Trumpet Yoga - Jerome Callet

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.Trumpet

A REVOLUTIONARY APPROACH

TO EMBOUCHURE DEVELOPMENT

by

Jerome

Callel

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-llANO TUNED TKUMPETS

Jerome Callet's design philosophies have re-sulted in a trumpet hailed by professionals and educators as the instrument with the most perfect intonation of any trumpet made today.

The uniqueness of the Callet trumpet begins with the use ofthick. twenty-two gauge brass belis for a richer, more resonant tone.

Heavy brass Iead pipes are corrosion-resistant and are opened up at the Venturi (where the end of the mouthpiece fits) and are carefully hand-tapered to create a perfectly even blow and re-sponse in each register. The bell is hand-tempered for hours resulting in clear bell-Iike tones with great projection, wide response and incredible volume, with no breakup or over-blow . . . no matter how strong the player. Per-fect intonation from Iow F sharp below the staff to D above double high C, brings ali harmonie series into better focus enabling even the "two octave range" player to add a third to his range while at the same time increasing endurance.

No assembly Iine trumpet can equal the Jerome Callet trumpet because the handcrafstmanship, which takes between five and ten hours, has to be done after the instrument is completed! That is what "hand-tuning" means. Each instrument must be tested and adjusted many times before it is perfect.

It is no longer necessary to "try out" homs in the hope of finding one you like because Jerome can "fine tune" your hom to your special Iikes and needs.

Naturally, this amount of handwork severely Iimits the number of trumpets that Jerome can produce in a year. No assembly line trumpet manufacturer can afford to hand tune and stay in business.

That is why today, the Jerome Callet trumpet has no equal.

Bb'Dumpet Bell Size 43/4"

Bore Medium Large .460 Large .468

Super Large .4 72 Weight 2Ib. loz.

Length 18. 75"

Valves are slightly balanced forward closer to the ' 'bell giving the instrument better balance. In

hold-ing the instrument bell does not tip down. C'liumpet

Built only in Large (.468) and Super Large (.472) bore. Has the best intonation of any C trumpet ever built. Easy blowing upper register (high G above high C), faster response, greater brilliance · and more powerful sound for symphony and

op-era. Play the most difficult modem concertos with ease! Super large bore must be played to be believed!

D and Eb 'Dumpets Short Model

Bore Medium Large .460 Large .468

Very free blowing with open upper register and powerful sound. Can be used for solo work, chamber music and has the power to be played in full symphony orchestras with fatness of tone. Available on special order in E natural and E flat combination for performing the Hummel and Haydn concertos.

BbComet

Built only in Super Large bore (.472). Designed specifically for modem concert bands, wind en-sembles and symphony orchestras. The sound is rich, free from stuffiness, with great carrying power. A fabulous solo jazz cornet!

Bb Flugelhom Bore .445

Easy blowing, great doubling hom! Allows trum-pet player after playing flugelhom to go back to trumpet without readjustment of blow. Free, quick response in middle and upper range, offer-ing greater endurance with Jess strain.

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00710 HELSINt\1-.

Jerome Callet -

1iumpet Yoga

Jerome Callet's 'Ihlmpet Yoga, a "SCIENTIFIC BREAKTHROUGH" is an

accumulative buildup in dedicated research as a result of over 35 years as

both student and teacher of trumpet. 24 of these busy years have been

devoted to conscientious, "in depth" experimentation in the clinical,

ther-apeutic, biological, physiological and muscular anatomy as applied to the

"Science of Embouchure". Ail of which has given new dimensions in

broad-ening and exploring the breathing possibilities far beyond any previous

human limitations. This is attributed to the advanced and authentic

con-cepts of the age old Yoga Philosophy of breathing and relaxation.

This is a mental approach to the phenomena of surmounting ali obstacles

and is proven by Mr. Callet's unique personal demonstration, of the most

expanded range ever played on a 'Ihlmpet.

His newly discovered formulais based on expanding and coordinating

unlimited possibilities in exploring the extremities of one's physical

resources.

Mr. Callet has pioneered new advanced theories through means of his

revolutionary discoveries of controlled accoustical sound production. His

innovation is a fearless, ambitious approach to the extremity in both

regis-ters (High and Low) and can

be

applied to ali eup mouthpieces.

Dr.

Charles Colin

''

Copyright© 1986 by CHARLES COLIN-.315 West 5.3rd St., New York. N.Y. 10019

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A Photo Of Jerome Callet Playing Loud Double lfigh

"C"s

At

The 197:3 ''New York Conference For Brass Scholarships"

Photos By: Ray Ross

Claude Carson

Randi I.:lfommedieu

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Preface

M y purpose in writing this book is to make available to players young and old, my way of playing. The "1tumpet Yoga" Method has given me, for the first time in my Iife, freedom from physical worries about the trumpet. It was a great struggle to come to these ideas 1 have been work-ing with. 1 vowed to myself if 1 could achieve this dream of mine, 1 would share it with ali brass players.

Modern trumpet playing demands a great, powerful embouchure, range in excess of a pic-colo trumpet and brilliant tone. Many pro-fessionals play jobs they can just barely finish. Most trumpet teachers have no idea what their students have to play. These teachers cannot im-prove a weak embouchure with scales or slurs. You must change the way you hold your Iips, so that the Iips are vibrant and never abused.

1 have spent the last 23 years using my own embouchure as a Iip laboratory. After ten years 1 could play loud double high "C'"s. 1 knew that my sound should be free and less strained. The Iips would not take the air, and the real endurance was

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not there. In November of 1970, 1 began what 1

cali "1tumpet Yoga". The musical exercises are proof of what 1 practice. Also important is that my warm-up can be done on the bandstand tore-fresh your Iips.

The most important result of 'ïhlmpet Yoga" has been the steady improvement on a daily basis. Over the past year, 1 have not had one bad playing day. No trumpet teacher has ever told me how to do this. 1 believe the way you start your day. how you play in using your embouchure whether it be in performance or practice, will show your Iip health. The whole story is how your Iips feel; confidence, control and power begin with feel.

1 have written the exercises for embouchure development, not for performance. "1tumpet Yoga" is written for the busy on the road trompeter who can take this one book and keep in shape. Whether you play twenty minutes or five hours a day. you will develop ali the power and confidence needed to perform today's music. 1 have enjoyed every note of playing "1tumpet Yoga", and so will you.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Biography . . . • . . . • . . . 1

Preface . . . 3

Instructions . . . 7-14

Photographs of Embouchure . . . 15-19

Section 1 Warmup Exercises 1, 2, 3 . . . • . . . 20

Section Il Conditioning Exercises 4, 4A. 5, 6, 7, 8 ... 22

Section III Etudes and Drills . . . • . . . 28

Section IV Extended Range Exercises . . . 52

Scales, Chords and Power Studies . . . 58

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1iumpet Yoga

J

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using this book you must play Exercise Number One, 'IWo and Three as both your daily warm-up and lip conditioner. The first note must be Exercise One in this book. Never vary. This is for your lip feel and to compare your daily pro-gress. You should also repeat these many times during your playing. 1 try to repeat as many as ten times a day. The feel you will begin to get is what 1 cali "the fat feel". Many of you have never experi-enced a good feeling in the lips, but now you will.

Exercise Number One is started by placing the mouthpiece seven eighths on the top lip and with very light arm pressure, begin to unroll both lips

outward. This lip action is called unfurling. The lips are still against the teeth but are unrolled to their fullest extent. 1èeth opening, for the pedal registet should be one half inch, and middle and upper register should have an opening of at least one quarter of an inch. Upper and lower teeth and jaw are parallel. Top lip feels, as it unrolls, like it is

being pulled down.

Before proceeding, study the photographs -... (notice top red is double thickness) -

photo-graph lips in the double pedal "C" (note seven eighths on top lip and soft inner red of top lip) -with embouchure visualizer.

Start

Aways start Exercise Nurnber One on the double pedal C, go slow play with as mu ch air as you can (loud and full) without heavy arm pressure keep pushing the lips to their most un-rolled position. The tone on the double pedal "C" will become very brilliant. 1 do not play in the single pedal register (low F toC). You will benefit more in the double pedal register because of the unrolling of the lips, and the freedom of your lips taking ali the air power you can put through your trumpet.

1ty to make your ·air steady and free, note volume marks. Notice when the lips are unrolled how the soft inner red of the top lip is exposed to the air (see photos). The top lip seems to overlap the bottom lip even though the teeth are even. The top lip must be relaxed in the center and unrolled across the entire top lip on every note you play.

Do not feel uneasy about how much air it takes, remember this is a different embouchure. When you go into the low and middle register you slide the mouthpiece down to your regular em-bouchure position except your top lip is kept unrolled. The lips should always be wet so that you can slide the mouthpiece position with ease. lfyou slur from the low "C" to the double pedal "C" you would slide the mouthpiece up to seven eighths on the top lip. You will need to keep this unrolling into the middle and high register. Re-peat this mouthpiece slide - the more you try with the unrolled lips the stronger the lips, jaw and air power become.

Study photos and drawings - remembet un-roll both lips- check teeth opening (the unun-rolled lip helps keep teeth open) much more air power can be used with this type embouchure - actual center lip touch and aperture will be doser from side to side. . . . the lip close for the upper regis-ter with less arm pressure. 1ty pumping air with-out the mwith-outhpiece - first form your old em-bouchure- pump air in front of a mirror- notice how wide the aperture is from side to si de. Now try the "1tumpet Yoga" way. Watch the top lip thicken as you unroll- the ridges in the top lip above the red top lip draws in sides under the nostrils of your nose - look in the mirrot see how the smaller aperture is side to side --this means less arrn, more range and endurance.

When you are playing ïtumpet Yoga" your top lip (white and red) ali the way across will become thicker. The thicker the top lip is before you start , , the better and stronger trompeter you will be. This warm-up and practice will keep your em-bouchure thick and solid. 1 know when 1 do Ex-ercise One, 'IWo and Three, which take less than twelve minutes, 1 can play every day double pedal "C" -low "C"- middle "C"- high "C"- double high "C". These tones must be compact - brilli-ant - pure and fulL no fuzz or grinding in the tone - ability to hold out your top notes.

Exercise Number 'IWo - start with regular mouthpiece placement- keep top lip thick. draw inward from side to side- do not stop the sound when going from middle register to double pedal or register. Slide the mouthpiece up to seven

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eighths on the top lip in the double pedal range. Thm lower lip outward (slightly). This exercise will take several weeks to develop proper freedom of sound.

Number Three is the ultimate test of any trum-pet player's embouchure. Do not be discouraged if you cannot go higher than a middle "C". Wet lips - very little arm pressure - slide mouthpiece down as you climb higher to your regular posi-tion. Keep lower lip moving up and in, slightly under the top lip, trying to keep lips more together - bottom lip cornes in towards center and tums slightly outward -lower lip feels like a round pad- top lip is still thick- try to keep the pedal feel in top lip, but on high tones do not let tip of top lip collapse into mouthcup.

The reason 1 cali my method 'ïtumpet Yoga" is this - trying to hold the unrolled lips in a fiXed feel is much like a yoga holds a posture such as a head or shoulder stand. The yoga holds steady-the life force in "1tumpet Yoga" is steady-the wind power. You will find that your new lip set in many cases, will require two to three times the air force of your old setting. Keep using more air.

In review- make sure the unrolling of the lips brings the soft inner red out on ali double pedal tones. Next push the bottom lip slightly forward and the two unrolled lips will forma strong lock in the sides of the lips in the double pedal register-you must start here. The two lips are still held against the teeth in ali regular playing.

1 have repeated many times sorne of the in-structions - they are very important. If you do these routines as 1 do, 1 know you will get greater results than you would ever hope for.

Your normal bottom lip is much stronger than your top lip. A good exercise that 1 do to develop both lips and side locks. Look at photograph number two -

try

to unroll top lip and bottom of , , their fullest- pushjaw forward- close

teeth-bite with unrolled lips (push lips together - feel soft inner red top and bottom pressing together

h~d, hold ten seconds). Now do the same un-rolling but open teeth one quarter inch and pump air through the lips as in photo.

Notice in photo on the doube pedal "C", how strong the lips are locked in at the sides - how much top lip must be used to get the proper unrolling of both lips. Do not push the bottom lip up and under with a recededjaw. Also, never play these pedals with your regular embouchure. Look at how relaxed a middle "C" should look - no strain. Now compare photo showing a loud double high "C" embouchure- still unrolled only slightly more tense. You can still see soft inn er red - in top lip, and as in ali my playing 1 am ready to slide the mouthpiece up to seven eighths top as in photo three to play loud double pedal "C". The double high "C" is being made with less arm than most of you use on a middle "C". 1 can play hundreds of double high "C"'s every day; and so can anyone who really wants to.

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Facial Muscular Development

When setting your lips and facial muscles, draw inward towards the Iip aperature.

1ly to round both Iips. Feel the Iower Iip making a smaller and U (Uuuu) inside the mouthpiece eup. Top Iip inward as you go up in range. Both Iips will have a very solid firmness in the upper register. The entire mouth area will develop an interval thickness you can feel whether playing or not.

1 have experimented on my own Iips and facial muscles to test how much work the embouchure can do playing the trumpet. Over the past sixteen years, 1 have played higher; Iouder and longer than any player ever bef ore, without any soreness or damage to lip or facial muscles.

Rules to use, never stretch the lips or tighten mou th corners. The mouth must be made smaller the higher you play, but the lips are not pushed away from the teeth as in a pucker.

Sorne of the world's grea~est players have

en-couraged me in my work and development. nmofei Dokschitzer of Russia said of my demon-stration, you are Phenomenal, if you leach this method I would like to become your student. H Maurice Andre said, "Fantastic demonstration, your lower pedal register 1 did not believe could be played on anything but a bass trombone." Frank Kaderabec lst 'Irumpet Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra says "Jerome canet plays .... the trumpet with the most power; and puts the greatest amount of air into it than any player 1 have ever beard."

Ali of this was done because of my knowledge of the workings of the embouchure. My teaching has laken me to Germany and Switzerland. I have been able to help players ali over the world. It is especially rewarding to help save the careers of players who are losing their ability to perform. As

long as you have your health, your embouchure and facial muscles can perform weil even beyond age 80.

Setting The Mouthpiece On The Lips

w t h the ïiumpet YogaH embouchure I advocate and use the old German French Hom embouchure of setting in the red of the bottom lip. For many players this would mean setting the mouthpiece higher on the bottom lip. Many play-ers are taught and try to pin as much outer white skin in the inner rim circle as they can. This will make the tone thin and not allow the Iips to unroll and be controlled by the air power.

{ Fatter tone

RIGHT Better range

Settlng ln tbe ~ of tbe bottom Up will procluce more soft unroUecl Ups ••••

If you do not wish to raise the setting on the bottom red of the Iip, you can still benefit from ïiumpet Yoga". I have bad many good players aQjust to this setting from the time they picked up the trumpet. Many have large lips and this is usually characterized by a full rich tone. If you have time give this setting a trial. In moving my own position up on the bottom lip it took Jess than one week for it to feel comfortable.

WROJ'IIQ { Tone small and c:bokecl Plnc:hecl Ups

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PEDAL IŒGIS'I'ER JIIIDDLE IŒGIS'l'Dl

Correct Embouchure

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Arm

Pressure Good and Bad

Excessive ann pressure on both Iips can be very destructive. 1 have found in teaching ali classes of students, the same pressure problem - too much ann crushing the top lip. The lower .... lip gets ann crushing. but does not get and keep its needed grip against the lower teeth. In the previous column 1 speak of setting-in of the mouthpiece on the red of the bottom lip. When 1 do this 1 can feel the grip of the inner rim on my lower teeth.

The real difficulty is to set the inner rim to feel the teeth, and then to play ali registers, intervals, slurs, attacks and volumes without the loss of this grip and feel. Even being aware of iit 1 can feel it pulling away from the teeth. When it leaves its grip, an excessive amount of pressutre is placed on· the top lip - which in tum shuts off vibration

and cuts down on endurance. The pressure is finn on the bottom lip, but not a heavy crushing-the correct pressure will come more natural when you play the intervals - chords - scales with a steady finn grip. Always feel that your lips are not crushed immobile, but can easily flex in ali directions.

When you start in any register; low, middle or high, get the lower lip grip. The only exception would be starting on the double pedal C, such as in Ex. No. 3, bVItas you slide into regular range the grip should come right in and be maintained. If this is done riglht your results will be fantastic. Do not pull lower lip tight to your mouth corners. Instead draw lower lip towards center and slightly forward as you .ascend in range.

Breathing and 1hlmpet Playing

Breathing with a conscious. effort toward more wind power should be done with and with-out the instrument. "Inhale" and "Exhale" should be a perfect match. The most important word is

relaxation. Without the instrument, breathe

deeply, inhale through the mouth, count to four slowly, now exhale with the same power as with the inhale. Now inhale and exhale wi11:'n greater air pressure. Note that the greater the air pressure on the exhale the finner th abdominal !muscles be-, , come. In ali my playing from double pedal "C" to double high "C", 1 have such finnneBs in the

ab-dominal walls, on both loud and soft notes, that 1 am able to take a hard punch in the r.nid section. Correct breath support will aid tone, power and endurance. Bring your upper stomach up and in under your rib cage. This will give you great breath power.

Now practice with the trumpet- p·laJr a soft 3rd space "C" - then slur to a high "C" !oud, do this first with your regular abdominal ten~ion - next

tense the abdominal walls, do the same slur from soft to loud. You will soon feel and hear the differ-ence. Ail exercises should be played in this book with real abdominal firmness. Shoulders are never raised, arms should not lift too far from rib cage. Throat open - the chest area will be re-laxed for grea ter intake of air. With the intake of air till up as low .as you can in the abdominal area. Note, on intakoe of air the abdominal muscles are loose and relaxed. On exhale, abdominal muscles should be as finn as possible.

An exercise that has been very effective with students is as follows · -1ty to lean back slowly un til you are looking alrnost directly at the ceiling. Note that the frontal abdominal muscles are very finn. Now play your instrument in the middle register still leaning back. This is the real finn-ness that you will soon develop in your own body. Go slowly, do not strain on the bending back. Do this ki nd of pratctice for short periods of ti me only.

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Air Stream

Your air stream must

be

graduat~d

from a gentle breeze to a tornado. In order to use this great variety of air streams, you must keep the top lip unrolled and inner red of the. top llp soft. It is not easy to gain control of the ait as your old habits must be overcome. The air strearns

in

a downward direction when it leaves the

llpa.

'D:'y blowing air without the mouthpiece.

keep

the teeth even - unroll the top lip - blow ttt~ air -notice the air blows in a downward dlr~tton, in most cases you will feel the air hit your chin when ' ' blowing hard. The degree of downward air di~

rection is

determi~e~ ~the

shape and size of the lips and teeth. This W{)~!f;i also be true about the angle of the bell of~ ~Qm. The freedom oftone

determines the best bell angle in every register. Also arm pressure, especially on the top lip, means aqjusting the angle of the bell to balance pressure so that the top lip can be left more free to vibra te.

Why is it wrong

to

blow the air stream up and roll the lips in.

1

can play ali the same range with rolled in and

rolled

out lips. The wrong way of blowing the air up brings the soft lnner red of the top llp tlghtagainst the top teeth- this will make the tonal quallty thin and the player will be trapped on the upper notes - limiting true

flexi-billty. The final reason is that rolled in lips will not take the full air and produce

easy

vibrations.

Air HCl,le

ln

Center 01f Tbe Lip

Most trumpe.t playerrs are taught to think of a large opening in the center of the lips. Many players are trying to whistle. This concept is wrong because no hole

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peeded in the ~nter of the lips. The air compffiMlon will control aize of aperture needed for any note. The "'D:urnpet Yoga"

1

use the tonaue through the teeth ln ali registers. With the unrolled lips, touch the top lip with the tip of the tongue. Thf! simplest ex-planation is to tongue by ":spitting a particle from the tip of the lip."

When

you use this tongulng through the teeth you wlll use more air than when tonguing behind the teeth. The tone will be richer

aperture is smaller and thinner and in many cases no apertu1re can

be

seen. Study the photos of the llps in the trumpet visualizer ring. When 1 blow a loud free ëmd clear double high C, very little air is actually going lnto the trumpet yet the blow is of complete lfreedom.

and fuilet especially in the upper reglster. If you tongue be:hind the teeth, the thrœt will be too tense and will restrict the free flow of air. Both intonation and projection of tone wllllmprove if you learn to tangue through the teeth. Most of the world's grte:atest artlst's tongue this

way.

Arched Tongue For RaDf.fl·e And Slurs

1

ask my students not to use too •. eee-ooo-eee for slurs, lip trills and range. This popular way of using the tongue to reduce the mouth cavity size is wrong. When you reduce the mouth cavity size with an arched tangue, you have to çhoke the thrœt thereby restricting the full, free flow of air power. The pull on tite lips is wrong

wlth

the

arçhed tomgue. The correct "'D'umpet Yoga" streteh ls mtore of a pull that locl~s the c;:heeks and rnouth comers

nrm -

then the air pPwer holds them ln place. You will develop a powerful set of facial mubx-.les. The free blown air wlll make the actJustmen t

that

you formerly made with the archal to•ngue.

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How Fast Can 1 Develop

A Powerful Embouchure

J

have sorne students who actually in-crease their power in days. The average student can double his sound in both volume and inten-sity in four weeks. 1 have had world famous symphony conductors marvel at the results achieved in a matter of weeks by their regular trumpet players playing in this manner.

My first sale of a copy ofïtumpet Yoga" was to a twenty-eight year old professional engineer who had not played the trumpet for eight years. His results using this method were very exceptional. ln a period of twenty days he went from a weak high "C" with moderate mid-range volume to loud high "E"'s with double volume throughout the

range. At the end of six weeks he was playing loud "G'"s above high "C"I Usually, the range cornes more slowly and after power increases.

The most important result from the use of "1hlmpet Yoga" is the improvement of the player's tone and power. Ali players who work at the prac-tice routines develop clear, more brilliant tones, great carrying power without sore or mangled "''ips. This method is very simple, yet the more 1 develop, the greater the potentiall find in myself and in my students. Remember, if the teacher cannot improve, he cannot ex.pect his students to improve.

What And How To Practice

Every time you start playing or start a practice session, go back to the warrn up in Sec-tion 1. You will not be able to overdothe pedals as we do them. Nex.t go to Ex. No. 4 in Section II (Chromatics), play every note loud and clear (free). Make sure that the lips are unrolled and relaxed as you ascend. In the regular range, low C and up, you will feel as if the lips are being pulled apart. Ail actual work is being done inside the mouth. Notice that a poor trumpet player will push, squeeze, and distort his outside lip area thinking it will help, it cannoti Almost ali work done on the trumpet is inside the mouth, with a free air flow.

At times when playing very loudly, you will note a slight rasp in tonal quality. Do not worry, you are developing a new set of muscular controls. Your body will go through a whole series of changes and you then will use a strong, free breath sup-port. The more correctly you use ïtumpet Yoga", the faster the air will go through your hom. Your range, power, and endurance will increase in pro-portion to your effort and patience in practice.

Your abdominal (outside) muscles are tense on ali notes in the range and at ali volumes. 1 can play the entire range of the piano in one continuous climb up and down. Months of really hard work are needed to build up the internai body strength. This type of playing will leave your lips fresh but

your body tired. When you feel this sensation you are on the right path.

Nex.t you should work on scales and chord studies - lip slurs slow and with the air flow making intonation, power and range. When your air power is strong enough to make ali three you will have no embouchure problems. Remeber, it is air power against soft unrolled lips held as in the photos that does it an.

Remember, go very slowly in regards to range and fast technique. 'Dy for more tonal center, always playing with perfect intonation. If your upper notes go flat you are falling back into a wrong embouchure setting. Stop and reset as often as needed. If your top notes are sharp, thin and pinched, your lips are squeezed and tight-' · ened too much. You will note that your blow is not

free, but very forced. Never over force with ex.cess air or arm pressure against your lips. If you take your time and develop correctly, you will be able to play with unlimited power, range and flexibility.

The only disadvantage to the ïtumpet Yoga" is that we must work hard physically to build a totally strong inner body. Almost every trumpet player. 1 have ever observed is only achieving a small fraction of his or her true trumpet playing potential.

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Range -

What Does It Mean

Range, or high notes are a complete waste if your low and middle register is not loud, clear and brilliant. The trumpet can be played with a good tone up to double high "C" and higher with volume. No one can develop range over night if he is a weak player. When you can unroll your lips, hold your facial muscles properly and increase your wind powet nature will give you a true range. The proof of this statement is: at age

thirty 1 could not play a high "C" and 1 bad very little endurance and no real power. 1 was very fortunate to discover where 1 was wrong in ali physical aspects of trumpet playing. Many tal-ented players develop problems which manifest themselves in more arm pressure, tightened lips, excessive pucker in lips, etc. which result in Jess and Jess air being used to power the horn correctly.

How Much To Play From Book

N o player should play higher in range unless he can do it with full volume of tone and minimum arm pressure. Your playing must be

done in a relaxed manner. ïiumpet Yoga" re-quires almost complete· physical relaxation

s<>

that your complete internai bodily strength can be

used in your playing. Sore and eut lips should be

things of the past. Your practice routine is much like the boxer who must train hard for months so that he can perform properly for thirty minutes. The trumpet is the king of instruments and will excite any audience when you are able to use its full power and tone.

About The Photographs

Notice photos of the

doubl~

and triple high "C"'s - See the expansion of the neck- it grows in size by several inches. This is due to the force of the air stream reacting to the soft un-rolled lip closing in on this air compression. The action of neck expansion is done without con-scious effort on my

part.

The inside throat and neck muscles are very relaxed.

Next notice the cheeks above corners, this Une points directly toward the nostrils and keeps the top lip fat in the center and unrolled. The mouth and chin retain the U shape. The chin muscles are .... very relaxed. The entire face has an easy upward pull. (There- are no locked down corners as one sees in the average trumpet player.) If you put your fingers at the sides of my mou th just below the corners of the bottom J.ip, you would feel a lifting of the entire area from low "C" to double high "C". 1 always think of keeping the chin relaxed.

Note also that the mouthpiece position on pedal tones slides down to the regular formation and position on lips.

Every day's practice should include Section 1

Ex. Nos. 1, 2, ~ 3 as warm up and._conditionet Section Il Ex. Nos. 4, 4A. 5, ~ 6 only as high as you can. As you get stronger repeat the above many times, then add nos. 7 and. S. Play everything slow and with very full tone. Keep thinking of the un-rolled lips which will get èven more air into your hom. This type of playing will make you very tired bodily, but this is natural and your lips will be

fresh and powerful. The improvement will be no-ticed by ali musicians and any one else with an ear for music. Be patient, 1 have never taught a player of any age or ability that could not improve sub-stantially with ïiumpet Yoga."

feel free to phone me for advice on any of your embouchure problems.

Jerome

Callet Private Lessons

in

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l"few lb~ 1"1. Y. 10027

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References

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