Sustainable Geothermal Power

105  Download (0)

Full text

(1)

Sustainable

Geothermal

Power

A preliminary study on the sustainable use

of a geothermal power plant

(2)

Title:  SUSTAINABLE GEOTHERMAL POWER;   A preliminary study on the sustainable use of a geothermal power plant in the built environment      Author:  ing. R. van Pruissen (#0611059)  rvanpruissen@gmail.com      Education:    Eindhoven University of Technology        Department of the Built Environment  Unit Building Physics and Systems  Master Building Services      Graduation:     prof.dr.ir. J.L.M. Hensen  committee    Department of Built Environment  Building Physics and Systems  ir. P. Hoes  Department of Built Environment  Building Physics and Systems  dr.ir. M.F.M. Speetjens  Department of Mechanical Engineering  Energy Technology      Date:      12 May 2014       

(3)
(4)

A

CKNOWLEDGEMENTS

This report is the result of the final project of my master study Building Services at Eindhoven  University of Technology. In the relatively uncommon subject of geothermal energy, I found an  interesting research topic involving both mechanical engineering (my bachelor study) and  Building Services. During this research, I did not only learn a lot about geothermal energy in the  built environment, but I also learnt a lot about myself and the people surrounding me. 

I would like to express my gratitude to the many people who have assisted me along the way in  any way. The following people I wish to thank explicitly. I would like to thank prof.dr.ir. Jan  Hensen for his pragmatic advice and for accepting me in his professional and enthusiastic  research group at a time when I needed it the most. Also, I would like to thank dr.ir. Michel  Speetjens for his perseverance in providing me with valuable advice, especially on the topics of  geothermal energy and system modelling. Many thanks to ir. Pieter‐Jan Hoes, with whom I  determined the general research approach and who provided me with daily guidance in  meetings that were both helpful and enjoyable. I would also like to thank dr.ir. Rinus van Houten  and ir. Gert Boxem, who are not members of the final committee, but provided me with  guidance and advice in the first part of this research. 

Last but not least, I would like to thank my friends and family for providing me with a comforting  environment and the necessary distractions, without which I would not have been able to get  over this final hurdle. Especially Martine, who had to sit through a lot of complaining whenever  the going got tough, patiently waited during the many study weekends and assisted me  wherever she could. 

Rick van Pruissen  May, 2014 

(5)

 

(6)

S

UMMARY

Although geothermal energy is considered a promising sustainable energy source, little is known  about the sustainable use of a geothermal power plant in the built environment. Results from  the research described herein, show that geothermal power could provide a considerable  contribution to the sustainable energy supply of a built environment like the TU/e Science Park.  A literature study into the concept of geothermal energy in general, and more specifically the  use of geothermal energy in the built environment was performed. This literature study showed  that geothermal energy is a promising sustainable energy source with a vast potential. Using the  concept  of  enhanced  geothermal  systems  (EGS),  the  number  of  possible  locations  for  geothermal energy in the Netherlands can be greatly increased. Globally, the main applications  of geothermal energy in the built environment are space heating, space cooling and electricity  generation.  

A computer model of an EGS system was used to assess the performance of geothermal energy  in the built environment for an operational period of 40 years. With this model, 18 scenarios  were compared, based on 3 energy demand projections and 6 energy supply variants for the  Eindhoven University of Technology campus (TU/e Science Park). 

The results of this performance assessment show that it is feasible to use an enhanced  geothermal system to sustainably meet a considerable part of the energy demand of a built  environment like the TU/e Science Park. The geothermal source could provide a valuable  contribution to the total sustainable energy supply of an environment like the TU/e Science  Park, especially in the first 20‐30 years of operation. The highest electricity production can be  achieved when the geothermal source is used for electricity only. If a reduction in CO2 emission 

between 30 and 40 % is required, a geothermal power plant is the best option. For a reduction  between 55 and 70 %, both geothermal electricity combined with geothermal heating, and  geothermal electricity with other renewables would be a good choice. The latter provides the  option of increasing the CO2 emission reduction to approximately 87 % when geothermal 

heating is added. However, for a fully sustainable energy supply to the TU/e Science Park in  terms of energy use and CO2 emission, the energy demand should be reduced considerably and 

a combination of several sustainable sources would be required. The generic model created in  this research provides a tool to investigate the sustainable performance of geothermal energy  for other combinations of energy supply and demand.             

(7)

 

   

(8)

T

ABLE OF CONTENTS

Acknowledgements ... i  Summary ... iii  List of symbols and abbreviations ... vii    1  Introduc on ... 1  1.1  Geothermal energy ... 1  1.2  Research aim and questions ... 1  1.3  Research methodology ... 2  1.4  Outline ... 2    2  Geothermal energy and  the built environment ... 3  2.1  Geothermal energy ... 3  2.2  Applications in the built environment ... 10  2.3  Concluding remarks ... 20    3  Enhanced Geothermal System model ... 23  3.1  Description of the used EGS model ... 23  3.2  Performance indicators ... 32  3.3  Model verification ... 37    4  Use case: TU/e Science Park ... 39  4.1  The campus ... 39  4.2  Current energy balance ... 39  4.3  Future and trends ... 43  4.4  Energy scenarios ... 47  4.5  Concluding remarks ... 51    5  Use case performance ... 53  5.1  Geothermal system ... 53  5.2  The built environment ... 60    6  Conclusions and future work ... 69  6.1  Conclusions ... 69  6.2  Future work ... 71    Bibliography ... 73  Appendices ... 77   

(9)

 

(10)

L

IST OF SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS

Symbol  Unit  Description 

C  [J/K]  Total heat capacity cp  [J/kg.K] Specific heat capacity

D  [m]  Reservoir centre diameter dm  [m]  Well diameter used in the model d  [m]  Actual well diameter

ε  [m]  Well roughness

ηcarnot   [‐]  Carnot efficiency

fd  [‐]  Darcy friction factor

frec  [‐]  Geothermal reservoir recovery factor g  [m/s²]  Gravitational constant

H  [J] Enthalpy 

h  [m]  Well depth

Iwell  [MPa.s/l]  Well impedance per well

κ  D  Permeability

λ  [W/m.K] Thermal conductivity L  [m]  Total model length Lres  [m]  Reservoir length

μ  [Pa.s]  Dynamic viscosity n  [‐]  Number of wells

ΔP [Pa]  Pressure difference  

Pel  [kWe]  Electric power  Pelev  [Pa]  Well elevation head Pth  [kWth]  Thermal power 

Re  [‐]  Reynolds number

ρ  [kg/m³] Density 

τ  [yr]  Characteristic time constant

Θ  [‐]  Volume fraction T  [°C]  Temperature

Tlow   [K]   Lowest temperature in the system

Thigh   [K]   Highest temperature in the system

Tsink   [K]   Temperature of the heat sink

t  [s]  Time 

t*  [yr]  Reservoir break‐through time u  [m3/s∙m2]  Fluid (darcy) velocity field

U  [J]

 

Internal energy of a system

V

gf  [m³/s]  Geofluid volume flow 

Vr  [m³]  Reservoir volume

W  [m]  Total model width V  [km³]  Reservoir volume

ε  [m]  Well roughness

Tinit  [°C]  Initial reservoir temperature

Te  [°C]  Average temperature of the environment

 

Abbreviation  Description  Abbreviation Description

avg  Average inj Injection

dem  Demand prim Primary energy 

el  Electric / Electricity  prod Production

eq  Equivalent  r Reservoir

Granite ret Return

gf  Geofluid ts Thermosyphon 

ht  Heat / Heating  wh Wellhead

(11)

 

(12)

1 I

NTRODUCTION

Possibly the most important question of the 21st century is how to meet our energy demand.  With rapidly developing countries like  China  and  India, the  amount  of energy needed  worldwide will keep on rising in the coming decades while fossil fuels, which constitute a  major part of the global energy supply, are running out [1]. Additionally, the use of these fossil  fuels has a large environmental impact because of harmful emissions and inherent risks. In 

appendix I the problems associated with conventional energy sources are described in more 

detail. To meet our energy demand in the future and sustain our way of living, other energy 

sources are needed [2]. 

1.1 Geothermal

energy

Geothermal energy is a promising sustainable energy source [3, 4]. Geothermal energy literally  means: the heat contained within the earth. The term ‘geothermal energy’ however, more  commonly refers to the part of this thermal energy that could be recovered and exploited by  man [5]. Apart from its vast energy potential, other advantages of geothermal energy include:  continuous availability (high capacity factor), base load capability without storage/buffer, small  footprint and low emissions [3]. This combination of characteristics makes it an interesting  addition to the energy mix.  

Recent technological developments in geothermal systems have made it possible to enhance  existing rock volumes at depth, enabling the creation of reservoirs and drastically increasing the  amount of possible locations for geothermal systems [3]. These so‐called enhanced geothermal  systems (EGS) are still in the research phase, although the first commercial EGS plant went into  operation in 2007 in Landau, Germany [6]. Main research topics of EGS are raising the flow rate  while  maintaining  sufficient  heat  exchange  surface  area,  and  long‐term  operability  and  sustainability [3]. 

1.2 Research

aim and questions

This research is a preliminary study into the operational feasibility of geothermal energy in the  Netherlands.  More  specifically,  the  relation  between  the  sustainability  of  an  enhanced  geothermal source and its implementation in the built environment is investigated. The aim of  the research presented in this report is to answer the following question:   What is the sustainable performance of an enhanced geothermal system that is used to  meet the energy demand of a built environment like the TU/e Science Park?  To answer the main research question, the following sub questions are formulated:  1. How is geothermal energy currently used in the built environment? 

a) What are the main principles and characteristics of geothermal energy?   b) What is the energy potential of geothermal energy? 

(13)

1.3 Research methodology 

2. How should an enhanced geothermal system be modelled to assess its long‐term 

performance? 

a) What are common modelling approaches and how do they compare? 

b) What are the important modelling parameters of a geothermal source? 

 

3. What is the performance of a geothermal system meeting the energy demand of TU/e 

Science Park?  

a) What is the energy demand of the TU/e Science Park? 

b) How can this demand be met with geothermal energy? 

c) What are relevant performance indicators of a geothermal system? 

1.3 Research

methodology

A literature study is performed on the topics of geothermal energy and energy in the built 

environment. The first part of the study focusses on the main principles of geothermal energy,   its characterising properties and its sustainability. The study on geothermal energy in the built  environment is performed to identify and characterise the possible applications of geothermal  energy in the built environment.  

As the sustainability of a geothermal source depends on a large number of variables, often  interdependent and transient, an analytical approach is impossible. A generic computer model is  developed which calculates the performance of a geothermal system based on a set of  parameters defining  the geothermal source and its energy load.  A two‐dimensional (2D)  transient  model  of  a  geothermal  source  is  developed  in  COMSOL  Multiphysics,  which  approximates the long‐term behaviour of a geothermal source for a given energy demand  profile. The model is based on the enhanced geothermal source on research site Bad Urach,  Germany. The generic nature of this model allows for easy application to other parameter sets.  With the simulation results, the energy output is calculated and the system performance is  expressed in several performance indicators, to make comparison possible. 

The TU/e Science Park (the Eindhoven University of Technology campus) serves as a use case for  a built environment. The energy demand of this campus is characterised based on available  measuring data. The general properties of the campus and its energy use are investigated to  allow for future comparison with other environments. 

1.4 Outline

This report is organised as follows. In Chapter 2, a literature study on the topics of geothermal  energy and energy in the built environment is presented. A theoretical model is then created in  Chapter 3. In Chapter 4, the TU/e Science Park is defined as a use case.  The performance of the  use case is assessed in Chapter 5, where the results of the simulations are presented. Finally, in  Chapter 6 the results are discussed and conclusions are drawn to answer the research questions.

(14)

2 G

EOTHERMAL ENERGY AND

THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Assessing an energy source and its sustainability requires a good understanding of the general  principles of the source, the load and the conversion. For this reason, the subjects of 

geothermal energy (§2.1) and energy demand in the built environment (§2.2) are investigated.  The results of this investigation are used for further research in Chapter 3. 

2.1 Geothermal

energy

Geothermal energy has been used for a long time; usage for bathing, washing and cooking dates  back to prehistory [7]. Since the first use of geothermal energy, the techniques have evolved  from the simple usage of heat from geysers, to completely man‐made systems at depths of  several kilometres producing electricity and heat for large industries and urban areas [5]. For  decades, geothermal energy has played a major role in the energy supply in several countries  around the world. Typically, current applications of geothermal energy occur in geographically  favourable locations, i.e. places with a high geothermal temperature gradient and naturally  occurring underground reservoirs.  

To get familiarised with the subject and determine the characteristics and parameters of a  geothermal source, the subject is investigated in this paragraph. The main topics are the basic  principles of a geothermal plant (§2.1.1) and the potential of geothermal energy (§2.1.2). For a  better understanding of the origins of geothermal energy and its vast potential, an introduction  to the earth’s composition and plate tectonics can be found in appendix II.  2.1.1 Basic principles A geothermal system is used to extract the heat from the earth and consists of wells, pumps, a  geothermal reservoir and a heat exchanger. The basic principle of such a system is as follows:  the geofluid (water/steam) is pumped from one or more wells, energy is transferred to a  secondary distribution fluid in a heat exchanger and the cooled geofluid is re‐injected into the  ground in another well. This principle is illustrated in Figure 1. In some situations, the geofluid is  used directly, without a secondary distribution system.   

In an ideal system, all water re‐injected into the ground travels through a permeable layer to the  production well(s), creating a closed loop. In reality, some of this water might be lost. This  should be avoided to minimise operational cost and environmental burden. Research on the  Soultz‐sous‐Forêts (France) test site has shown that geothermal systems without fluid loss are  possible. The part of the permeable layer used to exchange heat is called the geothermal  reservoir. The injected water is cooler than this layer and is heated along the way as it passes  through the reservoir. 

Thereservoir

A good geothermal reservoir has a sufficiently high output temperature and permeability, and is  able to sustain these properties for decades. These properties determine the technical potential 

(15)

2.1 Geothermal energy 

of a geothermal system and with that its possible applications (see §2.2). Both location and  depth of the boreholes have a large influence on these properties.  

 

Figure 1: The basic principle of a geothermal system with typical dimensions. The geofluid is  

pumped up from the left well, travels through a heat exchanger where it heats the secondary fluid  

and is re‐injected in the right well [based on: http://www.aardwarmtedenhaag.nl/]. 

The temperature of the earth rises with increasing depth and the rate at which it does, the  geothermal gradient, depends on the location. Down to accessible depths (<10 km), this  geothermal gradient is 25‐30 °C/km on average. Also varying with depth and location is the  composition of underground materials and with it its porosity and permeability. Porosity is the  fraction between the empty volume (the pores) and the material volume. The extent to which  these pores are interconnected is called permeability (κ). Related to the permeability is the  hydraulic conductivity, which also takes into account the dynamic viscosity of the geofluid. The  SI‐unit for permeability is m². A more common unit for permeability in aquifer or ground water  flow is darcy (D), which is approximately 10‐12 m². In Table 1, the hydraulic conductivity and  permeability of several common crust materials are shown. 

Table 1: Hydraulic conductivity and permeability of common materials found in the earth's crust [8] 

 

For the geofluid to be able to flow from the injection well to the production well, the reservoir  must be permeable. A high permeability (see Table 1) will require less pump energy for the same 

(16)

energy) of a geothermal system, a high permeability is required. A high permeability however  does not necessarily result in a good reservoir e.g. a large opening or crack in the reservoir  material can cause ‘short‐circuiting’ of the wells, limiting the source capacity. [3] The properties  of a geothermal reservoir change over time. Several processes contribute to this among which:  thermal contraction by cooling, thermal fracturing and deposition of minerals (scaling) [9]. A  typical flow for an engineered system is 50‐100 l/s per well [3, 10]. The hydraulic performance of  a geothermal well is often expressed as its productivity index, the flow rate per unit pressure  drop, or its inverse, well impedance. For a certain reservoir, the well impedance is inversely  proportional to the reservoir permeability, i.e. the higher the permeability the lower the  impedance and vice versa. Typical well impedances for an EGS source (see next paragraph) lie in  the range 0.15‐0.25 MPa.s/l [3]. These figures are expected to decrease as the technology  matures. 

Reservoirtypes

Four  types  of  geothermal  energy  are  usually  distinguished:  hydrothermal,  geo‐pressed,  magmatic and enhanced. The hydrothermal type of reservoir is currently the only one that is  used commercially. This type of reservoir is a permeable sedimentary layer between two  impermeable  layers  in  the  crust  containing  (hot)  water.  Figure  2  shows  a  graphical  representation of hydrothermal reservoir and its surroundings. In this figure, there is only one  well, because the water in the reservoir gets naturally recharged. A reinjection well is often used  to minimise the risk on seismic events and because natural recharge is generally a slow process  and  impedes  commercial  production  rates. Also,  to  minimise the environmental  impact,  legislation often requires reinjection for mass balance. 

 

Figure 2: A graphical representation of an ideal geothermal system  

[http://www.geothermal‐energy.org/]. 

Besides the common hydrothermal reservoirs, other types of reservoirs can be used or created.  A geo‐pressed reservoir is a hot‐water aquifer like a hydrothermal reservoir but under high  pressure, often containing dissolved methane. The use of this type of reservoir is often  problematic due to the dissolved methane and contaminants in the heat exchanger impeding  functioning. Another type is the magmatic reservoir. Geothermal energy from magma uses the  hot molten rock at 700‐1200 °C to heat the water. This type of resource is in a very early stage of  development and only applicable in regions with a high geothermal gradient, e.g., in Iceland [5].  

(17)

2.1 Geothermal energy 

The fourth and most promising type of reservoir is Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) [3]. EGS  is a concept in which a geothermal reservoir is created in volumes of rock with insufficient  porosity and/or permeability. Figure 4 shows a schematic representation of a typical EGS  system.   Ideally, a closed loop is created between the production and reinjection well with a  large heat‐exchanging surface and a high permeability. This is achieved by fracturing deep rock  formations. Stimulated volumes of up to 3 km³ can be created [3]. The geometry of the created  reservoir depends on the initial stress field in the rock and the applied stimulation.  The concept  of EGS was first demonstrated in the 1970’s at a research site in Fenton Hill, New Mexico. An on‐ going  European  research  project  was  started  in  1987  in  Soultz (France) to  explore the  possibilities of EGS for electricity generation and heating. Many similar research projects are  currently being conducted around the world [3]. The main technology‐related topic of research  is limiting the short circuiting between the reinjection and production well as this causes an  output temperature/capacity drop for the system. Another (related) main topic is the long‐term  operability and sustainability of an EGS‐source. [3] In the research projects mentioned above,  techniques are tested to limit or even avoid these problems. Other research topics include: site  surveying, better understanding of the role of major pre‐existing faults in well flow, measuring  down‐hole parameters and the prediction of scaling or deposition [3, 11]. 

Location

Finding a suitable location for geothermal energy can be as simple as looking for the presence of  a geyser, a boiling mud pot or a steaming pool. This is how a location was determined for the  early projects (the Geysers in California or Larderello in Italy). Because these natural surface  manifestations of geothermal energy are not very common on a global scale, techniques have  been developed to determine possible geothermal locations. In the Netherlands, a lot of  information  of  the  underground  is  freely  available.  This  includes  datasets  with  soil  characteristics, drill records, surface features and drill cores from earlier drilling, for example  from the exploration of oilfields. In Figure 3 an example is given for the available information in  the Netherlands; a map of the geothermal potential for space heating and a map of the  temperature at 5000 m depth. Please note that these maps do not directly translate to the  applicability of geothermal energy. 

a)      b)   

(18)

           

Figure 4: A schematic representation of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) with 

typical values indicated for the Netherlands [13]. 

(19)

2.1 Geothermal energy 

In general, a first estimation of the applicability of geothermal energy is made by analysing  available geological data [14]. After choosing a suitable location, based on the available geologic  information, the location will be investigated more thoroughly. These investigations provide a  general sense of the site potential although the final temperature, mass flow and sustainability  of the well are not known until the actual well has been drilled and tested. 

2.1.2 Sustainable energy potential

Resourcebase

The global geothermal energy resource base consists of energy from the formation of the earth  (accretion energy), radioactive decay in the crust (mainly continental) and absorption of solar  energy [14]. Energy flows constantly from the earth to the atmosphere. With an average of  65 mW/m² the global terrestrial heat flow is estimated to be 4.4*1013 W [15]. The total heat  content of the earth’s crust is estimated to be 5.4*109 EJ [5]. This illustrates the vast amount of  geothermal energy that is present. Of course, due to technical and economic reasons not all this  energy can be harvested. It was estimated in the year 2000 that the potential that would  become technically possible to acquire in the next 40‐50 years is approximately 5,000 EJ/yr,  about 10 times the current annual demand [3]. 

The utilisation of geothermal energy often benefits from the geographically varying geothermal  gradients, i.e. places exist where higher temperatures exist closer to the surface than in other  places. These so‐called hot spots exist due to several geologic processes. For example, near  tectonic plate boundaries relatively hot material emerges from the deeper parts of the earth  (mantle), and locally increases the temperature of the crust (see Appendix I). In addition, the  build‐up of the lithosphere (thin spots in the crust for example), the geothermal gradient varies.  An example of a high gradient area is Iceland with gradients varying from 50 to 150 °C/km [12]. 

Heatbalance

The heat balance of a system in general, is dictated by the first law of thermodynamics. If  mechanical work and reservoir regeneration are ignored, the first law is as follows: 

 

dU

H

in

( )

t

H

out

( )

t

V

gf

gf

c

p gf,

T

prod

( )

t

T

inj

(t)

V

r

r

c

p r,

dT

r avg,

( )

t

dt

dt

  (1)  

 

With: 

U    Internal energy of a system      [J] 

H    Enthalpy      [J] 

V

gf    Geofluid volume flow       [m³/s] 

ρgf    Density of the produced geofluid    [kg/m³] 

cp,gf    Specific heat capacity of the geofluid    [J/kg.K] 

Tprod    Temperature of the produced geofluid    [°C] 

Tinj    Temperature of the injected geofluid    [°C] 

Vr    Reservoir volume        [m³] 

ρr    Density of the reservoir      [kg/m³] 

cp,r    Heat capacity of the reservoir      [J/kg.K] 

Tr,avg    Average reservoir temperature       [K]

 

For a geothermal reservoir, the internal energy is contained in the rock/sediment and fluid. The  heat fluxes over the boundary of geothermal reservoirs are: the production and resupply of the 

(20)

In EGS reservoirs, advection of geothermal brine from and to the environment is often very low  or even non‐existent. In the reservoir itself, heat transport occurs by convection in the geofluid  and conduction in the (porous) reservoir material. Figure 5 illustrates the heat flows in a typical  hydrothermal system and in an EGS system. The lack of advection from its surroundings makes  the EGS reservoirs dependent on conduction for energy supply to the reservoir (regeneration).  Due to the low thermal diffusivity of surrounding rock materials, this conduction is a process  with a large time constant [12].  

    

Figure 5: An illustration of the heat flows in a typical hydrothermal system (left) and in an EGS (right). Note the 

lack of advection in the EGS reservoir. Both shapes are arbitrarily chosen and differ to indicate their variety.  

Sustainabilityandoperation

With respect to environmental impact, the terms ‘sustainable’ (determined by the way a  resource  is  used)  and  ‘renewable’  (the  nature  of  a  resource)  are  often  confused.  The  sustainability of a geothermal system depends on the initial heat and fluid in place and the rate  of their usage and regeneration [5, 11], i.e. the net amount of heat and fluid extraction should  be lower than or equal to the influx from the material surrounding for truly sustainable  production  [9]. In  practice,  for  economic  and  technical  reasons, energy  extraction  from  sedimentary reservoirs often exceeds resupply considerably. This is commonly called ‘excessive  production’ and will eventually lead to reservoir depletion [11]. Geothermal energy from  hydrothermal sources is generally classified as a renewable source; the energy removed from  the source is continuously replaced on time scales similar to those required for energy removal  of typical societal systems [11]. 

In a more general sense, the term ‘sustainable’ refers to a commonly used definition by the  Brundtland commission: “...meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability  of  future  generations  to  meet  their  own  needs”  [16].  In  this  context,  for  sustainable  development the use of a specific geothermal source does not have to be fully sustainable, as  long as a suitable replacement can be found after depletion [17]. In addition, when geothermal  energy is considered on a larger scale, a certain overall production level could be sustained by  creating new systems when others are depleted.  

When  using  energy  from  a geothermal  reservoir, the temperature of  this  reservoir  will  inherently drop. This process causes the sustainability of geothermal energy to be subject of  debate. When the reservoir cools down during production, the sustainability of a geothermal  source could be limited. It is also possible that a new equilibrium is reached at a lower  temperature, i.e. the lower temperature and pressure cause a higher influx of energy, possibly in 

(21)

2.2 Applications in the built environment 

balance with the heat extraction rate [11]. A reservoir is considered depleted when the  production temperature or flow becomes insufficient to supply the required amount of energy.  At this point, the reservoir might still contain a considerable amount of energy. The recovery  factor of the reservoir is often used to describe the efficiency at which the energy content of the  reservoir was used during its lifetime and is defined as the extracted energy divided by the total  energy content. For EGS reservoirs, with a volume greater than 0.1 km³, recovery factors  typically lie in the range of 0.4‐0.5, after a lifetime of 30 years [18]. A study by Sanyal and Butler  suggests that the net generation profile, i.e. the development of the net electricity output, is a  more appropriate criterion [18]. Another performance indicator of a geothermal power plant, is  the pump load factor, i.e. the fraction of the gross electricity produced that is used for the  pumps.  

When a reservoir is depleted, the exploitation is stopped and the reservoir temperature, fluid  and pressure, will eventually regenerate itself. Reservoir regeneration is an asymptotic process  that happens on various time scales, depending on the reservoir type, size, production system,  the extraction rate and properties of the reservoir [11]. 

In the case of an EGS reservoir (and confined hydrothermal reservoirs), regeneration happens  through  conduction  only,  making  excessive  production  almost  inevitable  for  economical  production [19]. This type of reservoir relies primarily on the heat initially stored in the reservoir  and surrounding material (heat content). It should therefore strictly be considered as a finite  energy source [19]. It has been shown for EGS sources that a lower production rate does not  necessarily mean that the total gains of the source will decrease in the same period. In a study  performed by Sanyal and Butler in 2005, the total net (pump energy subtracted) electricity  generation of an EGS power plant with 5 production wells was simulated for a high (500 kg/s)  and low (126 kg/s) flow rate over a period of 30 years. Both cases yielded a similar amount of  electricity, respectively 245 and 250 MWeyears. However, the source with the low flow rate is 

still usable after 30 years production, while the high flow source stopped producing after 20  years because of an insufficient production temperature, making the low flow‐rate case more  sustainable [18]. Two effects contribute to a higher overall performance of the geothermal  system with a lower flow rate: when the flow rate is lowered, the pump energy will also be  reduced exponentially, [20] and the production temperature will decline at a lower rate, causing  the conversion efficiency (see §2.2.2) to remain higher [11]. These observations demonstrate  the  importance  of  a  good  operational  strategy  for  the  sustainable  exploitation  of  any  geothermal source and EGS in particular. 

2.2 Applications in the built environment

With a total of 10 installed geothermal systems, geothermal energy in general, is a relatively  unknown energy source in the Netherlands [21].  The main application for geothermal energy in  the Netherlands is green houses. The current application of geothermal energy in the built  environment in the Netherlands is limited to one district heating project in the city of The  Hague.   

(22)

applications for geothermal energy in the built environment are: space heating (direct use) and  electricity generation. Another potentially interesting application is space cooling. For all these  applications the conversion, distribution and usage as well as the possibility of combining these  applications, will be discussed in the following paragraphs. 

2.2.1 Space heating (direct use)

The term ‘direct use’ refers to the usage of geothermal energy without energy conversions. One  of the most obvious and common direct uses of geothermal resources in the built environment  is space heating, which is logical because no conversions (with inherent losses) are needed. This  makes the system principle uncomplicated: the hot geofluid runs through a heat exchanger and  part of the geothermal energy is transferred to the relatively cold transport medium of a district  heating system (typically water).   

Figure 6: Direct usage with the use of a heat exchanger ‐ the relatively hot geofluid (Th,in)  runs through  

the heat exchanger and part of the geothermal energy (Q) is transferred from the hot geofluid  

to the relatively cold fluid (Tc,in) in for instance the district heating system [10]. 

Geothermal heat is one of the most attractive renewables with respect to environmental burden  and base load capability [10]. The first municipal district heating system using geothermal  energy was set up in Reykjavik, Iceland in 1930. Today, about 90 % of the heating demand of  Iceland is  covered by  geothermal  energy [22].  Large‐scale district heating systems using  geothermal energy have been built in many countries [23]. Refer to Appendix III for further  statistics. 

Distribution

The distribution of district heat is typically realised with a closed loop network with water  transporting the energy to the end‐users. As transportation of energy causes losses, the place  with energy demand should be close to the geothermal energy plant to acquire the highest  possible system efficiency. In other words, the thermal load density should be as high as  possible close to the source. This is particularly the case with thermal energy transport [5]. High‐ rise buildings increase the thermal load density when compared to a typical residential area. The  distribution  of residential  district  heat  is  characterised  by  supply temperatures  between  50‐90 °C and return temperatures between 30‐70 °C [12].  

Another consideration to be made is the demand profile on several timescales. Combining  different types of users (industry, offices, etc.) in the heating network might be necessary to  optimise the demand profile for the geothermal heating plant. On a daily scale, many homes  require a very small amount of heating energy during the day in the heating season, while the  demand rises quickly after office hours. For offices the opposite applies, i.e. the highest demand 

(23)

2.2 Applications in the built environment 

 

 

Figure 7: Lindal diagram showing numerous applications of geothermal 

(24)

occurs during the day. On a seasonal scale, heating demand varies greatly between the highest  demand in the winter and a low demand during summer because of the changing ambient  temperature. On a scale of decades, slower processes like a changing climate or improved  thermal insulation of buildings, influence the heating demand.  

  

Figure 8: Space heat demand profile relative to the ambient temperature [10]. 

A similar (direct) use of geothermal energy is industrial heating; this includes greenhouses,  industrial processes and aquaculture. In the Netherlands, 4 projects have been realised for the  heating of greenhouses [21]. In greenhouses, the geothermal energy is used to heat the interior  of the greenhouse to create optimum conditions for the crops to grow. In practice, geothermal  energy is mainly used for greenhouses without lighting, as CHP (Combined Heating and Power)  solutions with fossil or biofuels are more interesting when electricity is needed. Another  advantage of CHP is that it has CO2 as a waste product, which can be used to maintain an 

optimum CO2 level in the greenhouse. The usage for industrial processes is comparable to that 

of space heating, i.e. the energy is used directly to heat a medium. The difference lies in the  supply temperature needed for the specific process, which ranges from 30oC for aquaculture to  more than 180oC for the paper industry [5]. Another big difference is that industrial processes  have a relatively constant heat demand. Industrial processes in which geothermal energy is  already used, can be seen in the Lindal diagram in Figure 7. 

2.2.2 Electricity

Electricity generation is another common use of geothermal energy in the built environment.  Many countries have a small part of their total electricity demand covered by geothermal  power. The first geothermal power plant in the world is located in Larderello Italy and has been  producing electricity since 1912. The total installed capacity for geothermal power in the world  was 10,715 MWe in 2010 and the total amount of energy generated (67,246 GWhe) accounted 

for 0.32 % of the world’s total demand (21,248 TWhe [24]) in that year [25, 26]. With about 25 % 

of its electricity demand covered by geothermal power, Iceland is the largest geothermal  electricity producer in the world [22]. In some developing countries, geothermal power makes a  substantial contribution to the total. For example in the Philippines, it represents 21 % of the  total electricity supply, making it the second largest geothermal power producer in the world.  More information about geothermal electricity generation can be found in appendix IV. 

(25)

2.2 Applications in the built environment 

Conversion

Three main types of geothermal power plants exist: dry steam, flash and binary. In dry steam  and flash plants the geofluid is used directly and in binary plants a secondary energy medium is  used. Two main categories of geothermal electricity generation are generally distinguished: high  enthalpy and low enthalpy. High enthalpy generation is similar to traditional Rankine steam  power plants using fossil fuels or nuclear energy: steam is expanded, powering one or more  turbines which drive a generator. The difference between conventional steam plants and high  enthalpy geothermal plants lies in the fact that the latter typically uses a temperature between  150 °C and 250 °C [23], while temperatures can reach 620 °C for traditional steam powered  plants (current metallurgical maximum) [27]. 

The theoretical  maximum conversion efficiency of heat into work, the Carnot efficiency,  illustrates the value of a high temperature resource.     low sink gf 1 1 ( )

carnot     high T T T T t   (2)     With: 

ηcarnot     Carnot efficiency        [‐] 

Tlow     Lowest temperature in the system    [K]  

Thigh     Highest temperature in the system    [K]  

Tsink     Temperature of the heat sink      [K]  

Tgf     Temperature of the produced geofluid    [K]  

 

If a sink at 10 °C is assumed, the Carnot efficiencies for traditional power plants (620 °C) and  high enthalpy geothermal plants (250 °C) are respectively 68.3 % and 45.9 %. This demonstrates  that the theoretical efficiency of a high enthalpy plant is much lower than that of conventional  steam power plant designs. In practice, this efficiency ranges from 10 to 17 % for currently  running high enthalpy geothermal electricity generation plants [23] while modern traditional  power plants reach values of 34 % for nuclear and 40 % for fossil fuelled steam plants [27]. The  practical efficiency of a high enthalpy plant can be estimated by multiplying its Carnot efficiency  with a ‘utilisation factor’ of 0.45 [18]. This utilisation factor is the ratio between and actual work  potential and theoretical work potential. Sanyal and Butler investigated the average electricity  generation of an EGS source with an average initial temperature of 210 °C over a period of 30  years. They found that this is roughly 26(±5%) MWe per cubic kilometre of stimulated volume, 

regardless of well arrangement, fracture spacing and permeability [18].  

Due to local legislation and contamination in the geofluid, it is not always possible to directly use  the geofluid in the turbine (flashing). In this case binary systems are used in which the geofluid is  separated from the working fluid by a heat exchanger. When using a binary plant design, the  working fluid does not necessarily have to be water/steam as it is contained in a closed circuit.  Using  other working  fluids  than water  is particularly  useful when  using  a low  enthalpy  geothermal source. When the temperature of the geofluid is lower than 150 °C, it is difficult to  efficiently run a flash power plant and often a binary plant with an alternative working fluid  (with a lower boiling point) is used. If an organic working fluid like isobutene or isopentane is  used, the used cycle is commonly referred to as Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC). In this cycle heat  from the geothermal source vaporises the working fluid in a heat exchanger in a secondary 

(26)

type  of fluid  in  the  secondary circuit  determines  the  required minimum  and  maximum  temperature of the geothermal energy supplied. The maximum temperature depends on the  stability of the fluid and the minimum temperature depends on the economical size of the heat  exchanger to vaporise the fluid. The relatively low temperature results in a Carnot efficiency of  32.9 % with a geothermal source at 423 K (150 °C) and an assumed sink temperature of 283 K  (10 °C). A more realistic value of the plant efficiency would be 10‐13 % for these conditions [3,  10]. In Figure 9 several measured efficiencies of existing ORC power plants around the world are  shown [28].  A relatively new binary system is the Kalina cycle. In this cycle a water‐ammonia mixture is used  as a working fluid. Typically in a 3:7 ratio, depending on required boiling temperature or the  available source temperature. The main advantage of a Kalina cycle compared to an ORC cycle is  a  variable evaporation (and condensing) temperature which  can  be  fitted to  the  falling  temperature of a geothermal source and the possibly changing temperature of the sink,  continuously  optimising  system  efficiency  [29].  Because  of  better  recuperation  and  the  possibility to vary the composition of the mixture, the Kalina system is more efficient (20‐40 %)  than the conventional ORC systems, especially when varying supply and sink temperatures are  to be expected. Figure 10 shows the average specific resource utilisation of different cycles  suitable for geothermal power production, i.e. the of energy flow needed to produce 1 MWe of 

electricity at a certain geofluid temperature. In the low enthalpy range, the curve of the Kalina  cycle  lies considerably lower than the ORC curve, illustrating its higher efficiency. Other  advantages of using the water‐ammonia mixture instead of more common organic working  fluids are: it does not deplete ozone, it has no global warming potential, it is well known from its  use in absorption chillers and it is relatively cheap. In the near future, the cost of a Kalina cycle  plant is expected to be lower (up to 30 % for low enthalpy sources) than conventional Rankine  plants  [30].  The  main  disadvantage  of  this  technique  is  the  increased  heat  exchange;  approximately 25 % more heat exchanging surface is needed compared with conventional  Rankine cycles, increasing the initial investment costs. Another disadvantage is the added  complexity in operation and maintenance, which increases exploitation costs [31]. 

Distribution

As electrical power grids are widely developed in many countries [12], the necessity for an  additional distribution infrastructure for this application of geothermal energy is limited. The  only requirement is that the power plant has to be connected to the grid.  

(27)

2.2 Applications in the built environment 

 

 

Figure 9: Practical conversion efficiencies of existing ORC systems [32]. 

   

 

Figure 10: Specific average resource utilisation of different cycles suitable for geothermal power production [32]. 

(28)

2.2.3 Space cooling

Space cooling is another possible application for geothermal heat in the built environment.  Similar to direct use, the generated cold can be used for district space cooling and for industry  loads. 

A well‐established technique to convert heat into cold is absorption cooling [4, 12]. Absorption  chillers are very common in situations where heat is relatively cheap and a cooling load is  present. This is the most applicable technique for cooling using geothermal energy [12].When  applying absorption refrigeration systems a few considerations should be noted. Absorption  chillers are much more expensive than vapour‐compression systems in terms of investment as  well as service, because they are quite uncommon and relatively complex. They occupy more  space and when a suitable natural heat sink in the form of surface water is not present, a cooling  tower is needed which is larger than the condenser of a similar vapour‐compression system [27].  Alternative heat‐driven refrigeration systems exist (e.g. adsorption, metal‐hydrates, zeolites,  etc.), but these are relatively uncommon. Therefore, these alternative systems will not be  considered in this report, as they are not very likely to be economically and practically  applicable. 

Conversion

In Figure 11, a schematic representation of an ammonia‐water absorption chiller is shown that  illustrates the working principle of an absorption chiller. 

 

Figure 11: A schematic representation of an ammonia‐water absorption chiller [adapted from 35]. 

When compared to a typical compressor type chiller the left half of the schematic above is  similar. The basic principle is also the same: refrigerant is evaporated in the evaporator which  extracts heat from its environment, the vapour is compressed and condenses in the condenser  rejecting heat to the environment. A pressure valve separates the high‐ and low‐pressure part of  the system. The difference with a compression chiller lies in the compressor part which is  thermally driven (by geothermal energy) instead of mechanically. Water is the transporting  medium and ammonia is the refrigerant in this example. The compressor part (dotted line)  works as follows [27]: 

(29)

2.2 Applications in the built environment 

 The refrigerant vapour (NH3 in the picture) leaves the evaporator and enters the 

absorber where it is exothermically absorbed by a relatively cool ammonia‐water  mixture at a relatively low pressure. This mixture is cooled by a cooling source as was  discussed in last paragraph. 

 The mixture is then pumped to the generator, increasing the pressure.  

 In the generator, the mixture is heated by geothermal energy, evaporating the ammonia  again which has a lower boiling point than the water, still at a relatively high pressure.  The high pressure ammonia continues to the condenser and the water is separated in  the rectifier returning it to the generator. 

 The solution of ammonia and water (hot and high pressure) is passed through a  regenerator to transfer heat to the mixture leaving the absorber, is throttled and  returned to the absorber. 

Ammonia based systems can provide output temperatures from ‐40 °C to 20 °C [4]. This makes  them suitable for most cooling needs, including air‐conditioning, process cooling and freezing  applications. Other common combinations of refrigerant and transport medium include water‐ lithium bromide (LiBr) and water‐lithium chloride (LiCl). Both the LiBr and LiCl systems are  unsuitable for low temperature cooling because of the risk of crystallising water in the system  [4, 12]. 

The conversion efficiency of absorption cooling is commonly expressed in a coefficient of  performance (COP). The COP of an absorption cooling system is defined as follows [12]: 

 

COP

cool

cool

gen pump gen

Q

Q

Q

W

Q

  (3)  

 

With: 

Qcool    Heat extracted by the chiller      [W] 

Qgen     Heat input to the generator (geothermal energy)  [W] 

Wpump    Mechanical work by the circulation pump    [W] 

 

In a multistage arrangement, two or more absorption chillers are combined to allow for a better  overall conversion efficiency. A two‐stage absorption chiller heated with steam has a typical COP  of 1.2. A single stage absorption chiller on water of 90 °C typically achieves a COP of 0.7 [4]. In  comparison with vapour compression cycles, the pump energy is negligible, i.e. approximately  5‐8 % of the refrigeration capacity [12]. The energy extracted (Qcool) and the energy supplied 

(Qgen) depend strongly on the various temperatures present in the system. According to Ziegler  and Alefeld, the COP of an absorption chiller can be approximated by the following formula [33]:    supply sink , sink supply , , , ( ) ( ) COP 1 ln ( (t)) ( ) ( ) ( )     h out h in h out h in T t T T t T T T t T t T t   (4)     With: 

Tsupply    Cold supply temperature      [K] 

Tsink    Heat sink temperature      [K]  

Th,in    Heat source supply temperature     [K] 

Th,out    Heat source return temperature     [K]

(30)

In Figure 12, this formula is illustrated for a heat source supply temperature of 80 °C, 100 °C and  120 °C and a constant sink temperature of 31 °C and a constant average chill provision  temperature of 9 °C. 

 

Figure 12: The COP of absorption chillers with an assumed chill provision  

temperature of 9 °C and average heat sink temperature of 31 °C [12]. 

Distribution

For the distribution of cold, two options exist: a central cooling plant provides cooling power to  a dedicated cooling network or local cooling plants use the heat from a district heating network  [12]. The advantage of the latter is the absence the need for an additional supply infrastructure.  As with direct use, a high energy demand density is also preferable for a high system efficiency.  In contrast with space heating demand, the highest space cooling demand occurs in the  summer, when ambient temperatures are high. The opposite behaviour of demand in relation to  ambient temperature might make these two applications a good candidate for combined  application (see §2.2.1).  

2.2.4 Combined application

By combining applications, the utilisation of the available energy at the production well can  increased [12]. Two factors contribute to this: 

1. Increased use of potential: the ratio between energy used and energy produced can be  higher (or the return temperature lower), if applications with different temperature  requirements are used in (partially) serial setup.  

2. Load levelling: When the demand of a certain application drops, other applications  might still have a demand for which the geothermal energy can be used.  

An example of increased use of potential is using the geofluid returning from a geothermal  power plant, for heating purposes in de vicinity. The temperature of the geofluid leaving an ORC  cycle is often still suitable for a variety of heating applications. This setup results in a lower  temperature of the reinjected geofluid. The relatively low temperature requirement for heating  purposes (see Figure 7), often makes it technically possible to use it as a secondary application.  To reach the required temperature, the primary geofluid might still be needed. 

Combining space heating with space cooling is an example of load levelling. When the primary  heat demand for space heating gets lower, the primary heat demand for space cooling increases 

(31)

2.3 Concluding remarks 

as both are related to the ambient temperature [12]. In an ideal case, the sum of the primary  energy demand for both the heating demand and the cooling demand equals the geothermal  energy supply. This ideal case is illustrated in Figure 13. 

   

Figure 13: An idealised graph of load levelling by combining geothermal space 

heating and absorption cooling with geothermal energy [12]. 

2.3 Concluding

remarks

Geothermal energy is a promising energy source for the built environment. Hydrothermal  reservoirs are used in several locations around the world, mainly near geothermal anomalies. In  the near future, Enhanced Geothermal Systems are expected to become technically viable,  significantly increasing the spatial applicability of geothermal energy. For this reason, this type  of reservoir is chosen as subject for further research in this report.  

The most important parameters for the performance of a geothermal reservoir are: initial  temperature, permeability and heat capacity. Because these parameters vary geographically,  they translate into location, depth and volume of the reservoir. In the case of an EGS the degree  of reservoir fracturing determines its permeability. 

Because an EGS reservoir cannot be operated both fully sustainably and economically, the  reservoir is used as a finite energy source, i.e. due to excessive production, the reservoir is  cooled to a point where further use is not economical. After abandonment, the reservoir  temperature will slowly recover under heat  conduction from the environment. However,  sustainability should be considered in a broader perspective: an EGS reservoir is able to provide  clean energy for decades without the disadvantages of conventional energy sources and a  combination of multiple reservoirs could make it a fully sustainable energy source. The amount  of years an EGS reservoir can be used depends heavily on the operational strategy. Lowering  flow does not necessarily decrease total gains and is likely to increase sustainability. Relevant  performance indicators for sustainability are investigated in Chapter 5. 

(32)

In the built environment, geothermal energy can be used for heating, cooling and electricity  generation. Because of distribution losses, the heating and cooling load should be located close  to the geothermal system. Distance between source and demand is of less importance with  geothermal  electricity,  i.e.  transportation  of  electricity  is  relatively  efficient.  Combining  applications might increase system performance although possibly lower/no demand periods  might also be preferable to allow for regeneration during operation. 

(33)

2.3 Concluding remarks 

(34)

3 E

NHANCED

G

EOTHERMAL

S

YSTEM MODEL

This chapter describes the model that is used for the performance assessment of an enhanced  geothermal energy source for energy supply in the built environment. A computer model is  created in COMSOL Multiphysics, which is used to investigate the performance of an EGS for  the scenarios described in Chapter 4. Using Matlab, the output of these simulations is  analysed and expressed in performance indicators. This general approach is illustrated in  Figure 14. 

 

Figure 14: A schematic representation of the general approach used for the simulations. 

In §3.1 the modelling of the enhanced geothermal system is described.  In §3.2 the analysis of  the output data from the EGS model is explained and in §3.3 the model output is verified.  

3.1 Description of the used EGS model

The performance of an EGS reservoir involves several coupled physical and geochemical  processes, including heat and mass transfer, pressure distribution, deformation and scaling. Due  to the large number of parameters involved to define geometry, hydraulics, heat transfer and  material stresses, the only viable approach to modelling a geothermal system, is to use  numerical methods [34]. 

Numerical simulation with a computer model requires a good balance between the required  level of detail and the computing power available. The required level of detail depends on the  aim of the simulations. A model concept is typically chosen depending on the specific properties  of the assessed reservoir, the required level of detail and the available computing power [34,  35]. Several modelling concepts exist for porous and fractured media. In order of increasing  detail, these modelling concepts are [36]: 

 Continuum / Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM): the whole reservoir volume is assumed  to have the same properties and equivalent values are calculated to characterise them.  Although limited in the detail it provides, this approach has been shown to give good  results for the gross behaviour of the geothermal system [35] and is widely accepted for  a coarse approximation of the behaviour of a geothermal source [8]. 

 Multi continuum: both fractures and rock are characterised separately by continuum  models. Multiple models can be used for multiple fracture size groups.  

(35)

3.1 Description of the used EGS model 

 Discrete fracture model: the geometry of the fractures is modelled and no fluid flow  (hence no heat advection) is assumed in the surrounding material. 

 Combinations of both: the most realistic modelling concept is a combination of the  discrete fracture model combined with a continuum model for fluid flow through the  porous surrounding material. 

The most common concepts for different domain (reservoir) classifications are shown in Figure  15. 

 

Figure 15: Modelling concepts for the description of porous fractured media [36]. 

A finite element computer model of an EGS is used to calculate the production temperature and  flow of the source and the temperature distribution in the source and its surroundings. The  finite element software suite Comsol Multiphysics version 4.2 is used to generate this model and  perform simulations. As sustainability is of a slow nature by definition, i.e. measured on a  timescale of decades, a high level of detail is unnecessary for the research at hand. Combined  with the absence of detailed statistical fracture data and the limited computing power available,  this observation leads to the choice of an Equivalent Porous Medium (EPM) approach. As this  approach assumes homogeneity and isotropy in the reservoir, a two‐dimensional cross section  of the reservoir is assumed to be representative for the whole reservoir. A transient, two‐ dimensional (2‐D) model is created of the horizontal cross section (parallel to the earth’s  surface) of an enhanced geothermal reservoir and the surrounding material. Based on the fact  that several processes can both improve or deteriorate the reservoir properties, they are  assumed to remain the same during the simulation period.  

As described in §2.1, a high enthalpy geothermal reservoir is needed for electricity generation.  For this reason, an enhanced geothermal reservoir is assumed at a depth of 5000 m. For the city  of Eindhoven, the temperature at this depth is roughly 185 °C (see Figure 3b). It is assumed that  an EGS at this depth and location will be possible in the near future.  

Figure

Updating...

References

Related subjects :