatric Nursing National Conference

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