Facilitating Active Learning in Large Classes

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Facilitating Active Learning

in Large Classes

Anita M. Stineman, PhD, RN The University of Iowa

College of Nursing

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Activity

TTYP – Turn to Your

Partner

What are the biggest

challenges you face

with large classes?

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Active Learning

By the very act of being

engaged, students

develop habits of the

mind and heart that

promise to stand them in

good stead for a lifetime

of continuous learning.”

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Research states…..

“Students who engage more

frequently in educationally

effective practices get better

grades, are more satisfied,

and are more likely to persist.”

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7 Principles of Good Practice

1. Student-Faculty Contact

2. Cooperation Among Students

3. Active Learning

4. Prompt Feedback

5. Time on Task

6. High Expectations

7. Diverse Talents and Ways of

Learning

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7 Principles of Good Practice

1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6.

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7 Principles of Good Practice

1. Student-Faculty Contact 2. Cooperation Among Students 3. Active Learning

4. Prompt Feedback 5. Time on Task 6. High Expectations

7. Diverse Talents & Ways of

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7 Principles of Good Practice

“A Whole Brain Grid Activity”, Backer & Deck

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Creating an “Engaged” Culture

First Day

• Start learning names • Ice Breaker • Planned Activity – Goal of activity – Project directions (ppt, overhead) – Turn in assignment – Limit time

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At the beginning of class….

Use Active

Learning to

“hook” to snag

the interest

level

TTYP

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Reflective Responses

 Provide students with a question that they must respond to in writing - a one or two paragraph response

 Bring to next class

Advantages

“Hook” for beginning class Everyone has something they can contribute Increase ‘time on task’ Introduction for class

discussion

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Reflective Responses

96:157 Leadership and Care Management

Content: Decision Making and Evaluation of Outcomes

Question:

Think of the last time that you

had to make a very difficult decision.

What steps/process did you use to make

that decision? Was there anything you

might have done differently to improve

the outcome of your decision.

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“There is not enough class time

to do activities.”

Thinking

Thinking

Thinking

Thinking

Thinking

Thinking

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“There is not enough class time

to do activities.”

Can we afford to ignore the evidence?

Consider these:

Develop a course website

– post powerpoint slides with audio for students to listen to prior to coming to class. “Bookend” approach

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96:152

Gerontological

Nursing

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Associational Brainstorming

• Write thoughts they associate

with word, concept, picture

• Transcribe their responses on

board, overhead

• Discuss in relation to topic

• Provides sense of prior

experience, attitudes and

knowledge

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Throughout the class ……

Pause Procedure

Stop lecture

Students work in pairs

Compare and rework notes

“What remains unclear?”

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Case Studies

Several weeks ago, Kevin Andrews, a 17-year-old high school gymnast, fell from the parallel bars and fractured his left femur. Kevin has been on bed rest in skeletal traction since the accident. He is depressed and bored with the hospital

routine of care. Because of painful muscle

spasms, he often refuses to be turned or to move voluntarily. His appetite is poor, and he often

refuses his hospital meals. He needs

encouragement from the nursing staff to cough and deep breath.

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96:124 Pharmacotherapeutics in Nursing

Classification Generic Trade Action Side

Effects Alpha 1 Blockers Prazosin Beta 1 Blockers Propranolo

ACE Inhibitors Captopril Angiotensin II

Blockers Losartan Direct Acting

Vasodialators Minoxidil

Angelo & Cross, 1993

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96:135 Complex Concepts of Nursing Regulation of Fluid Balance With permission of B. Rakel

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Class Modeling

acting clip art

-Small groups

-Each group present at next class meeting

-Identify key components that must be included in modeling (hypothalamus, adrenals, pituitary, kidney, pancreas)

-Provide with ‘direction’ sheet Q/A following presentations

Students transform what they have learned

from reading and listening into DOING.

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Who Wants to Be a Registered Nurse

• Divide participants into four to eight groups • Provide markers and paper

• Designate recorder and spokesperson • Provide question

• Teams have 15 seconds to respond • Spokesperson shares team response

• +/- 100 points for correct/incorrect answer

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ABCD Cards

(alias Low-Tech Clickers)

Which of the following learning activities

would provide the learner with the

HIGHEST level of cognitive learning?

A. Winning “Who Wants to Be a Registered Nurse” B. Providing responses for an Associational

Brainstorming

C. Completing a Memory Matrix

D. Developing a nursing diagnosis from Case Study information

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……Closing

One-Sentence Summary

– summarize each

step of the nursing process

Minute Paper

– “What was the most important

thing you learned during this class?”/”What

important question remains unanswered?”

Test Content

– Reflect back on the material

we discussed today, what content do you

think will be covered on the exam?

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Success in a large

class is 10%

perspiration and

90% inspiration.

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7 Principles of Good Practice

“A Whole Brain Grid Activity”, Backer & Deck

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One Minute Summary

Reflecting back

on today’s

presentation, what is

one point

that you will integrate

into your classroom?

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References

Angelo, T.A. & Cross, K.P. (1993). Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers. (2nd Ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Backer, L.& Deck, M. (2003). The presenter’s EZ graphics kit. Sterling, VA: Stylus.

Chickering, A.W. & Gamson, A.F. (1987). Seven principles for good practice in undergraduate education. Racine, WI:The Johnson Foundation,

Inc./Wingspread.

Frederick, P.J. (2002). Engaging students actively in large lecture settings. In C.A.Stanley & M.E. Porter (Eds.). Engaging large classes: Strategies and techniques for college faculty. (pp. 58-66). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing. LeCroy, C. (2006). Games as an innovative teaching strategy for overactive

bladder and BPH. Urologic Nursing, 26(5), 381-384.

National Survey of Student Engagement. (2006). Engaged learning: Fostering success for all students: Annual report, 2006. Bloomington, IN:Indiana

University Center for Postsecondary Research.

Sorcinelli, M.D. (2002). Promoting civility in large classes. In C.A.Stanley & M.E. Porter (Eds.). Engaging large classes: Strategies and techniques for college faculty. (pp. 44-57). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

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