Transport of Dangerous Goods. Class 7. Radioactive Material

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Transport

of

Dangerous Goods

Class 7

Radioactive

Material

Radiation Safety Officer

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Table of Contents

SECTION 1

Objectives and Introduction... 3 SECTION 2

Training... 4 SECTION 3

Classification... 5

Classes and Divisions

Packing Groups and Risk Groups Primary Classes

SECTION 4

Package Limits...7

Excepted vs Type A Limited Activity Cut-off

SECTION 5

Receiving... 10

Initial Inspection Daytime Delivery After Hours Delivery Opening a Package Dangerous Occurrence Record Keeping SECTION 6 Packaging... 15 Package Types Labelling Vehicle Placards Segregation of Packages Contamination SECTION 7 Documentation... 18 Shipping Document

Sample Shippers Declarations

SECTION 8 Emergencies... 24 SECTION 9 Definitions... 25 SECTION 10 References... 26 SECTION 11 Other... 27

Infectious Substances and Air Transport p27 Excepted Package Check List p28 Type A Package Check List p29 Transport Canada Schedule 1 Dangerous Goods List p30 Transport Canada Schedule 2 Special Provisions p32 Transport Canada Schedule 3 Alphabetical Cross Reference p33 Emergency Response Guides p35

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Section 1: Objectives

1. Understand the basic requirements of the regulations governing the transport of radioactive material or where to look to obtain such regulatory requirements.

- licensing requirements (consignor and consignee) - exemptions

- security

- worker qualifications - vehicle requirements - segregation of shipments

2. Package and label a transportation container to be used for radioactive material. - classification

- packaging - proper labels - radiation survey

3. Prepare a shipping document for radioactive material. - information on package contents

- emergency information

Introduction

There are many regulations that govern the transport of radioactive material. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) and Transport Canada, Clear Language Regulations (TCCL) have generally adopted the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material. Local Public Utility Boards may also set regulations regarding the transport of dangerous goods.

Where there is a conflict in the regulations, you must follow the most restrictive regulations.

Class 7 Radioactive Material is defined as any substance with a specific activity greater than 70 kBq/kg (70 Bq/g). This means that virtually all radioactive material used in hospital settings would fall under the Class 7 Transport of Dangerous Goods Regulations.

TCCL Classification

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Section 2: Training

No person shall handle, offer for transport, or transport dangerous goods unless they are trained or performing the

duties under the direct supervision of a trained person.

Training should include all of the information necessary to enable the employee to do the job they are asked to do. This includes information on:

• Classification of Dangerous Goods

• The use of the Schedules: Dangerous Goods List, Special Provisions and Alphabetical Cross Reference

• Shipping Documents • Safety Marks

• Basic Emergency Procedures

• Safe Handling and Transport Requirements

• Emergency Response and Accidental Release (if applicable)

The certificate of training is issued by the employer who has reasonable grounds to believe the employee is trained to perform the shipping duties and includes:

• employees name and signature • the date of initial training

• the aspects of the transport of dangerous goods training (related to assigned duties) • the expiry date of the certificate “Expires on…”

• name and address of employer • authorized employer signature

CERTIFICATE VALIDITY

• The certificate is valid for:

- 3 years following ground transport training

- 2 years following air transport training under the International Air Transport Association (IATA) Transport of Dangerous Goods Regulations

• The employer must keep the certificates for 2 years following the date of expiration. • Trained individuals must be able to produce a certificate of training on request by any

inspector.

• Those not trained can package under direct supervision of a trained person who holds a valid certificate.

Those who only receive radioactive material do not need specific TDG training or certificates. They must have documented radiation safety training covering the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission regulations for receiving packages.

TCCL Training 6.2 TCCL Training 6.3

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Section 3: Classification

CLASSES and DIVISIONS (Column 3 of Schedule 1)

Dangerous goods are divided into nine classes. Many classes are further divided into smaller groups called divisions.

Class Division

1 - Explosives 1 to 6

2 - Compressed Gases 1 - Flammable 2 - Non-Flammable 3 - Poison

4 - Corrosive 3 - Flammable Liquids None

4 - Flammable Solids 1 - Flammable

2 - Spontaneously Combustible 3 - Dangerous when Wet 5 - Oxidizing Substances 1 - Oxidizing Substances

2 - organic Peroxides

6 - Poisonous and Infectious 1 - Poisonous Solids and Liquids 2 - Infectious Substances 7 - Radioactive Material None

8 - Corrosive Material None

9 - Miscellaneous 1 - Miscellaneous 2 - Environmental Hazard 3 - Dangerous Waste

PACKING GROUPS

The degree of danger represented by roman numerals. (Column 4 of Schedule 1).

I Most dangerous

II to

III Least dangerous

There are no packing groups for Class 7 Do not confuse the packing group with the numbers used to determine the radiation label for a package.

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RISK GROUP (None for Class 7)

Used for Class 6.2 Infectious Substances. The risk factors for the roman numerals are opposite to the packing group.

1 Diagnostic Specimen Low Risk

2 Moderate Risk

3 to

4 High Risk

PRIMARY CLASSIFICATION

For substances that fall into more than one class or division you have to determine the primary classification.

Order of Precedence: Class 7 is considered primary class along with classes 2, 2.3, 2.4, 2.1, 5.2, 6.2. If shipment meets two of these classes then labels for both classes must be used and other requirements (packaging and documentation) for both classes must be met.

For other classes, Class 7 is considered the primary class.

Schedule 1 in the Guide to Canadian Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and Regulations lists the requirements and reference numbers for dangerous goods.

Column Title Description

1 UN Number UN number for documents and package

2 Shipping Name and Description Name to be listed on documents

3 Classification Class of product for labels and documents

4 Packing Group/Risk Group Level of hazard I, II, III (none for Class 7 Radioactive)

5 Special Provision Look up number in Schedule 2 for requirements

6 Limited Quantity Index Quantity below which some exemptions apply

7 ERAP Index Quantity above which an Emergency Plan is required

8 Passenger Ship Index Quantity above which ship transport is prohibited.

9 Passenger Vehicle or Railway Quantity above which passenger road vehicle or passenger rail transport is prohibited.

10 Marine Pollutant P=pollutant PP=severe pollutant •=potential pollutant

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Section 4: Package Limits (Exemptions)

The first thing you should determine is whether or not your shipment can be exempt from the regulations. For radioactive

material, it is unlikely you will meet the exemption criteria.

The regulations do not apply if the nuclear substance is:

• shipped within private property by a licence under the CNSC or over private roads where

public access is under control of the owner of the road. All other conditions require you

to follow the regulations.

• incorporated in a person or animal for diagnosis or treatment. • contained in a sample of material taken for bioassay purposes.

• contained in human or animal tissue remains with specific activity less than 10-6

A2/kg of

mass of tissue.

• contained in a consumer product that has received regulatory approval following the sale to an end user.

• a natural material or ore with a specific activity less than 10 times the values listed as A2

in the IAEA Safety Series of exempt material.

If any package does not conform to the regulations then a special application must be made to the CNSC. The application will include the degree of non-conformity and the measures taken to compensate for non-conformity. The CNSC will assess the application and issue an authorization to transport with relevant terms and conditions.

The regulations do not apply for shipments of radioactive material below defined exemption limits. The regulators have different limits and you must use the most restrictive number.

Radioactive material being shipped to and from universities and hospitals will generally not be exempt from the regulations because the activity levels are too high.

The CNSC uses the exemption limits based on the A1 and A2 values listed in the IAEA Safety

Standard Series TS-R-1 (ST-1, revised). These values may differ from the Transport of Dangerous Goods Regulations so you must use the more restrictive values.

IAEA Section IV

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Exemption Limits for Selected Radionuclides Used in Medicine For radionuclides not listed consult regulations or contact the radiation safety office

Radionuclide Transport Canada TDG Clear Language Limits Material (Bq/g) CNSC and IAEA Exemption Limits Material (Bq/g) CNSC and IAEA Exemption Limits for

a Package (MBq) Carbon 14 70 10,000 10 Cesium 137 70 10 0.01 Chromium 51 70 1,000 10 Cobalt 57 70 100 1 Cobalt 58 70 10 1 Fluorine 18 70 10 1 Gallium 67 70 100 1 Indium 111 70 100 1 Iodine 123 70 100 10 Iodine 125 70 1,000 1 Iodine 131 70 100 1 Molybdenum 99 70 100 1 Phosphorous 32 70 1,000 0.1 Phosphorous 33 70 100,000 100 Sulphur 35 70 100,000 100 Technetium99m 70 100 10 Thallium 201 70 100 1 Yttrium 90 70 1,000 0.1

EXCEPTED vs TYPE A PACKAGES

If the radioactive material is unable to be exempt from the regulations then you must determine the type of package under which it must be shipped. Radioactive material being shipped to and from hospitals is usually not exempt and is shipped as either Excepted Packages or Type A Packages.

The limits for each package are defined in

the regulations. See ‘Fact Sheet 63 - Limited

Activity Cut-Off’ for activity limits of common

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Radiation Safety Fact Sheet

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Reference Sheet: 63

Introduction

All packages containing radioactive material used in medicine and biomedical research must be shipped using authorized carriers. The package and associated documentation must meet the following guidelines:

CNSC Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations

Transport Canada Transport of Dangerous Goods Regulations

Excepted packages have a dose rate at the surface of less than 5 µSv/hr and do not exceed cut-off activity levels.

The cut-off activity levels are generally defined as 10-4A2 for liquids and 10-3A2 for solids and gases. A2 is the

activity level set in the regulations.

Type A packages can contain greater amounts of activity than Excepted packages. The activity limits for Type A

packages are defined as the A2 limits in the regulations. Type A packages must conform to specific packaging

criteria and must have an appropriate label on the outside of the box. If you are above the Type A limit you have to go to a Type B container.

Cut-off Limits for Selected Radionuclides Used in Medicine For radionuclides not listed consult regulations or contact the radiation safety office

Radionuclide A2 (TBq)

Excepted Package Limits Liquid Form 10-4A2

(MBq)

Excepted Package Limits Solid Form 10-3A2

(GBq)

Type A Package Limits A2 (GBq) Carbon 14 3 300 3 3,000 Cesium 137 0.6 60 0.6 600 Chromium 51 30 3000 30 30,000 Cobalt 57 10 1000 10 10,000 Cobalt 58 1 100 1 1,000 Fluorine 18 0.6 60 0.6 600 Gallium 67 3 300 3 3,000 Indium 111 3 300 3 3,000 Iodine 123 3 300 3 3,000 Iodine 125 3 300 3 3,000 Iodine 131 0.7 70 0.7 700 Molybdenum 99 0.6 60 0.6 600 Phosphorous 32 0.5 50 0.5 500 Phosphorous 33 1 100 1 1,000 Sulphur 35 3 300 3 3,000 Technetium99m 4 400 4 4,000 Thallium 201 4 400 4 4,000 Yttrium 90 0.3 30 0.3 300

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Section 5: Receiving

“ Every consignor, carrier and consignee of radioactive material shall implement a radiation protection program and shall, as part of that program implement personnel qualification and training, control occupational and public exposure to radiation and plan for unusual situations.”

Specific procedures are described in the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission INFO Document “Identifying and Opening Radioactive Packages, INFO - 0426 rev 1” Procedures for receiving radioactive material should be established to ensure the material is: • delivered, without delay, to the user or securely stored until delivery.

• immediately inspected for evidence of leakage or damage. • only opened by personnel authorized to do so.

• properly stored after receiving.

RECEIVING A PACKAGE

All radioactive material received should be designated for an authorized licence or permit holder. The address label should provide sufficient information for the delivering company to accurately locate the individual or department responsible for the package.

Receiving procedures are used as a method to monitor the integrity of the package and indirectly keep the regulatory agencies aware of company compliance with the packaging and transport regulations. The reporting mechanism identifies companies with poor track records for packaging and transport.

Measuring Contamination

• below contamination criteria

• can measure on survey meter with pancake probe if efficiencies are worked out. Logging Product to Inventory

• confirms package receipt was OK • separate record for each vial Reporting Damaged or Leaking Packages

• call RSO immediately Discarding Packing Material

• remove labels when goods are removed and package is not contaminated • deface labels before placing in waste stream

Initial Inspections

The initial inspection should verify the address on the delivery label. Any package that does not have an address for an authorized user at the hospital should not be accepted. Once a package is accepted, even if it does not belong at the hospital, it becomes the responsibility of the hospital. You do not want to receive a package and then discover you do not have the nuclear substance listed on your licence.

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Daytime Delivery to Receiving Stores

All radioactive material delivered to a receiving department, instead of directly to a department, should remain unopened until the package is delivered to the appropriate department.

Receiving personnel shall be trained to conduct an initial inspection of the package for the correct address and damage. Damaged packages will remain in the receiving area until instructions are received from the Radiation Safety Officer.

If the package is not damaged it will be delivered by appropriately trained security, stores or porter services personnel to the department listed on the packing slip.

All packing slips should accompany the package to its’ final destination.

Daytime Delivery to Departments

Many radioactive packages are delivered directly to the department by authorized couriers and arrive during regular daytime working hours. These companies are responsible for the package until an authorized user accepts delivery. If it is not addressed to your department, do not sign for the package. If the package is undeliverable, it remains the responsibility of the courier service.

After Hours Delivery

Personnel receiving the package will conduct an initial inspection and contact the Radiation Safety Officer if damage is noted.

If the package is not damaged it should be delivered by security personnel to a secured room.

Individual departments will be responsible for picking up their respective packages promptly upon notification.

OPENING A PACKAGE

The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission guidelines “Identifying and Opening Radioactive Packages,

INFO - 0426 (rev 1)” should be posted at the location the package is opened.

The following information should be recorded on the receiving record. Some departments choose to include this information as part of the isotope daily use record.

• Date package received • Name of supplier and shipper

• Shipping document number (ie. waybill)

• Isotope name, activity, chemical form, lot number

• Results of inspection to include: accuracy of labels, visual inspection, record of damage, record of radiation exposure readings, wipe test results of primary container

For most isotopes, a wipe test may be performed and checked with a contamination monitor. If the results are questionable then a check with more sensitive equipment may be required.

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Reporting Dangerous Occurrences

Any person that receives a package should inspect the integrity of the package and report any of the following conditions to the Radiation Safety Officer.

• Incorrect package label • A damaged package • A package with leaking

• Packages with evidence of being tampered with • Any radiation levels above regulatory limits

- Dose rate at the package surface exceeds 2000 µSv/hr. - Dose rate at 1m from the package exceeds 100 µSv/hr.

The Radiation Safety Officer must file a full report of the discovery with the supplier and the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission.

RECORD KEEPING

Maintain all receiving records and shipping documents for a period of at least 2 years.

Forms

Radioisotope Receiving Record (Sample)

(follow ‘Identifying and Opening Radioactive Packages’ INFO-0426 rev 1)

Name of Supplier (Consignor) Name of Shipper (Carrier) Waybill Number

Date Received (yy-mm-dd) Received By Isotope Supplier ID or Lot #

Total Activity Total Volume (mL) Department Assigned ID or Lot #

Results of Receiving Inspection

Item Checked OK Not OK

Department address correct Shipping label appropriate No evidence of damage Wipe Test results < 4 Bq/cm2

Exposure Readings Appropriate for Label (ie. Category I, II III and Transport Index)

White-I 5 µSv/hr (surface) Yellow-II 5-500 µSv/hr (surface) Yellow-III 500-2000 µSv/hr (surface) < 10 µSv/hr (at 1m) 10-100 µSv/hr (at 1m)

If any are not OK Report to Radiation Safety Officer

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Receiving Radioactive Package Training Checklist

Name:_________________________________________________________

Department:____________________ Permit/Licence Number ___________

Item Observed Not Observed

Rules for opening packages is posted or available Lab coat is buttoned

Disposable gloves are worn

Radiation monitor worn  not applicable Verifies package address

Verifies package radiation label is correct  not applicable Checks package for signs of damage

Verifies activity level of package  not applicable Opens outer package and checks for inner damage

Performs wipe-test on primary container

Verifies isotope and activity with shipping documents Logs the radioactive source into inventory

Describes response for outer package damage Describes response for outer box wetness or leaking Describes response for wipe test exceeding limits Describes response for incorrect transport label

___________________________________ _______________________ Radiation Safety Officer Date

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Section 6: Packaging

Packages must follow strict design requirements. Such requirements include: • Ease of transport

• Will not fail if dropped • Easily decontaminated • Prevents water retention

• Withstands vibrations of normal transport • Secured from unintentional opening

• Components physically and chemically compatible with the contents.

• Can withstand temperatures and pressures likely to be encountered during transport. Type A packages must also include:

• Tamper evident seal

• Temperature conditions including freezing

• Containment system to prevent unintentional release of components

• Meets various testing procedures for packages such as drop test, penetration, water immersion, compression, mechanical and temperature.

• the words “Type A Package” are included on the outside of the package

The design of all packages used for transport must be registered and approved by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission. The testing and approval process is the responsibility of the company that is making the packages for use by other departments. The package must be safe under normal conditions of transport and meet containment standards.

Departments must have a copy of the approval certificates to prove all testing is complete for the packaging material they use for shipments.

These certificates must be made available to the inspectors upon request. The certificates must list all components of the packaging

being used. PACKAGE TYPES a) Empty b) Excepted c) Type A d) Type B (U) e) Type B (M) f) Type C

g) Industrial Type 1 (Type IP-1) h) Industrial Type 2 (Type IP-2) i) Industrial Type 3 (Type IP-3)

Mixtures of Radionuclides (IAEA 407-419)

Type A Packages

SPECIAL FORM

(Sum of the activity of each nuclide ÷A1 value) < 1 NOT SPECIAL FORM

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Labeling and Preparing Material for Shipment

It is the shipper (consignor) responsibility to label all packages containing dangerous goods. The shipper is also responsible for providing the carrier with placards for their vehicle.

Category

Label Required on package • 2 on opposite sides

• not on sides the package rests on or will be stacked on.

• minimum 100mm per side

Radiation Level at surface use higher of surface or 1m to determine label Transport Index at 1 m from surface (µSv ÷10) or (mSv x 100) UN Identification

next to package label

ERG # on Package and Documents

Empty None background none UN 2908

Excepted

None outside Warning inside with word ‘radioactive’ visible when

package opened

<5 µSv/hr none UN 2910 ERG # 161

I White

also nuclide name/symbol or most restrictive of mixture

and activity <5 µSv/hr none UN 2915 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, TYPE A PACKAGE ERG # 163 II Yellow

also nuclide name/symbol or most restrictive of mixture, activity and transport index

5 µSv/hr to 500 µSv/hr <1 if <0.05 the value may be listed as 0 UN 2915 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, TYPE A PACKAGE ERG # 163 III Yellow

also nuclide name/symbol or most restrictive of mixture, activity and transport index

500 µSv/hr to 2 mSv/hr 1-10 UN 2915 RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, TYPE A PACKAGE ERG # 163

III Yellow 2-10 mSv/hr >10 SHIP AS EXCLUSIVE USE

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EMPTY PACKAGE

Sometimes packages that have been used to transport radioactive material are being sent back empty. If there is residual activity in the package that exceeds the exemption quantity but no more than 100 times the contamination limit of 4Bq/cm2 over 300cm2 then you can send it as a TDG empty package UN2908. There are no outside labels but you still need a shipping document. If less than an exemption quantity and below 4Bq/cm2 contamination then you can just send it as a regular package exempt from TDG reguilations.

SPECIAL LABELS

Packages may require additional labels if they belong to another dangerous goods category such as blood products (biohazard) or are liquids and require a specific package orientation.

VEHICLE PLACARDS

Vehicle placards must be displayed on a large means of containment, other than ship or aircraft, if the dangerous goods are Class 7 Category III Yellow label.

The carrier is responsible for placing the placards on the vehicle before loading the goods. Placards are to be displayed on all four sides of the transport vehicle. Minimum of 250mm on each side, no exceptions.

Vehicle placards are not required for empty or excepted packages

OR

I White or II Yellow category packages.

• Transport Canada TDG Clear Language Regulations Section 4.15

• CNSC Packaging and Transport Regulations Section 15.5 specifically deletes IAEA paragraph 570 thus we follow TDG Clear Language for this requirement.

SEGREGATION OF PACKAGES

• Radioactive material must be sufficiently segregated from general workers and members of the general public in order to keep the radiation exposure to 1 mSv/year.

• Radioactive material must also be segregated from undeveloped photographic film to ensure a film exposure of no more than 0.1 mSv/shipment.

• The limit of the total sum of the transport indexes is 50 for vehicles and passenger aircraft.

PACKAGE CONTAMINATION

Excepted Package Type A Package CNSC and IAEA Contamination Level (averaged over 300 cm2) 4 Bq/cm2 (β,γ) 0.4 Bq/cm2(α) 4 Bq/cm2(β,γ) 0.4 Bq/cm2(α) TCCL Safety Marks 4.7 + 4.15 (2) PTNSR 16 (4) IAEA Section V 508

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Section 7: Documentation

The shipper (consignor) is to prepare three copies of the shipping document (Shipper’s Declaration of Dangerous Goods). The shipper keeps one copy and gives two to the carrier. The carrier is responsible to retain one copy and give one to the receiver (consignor).

The carrier must ensure the shipping documents are located: • with the package and

• on the drivers door of the vehicle or ‘clearly visible’ on the seat of the vehicle.

Goods in storage are deemed to be in possession of the person in charge of the storage area and the shipping documents must remain with the package and given to the next person who takes possession.

REQUIRED INFORMATION ON A SHIPPING DOCUMENT

• Name and Address of the shipper (consignor) • Name and Address of the receiver (consignee)

• ID Number for the document as the shipper number (can be the date such as 20020623) • Date the document was prepared

• Type and Number of Placards (4 x Class7)

• Number of pages of the Shipping Document (page 1 of 1 etc) • Description of dangerous goods (in this order)

- Shipping name (as defined by upper case letters in Schedule 1) RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, EXCEPTED PACKAGE, EMPTY PACKAGING RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, EXCEPTED PACKAGE, LIMITED QUANTITY RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL, TYPE A PACKAGE

- Primary Class (Class 7) - UN Number

- Special Instructions or a statement that none are needed • Quantity and unit of measure of each item (in SI units)

NAME OR SYMBOL OF EACH NUCLIDE WITH THE MASS NUMBER DESCRIPTION OF PHYSICAL OR CHEMICAL FORM

ACTIVITY OF EACH NUCLIDE TOTAL ACTIVITY OF PACKAGE

TOTAL VOLUME OF LIQUID OR WEIGHT OF PACKAGE • Number and Name of Packages (ie. 1 Type A package) • Category of Package (1 White, II Yellow or III Yellow) • Transport Index TCCL Documentation 3.2 (6) + 3.11 IAEA 549 + TCCL 3.5

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• The words “24 hour number” includes area code and number where technical information can be obtained without breaking the connection of the caller. The number is in use when the dangerous goods are in transport. CANUTEC can be used but you must first have permission in writing. • Emergency Response Guide Number

• Declaration: I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment are fully and accurately

described above by the proper shipping name and are classified, packed, marked and labelled, and are in all respects in proper condition for transport according to applicable international and national governmental regulations.

• Signature of Shipper

Shipping and receiving documents records must be kept for two years following the date on which the packaging occurred.

TCCL Documentation

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SAMPLE SHIPPERS DECLARATION

Document Number: YYYY-001 Page ________ of _________

Description: RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL - TYPE A PACKAGE

Class 7 UN 2915 No Special Instructions

Category: Transport Index ________ (II Yellow or III Yellow only)

Placards: Total Number of Packages: _________

Contents:

Product Name Activity Volume (SI Units) ____________________________ __________ __________ ____________________________ __________ __________ ____________________________ __________ __________ ____________________________ __________ __________ Total: __________ __________

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY 24 hour number: ____________________

Emergency Response Guide Number: 163

Declaration: I hereby declare that the contents of this consignment are fully and accurately described above by the proper shipping name and are classified, packed, marked and labelled, and are in all respects in proper condition for transport according to applicable international and national governmental regulations. “Classification is in accordance

with the International Civil Aviation Authority Technical Instructions”. Shipper Signature: Date: To: (Consignee) Name: ______________________________ Address: ____________________________ ____________________________________ From: (Shipper) Name: ______________________________ Address: ____________________________ ____________________________________

None Required 4 x Class 7 I White II Yellow III Yellow

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Section 8: Emergencies

An Emergency Response Assistance Plan (ERAP) must be prepared and submitted for approval only if the dangerous goods have an index number listed in Schedule 1. A plan is not required for radioactive material shipped as Excepted (UN 2910) or Type A (UN 2915) Packages.

In the event of an accidental release of dangerous goods, it is the person who has possession who must make the immediate report. The level of radioactive material that requires immediate reporting is an emission level, for non-exclusive packages, greater than the III Yellow limits or any quantity that could pose a danger to public safety

Any accidental releases inside the hospital buildings are dealt with under existing radiation safety policies and are not part of the transport reporting requirements.

Reporting

Preliminary dangerous occurrence reporting to the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission shall be made immediately for accidents, tampering, leakage, damaged, lost or stolen radioactive material. These provisions should be noted on the receiving record and are part of the receiving process. A full report must be made within 21 days of the dangerous occurrence.

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Section 9: Definitions

Most definitions are available in the IAEA Safety Standard Series TS-R-1 (ST-1 rev) 201-248

Activity Limits: The limits as specified in the IAEA Regulations for the Safe Transport of

Radioactive Material used to determine the package limits for radioactive shipments.

Carrier: Any person or organization engaged in the transport of goods, whether or not for hire or

reward.

Consignee: the person or organization that receives the consignment (shipment or package) for

which it was intended.

Consignment: The package or quantity of goods presented for transport.

Consignor: the person or organization that prepares the consignment (shipment or package) for

transport.

Contamination: The presence of radioactive substance on a surface in excess of the guidelines.

(4 Bq/cm2 for beta and gamma emitters and low toxicity alpha emitters, or 0.4 Bq/cm2 for all other alpha emitters)

Diagnostic Specimen: Any human or animal material (tissue, excreta, blood etc.) transported for

the purpose of diagnosis.

Inner Package: A package for which an outer package is required for transport such as a box

containing a lead pot secured with foam packing.

Inner receptacle: A container requiring additional inner or outer protection in order to perform

its containment function such as a vial requiring lead pot and packing to contain the liquid contents.

Package: The components including the radioactive contents as presented for transport. The

types of packages are defined in the regulations and subject to activity limits.

Radioactive Material: Any material containing radionuclides where the activity of the material

or consignment exceeds the published limits set in the regulations.

Transport Index: The number assigned to the package which is used to provide control over

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Section 10: References

• Packaging and Transport of Nuclear Substances Regulations, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, February 2004

• Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, IAEA Safety Series No.TS-R-1 (ST-1, revised) of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 1996 Edition (Revised 2000) ISBN 92-0-100500-8

• Transportation of Dangerous Goods Regulations (Clear Language Version) Amendment 3, SOR 2003-400, December 17, 2003.

• Emergency Response Guidebook 2000, ICC Compliance Centre

• Identifying and Opening Radioactive Packages, INFO-0426 revision 1, Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission

• Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, IAEA Safety Standard Series No.TS-R-1 of the International Atomic Energy Agency, 2009 Edition

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Section 11: Other

Consult Transport Canada Transportation of Dangerous Goods Clear Language Regulations for information on shipments of dangerous goods that are not exclusively radioactive material.

Infectious Substances Class 6.2

• Need special packaging ordered for TC 125 1A package. • Requires UN # followed by RG # (Risk Group)

• Items from Risk Group 2 requiring TC 125 1A package (all others can go in TC 125 1B) - Corynebacterium diphtheriae

- Francisella tularenis, Type B (biovar palaearctica) - Rickettsia ruminatum

- Salmonella enterica, serovar thyphi or Salmonella thyphi - Vibrio cholerae (including EI Tor)

- Echinococcus (gravid segments) - Hepatitis B virus

- Lentivirinae: all isolates including HIV-I and HIV-II only as non-cultured specimens. - Genus Vesiculovirus: all isolates

• Blood Products that are Radioactive not in above list can go as TC 125 1B package with waterproof primary and secondary container, cushioning between multiple primaries and absorbent material between primary and secondary.

• Treated as primary class along with Class 7 so you need infectious product label along side radioactive label.

INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCE, AFFECTING HUMANS Class 6.2 UN2814 Risk Group 2 or 3 ERG# 158

Air Transport of Radioactive Material

Consult International Air Transport (IATA) Regulations Section 10 for information on shipments of radioactive material by air.

Many of the regulations regarding the use of air for transport of radioactive material are the same as the ground regulations. Each airline may have additional requirements.

The shipper’s declaration is the only major change to the preparation. The following are general differences in the information required on the shipper’s declaration.

• The shipper’s declaration must include red-cross hatched markings on the sides.

• All information must be typed with the only exception being the signature of the shipper. • Transport details must indicate ‘passenger and cargo aircraft’ or ‘cargo aircraft only’ with

the incorrect one crossed out.

• The airport of departure must be listed. • The airport of destination must be listed.

• The addition of “I declare that all of the applicable air transport requirements have been met” is added to the regular ground declaration.

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Excepted Package Check List

 Meets Limited Activity Cut-off Levels for Excepted or Empty Category  External Surface <5µSv/hr

 Wipe Test < 4 Bq/cm2 (β γ)

 Design requirements for package met

 The word ‘Radioactive’ visible to person opening package

Shipping Document contains:

 Name and Address of the consignor (shipper) (TDG)  Name and Address of the consignee (recipient)  ID Number for the document (traceable)  Number of pages (page 1 of 1) (TDG)  Date the document was prepared (TDG)

 Total Number of Packages under the Shipping Document (TDG) Description of dangerous goods (in this order)

 Shipping name (IAEA, TDG)

‘Radioactive Material, Excepted Package - Limited Quantity’ ‘Radioactive Material, Excepted Package - Empty Packaging’  Primary Class (IAEA, TDG)

 UN Number (IAEA, TDG)

 Symbol and chemical or physical description (Ga-67 citrate liquid) (IAEA)  Quantity and unit of measure of each item (in SI units) (IAEA, TDG)

 Any special instructions or statement that no such instructions are necessary (IAEA)  The words “24 hour number” (IAEA, TDG)

 Emergency Response Guide Number (IAEA)  Declaration (IAEA, TDG)

 Tamper proof indicator or tape  Signature of Shipper (IAEA)

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Type A Package Check List

 Meets Limited Activity Levels

 External Surface dose rate meets category limit (I White, II Yellow, III Yellow)  Wipe Test < 4 Bq/cm2 (β γ)

 Design requirements for package met  Shipping Documents contain wording

‘Radioactive Material, Type A Package’

Shipping Document contains:

 Name and Address of the consignor (shipper) (TDG)  Name and Address of the consignee (recipient)  ID Number for the document (traceable)  Number of pages (page 1 of 1) (TDG)  Date the document was prepared (TDG)

Description of dangerous goods (in this order)  Shipping name (IAEA, TDG)

“Radioactive Material, Type A Package”  Primary Class (IAEA, TDG)

 UN Number (IAEA, TDG)

 Symbol and chemical or physical description (Ga-67 citrate liquid) (IAEA)  Quantity and unit of measure of each item (in SI units) (IAEA, TDG)  Number of packages and type (1 Type A package) (TDG)

 Category of Package (I White, II Yellow, III Yellow) (TDG)  Transport Index for II Yellow and III Yellow (IAEA)

 Any special instructions or statement that no such instructions are necessary (IAEA)  The words “24 hour number” and a contact number (IAEA, TDG)

 Emergency Response Guide Number (IAEA)  Declaration (IAEA, TDG)

 Tamper proof indicator or tape  Signature of Shipper (IAEA)

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Figure

Updating...

References