Richmond. Music PRIMARY

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Music

Richmond

PRIMAR Y

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Lesson Topics

Music Key competences

STRAND 1: Listening STRAND 2: Musical performance STRAND 3: Moving and dancing

1 Venues for Music 6

Venues for the performance of music throughout history

• Properties of sound

• Experimenting with the properties

of sound • Story: Venues for Music • Cultural awareness and expression

• Competence in mathematics, science and technology

2 Fermata Sign 8

The fermata sign

• Review of note values and rests

• Review of sound-lengthening signs

• Vocal performance

• Performing rhythms with body percussion

• Accompanying pieces of music with body percussion ostinatos

Fermata Sign • Linguistic competence

• Competence in mathematics, science and technology

3 Plink, Plank, Plunk! 10

• Parts of a piece of music:

introduction, bridge and coda

• Review of musical forms

• Performing a dance with a complex form

• Creating and performing steps for a dance

• Singing with the names for the notes

Plink, Plank, Plunk!,

L. Anderson • Initiative and entrepreneurship

• Linguistic competence

4 Please Repeat 12

Review of notes from Do or C to Re’ or D’ on the recorder, repeat signs and musical scales

• Musical improvisation

• Performing on the recorder and mallet percussion instruments

• Improvising over a given backing track

Please Repeat • Social and civic competences

• Learning to learn

5 Electrophones 14

• Active listening with graphic scores

• Electrophones

• Instruments: electric guitar and synthesiser

• Experimenting with electrophones • Feuillet Inédit No. 4,

O. Messiaen • Cultural awareness and expression

• Digital competence

6 The Zulu Warrior 16

Music around the world: Africa and America

• Instruments: djembe, zurna, banjo and quena

• Review of electrophones

• Vocal performance

• Accompanying pieces of music with objects that make a sound

Creating and performing vocal ostinatos to accompany a piece of music

• Excerpts of music from Africa and America

The Zulu Warrior, traditional song

• Cultural awareness and expression

• Social and civic competences

7 En Todo Tempo

Faz Ben 18

• Music in the Middle Ages

• Listening to pieces of classical music

• Instruments: tabor and three-holed pipe

• Writing a review of a concert

• Performing on the recorder

• Accompanying pieces of music on school percussion instruments

• Creating and performing lyrics for a given melody

• Excerpts of music from the Middle Ages

En Todo Tempo Faz Ben, Cantiga No. 111, Alfonso X the Wise

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

• Linguistic competence

8 Eine Kleine Nachtmusik

20

• Accidentals: the sharp

• Intervals: tones and semitones

• The note Fa# or F# on the stave, the recorder and mallet percussion instruments

• Listening to pieces of classical music

• Performing on the recorder

• Accompanying pieces of music on mallet and school percussion instruments

Eine Kleine Nachtmusik,

W. A. Mozart • Competence in mathematics, science and technology

• Learning to learn

term

1

review

Oh, Christmas

Tree 22

• Review of the contents and musical practice of term 1 • Oh, Christmas Tree,

traditional Christmas song • Learning to learn

• Social and civic competences

Contents

term

1

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Lesson Topics

Music Key competences

STRAND 1: Listening STRAND 2: Musical performance STRAND 3: Moving and dancing

9 How a Song Is Born 24

• Phases of creating a song

• Professionals from the world of music

• Music and advertising

• Vocal performance

• Creating and performing a jingle

Story: How a Song Is Born

Jingle: Robbie, the Robotic Backpack

• Social and civic competences

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

10 The Quartet 26

The speech organs

• The hearing organs

• Review of types of voices

• Review of professionals from the world of music

• Vocal performance in canon

• Creating and performing body percussion rhythms to accompany a piece of music in canon

• Experimenting with the voice

The Quartet • Competence in mathematics, science and technology

• Social and civic competences

11 Prussia’s

Glory 28

• Active listening with graphic scores

• Types of musical bands: marching band, big band and rock band

• Review of the speech and hearing organs

• Accompanying pieces of music with body percussion and school percussion instruments

Prussia’s Glory,

J. G. Piefke • Cultural awareness and expression

• Learning to learn

12 Autumn Leaves 30

Improvisation

• Syncopation

• Review of the note Fa# or F# on the recorder and mallet percussion instruments

• Vocal performance

• Performing on the recorder and mallet percussion instruments

• Improvising over a given piece of music

Autumn Leaves,

J. Kosma and J. Mercer • Cultural awareness and expression

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

13 America 32

Musical theatre • Performing a dance with a complex form

• Vocal performance

• Accompanying pieces of music with body percussion

America from West Side Story, L. Bernstein

I’ve Got Rhythm from Girl Crazy, G. Gershwin

• Competence in mathematics, science and technology

• Digital competence

14 Sakura, Sakura 34

• Music around the world: Asia and Oceania

• Instruments: koto, sitar and didgeridoo

• Making a mallet percussion instrument

• Performing with the voice and on the recorder

• Creating and performing melodic ostinatos to accompany a song

• Excerpts of music from Asia and Oceania

Sakura, Sakura, traditional song

• Cultural awareness and expression

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

15 Music in the Modern Era

36

• Music in the Modern Era: Renaissance, Baroque and Classical periods

• Listening to pieces of classical music

• The luthier

• Singing with the names for the notes • Excerpts of music from

the Modern Era • Cultural awareness and expression

• Digital competence

16 Vivaldi’s

Autumn 38

• Accidentals: the flat and the natural

• The note Sib or Bb on the stave, the recorder and mallet percussion instruments

• Performing on the recorder, and school and mallet percussion instruments

• Singing with the names for the notes

• Melodic dictation

Autumn from The Four Seasons, A. Vivaldi

• Competence in mathematics, science and technology

• Linguistic competence

term

2

review

Samuel Goldenberg and Schmuyle 40

• Review of the contents and musical practice of term 2 • Excerpts from Pictures at an Exhibition, M. Mussorgsky

• Learning to learn

• Linguistic competence term

2

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term

3

Lesson Topics

Music Key competences

STRAND 1: Listening STRAND 2: Musical performance STRAND 3: Moving and dancing

17 Music and Other Art

Forms 42

• Connection between music and other art forms: painting, sculpture, architecture and literature

• Music and language: the lyrics of songs

• Vocal performance

• Writing and performing lyrics for a given melody

Story: Music and Other Art Forms

Blowin’ in the Wind, B. Dylan

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

• Linguistic competence

18 Oh, Susanna 44

Ways of accompanying a melody:

with rhythms, with a parallel melody and with chords

• Review of accidentals

• Vocal performance

• Performing on the recorder and mallet percussion instruments

• Accompanying pieces of music on school percussion instruments

Oh, Susanna,

traditional song • Competence in mathematics, science and technology

• Social and civic competences

19 Sweet Eyes 46

Theme and variations

• Review of binary, ternary and rondo forms

• Listening to pieces of classical music

• Performing on the recorder and mallet percussion instruments

• Creating and performing a variation for a given theme

Sweet Eyes, traditional

song • Linguistic competence

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

20 The Young Person’s

Guide to the Orchestra 48

• The orchestra

• Active listening with graphic scores

• Listening to pieces of classical music

• Composer B. Britten

• Review of types of ensembles

• Accompanying pieces of music

with body percussion • Theme from The Young Person’s Guide to the Orchestra, B. Britten

• Cultural awareness and expression

• Competence in mathematics, science and technology

21 World Dances 50

World dances: tango, bhangra, rumba, belly dance, gumboot dance and hip hop

• Review of the position of the instruments in the orchestra

• Creating and performing a complex choreography for a dance

• Singing with the names for the notes

• Excerpts of music from world dances

Bonsue-2000, The Good People

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

• Digital competence

22 Britches Full of Stitches 52

• Music around the world: Europe

• Instruments: bagpipes, Portuguese guitar and cajón

• Unconventional ways of representing music

• Performing on the recorder

• Creating and performing a piece of music from a given graphic score

• Excerpts of music from Europe

Britches Full of Stitches, traditional song

• Social and civic competences

• Linguistic competence

23 Music in the Late Modern Period 54

• Music in the late modern period:

Romanticism, contemporary music and popular music of the 20th century

• Listening to pieces of classical music

• Writing a review of a record

• Vocal performance • Excerpts of music from the late modern period

• Digital competence

• Initiative and entrepreneurship

24 Danse Macabre 56

Programme music

• Listening to pieces of classical music

• Review of the history of music

• Acting out scenes based on a piece

of programme music • Danse Macabre, C. Saint-Saëns

• Excerpts of programme music

• Cultural awareness and expression

• Learning to learn

term

3

review

Take the Train 58

• Review of the contents and musical practice of term 3 • Take the Train • Social and civic competences

• Learning to learn

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Scores Topics Music Scarborough Fair 60

Review of the notes Do or C, Re or D, Mi or E, Fa or F, Sol or G,

La or A, Si or B, Do’ or C’ and Re’ or D’ on the stave and the recorder

• Performing a melody with the notes Do or C to Re’ or D’

• Accompanying pieces of music on school and mallet percussion instruments

Scarborough Fair, traditional song

Remember Me 61

Performing a melody with the notes Do or C to Re’ or D’

• Accompanying pieces of music on school percussion instruments

Remember Me

Adeste Fideles 62

The note Fa# or F# on the stave and the recorder

• Performing a melody with the notes Do or C to Re’ or D’ and Fa# or F#

in two groups of recorders

Adeste Fideles, traditional Christmas song

Allegretto 63

• Performing a melody with the notes Re or D to Re’ or D’ and Fa# or F#

• Accompanying pieces of music on school percussion instruments

Allegretto, S. Suzuki

Tin, Tan 64

Performing a melody with the notes Fa# or F# to Re’ or D’

• Accompanying pieces of music on school and mallet percussion instruments

Tin, Tan, medly of traditional songs

Symphony No. 1 65

The note Sib or Bb on the stave and the recorder

• Performing a melody with the notes Re or D to Sib or Bb in two groups of recorders

Symphony No. 1, G. Mahler

Stella Splendens 66

• The note Si or B and Sib or Bb in the same piece of music

• Performing a melody with the notes Do or C to Re’ or D’ and Sib or Bb in two groups of recorders

Stella Splendens from Llibre Vermell de Montserrat

Spring 67

Performing a melody with the notes Fa or F to Re’ or D’ and Sib or Bb

• Accompanying pieces of music on school and mallet percussion instruments

Spring from The Four Seasons, A. Vivaldi

La Cucaracha 68

Performing a melody with the notes Do or C to Re’ or D’ and Sib or Bb

• Accompanying pieces of music on school percussion instruments

La Cucaracha, traditional song

Yellow Submarine 69

• Performing a melody with the notes Re or D to Re’ or D’ and Sib or Bb

• Accompanying pieces of music on school and mallet percussion instruments

Yellow Submarine, The Beatles

The notes you know

on the recorder 70

RECORDER TAB

instrumentpractice

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The Roman Empire

The Modern Era

The Present Age The Middle Ages

There have always been venues for music. The Romans built amphitheatres outdoors, with the seats in a semicircle in front

of the stage. The acoustics were so good that we still use them nowadays.

Nowadays, we still use venues from the past, but we don’t only listen to music

in concert halls. Contemporary music uses electronic equipment to amplify sound,

so that it can be played on big stages to thousands of people.

During the Middle Ages, monks sang Gregorian chant in cathedrals, a type of religious music performed a cappella in Latin. In village squares and cities, jongleurs set up small

portable stages where they performed their productions.

During the Modern Era, the royalty and nobility loved to organise concerts and dances in the chambers of their

palaces. They also began to stage operas in theatres with a big stage and a separate orchestra pit.

Listen and read about venues for music throughout history.

1

Venues for Music

1 TERM

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Listen and say which properties of sound change in each pair of instruments.

2

1.3

Answer the questions.

• When a pianist and a violinist perform the same melody, which property of sound changes?

• The human ear can’t hear sounds below 16 Hz.

Which property of sound are we talking about?

• When a sound exceeds 100 dB, it starts to become dangerous for our ears. Which property of sound are we talking about?

3

Properties of sound

When an object vibrates, it emits waves.

These waves are transmitted through the air or another medium to our ears, and we perceive them as sound.

The four properties of sound can be expressed or measured in different ways:

Timbre is the property that allows us to distinguish between different instruments, voices and other sounds.

Dynamics, or volume, tells us if a sound is loud or quiet. It’s measured in decibels (dB). In music, we show it with dynamic indicators ( 𝆑 𝆑 , 𝆑 , 𝆐 𝆑 ,

𝆐 𝆏 , 𝆏 , 𝆏 𝆏 , cresc. or , and dim.

or ).

Duration tells us if a sound is long or short. In music, we show it with note values and rests. It’s measured in beats (on the metronome) or in seconds.

Pitch, or tone, tells us if a sound is high or low. In music, we show it with musical notes. An object that emits a high sound vibrates more quickly than one that emits a low sound, and the frequency of this vibration is measured in hertz (Hz).

high sound

(more vibrations per second)

low sound

(fewer vibrations per second)

1

3

2

4

TERM 1 lesson 1

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Fermata Sign

The fermata (

  ) is a sound-lengthening sign.

It shows that the duration of a note or rest can be lengthened for as long as the performer or conductor wishes.

The fermata sign is written above the stave, on the note or rest that it lengthens:

  ™™

44 Œœ œ œ w ‰ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ w Œ œ œ œ w ‰ œj œ œ œ œ œ œ w

U U U

Fer ta sign Fer ma ta sign

is is

used al

a so

- -

-

ma

-

-

lot

known in

as this

a

song.

hold.

When you see one, just play the note and hold on.

semibreve 𝅝 four beats

minim 𝅗𝅥 two beats

crotchet 𝅘𝅥 𝄽 one beat

quaver 𝅘𝅥𝅮 𝄾 half a beat semiquaver 𝅘𝅥𝅯 𝄿 a quarter of a beat ReVIeW

Listen and sing along.

1

1.5 1.4

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Play with body percussion.

2

Say the right rhythm to accompany the song and explain why.

Then listen and play along.

3

1.4

The musicians are in the wrong places. Explain where they should be and why.

4

           

       

    

     

          

R L

R L

R L

R L

      

If to this rhythm:

We add a tie:

We get:

You know two other sound-lengthening signs:

• The tie joins two or more notes of the same pitch, adding their lengths together.

• A dotted note or rest lengthens the duration

of the note or rest by half its original value. 𝅗𝅥 𝅘𝅥( 𝅗𝅥𝅼

ReVIeW





 

R L R both R L R both R L R R L R R L R both

snap R L R L snap R L R L

R L R L snap snap snap

R L R L R L R L

TERM 1 lesson 2

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Listen and learn the dance. Then make up the missing steps and dance it with your classmates.

1

1.6

introduction

introduction

AA B A B A CC bridge A B AA coda

bridge coda

Make up the steps!

Make up the steps! Make up the steps!

Take five steps, make a statue and take another five steps back to your partner. Repeat.

Greet your partner with body percussion.

Take three steps to the side and snap your fingers.

Repeat in the other direction.

With your partner, turn eight steps in each direction.

A

C

B

Plink, Plank, Plunk!

Figure

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References

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