Your Guide to Retirement Options

Full text

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Your Guide to Retirement

Options

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Contents

Introduction 3

Overview 4

Personal Pension Plans/PRSAs

5

Defined Contribution Company Pension Plans

8

Additional Voluntary Contributions (AVCs)

11

Retirement Bonds

15

Tax Treatment of Retirement Options

18

Specified Income

19

Taxation & Revenue Limits

20

How your Annuity Options Impact your Payment Amount

21

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Introduction

As you approach retirement, one of the most important decisions you will make is how to use your pension fund to provide for you and your family in retirement.

The options available to you depend mainly on: l The type of pension arrangement you have

l The amount you have in your retirement fund when you retire

The option(s) that are right for you will depend on many factors including; l The size of your retirement fund

l The level of income you and your family will need during your retirement years

l The amount of other assets, apart from your retirement fund, you have to fall back on l Whether investment growth or security is more important to you during your retirement years l Whether you wish to pass your retirement fund on to your dependants on your death l Your current state of health

This guide aims to set out the different options available to you depending on your pension arrangement and sets out the points you should consider for each option. Current taxation and Revenue limits, which may change, are set out on page 20. You should talk to your Insurance & Investments Manager when considering your retirement options.

You should carefully consider how to use your retirement fund to

provide for your retirement years

The options you choose should suit your retirement plans,

including whether you plan to provide for others, such as a

spouse, civil partner or dependant

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Overview

Personal

Pension Plan PRSA Defined Contribution Company Pension Scheme & Retirement Bonds*

Additional Voluntary Contributions Option 1 Option 2

Step 1

Retirement Lump Sum Up to 25% Up to 25% Take up to 25% as a retirement lump sum Take an amount based on your salary and service with the employer up to a maximum of 1.5 times your salary

Amount (if any) will depend on the rules and retirement lump sum entitlement of your main scheme

Step 2

Buy an Annuity/ Pension

Can use some or all of the remainder of your fund to buy an annuity

Can use some or all of the remainder of your fund to buy an annuity You cannot buy an annuity if you take the 25% retire-ment lump sum option, though money in an ARF may be used to buy an annuity You have to buy an annuity if you take the retirement lump sum option based on salary and service

Can use some or all of the remainder of your fund to buy an annuity depending on the rules and how you take benefits from your main scheme

Step 3

Find out if you meet the requirements to invest in an ARF or take taxable cash

For more details on these requirements see the section on Specified Income on page 19

Invest in an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF)† Invest in an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF)† Invest in an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF)† The Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) option/Taxable Cash option is not available Invest in an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF)† Take Taxable

Cash Take Taxable Cash Take Taxable Cash Take Taxable Cash

Step 4

PRSA & AVC PRSA

Not Applicable Leave the balance of your fund in your PRSA after taking your retirement lump sum.

Not Applicable Not Applicable Leave the balance of your fund in your AVC PRSA after taking your retirement lump sum * Personal Retirement Bonds set up in respect of transfers from Defined Benefit (DB) schemes must follow the

retirement options under the DB scheme. For Retirement Bonds taken out after 6th February 2011, the rules of the corresponding Defined Contribution scheme applies. For Retirement Bonds taken out before 6th February 2011, the only retirement options available are a lump sum based on salary and service and the annuity option as per Option 2, unless you were a proprietary director in the previous scheme.

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Personal Pension Plans/

PRSAs

Do you Want to Take a Retirement Lump Sum?

Generally, pension funds provide you with an option to take a lump sum at retirement, some or all of which can be taken tax-free. You can use this money in any way you wish. You can even re-invest this lump sum.

Currently you can take up to 25% of your fund as a retirement lump sum from your Personal Pension Plan/PRSA.

Revenue limits however apply in relation to how much of this retirement lump sum may be taken tax-free. Please see page 20 for more details.

Do you Want to Buy an Annuity/Pension?

You have the option to use some (or all) of your fund to purchase an annuity when you retire. An annuity, commonly known as a pension, provides you with security of income during your retirement years. This was historically the only option available on retirement in respect of personal pensions and it continues to be an attractive option particularly if:

l Your retirement fund will be your main source of income in retirement

l Your main priority in retirement is a secure regular income rather than passing on your fund to your dependants

Purchasing an annuity involves using some (or all) of your pension fund to secure a regular income for the rest of your life. The amount of income you receive depends on the annuity rates in force when you buy your annuity.

Your choice of annuity can include:

1. (a) Level Payments: Where your payments stay the same each year, or

1. (b) Increasing Payments: Where your payments increase each year by a fixed amount, eg 3% each year.

2. A Guarantee Period: You can choose that your payments are secured for a fixed period of up to 10 years, so that if you die during this time, your annuity payments will be paid to your dependants for the remainder of the guaranteed period.

3. A Dependant’s Pension: You can specify a percentage of your pension that is to be paid, following your death in retirement, to your spouse/civil partner or dependant.

Annuity rates vary depending on:

l Your age; you will generally secure a larger income the older you are

l Interest rates, as they are linked to annuity rates

l The options you choose for your annuity

Annuity/pension payments are subject to income tax at your marginal rate and Universal Social Charge (USC) deductions under the PAYE system. We generally make these deductions at source and remit them to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf.

Full details of the types of annuity benefits that you may purchase are available from your Insurance & Investments Manager.

Step 1

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Do you Meet the Requirements to Invest in an ARF or Take Taxable Cash?

As an alternative to purchasing an annuity/pension, you have the option to invest in an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) or you may be able to withdraw the balance of your fund, subject to tax. These options are explained below but are only available if you meet at least one of the following requirements:

l You are in receipt of pension income for life of at least €12,700 each year

l You have used/are using €63,500 of your retirement fund to invest in an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF), and/or to purchase an annuity/pension, (see page 7 for details on AMRFs)

l You use part of your retirement fund to set up a pension to bring your pension income up to €12,700 per annum

Please note that the above figures are for 2013 and may change. For more details on these requirements see the section on Specified Income on page 19.

1. Invest in an ARF

An Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) is a flexible arrangement that allows you to remain invested in funds after retirement and withdraw money as and when you wish. Any investment growth within the fund is currently tax free, however, withdrawals are taxed as set out below.

An ARF allows you to:

l Make withdrawals when you want (though the frequency and size of your withdrawals will impact the length of time your ARF can provide you with an income in retirement)

l Set it up to receive a regular income from your ARF

l Pass on the remaining value of your fund to your dependants or other beneficiaries on your death Required Withdrawal

Please note, you are required to take a withdrawal of a certain amount each year, currently 5%, from your ARF/Vested PRSA (6% if total ARF/Vested PRSA value exceeds €2 million).

It is important to note that if a high level of withdrawals is made relative to any growth achieved there is a risk that your ARF fund could run out.

All withdrawals and income payments are subject to income tax, USC and (PRSI up to age 66). Bank of Ireland Life will make the appropriate deduction and remit it to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf. Money in an ARF can be used to buy an annuity at any time.

You may have to pay additional ‘early encashment charges’ on an ARF if you withdraw all or part of the value within the first five years

Please talk to your Insurance & Investments Manager before you make a decision.

Step 3

Warning: The value of your investment may go down as well as up.

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What is an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF)

An AMRF is similar to an ARF but there is a maximum investment amount for an AMRF, which is set by the Revenue (currently E63,500). An individual can only have one AMRF. You cannot withdraw from the original capital invested, but investment growth (if any) can be withdrawn at any time (subject to tax).

An AMRF becomes an ARF: l When you reach age 75 OR

l If you satisfy the specified pension income requirement as set out by the Revenue before age 75 OR

l If you die before age 75 whichever event first occurs.

Please note that if your AMRF becomes an ARF then the required withdrawal each year will then apply (see page 6).

Money in an AMRF can be used to buy an annuity at any time.

2. Take Taxable Cash

You may be able to take an additional taxable lump sum. You will pay income tax and USC on the amount you withdraw from your fund.

Do you Want to Leave the Balance of your Fund in your PRSA?

You have the option of leaving the balance of your fund in your PRSA until age 75 after taking your retirement lump sum. This means you can remain invested without availing of the ARF option. You can take withdrawals subject to satisfying the specified income requirements. If you do not meet the specified income requirements, you can still make withdrawals, as long as you maintain a minimum investment amount (currently E63,500) in your PRSA. Similar to an ARF, you are required to take a withdrawal of a certain amount from your vested PRSA each year (see page 6). Talk to your Insurance & Investments Manager for more details.

Step 4

For PRSAs only

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Defined Contribution

Company Pension Plans

Do you Want to Take a Retirement Lump Sum?

Generally, pension funds provide you with an option to take a lump sum at retirement some or all of which can be taken tax-free. You can use this money in any way you wish. You can even re-invest this lump sum.

You have a choice in how you take your retirement lump sum but the option you choose will then determine the options available for the balance of your fund (if any).

You can take up to 25% of your fund as a retirement lump sum or an amount calculated based on your salary and service with your employer up to a maximum of 1.5 times your salary. You will only be able to take the 1.5 times salary if you have 20 years service with the sponsoring employer at normal retirement age. A sliding scale applies where you have less than 20 years service or if you retire or leave that employment before normal retirement age.

Revenue limits however apply in relation to how much of this retirement lump sum may be taken tax-free. Please see page 20 for more details.

Do you Want to Buy an Annuity/Pension?

The option to use some of your fund to purchase an annuity when you retire is available if you choose the retirement lump sum based on salary and service. An annuity, commonly known as a pension, provides you with security of income during your retirement years.

If you choose the retirement lump sum based on salary and service, you have to use the remainder of your fund to buy an annuity. However, if you have paid Additional Voluntary Contributions (AVCs) to the scheme, you don’t have to use your AVC fund to buy an annuity. You can choose from the ARF/taxable cash options in respect of your AVC fund subject to satisfying the relevant conditions.

The annuity option was historically the only option available on retirement and it continues to be an attractive option particularly if:

l Your retirement fund will be your main source of income in retirement

l Your main priority in retirement is a secure regular income rather than passing on your fund to your dependants

Purchasing an annuity involves using your pension fund to secure a regular income for the rest of your life. The amount of income you receive depends on the annuity rates in force when you buy your annuity.

Annuity rates vary depending on:

l Your age; you will generally secure a larger income the older you are

l Interest rates, as they are linked to annuity rates

l The options you choose for your annuity

Step 1

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Your choice of annuity can include:

1. (a) Level Payments: Where your payments stay the same each year, or

1. (b) Increasing Payments: Where your payments increase each year by a fixed amount, eg 3% each year.

2. A Guarantee Period: You can choose that your payments are secured for a fixed period of up to 10 years, so that if you die during this time, your annuity payments will be paid to your dependants for the remainder of the guaranteed period.

3. A Dependant’s Pension: You can specify a percentage of your pension that is to be paid, following your death in retirement, to your spouse/civil partner or dependant.

Annuity/pension payments are subject to income tax at your marginal rate and Universal Social Charge (USC) deductions under the PAYE system. We generally make these deductions at source and remit them to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf.

Full details of the types of annuity benefits that you may purchase are available from your Insurance & Investments Manager.

Do you Meet the Requirements to Invest in an ARF or Take Taxable Cash?

If you choose the 25% retirement lump sum you may have the option to invest in an ARF or withdraw the balance of your fund subject to tax. If you have made AVCs, these options may also be available for your AVC fund.

These options are explained below but are only available if you meet at least one of the following requirements:

l You are in receipt of pension income for life of at least €12,700 each year

l You have used/are using €63,500 of your retirement fund to invest in an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF) and/or to purchase an annuity/pension (see page 10 for details on AMRFs)

l You use part of your retirement fund to set up a pension to bring your pension income up to €12,700 per annum

Please note that the above figures are for 2013 and may change. For more details on these requirements see the section on Specified Income on page 19.

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1. Invest in an ARF

An Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) is a flexible arrangement that allows you to remain invested in funds after retirement and withdraw money as and when you wish. Any investment growth within the fund is currently tax free, however withdrawals are taxed as set out below.

An ARF allows you to:

l Make withdrawals when you want (though the frequency and size of your withdrawals will impact the length of time your ARF can provide you with an income in retirement)

l Set it up to receive a regular income from your ARF

l Pass on the remaining value of your fund to your dependants or other beneficiaries on your death

Required Withdrawal

Please note, you are required to take a withdrawal of a certain amount each year, currently 5%, from your ARF (6% if total ARF/Vested PRSA value exceeds €2 million).

It is important to note that if a high level of withdrawals is made relative to any growth achieved there is a risk that your ARF fund could run out.

All withdrawals and income payments are subject to income tax, USC and (PRSI up to age 66). Bank of Ireland Life will make the appropriate deduction and remit it to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf. Money in an ARF can be used to buy an annuity at any time.

You may have to pay additional ‘early encashment charges’ on an ARF if you withdraw all or part of the value within the first five years

What is an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF)

An AMRF is similar to an ARF but there is a maximum investment amount for an AMRF, which is set by the Revenue (currently E63,500). An individual can only have one AMRF. You cannot withdraw from the original capital invested, but investment growth (if any) can be withdrawn at any time (subject to tax).

An AMRF becomes an ARF: l When you reach age 75 OR

l If you satisfy the minimum guaranteed pension income requirement as set out by the Revenue before age 75 OR

l If you die before age 75 whichever event first occurs.

Please note that if your AMRF becomes an ARF then the required withdrawal each year will then apply (see above).

Money in an AMRF can be used to buy an annuity at any time.

2. Take Taxable Cash

You may be able to take an additional taxable lump sum. You will pay income tax and USC on the amount you withdraw from your fund.

Warning: The value of your investment may go down as well as up.

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Your AVCs are linked to your employer’s occupational pension scheme and should be accessed at the same time as the retirement benefits of your main scheme.

Do you Want to Take a Retirement Lump Sum?

Generally pension funds provide you with an option to take a lump sum at retirement, some or all of which can be taken tax-free. You can then use this money in any way you wish. You can even re-invest this lump sum.

The amount (if any) of retirement lump sum that you can take from your AVCs will depend on the rules of your main scheme.

If you received less than the maximum allowable lump sum from your main scheme, you may be able to take some or all of your AVC fund as a lump sum.

Do you Want to Buy an Annuity/Pension?

You may have the option to use some (or all) of your AVC fund to purchase an annuity when you retire depending on the rules and how you take benefits from your main scheme. An annuity, commonly known as a pension, provides you with security of income during your retirement years. This was historically the only option available on retirement and it continues to be an attractive option particularly if: l Your retirement fund will be your main source of income in retirement

l Your main priority in retirement is a secure regular income rather than passing on your fund to your dependants

Purchasing an annuity involves using your AVC fund to secure a regular income for the rest of your life. The amount of income you receive depends on the annuity rates in force when you buy your annuity.

Annuity rates vary depending on:

l Your age; you will generally secure a larger income the older you are

l Interest rates, as they are linked to annuity rates

l The options you choose for your annuity

Additional Voluntary

Contributions (AVCs)

Including AVC PRSAs

Step 1

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Your choice of annuity can include:

1. (a) Level Payments: Where your payments stay the same each year, or

1. (b) Increasing Payments: Where your payments increase each year by a fixed amount, eg 3% each year.

2. A Guarantee Period: You can choose that your payments are secured for a fixed period of up to 10 years, so that if you die during this time, your annuity payments will be paid to your dependants for the remainder of the guaranteed period.

3. A Dependant’s Pension: You can specify a percentage of your pension that is to be paid, following your death in retirement, to your spouse/civil partner or dependant.

Annuity/Pension payments are subject to income tax at your marginal rate and Universal Social Charge (USC) deductions under the PAYE system. We generally make these deductions at source and remit them to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf.

Full details of the types of annuity benefits that you may purchase are available from your Insurance & Investments Manager.

Do you Meet the Requirements to Invest in an ARF or Take Taxable Cash?

As an alternative to buying a pension, you may have the option to invest in an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) or may be able to withdraw the balance of your AVC fund, subject to tax.

These options are explained below but are only available if you meet at least one of the following requirements:

l You are in receipt of pension income for life of at least €12,700 each year

l You have used/are using €63,500 of your retirement fund to invest in an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF), and/or to purchase an annuity/pension (see page 13 for details on AMRFs)

l You use part of your retirement fund to set up a pension to bring your pension income up to €12,700 per annum

Please note that the above figures are for 2013 and may change in subsequent years. For more details on these requirements see the section on Specified Income on page 19.

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1. Invest in an ARF

An Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) is a flexible arrangement that allows you to remain invested in funds after retirement and withdraw money as and when you wish. Any investment growth within the fund is currently tax free, however withdrawals are taxed as set out below.

An ARF allows you to:

l Make withdrawals when you want (though the frequency and size of your withdrawals will impact the length of time your ARF can provide you with an income in retirement)

l Set it up to receive a regular income from your ARF

l Pass on the remaining value of your fund to your dependants or other beneficiaries on your death

Required Withdrawal

Please note, you are required to take a withdrawal of a certain amount each year, currently 5%, from your ARF (6% if total ARF/Vested PRSA value exceeds €2 million).

It is important to note that if a high level of withdrawals is made relative to any growth achieved there is a risk that your ARF fund could run out.

All withdrawals and income payments are subject to income tax, USC and (PRSI up to age 66). Bank of Ireland Life will make the appropriate deduction and remit it to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf.

You may have to pay additional ‘early encashment charges’ on an ARF if you withdraw all or part of the value within the first five years

Money in an ARF can be used to buy an annuity at any time. What is an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF)

An AMRF is similar to an ARF but there is a maximum investment amount for an AMRF, which is set by the Revenue (currently E63,500). An individual can only have one AMRF. You cannot withdraw from the original capital invested, but investment growth (if any) can be withdrawn at any time (subject to tax).

An AMRF becomes an ARF: l When you reach age 75 OR

l If you satisfy the minimum guaranteed pension income requirement as set out by the Revenue before age 75 OR

l If you die before age 75 whichever comes first.

Please note that if your AMRF becomes an ARF then the required withdrawal each year will then apply (see above).

Money in an AMRF can be used to buy an annuity at any time.

Warning: The value of your investment may go down as well as up.

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2. Take Taxable Cash

You may be able to take an additional taxable lump sum. You will pay income tax and USC on the amount you withdraw from your AVC fund.

Do you Want to Leave the Balance of your Fund in your AVC PRSA?

If your AVCs have been made to an AVC PRSA you may have the option of keeping the balance of your fund in your AVC PRSA until age 75. This means you can remain invested (until age 75 at the latest) without availing of the ARF/AMRF option. You can take withdrawals subject to satisfying certain criteria. If you do not meet the specified income requirements, you can still make withdrawals as long as you maintain a minimum investment amount (currently E63,500) in your AVC PRSA. Similar to an ARF, you may be required to take a withdrawal of a certain amount from your vested AVC PRSA each year (see page 13).

Talk to your Insurance & Investments Manager for more details.

Warning: The value of your investment may go down as well as up.

Warning: If you invest in this product you may lose some or all of the money you invest.

Step 4

For AVC PRSAs only

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The options available for your Retirement Bond fund at retirement are tied to the rules of the scheme you have transferred from and therefore are specific depending on your particular case. Below are the general steps you should take in reviewing your options.

Do you Want to Take a Retirement Lump Sum?

Generally pension funds provide you with an option to take a lump at retirement, a portion of which can be taken tax-free. You can use this money in any way you wish. You can even re-invest this lump sum. The amount you can take as a lump sum at retirement depends on the rules of the scheme you have transferred from. You should talk to Insurance & Investments Manager to discuss your options. Revenue limits however apply in relation to how much of this retirement lump sum may be taken tax-free. Please see page 20 for more details.

Do you Want to Buy an Annuity/Pension?

If you take a retirement lump sum based on salary and service, you will have the option to use some (or all) of your fund to purchase an annuity when you retire. An annuity, commonly known as a pension, provides you with security of income during your retirement years.

This was historically the only option available on retirement and it continues to be an attractive option particularly if:

l Your retirement fund will be your main source of income in retirement

l Your main priority in retirement is a secure regular income rather than passing on your fund to your dependants

Purchasing an annuity involves using some or all of your fund to secure a regular income for the rest of your life. The amount of income you receive depends on the annuity rates in force when you buy your annuity.

Annuity rates vary depending on:

l Your age; you will generally secure a larger income the older you are

l Interest rates, as they are linked to annuity rates

l The options you choose for your annuity

Retirement Bonds

Step 1

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Your choice of annuity can include:

1. (a) Level Payments: Where your payments stay the same each year, or

1. (b) Increasing Payments: Where your payments increase each year by a fixed amount, eg 3% each year.

2. A Guarantee Period: You can choose that your payments are secured for a fixed period of up to 10 years, so that if you die during this time, your annuity payments will be paid to your dependants for the remainder of the guaranteed period.

3. A Dependant’s Pension: You can specify a percentage of your pension that is to be paid, following your death in retirement, to your spouse/civil partner or dependant.

Annuity/pension payments are subject to income tax at your marginal rate and Universal Social Charge (USC) deductions under the PAYE system. We generally make these deductions at source and remit them to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf.

Full details of the types of annuity benefits that you may purchase are available from your Insurance & Investments Manager.

Do you Meet the Requirements to Invest in an ARF or Take Taxable Cash?

Depending on the rules of the scheme you transferred from, you may have the option to invest in on ARF and/or withdraw the balance of your fund, subject to tax. These options may also be available for your AVC fund, if you paid AVCs to the scheme.

If your retirement bond was taken out before 6th February 2011, or if the transfer came from a Defined Benefit Scheme at any time, you can only choose the lump sum based on salary and service and annuity options. You may be entitled to the ARF option if you are a Proprietary Director, talk to your Insurance & Investments Manager to find out.

Provided that the rules of the scheme you transferred from permitted you to access the ARF option, this will only be available if you meet at least one of the following requirements:

l You are in receipt of pension income for life of at least €12,700 each year

l You have used/are using €63,500 of your retirement fund to invest in an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF), and/or to purchase an annuity/pension (see page 17 for details on AMRFs)

l You use part of your retirement fund to set up a pension to bring your pension income up to €12,700 per annum

Please note that the above figures are for 2013 and may change. For more details on these requirements see the section on Specified Income on page 19.

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1. Invest in an ARF

An Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) is a flexible arrangement that allows you to remain invested in funds after retirement and withdraw money as and when you wish. Any investment growth within the fund is currently tax free, however withdrawals are taxed as set out below.

An ARF allows you to:

l Make withdrawals when you want (though the frequency and size of your withdrawals will impact the length of time your ARF can provide you with an income in retirement)

l Set it up to receive a regular income from your ARF

l Pass on the remaining value of your fund to your dependants or other beneficiaries on your death

Required Withdrawal

Please note, you are required to take a withdrawal of a certain amount each year, currently 5%, from your ARF (6% if total ARF/vested PRSA value exceeds €2 million).

It is important to note that if a high level of withdrawals is made relative to any growth achieved there is a risk that your ARF fund could run out.

All withdrawals and income payments are subject to income tax, USC and (PRSI up to age 66). Bank of Ireland Life will make the appropriate deduction and remit it to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf.

You may have to pay additional ‘early encashment charges’ on an ARF if you withdraw all or part of the value within the first five years

Money in an ARF can be used to buy an annuity at any time. What is an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF)

An AMRF is similar to an ARF but there is a maximum investment amount for an AMRF, which is set by the Revenue (currently E63,500). An individual can only ever have one AMRF. You cannot withdraw from the original capital invested, but investment growth (if any) can be withdrawn at any time (subject to tax).

An AMRF becomes an ARF: l When you reach age 75 OR

l If you satisfy the minimum guaranteed pension income requirement as set out by the Revenue before age 75 OR

l If you die before age 75 whichever comes first.

Please note that if your AMRF becomes an ARF then the required withdrawal each year will then apply (Please see above for further details).

Money in an AMRF can be used to buy an annuity at any time.

2. Take Taxable Cash

You may be able to take an additional taxable lump sum. You will pay income tax and USC on the amount you withdraw from your fund.

Warning: The value of your investment may go down as well as up.

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Tax Treatment of

Retirement Options

If you want to pass on some of your pension benefits to your dependants or other beneficiaries following your death in retirement, you need to consider this when choosing from your retirement options.

Annuity

You can choose to have a guarantee period, which means your pension will be paid for a fixed period of up tp 10 years, even if you die in the interim. You can also add a dependant’s pension. These options allow you to provide added security for your dependants following your death in retirement.

ARF/Vested PRSA

The balance of your ARF/Vested PRSA (if any) becomes payable to your estate when you die. The same applies to an AMRF, which automatically becomes an ARF when you die.

The tax treatment of the transfer of your ARF/Vested PRSA to your dependants on your death will depend on the relationship between you and the beneficiary:

Proceeds of ARF/ Vested PRSA Inherited by:

Rate of Income Tax Deducted by QFM/

PRSA Provider Captial Acquisitions Tax (CAT)

Spouse or civil partner If encashed:

Treated as income of the deceased in the year of death and subject to tax under the PAYE system at the deceased’s marginal rate of income tax plus PRSI and USC as appropriate.

If transferred to an ARF in name of spouse/ civil partner of deceased:

Transfer is exempt from income tax. Subsequent withdrawals by spouse/civil partner will be subject to tax under PAYE system at their marginal rate of income tax plus PRSI and USC as appropriate.

None (exemption applies)

Child (under 21) of deceased, or of civil partner of the deceased

None (exemption applies) May be liable, normal rules and thresholds apply

Child (21 or over) of de-ceased, or of civil partner of the deceased

Taxed at 30%* None (exemption applies) Any other individual Treated as income of the deceased in the

year of death and subject to tax

under the PAYE system at the deceased’s marginal rate of income tax, PRSI and USC as appropriate.

May be liable, normal rules and thresholds apply

* The 30% rate of income tax is applied under schedule D Case IV. No reliefs, deductions or tax credits can be set off against this tax and the income tax exception limits and marginal relief do not apply.

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Specified Income

What are the Requirements?

In order to invest in an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF) or take taxable cash, you need to have pension income for life, at the time of drawing your retirement benefits equal to or greater than €12,700 a year. This is known as ‘specified income’. You do not have to meet this requirement if you are aged 75 or over.

If you do not have this specified income then you must use €63,500 (or the balance of your fund if less) to invest in an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF) and/or to buy an annuity (or in the case of a PRSA, retain in your vested PRSA). If you have previously met this requirement you do not have to satisfy this condition again.

There are three simple steps:

1. Find out what your State Pension entitlement is (single life rate only) 2. Add to this any other pensions that you are currently in receipt of

3. If there is a shortfall, find out if your retirement fund can buy an annuity to bring you up to 212,700 a year

How to Check if you Meet the Requirements

You Meet the Requirements if:

l You are in receipt of pension income for life of at least €12,700 each year

OR

l You have used/are now using €63,500 of your retirement fund to invest in an Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF) and/or to purchase an annuity/pension

OR

l You use part of your retirement fund to set up a pension to bring your pension income up to €12,700 per annum

Please note that the above figures are for 2013 and may change.

To find out if you satisfy the specified income test, you should check your State Pension entitlements, and check what other private pension income you may be in receipt of, for example a pension from a previous employer. If you are receiving the maximum rate of State Pension (Contributory), which is currently €230.30 per week (€11,975 annually), you will then need to have supplementary guaranteed pension income of €725 annually. If your State Pension benefit is a smaller amount, you will need more supplementary pension income to make up the remainder of the €12,700 a year.

There are certain criteria that must be satisfied in order for pension income to be counted towards the €12,700 total.

Your Insurance & Investments Manager will be able to help you find out:

l what pension income counts towards the €12,700 total

l if you meet the requirements if you want to invest in an ARF or withdraw some or all of your

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Taxation & Revenue Limits

Maximum Fund

There is a threshold on the value of the fund that you can build up before retirement, which is currently €2,300,000. If you build up a fund over €2,300,000, the excess will be liable to a once off income tax charge of 41%, before being applied to provide your retirement benefits.

Any pension benefits that you have taken since 7th December 2005 will count towards this threshold.

Taxation on Retirement Lump Sums

If you take a retirement lump sum, a total of €200,000 can be taken tax free (this is a total from all pension arrangements). Any amount between €200,000 and €575,000 will be subject to income tax at the standard rate and any amount over €575,000 will be taxed at your marginal rate and will also be subject to PRSI and Universal Social Charge (USC). Any retirement lump sums taken on or after 7th December 2005 will count towards these limits.

Taxation on other Retirement Income

Annuity/pension payments are subject to income tax at your marginal rate and USC deductions under the PAYE system. We generally make these deductions at source and remit them to the Revenue Commissioners on your behalf.

Any withdrawals from an Approved Retirement Fund (ARF), Approved Minimum Retirement Fund (AMRF) or Vested PRSA are subject to income tax, USC and (PRSI up to age 66 only). We also deduct these charges from your withdrawal.

If you take an additional taxable lump sum, it will be liable to income tax at your marginal rate and USC.

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How your Annuity Options

Impact your Payment Amount

The table below shows the differences in payments you can expect depending on the annuity

options you choose using purchase money (fund) of E150,000. Level

Payments Increasing Payments at 2% p.a. Spouse/ Civil Partner/ Dependant Pension 10-year Guaranteed Period 5-year Guaranteed Period Annual Payments ✔ ✔ E7,644.60 ✔ ✔ E7,539.60 ✔ ✔ ✔ E6,954.60 ✔ ✔ ✔ E6,909.60 ✔ ✔ E5,949.60 ✔ ✔ E5,874.60 ✔ ✔ ✔ E5,274.60 ✔ ✔ ✔ E5,244.60

Note: This table is for illustration purposes only. All figures are based on a retiree with Purchase Money of €150,000 at age 65. The Dependant’s Pension is assumed to be 50% of the main pension, dependant is assumed to be age 63 and commission is 2%. Figures correct as at October 2013.

These figures are before tax.

Warning: These figures are estimates only. They are not a reliable guide to the future performance of your investment.

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ARF Versus Annuity as

Retirement Income

Pension bought at: Annuity rate of 99% and payments increasing by

2% p.a.

ARF growing at 3% p.a. ARF growing at 6% p.a.

Age Annual IncomeBefore Tax

Cash Value

Before Tax € Annual IncomeBefore Tax €

Cash Value Before Tax € Annual Income Before Tax € Cash Value Before Tax € 65 5,949.60 0 7,500 144,885 7,500 149,323 66 6,068.59 0 7,725 139,279 7,725 148,196 67 6,189.96 0 7,957 133,360 7,957 146,787 68 6,313.76 0 8,195 127,115 8,195 145,076 69 6,440.04 0 8,441 120,532 8,441 143,045 70 6,568.84 0 8,695 113,600 8,695 140,670 71 6,700.22 0 8,955 106,306 8,955 137,930 72 6,834.22 0 9,224 98,636 9,224 134,799 73 6,970.90 0 9,501 90,577 9,501 131,254 74 7,110.32 0 9,786 82,114 9,786 127,266 75 7,252.53 0 10,079 73,234 10,079 122,809 76 7,397.58 0 10,382 63,922 10,382 117,853 77 7,545.53 0 10,693 54,162 10,693 112,366 78 7,696.44 0 11,014 43,937 11,014 106,315 79 7,850.37 0 11,344 33,233 11,344 99,667 80 8,007.38 0 11,685 22,031 11,685 92,385 81 8,167.53 0 12,035 10,315 12,035 84,429 82 8,330.88 0 10,459 0 12,396 75,762 83 8,497.49 0 0 0 12,768 66,339 84 8,667.44 0 0 0 13,151 56,116 85 8,840.79 0 0 0 13,546 45,047 86 9,017.61 0 0 0 13,952 33,082 87 9,197.96 0 0 0 14,371 20,170 88 9,381.92 0 0 0 14,802 6,256 89 9,569.56 0 0 0 6,501 0

The table above shows the difference between an ARF and an annuity as a source of retirement income based on a purchase money (fund) of €150,000. Figures are correct as at October 2013 using gender neutral rates. The annuity figures assume a retirement age of 65. The annuity figures are based on payments increasing by 2% each year, no dependant pension, no guarantee period and 2% commission is payable.

The ARF illustrations above assume that withdrawals increase at a rate equal to 2% p.a. and that 1.5% Fund Management Charge is deducted annually. This rate is for illustration purposes only and is not guaranteed. Unit prices can fall as well as rise. Actual investment growth depends on the performance of the underlying assets and may be more or less than illustrated. Withdrawals from your ARF will be subject to income tax, USC (and PRSI up to age 66). Each year you are required to make a 5% withdrawal from your ARF or pay tax on it as if you have.

Warning: These figures are estimates only. They are not a reliable guide to the future performance of your investment.

Warning: If you invest in an ARF you may lose some or all of the money you invest. Warning: The value of your investment may go down as well as up.

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1890 309 309

www.bankofireland.com

500200 V6.10.13

Terms and conditions apply.

This brochure is based on our understanding of current legislation and Revenue practice as at October 2013.

While great care has been taken in its preparation, this document is of a general nature and should not be relied on in relation to specific issues without appropriate financial, insurance, investment or other professional advice. The content of this document is for information purposes only and does not constitute an offer or recommendation to buy or sell any investment or to subscribe to any investment management or advisory service. While the information has been taken from sources we believe to be reliable, we do not guarantee their accuracy or completeness and any such information may be incomplete or condensed. All opinions and estimates constitute best judgement at the time of publication and are subject to change without notice.

In the event of any changes in taxation or legislation, New Ireland Assurance may amend the terms and conditions of the relevant contract to take account of any such changes. The details shown above relating to this fund and its composition are as at the date of this document and may change over time. If there is any conflict between this document and the policy conditions, the policy conditions will apply.

Bank of Ireland Life is a trading name of New Ireland Assurance Company plc.

New Ireland Assurance Company plc trading as Bank of Ireland Life is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland. Bank of Ireland Insurance & Investments Limited is regulated by the Central Bank of Ireland. Bank of Ireland Insurance & Investments Limited is a tied agent of New Ireland Assurance Company plc. Members of Bank of Ireland Group.

Warning: The value of your investment may go down as well as up.

Warning: This product may be affected by changes in currency exchange rates.

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